National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for building codes cost

  1. Cost and code study of underground buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Various regulatory and financial implications for earth-sheltered houses and buildings are discussed. Earth-sheltered houses are covered in the most detail including discussions of building-code restrictions, HUD Minimum Property Standards, legal aspects, zoning restrictions, taxation, insurance, and home financing. Examples of the initial-cost elements in earth-sheltered houses together with projected life-cycle costs are given and compared to more-conventional energy-conserving houses. For larger-scale underground buildings, further information is given on building code, fire protection, and insurance provisions. Initial-cost information for five large underground buildings is presented together with energy-use information where available.

  2. Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

    2004-04-30

    The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

  3. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Rhode Island Building Code Standards Committee adopts, promulgates and administers the state building code. Compliance is determined through the building permit and inspection process by local...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Public Act 093-0936 (Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings) was signed into law in August, 2004. The Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings became...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Building Code (KBC) is updated every three years on a cycle one year behind the publication year for the International Building Code. Any changes to the code by the state of Kentucky...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006 Iowa enacted H.F. 2361, requiring the State Building Commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized building energy code. The State Building Code...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NOTE: On March 9, 2016, the State Fire Prevention and Building Code Council adopted major updates to the State Uniform Code and the State Energy Code. The State Energy Code has been updated to 2015...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North Carolina State Building Code Council is responsible for developing all state codes. By statute, the Commissioner of Insurance has general supervision over the administration and...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Connecticut Office of the State Building Inspector establishes and enforces building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing and energy code requirements by reviewing, developing, adopting and...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 1997, South Carolina's local governments adopted and enforced the building codes. In 1997, the law required statewide use of the most up-to-date building codes, which then required the...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Building Commission (FBC) is directed to adopt, revise, update, and maintain the Florida Building Code in accordance with Chapter 120 of the state statutes. The code is mandatory...

  14. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more deta...

  15. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC) is a statewide minimum requirement that local jurisdictions cannot amend. The code is applicable to all new buildings in the commonwealth. The...

  17. Guam- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  18. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2012 IECC is in effect for all residential and commercial buildings, Idaho schools, and Idaho jurisdictions that adopt and enforce building codes, unless a local code exists that is more...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In March 2006, SB 459 was enacted to promote renewable energy and update the state's building energy codes.

  20. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The State Building Code Council revised the Washington State Energy Code (WESC) in February 2013, effective July 1, 2013. The WESC is a state-developed code based upon ASHRAE 90.1-2010 and the...

  1. Building Energy Codes Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Jeremy Williams, Project Manager Building Technologies Peer Review April 2014 Presentation Overview: * Introduction * Statutory Requirements * Program Structure * Recent accomplishments 2 Introduction: Background NATIONAL STATE LOCAL Building codes are developed through national industry consensus processes with input from industry representatives, trade organizations, government officials, and the general public Model energy codes

  2. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A mandatory energy code is not enforced at the state level. If a local energy code is adopted, it is enforced at the local level. Builders or sellers of new residential buildings (single-family or...

  3. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Indiana Residential Building Code is based on the 2003 IRC with state amendments (eff. 9/11/05). This code applies to 1 and 2 family dwellings and townhouses. During the adoption process,...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2011 the Nebraska Building Energy Code was updated to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) standards. As with the previous 2003 IECC standards, which had been in...

  5. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In November of 2015, the Commission adopted the 2015 International Building Code (IBC) with amendments. The Commission did not adopt the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as part...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Changes to the energy code are submitted to the Uniform Building Code Commission. The proposed change is reviewed by the Commission at a monthly meeting to decide if it warrants further considera...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Colorado is a home rule state, so no statewide energy code exists, although state government buildings do have specific requirements. Voluntary adoption of energy codes is encouraged and efforts...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Hampshire adopted a mandatory statewide building code in 2002 based on the 2000 IECC. S.B. 81 was enacted in July 2007, and it upgraded the New Hampshire Energy Code to the 2006 IECC. In Dece...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority to promulgate the Massachusetts State Building Code (MSBC). The energy provisions in the MSBC were developed by the Boa...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Missouri does not have a statewide building or energy code for private residential and commercial buildings, and there currently is no state regulatory agency authorized to promulgate, adopt, or...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kansas adopted the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) as "the applicable state standard" for commercial and industrial buildings. Enforcement is provided by local jurisdictions; t...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Building Performance Standards (MBPS) are adopted by the Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) Codes Administration. As required by legislation passed in...

  13. Building Energy Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Cohan Program Manager Building Energy Codes April 22, 2014 Presentation Outline * Mission * Goals * Program Organization * StrategiesRoles * Near-Term Focus * Measuring ...

  14. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Both State building codes adoption and enforcement efforts fall under the purview of the State Fire Marshal’s Office within the Department of Commerce and Insurance (C&I). Any changes to the...

  15. Tribal Green Building Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with even amount of white space between photos and header Tribal Green Building Codes Chelsea Chee November 1 3, 2012 SAND 2012---9858C Photos placed in horizontal position with ...

  16. Building Energy Codes Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Overview 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Bing Liu bing.liu@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ADOPT COMPLY DEVELOP FY12 FY13 FY14 $6.8M $4.8M $4.0M Program Summary Timeline: Multi-year program in support of DOE statutory requirements Key Milestones: 1. Update Building Energy Codes Cost-Effectiveness Methodology (Aug 2014) 2. Revised Compliance Methodology (Sept 2014) 3. 90.1-2013 Cost Analysis (Oct 2014) 4. REScheck Update Including Enhancements (Aug 2014) 5.

  17. Building Energy Codes: State and Local Code Implementation Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mark Lessans Fellow Building Energy Codes: State and Local Code Implementation Overview ... building code regarding energy efficiency to the revised model code and submit a ...

  18. Nevada Energy Code for Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Legislation signed in 2009 changed the process of adopting building codes in the state. Previously, the statewide code would only apply to local governments that had not already adopted a code,...

  19. Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013 ...

  20. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Bureau of Construction Codes is responsible for the administration of the State Construction Code Act (1972 PA 230), also known as the Uniform Construction Code.

  1. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Georgia's Department of Community Affairs periodically reviews, amends and/or updates the state minimum standard codes. Georgia has "mandatory" and "permissive" codes. Georgia State Energy Code...

  2. NEEP Building Energy Codes Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Markets value and prioritize energy efficiency - Rating and Disclosure ( VT, Cambridge, MA) * Robust & qualified building energy code work force: DE, RI, MA, MD, NY * ...

  3. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Mississippi's existing state code is based on the 1977 Model Code for Energy Conservation (MCEC). The existing law does not mandate enforcement by localities, and any revised code will probably...

  4. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. These codes may be voluntarily adopted at the local level. Local jurisdictions...

  5. Model Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Building Performance Standards (EEBPS) are statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include...

  6. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The California Building Standards Commission (BSC) is responsible for administering California's building standards adoption, publication, and implementation. Since 1989, the BSC has published tr...

  7. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Jersey Uniform Construction Code Act provides that model codes and standards publications shall not be adopted more frequently than once every three years. However, a revision or amendment...

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislation passed in March 2010 authorized the Alabama Energy and Residential Code (AERC) Board to adopt mandatory residential and commercial energy codes for all jurisdictions. In 2015, the AER...

  9. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 1993 State Legislature updated the state energy code to the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC) and established a procedure to update the standard. Then in 1995, following consultation with an...

  10. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All residential and commercial structures are required to comply with the state’s energy code. The 2009 New Mexico Energy Conservation Code (NMECC), effective June 2013, is based on 2009...

  11. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects the public's safety by: adopting rules governing the construction, repair, and rehabilitation of buildings in the state;...

  12. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) has the authority to upgrade commercial and residential energy standards through the regulatory process. The current code, the 2009 UCC, became...

  13. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of the State Fire Marshal is granted the authority to promulgate amendments, revisions, and alternative compliance methods for the code.

  14. State building energy codes status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This document contains the State Building Energy Codes Status prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 and dated September 1996. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards has developed this document to provide an information resource for individuals interested in energy efficiency of buildings and the relevant building energy codes in each state and U.S. territory. This is considered to be an evolving document and will be updated twice a year. In addition, special state updates will be issued as warranted.

  15. Building Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    On May 2014, Delaware updated its energy code to 2012 IECC with amendments for residential sector and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 with amendments for the commercial sector. The Delaware specific amendments to...

  16. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Authority for adopting the state energy codes was previously vested in the Energy Security Office of the Department of Commerce (originally the Department of Public Services). In 1999-2000, the...

  17. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oregon Energy Code amendments were most recently updated for both residential and non-residential construction in 2014. In October 2010 Oregon also adopted the Oregon Solar Installation...

  18. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) by rule may choose to adopt the latest published editions of the energy efficiency provisions of the International Residential Code (IRC) or the...

  19. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All new residential, commercial, and community-owned buildings constructed on or after January 1, 1992 that receive financing from the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) must comply with...

  20. Building Energy Code | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Energy Code Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial andor residential construction to adhere...

  1. Building Energy Codes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Building Energy Codes Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial andor residential construction to adhere...

  2. Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical ... 2014 BTO Peer Review Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes ...

  3. Building Codes Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Resources Building Codes Resources Some commercial and/or residential construction codes mandate certain energy performance requirements for the design, materials, and equipment used in new construction and renovations. State-wide minimum codes may be amended by local jurisdictions to be more stringent if energy performance requirements are lacking or liberal. Find building codes resources below. DOE Resources Building Energy Codes Program: Resource Center Building Energy Codes Program:

  4. City of San Francisco- Green Building Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the...

  5. Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code includes the statewide minimum requirements that all new construction and additions to existing buildings must satisfy. Exceptions include log homes, ma...

  6. Building Energy Codes Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and ...

  7. N. Mariana Islands- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

  8. Building Energy Code | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Type Building Energy Code Summary Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program ...

  9. Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Separation Walls | Department of Energy Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls This Building America Expert Meeting was conducted by the IBACOS team on Sept. 29, 2014, and focused on air sealing of area separation wall assemblies in multifamily buildings. This is an identified barrier that limits the ability of builders to cost effectively achieve higher energy efficiency and quality

  10. Building Energy Codes Program Logic Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    provide funding to help measure & improve code compliance The Building Energy Codes Program aims to "lock in" savings from energy codes by participating in code development processes and supporting local and state governments in the adoption and implementation of progressively more advanced building energy codes across the country. External Influences: DOE budget, Construction industry, Real estate market, State/local policies & budget Objectives Activities / Partners Outputs

  11. Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

  12. Could Building Energy Codes Mandate Rooftop Solar in the Future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williams, Jeremiah

    2012-08-01

    This paper explores existing requirements and compliance options for both commercial and residential code structures. Common alternative compliance options are discussed including Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), green-power purchasing programs, shared solar programs and other community-based renewable energy investments. Compliance options are analyzed to consider building lifespan, cost-effectiveness, energy trade-offs, enforcement concerns and future code development. Existing onsite renewable energy codes are highlighted as case studies for the code development process.

  13. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

  14. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research on simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install and meet code requirements.

  15. Appliance Standards and Building Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Appliance Standards Overview for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review appstdsoverviewcymbalsky040213...

  16. Cost Codes and the Work Breakdown Structure

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    The chapter discusses the purpose of the work breakdown structure (WBS) and code of account (COA) cost code system, shows the purpose and fundamental structure of both the WBS and the cost code system, and explains the interface between the two systems.

  17. Levelized Power Generation Cost Codes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-30

    LPGC is a set of nine microcomputer programs for estimating power generation costs for large steam-electric power plants. These programs permit rapid evaluation using various sets of economic and technical ground rules. The levelized power generation costs calculated may be used to compare the relative economics of nuclear and coal-fired plants based on life-cycle costs. Cost calculations include capital investment cost, operation and maintenance cost, fuel cycle cost, decommissioning cost, and total levelized power generationmore » cost. These programs can be used for quick analyses of power generation costs using alternative economic parameters, such as interest rate, escalation rate, inflation rate, plant lead times, capacity factor, fuel prices, etc. The two major types of electric generating plants considered are pressurized water reactor (PWR) and pulverized coal-fired plants. Data are also provided for the Large Scale Prototype Breeder (LSPB) type liquid metal reactor.« less

  18. Cost Analysis Approach for Codes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "How much insulation is too much?"

  19. Building Energy Codes Program (BECP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements 2 BECP Budget FY 2015 5.59M + FOA budget 2Myr 3 800,000 825,000 5,607,000 Development Adoption Compliance Goal Reduce energy use in buildings subject to...

  20. Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert ...

  1. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations This webinar provided an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in ...

  2. Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Photo of an unvented and insulated ...

  3. Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Bing Liu, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory View the Presentation Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer ...

  4. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer ...

  5. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit:...

  6. Seminar on building codes and standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A seminar was conducted for state building code officials and state energy officials to discuss the following: status of the states regulatory activities for energy conservation standards for buildings; the development, administration, and enforcement processes for energy conservation standards affecting new construction; lighting and thermal standards for existing buildings; status of the development and implementation of the Title III Program, Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS); and current status of the State Energy Conservation Program. The welcoming address was given by John Wenning and the keynote address was delivered by John Millhone. Four papers presented were: Building Energy Performance Standards Development, James Binkley; Lighting Standards in Existing Buildings, Dorothy Cronheim; Implementation of BEPS, Archie Twitchell; Sanctions for Building Energy Performance Standards, Sue Sicherman.

  7. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes03_guttman_040213.pdf (544.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows Building America System Research

  8. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

  9. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Takagi, T.

    2009-04-15

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Japan, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Japan.

  10. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Korea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; McJeon, Haewon C.; Shui, Bin; Lee, Seung Eon

    2009-04-17

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Korea, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial buildings in Korea.

  11. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Somasundaram, Sriram

    2009-04-02

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Australia, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Australia.

  12. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-06

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

  13. Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

    2009-04-30

    This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

  14. Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks | Department of Energy Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks Self-powering wireless sensor node. Image courtesy of Case Western University and BTO Peer Review. Self-powering wireless sensor node. Image courtesy of Case Western University and BTO

  15. Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes04_zweig_040213.pdf (708.72 KB) More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: Southeast Region - 2014 BTO Peer Review Stretch/Reach Codes Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

  16. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

  17. Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes01_wagner_040213.pdf (510.35 KB) More Documents & Publications State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through

  18. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Building Energy Codes Program activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation Building Energy Codes Program Overview -

  19. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovations | Department of Energy Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations This webinar provided an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations. The presenter also described new content on the Building America Solution Center that will help builders meet code requirements and will help code officials apply codes to

  20. Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Fact Sheet Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet Building energy codes have been in place for over 20 years. Today's codes are providing energy savings of more than 30% compared to the codes of a decade ago. They're also saving consumers an estimated $5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet below to learn more about the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes program. View the Fact Sheet

  1. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This ...

  2. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review 2014-05-08 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Improvements in ANSIASHRAEIES Standard 90.1-2013; ...

  3. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at ...

  4. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer ...

  5. Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AgencyCompany Organization: The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Resource...

  6. Yearly Energy Costs for Buildings

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-03-20

    COSTSAFR3.0 generates a set of compliance forms which will be attached to housing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) issued by Departments or Agencies of the Federal Government. The compliance forms provide a uniform method for estimating the total yearly energy cost for each proposal. COSTSAFR3.0 analyzes specific housing projects at a given site, using alternative fuel types, and considering alternative housing types. The program is designed around the concept of minimizing overall costs through energy conservationmore » design, including first cost and future utility costs, and estabilishes a standard design to which proposed housing designs are compared. It provides a point table for each housing type that can be used to determine whether a proposed design meets the standard and how a design can be modified to meet the standard.« less

  7. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every

  8. Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Unvented Crawlspace Code Adoption - Building America Top Innovation Photo of an unvented and insulated crawlspace. This Top Innovation profile describes Building America research by Building Science Corporation that helped to clarify and contribute to code requirements that allow unvented crawlspaces in new home construction. This is critical because unvented crawlspaces save energy while improving

  9. Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Implementation activities. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the Presentation Building Energy Codes

  10. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 5 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. VIEW THE PRESENTATION Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review (393.33 KB) More Documents &

  11. How are Building Energy Codes Developed? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How are Building Energy Codes Developed? How are Building Energy Codes Developed? August 8, 2016 - 2:19pm Addthis Image courtesy of LBNL. Image courtesy of LBNL. David Cohan David Cohan Building Energy Codes Program Manager We recently gave an overview of building energy codes and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) corresponding role. Now, we are going to take a deeper dive into the three main steps in the codes process: how they are developed, adopted, and complied with. This post focuses on

  12. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2014 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office's Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. View the presentation BTO_PeerReview_CodesOverview_042214.pdf (543.56 KB) More Documents &

  13. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides states and their stakeholders with a short synopsis for what it would look like to include building ...

  14. Building Energy Codes Program Overview — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building Energy Codes Program. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  15. Energy Efficiency Program Administrators and Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-09-01

    Explores how energy efficiency program administrators have helped advance building energy codes at federal, state, and local levels using technical, institutional, financial, and other resources.

  16. Building Energy Codes Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    also saving consumers an estimated 5 billion annually as of 2012. Since 1992, building codes have saved about 300 million tons of carbon cumulatively. Read the fact sheet...

  17. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes Reducing Energy Demand in ... More Documents & Publications Technology Performance Exchange - 2013 BTO Peer Review ...

  18. Exploring Partnerships to Further Building Code Compliance Enhancement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), identifies opportunities for municipal and state partnerships to ensure better building code compliance.

  19. Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Implementation Overview - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Jeremiah Williams, U.S. Department of Energy This ...

  20. Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision...

  1. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BTO Peer Review | Department of Energy Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Pam Cole, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory This project is developing processes and resources for a Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) team to assist research partners and industry in overcoming codes and standards barriers to high-performance

  2. A Retrospective Analysis of Commercial Building Energy Codes: 1990 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.; McDonald, Sean C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2010-10-01

    Building Energy Codes Program's efforts are designed to result in increased stringency in national model energy codes, more rapid and broader adoption by states and localities of updated codes, and increased compliance and enforcement. Report estimates the historical impact of Building Energy Codes Program in terms of energy savings achieved that are based upon various editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1).

  3. SPEERs Building Energy Codes Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of the REEO's, we are learning quickly, responding to ... Energy Code Compliance Collaborative in Oklahoma. *Double ... regional code datastrategies - provide technical ...

  4. 1994 Building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    During the spring of 1994, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards, conducted five two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the United States. Workshops were held in Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and Denver. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing state building codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requirements for residential and commercial building energy codes, the Climate Change Action Plan, the role of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Building Energy Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the commercial and residential codes and standards, the Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants were also encouraged to inform DOE of their needs, particularly with regard to implementing building energy codes, enhancing current implementation efforts, and building on training efforts already in place. This paper documents the workshop findings and workshop planning and follow-up processes.

  5. The building codes and the forgotten basics of risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norte, M.

    1995-12-01

    Building codes specifically developed to identify and manage chronic, endemic, facilities, risks, and the information and monitoring resources that must support them, are fundamental elements of a broadly based and comprehensive system of conventional risk management and compliance processes. This presentation discusses the proper role of building codes in atruly mature risk management and regulatory compliance strategy.

  6. Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.ecn.nlfileadminecnunitsbsIEC...

  7. City of Chicago- Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CECC establishes standards to minimize solar energy absorbed by building roofs, a condition known as the urban heat island effect. Increased reflecting capacity of individual and aggregate...

  8. Building Energy Codes: Residential Energy Code Field Study — 2016 BTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office’s Building Energy Codes Program: Residential Energy Code Field Study. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs.

  9. Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab (Device build

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab | Jefferson Lab Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab (Device build at ODU to crack nature's code takes ride to JLab External Link: http://hamptonroads.com/2012/02/device-built-odu-crack-natures-code-takes-ride By jlab_admin on Tue, 2012-02-14

  10. Building guide : how to build Xyce from source code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Eric Richard; Russo, Thomas V.; Schiek, Richard Louis; Sholander, Peter E.; Thornquist, Heidi K.; Mei, Ting; Verley, Jason C.

    2013-08-01

    While Xyce uses the Autoconf and Automake system to configure builds, it is often necessary to perform more than the customary %E2%80%9C./configure%E2%80%9D builds many open source users have come to expect. This document describes the steps needed to get Xyce built on a number of common platforms.

  11. Puerto Rico- Building Energy Code with Mandatory Solar Water Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2009, the Governor of Puerto Rico provided assurance that Puerto Rico would update its building energy codes as part of the state's application for State Energy Program funds from the American...

  12. Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2015 Peer Review provided ...

  13. Building Energy Codes Rulemaking | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investigation | Department of Energy Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation (2.17 MB) Summary - Building C-400 Thermal Treatment Remedial Design Report and Investigation, Paducah, Kentucky (57.35 KB) More Documents & Publications Paducah Site End State Vision Enhancements to Natural Attenuation: Selected Case Studies X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio Energy

    This page

  14. Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

    2000-09-30

    1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.

  15. Synthesis Report on the Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Haiyan, Lin; Congu, Yu; Halverson, Mark A.; Bo, Song; Jingru, Liu; Evans, Meredydd; Xiajiao, Zhu; Siwei, Lang

    2011-03-31

    China building energy code and details to help improve building energy efficiency at global, national and local levels

  16. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. They include BLCC5, the Energy Escalation Rate Calculator, Handbook 135, and the Annual Supplement to Handbook 135. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-15 (for Windows or Mac OS X). BLCC version 5.3-15 contains the

  17. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. They include BLCC5, the Energy Escalation Rate Calculator, Handbook 135, and the Annual Supplement to Handbook 135. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-15 (for Windows or Mac OS X). BLCC version 5.3-15 contains the

  18. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides states and their stakeholders with a short synopsis for what it would look like to include building energy codes in their climate and energy plans, including current activity at the national and state levels, best practices, energy savings examples, cost-effectiveness, EM&V and DOE support.

  19. How Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning energy.gov/eere/slsc/EEopportunities March 18, 2016 2 About this Presentation Slide Overview * Summary * Purpose and Benefits * Current Status * State and Local Role * Best Practices in Implementation * Complementary / Related Programs * National Savings Estimates * Savings Examples from States * Cost-Effectiveness * Evaluation, Measurement, & Verification * DOE Support * Additional Resources This short presentation is

  20. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Platinum standards, while the courthouse and other buildings have been rebuilt to LEED Certified and Gold standards saving a combined total of 200,000 in energy costs per year. ...

  1. 2015-03-16 Issuance: Building Energy Codes Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register request for information regarding the DOE Methodology for Assessing the Cost-effectiveness of Building Energy Codes, as issued by the Building Energy Codes Program Manager on March 16, 2015. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  2. Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G.; Panza, G. F.

    2008-07-08

    The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

  3. Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mapes, Terry S.

    2012-02-14

    This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

  4. Low-cost Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring Applications

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... DeviceSensor Integration, Regulations - Cost: Low-cost, Manufacturing Infrastructure * ASHRAE Standards 90.1, 90.2, 55, 62.1, and 189.1 * IECC, IBC, and NFPA 5000 code. ...

  5. Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing - Building America...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing (845.94 KB) More Documents & Publications Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, ...

  6. Better Buildings Challenge Saves $840 Million in Energy Costs...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Saves 840 Million in Energy Costs, Adds New Water Savings Goal Better Buildings Challenge Saves 840 Million in Energy Costs, Adds New Water Savings Goal May 27, 2015 - 10:08am ...

  7. Cost Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairey, Philip

    2012-11-01

    This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous United States. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

  8. Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2011-07-01

    This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where we’re going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

  9. Building Energy Efficiency in India: Compliance Evaluation of Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Delgado, Alison

    2014-03-26

    India is experiencing unprecedented construction boom. The country doubled its floorspace between 2001 and 2005 and is expected to add 35 billion m2 of new buildings by 2050. Buildings account for 35% of total final energy consumption in India today, and building energy use is growing at 8% annually. Studies have shown that carbon policies will have little effect on reducing building energy demand. Chaturvedi et al. predicted that, if there is no specific sectoral policies to curb building energy use, final energy demand of the Indian building sector will grow over five times by the end of this century, driven by rapid income and population growth. The growing energy demand in buildings is accompanied by a transition from traditional biomass to commercial fuels, particularly an increase in electricity use. This also leads to a rapid increase in carbon emissions and aggravates power shortage in India. Growth in building energy use poses challenges to the Indian government. To curb energy consumption in buildings, the Indian government issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which applies to commercial buildings with a connected load of 100 kW or 120kVA. It is predicted that the implementation of ECBC can help save 25-40% of energy, compared to reference buildings without energy-efficiency measures. However, the impact of ECBC depends on the effectiveness of its enforcement and compliance. Currently, the majority of buildings in India are not ECBC-compliant. The United Nations Development Programme projected that code compliance in India would reach 35% by 2015 and 64% by 2017. Whether the projected targets can be achieved depends on how the code enforcement system is designed and implemented. Although the development of ECBC lies in the hands of the national government – the Bureau of Energy Efficiency under the Ministry of Power, the adoption and implementation of ECBC largely relies on state and local governments. Six years after ECBC

  10. Alternative Formats to Achieve More Efficient Energy Codes for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Halverson, Mark A.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Makela, Eric J.

    2013-01-26

    This paper identifies and examines several formats or structures that could be used to create the next generation of more efficient energy codes and standards for commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) to provide technical support to the development of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1. While the majority of PNNL’s ASHRAE Standard 90.1 support focuses on developing and evaluating new requirements, a portion of its work involves consideration of the format of energy standards. In its current working plan, the ASHRAE 90.1 committee has approved an energy goal of 50% improvement in Standard 90.1-2013 relative to Standard 90.1-2004, and will likely be considering higher improvement targets for future versions of the standard. To cost-effectively achieve the 50% goal in manner that can gain stakeholder consensus, formats other than prescriptive must be considered. Alternative formats that include reducing the reliance on prescriptive requirements may make it easier to achieve these aggressive efficiency levels in new codes and standards. The focus on energy code and standard formats is meant to explore approaches to presenting the criteria that will foster compliance, enhance verification, and stimulate innovation while saving energy in buildings. New formats may also make it easier for building designers and owners to design and build the levels of efficiency called for in the new codes and standards. This paper examines a number of potential formats and structures, including prescriptive, performance-based (with sub-formats of performance equivalency and performance targets), capacity constraint-based, and outcome-based. The paper also discusses the pros and cons of each format from the viewpoint of code users and of code enforcers.

  11. Do We Really Know how Much it Costs to Construct High Performance Buildings?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Olga V.; Dillon, Heather E.; Halverson, Mark A.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Madison, Michael C.; Lucas, Robert G.

    2012-08-31

    Understanding the cost of energy efficient construction is critical to decision makers in building design, code development, and energy analysis. How much does it cost to upgrade from R-13 to R-19 in a building wall? How much do low-e windows really cost? Can we put a dollar figure on commissioning? Answers to these questions have a fuzzy nature, based on educated guesses and industry lore. The response depends on location, perspective, bulk buying, and hand waving. This paper explores the development of a web tool intended to serve as a publicly available repository of building component costs. In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the launch of a web tool called the Building Component Cost Community (BC3), dedicated to publishing building component costs from documented sources, actively gathering verifiable cost data from the users, and collecting feedback from a wide range of participants on the quality of the posted cost data. The updated BC3 database, available at http://bc3.pnnl.gov, went live on April 30, 2012. BC3 serves as the ultimate source of the energy-related component costs for DOEs residential code development activities, including cost-effectiveness analyses. The paper discusses BC3 objectives, structure, functionality and the current content of the database. It aims to facilitate a dialog about the lack of verifiable transparent cost data, as well as introduce a web tool that helps to address the problem. The questions posed above will also be addressed by this paper, but they have to be resolved by the user community by providing feedback and cost data to the BC3 database, thus increasing transparency and removing information asymmetry.

  12. Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tower, S.E.

    2000-07-01

    The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

  13. Cost effectiveness of the 1993 model energy code in New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, R.G.

    1995-09-01

    This is an analysis of cost effectiveness the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family houses and multifamily housing units in New Jersey. Goal was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to the alternate allowed in the 1993 Building Officials & Code Administrators (BOCA) National Energy Conservation Code -- American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90A-1980 -- based on a comparison of the costs and benefits associated with complying with each. This comparison was performed for Camden, New Brunswick; Somerville, and Sparta. The analysis was done for two different scenarios: a ``move-up`` home buyer purchasing a single-family house and a ``first-time`` financially limited home buyer purchasing a multifamily unit. For the single-family home buyer, compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1028 to $1564, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $206 to $313 (at 20% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was from 1 to 5 years. The home buyer who paid 20% down had recovered increases in down payments and mortgage payments in energy cost savings by the end of the fifth year or sooner and thereafter will save more money each year. For the multifamily unit home buyer first costs were estimated to increase by $121 to $223, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $12 to $22 (at 10% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was 1 to 3 years.

  14. Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

    2011-09-30

    As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy

  15. Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and

  16. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Software Installation Troubleshooting |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Software Installation Troubleshooting Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Software Installation Troubleshooting Having trouble downloading the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs software? Macintosh Operating Systems If you are receiving the "Download.app is damaged and can't be opened" error message when you attempt to install the BLCC software on your Macintosh operating system, visit the Tech Recipes website for instruction on how to change your security

  17. Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standards Issues to Energy Innovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join us for a free webinar that will provide an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations. Learn about new content on the Building America Solution Center that will help builders meet code requirements and will help code officials apply codes to new and emerging innovations. Our presenter will be:

  18. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  19. Building Cost and Performance Metrics: Data Collection Protocol, Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Solana, Amy E.; Spees, Kathleen L.

    2005-09-29

    This technical report describes the process for selecting and applying the building cost and performance metrics for measuring sustainably designed buildings in comparison to traditionally designed buildings.

  20. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

    2013-08-30

    The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  1. Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hacking Away at Soft Costs: 24-Hour Coding Event Focuses on Expanding Solar Market Hacking Away at Soft Costs: ... at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Industry Growth ...

  2. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Unvented Crawlspaces Code Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America research which has supported acceptance of unvented crawlspaces in the IRC.

  3. Energy Department Invests $6 Million to Increase Building Energy Code Compliance Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has awarded $6 million to fund projects that will investigate whether investing in education, training, and outreach programs can produce a significant change in residential building code compliance rates.

  4. Building Energy Codes Newsletter: Setting the Standard-February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy

    2010-02-01

    This newsletter from the U.S. Department of Energy Buildng Energy Codes Program keeps readers up to date on energy code standards; the February 2010 issue focuses on helping states with code adoption, compliance, and resources.

  5. Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DC Energy Conservation Code is updated regularly as national codes are revised or if a change is proposed by local code enforcement officials, industry, design professionals, or other...

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

    2012-11-01

    This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

  7. Resolving Code and Standard Barriers to Building America Innovations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... - ICC Education Summit, Las Vegas, NV - National &18;odes &18;ollaborative (REEO's, &17;&18;P, NSEO), monthly conference calls - Idaho Codes Collaborative, Boise - Nevada Codes ...

  8. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-06-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  9. Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the 2015 IECC for Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Xie, YuLong; Athalye, Rahul A.; Zhuge, Jing Wei; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-09-01

    As required by statute (42 USC 6833), DOE recently issued a determination that ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2013 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code compared to the 2010 edition of the standard. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2013 in support of its determination . While Standard 90.1 is the model energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors (42 USC 6833), many states have historically adopted the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for both residential and commercial buildings. This report provides an assessment as to whether buildings constructed to the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the 2015 IECC would save energy and energy costs as compared to the 2012 IECC. PNNL also compared the energy performance of the 2015 IECC with the corresponding Standard 90.1-2013. The goal of this analysis is to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

  10. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN | Department of Energy Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Cost Analysis of Roof-Only Air Sealing and Insulation Strategies on 1-1/2 Story Homes in Cold Climates, Minneapolis, MN This case study describes the External Thermal and

  11. Low-Cost Phase Change Material for Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2015-08-06

    A low-cost PCM process consisting of conversion of fats and oils to PCM-range paraffins, and subsequent “encapsulation” of the paraffin using conventional plastic compounding/pelletizing equipment was demonstrated. The PCM pellets produced were field-tested in a building envelope application. This involved combining the PCM pellets with cellulose insulation, whereby 33% reduction in peak heat flux and 12% reduction in heat gain was observed (average summertime performance). The selling price of the PCM pellets produced according to this low-cost process is expected to be in the $1.50-$3.00/lb range, compared to current encapsulated PCM price of about $7.00/lb. Whole-building simulations using corresponding PCM thermal analysis data suggest a payback time of 8 to 16 years (at current energy prices) for an attic insulation retrofit project in the Phoenix climate area.

  12. An Analysis of Statewide Adoption Rates of Building Energy Code by Local Jurisdictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.

    2012-12-31

    The purpose of this study is to generally inform the U.S. Department of Energys Building Energy Codes Program of the local, effective energy code adoption rate for a sample set of 21 states, some which have adopted statewide codes and some that have not. Information related to the residential energy code adoption process and status at the local jurisdiction was examined for each of the states. Energy code status information was gathered for approximately 2,800 jurisdictions, which effectively covered approximately 80 percent of the new residential building construction in the 21 states included in the study.

  13. Mandating better buildings: a global review of building codes and prospects for improvement in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Brown, Marilyn A.; Cox, Matt; Jackson, Roderick

    2015-03-11

    This paper provides a global overview of the design, implementation, and evolution of building energy codes. Reflecting alternative policy goals, building energy codes differ significantly across the United States, the European Union, and China. This review uncovers numerous innovative practices including greenhouse gas emissions caps per square meter of building space, energy performance certificates with retrofit recommendations, and inclusion of renewable energy to achieve “nearly zero-energy buildings”. These innovations motivated an assessment of an aggressive commercial building code applied to all US states, requiring both new construction and buildings with major modifications to comply with the latest version of the ASHRAE 90.1 Standards. Using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), we estimate that by 2035, such building codes in the United States could reduce energy for space heating, cooling, water heating and lighting in commercial buildings by 16%, 15%, 20% and 5%, respectively. Impacts on different fuels and building types, energy rates and bills as well as pollution emission reductions are also examined.

  14. Mandating better buildings: a global review of building codes and prospects for improvement in the United States

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Xiaojing; Brown, Marilyn A.; Cox, Matt; Jackson, Roderick

    2015-03-11

    This paper provides a global overview of the design, implementation, and evolution of building energy codes. Reflecting alternative policy goals, building energy codes differ significantly across the United States, the European Union, and China. This review uncovers numerous innovative practices including greenhouse gas emissions caps per square meter of building space, energy performance certificates with retrofit recommendations, and inclusion of renewable energy to achieve “nearly zero-energy buildings”. These innovations motivated an assessment of an aggressive commercial building code applied to all US states, requiring both new construction and buildings with major modifications to comply with the latest version of themore » ASHRAE 90.1 Standards. Using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), we estimate that by 2035, such building codes in the United States could reduce energy for space heating, cooling, water heating and lighting in commercial buildings by 16%, 15%, 20% and 5%, respectively. Impacts on different fuels and building types, energy rates and bills as well as pollution emission reductions are also examined.« less

  15. Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects in Jaipur: Testing the Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Yu, Sha

    2014-03-26

    The Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) in Jaipur, India is constructing two new buildings on its campus that allow it to test implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC), which Rajasthan made mandatory in 2011. PNNL has been working with MNIT to document progress on ECBC implementation in these buildings.

  16. Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Distinctive Characteristics * BCAP is the catalyst for developing state-based, long- term solutions: - Convene state experts; train ...

  17. Building Life Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy File Saving Troubleshooting Building Life Cycle Cost Programs File Saving Troubleshooting Some users have experienced difficulties saving BLCC projects. The primary issue causing the issue is that the user is not an "Administrator," and lacks the "permission" to save to that location. In this case, a user can save the BLCC project file anywhere else on the computer, such as "My Documents" or "Desktop". Below are instructions and a screen shot

  18. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Status of State Energy Codes: Commercial Sector(1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current Commercial codes as of March 2012. DOE/EERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, http://www

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Status of State Energy Codes: Residential Sector (1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current residential codes as of March 2012. DOEEERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, ...

  20. Methodology for Evaluating Cost-effectiveness of Commercial Energy Code Changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Liu, Bing

    2015-01-31

    This document lays out the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) method for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of energy code proposals and editions. The evaluation is applied to provisions or editions of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The method follows standard life-cycle cost (LCC) economic analysis procedures. Cost-effectiveness evaluation requires three steps: 1) evaluating the energy and energy cost savings of code changes, 2) evaluating the incremental and replacement costs related to the changes, and 3) determining the cost-effectiveness of energy code changes based on those costs and savings over time.

  1. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Resolving Codes and Standard Issues to Energy Innovations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Text-alternative version of the May 20 webinar on an overview of how Building America has impacted codes and standards in the past through technical and market innovations.

  2. High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America research showing how some energy-efficiency measure cost increases can balance again measures that reduce up-front costs: Advanced framing cuts lumber costs, right sizing can mean downsizing the HVAC, moving HVAC into conditioned space cuts installation costs, designing on a 2-foot grid reduces materials waste, etc.

  3. Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  4. Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  5. Potential Job Creation in Minnesota as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  6. Potential Job Creation in Nevada as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

    2013-09-01

    Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

  7. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, P. C.; Halverson, M. A.

    2013-09-01

    This guidance document was prepared using the input from the meeting summarized in the draft CSI Roadmap to provide Building America research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods.

  8. Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Subhendu Guha; Dr. Jeff Yang

    2012-05-25

    The goal of the program is to develop 'LOW COST THIN FILM BUILDING-INTEGRATED PV SYSTEMS'. Major focus was on developing low cost solution for the commercial BIPV and rooftop PV market and meet DOE LCOE goal for the commercial market segment of 9-12 cents/kWh for 2010 and 6-8 cents/kWh for 2015. We achieved the 2010 goal and were on track to achieve the 2015 goal. The program consists of five major tasks: (1) modules; (2) inverters and BOS; (3) systems engineering and integration; (4) deployment; and (5) project management and TPP collaborative activities. We successfully crossed all stage gates and surpassed all milestones. We proudly achieved world record stable efficiencies in small area cells (12.56% for 1cm2) and large area encapsulated modules (11.3% for 800 cm2) using a triple-junction amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon/nanocrystalline silicon structure, confirmed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We collaborated with two inverter companies, Solectria and PV Powered, and significantly reduced inverter cost. We collaborated with three universities (Syracuse University, University of Oregon, and Colorado School of Mines) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and improved understanding on nanocrystalline material properties and light trapping techniques. We jointly published 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals and International Conference Proceedings. We installed two 75kW roof-top systems, one in Florida and another in New Jersey demonstrating innovative designs. The systems performed satisfactorily meeting/exceeding estimated kWh/kW performance. The 50/50 cost shared program was a great success and received excellent comments from DOE Manager and Technical Monitor in the Final Review.

  9. Overcoming Codes and Standards Barriers to Innovations in Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-02-15

    In this journal article, the authors discuss approaches to overcoming building code barriers to energy-efficiency innovations in home construction. Building codes have been a highly motivational force for increasing the energy efficiency of new homes in the United States in recent years. But as quickly as the codes seem to be changing, new products are coming to the market at an even more rapid pace, sometimes offering approaches and construction techniques unthought of when the current code was first proposed, which might have been several years before its adoption by various jurisdictions. Due to this delay, the codes themselves can become barriers to innovations that might otherwise be helping to further increase the efficiency, comfort, health or durability of new homes. . The U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America, a program dedicated to improving the energy efficiency of America’s housing stock through research and education, is working with the U.S. housing industry through its research teams to help builders identify and remove code barriers to innovation in the home construction industry. The article addresses several approaches that builders use to achieve approval for innovative building techniques when code barriers appear to exist.

  10. Building America Guidance for Identifying and Overcoming Code, Standard, and Rating Method Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Pamala C.; Halverson, Mark A.

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building America program implemented a new Codes and Standards Innovation (CSI) Team in 2013. The Team’s mission is to assist Building America (BA) research teams and partners in identifying and resolving conflicts between Building America innovations and the various codes and standards that govern the construction of residences. A CSI Roadmap was completed in September, 2013. This guidance document was prepared using the information in the CSI Roadmap to provide BA research teams and partners with specific information and approaches to identifying and overcoming potential barriers to Building America (BA) innovations arising in and/or stemming from codes, standards, and rating methods. For more information on the BA CSI team, please email: CSITeam@pnnl.gov

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies in the United States Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Public Buildings Homes Existing Policy Policy Being Considered Rating Requirement Disclosure Requirement Austin, TX Connecticut Arlington County, VA Alaska California Colorado Denver, CO Austin, TX District of Columbia Illinois Hawaii Kansas New York, NY Maine Michigan Montgomery County, MD San Francisco, CA Maryland Minnesota Nevada Seattle, WA Massachusetts Ohio New York Washington

  12. Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings This webinar covered how to make existing buildings more energy efficient. Transcript Presentation (3.48 MB) More Documents & Publications Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings Preparing for the Arrival of Electric Vehicle Quality Assurance for Residential Retrofit Programs

  13. Whole Building Cost and Performance Measurement: Data Collection Protocol Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Spees, Kathleen L.; Kora, Angela R.; Rauch, Emily M.; Hathaway, John E.; Solana, Amy E.

    2009-03-27

    This protocol was written for the Department of Energys Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to be used by the public as a tool for assessing building cost and performance measurement. The primary audiences are sustainable design professionals, asset owners, building managers, and research professionals within the Federal sector. The protocol was developed based on the need for measured performance and cost data on sustainable design projects. Historically there has not been a significant driver in the public or private sector to quantify whole building performance in comparable terms. The deployment of sustainable design into the building sector has initiated many questions on the performance and operational cost of these buildings.

  14. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Scale, Fresno, California Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California In this project, ...

  15. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Full report (3.6 mb) Major residential equipment and commercial heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies

  16. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings | Department of Energy Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. <em>Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952</em> The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952 On May 4, 2007, a massive tornado

  17. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  18. Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No.

  19. Building Code Compliance and Enforcement: The Experience of SanFrancisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinanace and California'sBuildign Standards for New Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, E.

    1990-11-01

    As part of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's (LBL) technical assistance to the Sustainable City Project, compliance and enforcement activities related to local and state building codes for existing and new construction were evaluated in two case studies. The analysis of the City of San Francisco's Residential Energy Conservation Ordinance (RECO) showed that a limited, prescriptive energy conservation ordinance for existing residential construction can be enforced relatively easily with little administrative costs, and that compliance with such ordinances can be quite high. Compliance with the code was facilitated by extensive publicity, an informed public concerned with the cost of energy and knowledgeable about energy efficiency, the threat of punishment (Order of Abatement), the use of private inspectors, and training workshops for City and private inspectors. The analysis of California's Title 24 Standards for new residential and commercial construction showed that enforcement of this type of code for many climate zones is more complex and requires extensive administrative support for education and training of inspectors, architects, engineers, and builders. Under this code, prescriptive and performance approaches for compliance are permitted, resulting in the demand for alternative methods of enforcement: technical assistance, plan review, field inspection, and computer analysis. In contrast to existing construction, building design and new materials and construction practices are of critical importance in new construction, creating a need for extensive technical assistance and extensive interaction between enforcement personnel and the building community. Compliance problems associated with building design and installation did occur in both residential and nonresidential buildings. Because statewide codes are enforced by local officials, these problems may increase over time as energy standards change and become more complex and as other standards (eg, health and

  20. Verification of RESRAD-build computer code, version 3.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-06-02

    RESRAD-BUILD is a computer model for analyzing the radiological doses resulting from the remediation and occupancy of buildings contaminated with radioactive material. It is part of a family of codes that includes RESRAD, RESRAD-CHEM, RESRAD-RECYCLE, RESRAD-BASELINE, and RESRAD-ECORISK. The RESRAD-BUILD models were developed and codified by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); version 1.5 of the code and the user's manual were publicly released in 1994. The original version of the code was written for the Microsoft DOS operating system. However, subsequent versions of the code were written for the Microsoft Windows operating system. The purpose of the present verification task (which includes validation as defined in the standard) is to provide an independent review of the latest version of RESRAD-BUILD under the guidance provided by ANSI/ANS-10.4 for verification and validation of existing computer programs. This approach consists of a posteriori V&V review which takes advantage of available program development products as well as user experience. The purpose, as specified in ANSI/ANS-10.4, is to determine whether the program produces valid responses when used to analyze problems within a specific domain of applications, and to document the level of verification. The culmination of these efforts is the production of this formal Verification Report. The first step in performing the verification of an existing program was the preparation of a Verification Review Plan. The review plan consisted of identifying: Reason(s) why a posteriori verification is to be performed; Scope and objectives for the level of verification selected; Development products to be used for the review; Availability and use of user experience; and Actions to be taken to supplement missing or unavailable development products. The purpose, scope and objectives for the level of verification selected are described in this section of the Verification Report. The development products that were used for

  1. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9...

  2. Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    useful for evaluating the costs and benefits of energy and water conservation and renewable energy projects. The life-cycle cost (LCC) of two or more alternative designs are...

  3. Better Buildings Challenge Partners Exceed $1.3 Billion in Energy Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings, Share Hundreds of Solutions to Help Spur Future Efficiency Efforts | Department of Energy Partners Exceed $1.3 Billion in Energy Cost Savings, Share Hundreds of Solutions to Help Spur Future Efficiency Efforts Better Buildings Challenge Partners Exceed $1.3 Billion in Energy Cost Savings, Share Hundreds of Solutions to Help Spur Future Efficiency Efforts May 11, 2016 - 9:21am Addthis Better Buildings Challenge Partners Exceed $1.3 Billion in Energy Cost Savings, Share Hundreds of

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California | Department of Energy Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California In this project, U.S. Department of Energy Building America research team IBACOS partnered with builder Wathen Castanos Hybrid Homes to develop a simple and low-cost methodology by which

  5. NREL-Developed Software Tackles Building Efficiency and Offers Cost Savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - News Releases | NREL NREL-Developed Software Tackles Building Efficiency and Offers Cost Savings November 20, 2013 A unique software application created by the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) could improve the efficiency of commercial buildings by allowing occupants to interact with buildings more directly. The new Building Agent (BA) application allows facility managers to quickly diagnose and adjust for problems based on direct occupant comfort feedback.

  6. Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2011-01-06

    Quality assurance and optimization are essential elements of any serious technological endeavor, including efforts to improve energy efficiency. Commissioning is an important tool in this respect. The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver-if not exceed-the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, one-time or repeated commissioning (often called retrocommissioning) identifies the almost inevitable drift in energy performance and puts the building back on course, often surpassing the original design intent. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to improving performance, rather than a discrete technology.

  7. Low-cost Manufacturing of Wireless Sensors for Building Monitoring...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Four Key Elements of Technology Low-power Wireless Communication Energy-Harvesting and Storage Integrated System Design Innovative low-cost manufacturing 1 2 3 4 Multifunctional ...

  8. Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

    2008-06-01

    The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

  9. Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-01-31

    India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human

  10. Adoption, implementation and enforcement of commercial building energy codes in New Mexico and Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J W; Thurman, A G; Shankle, D L

    1991-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering ways to encourage states to adopt energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial buildings in the private sector. Such standards are now mandatory for federal buildings, and for private buildings in 34 states; in the remaining 16 states, the standards serve as guidelines for voluntary compliance. In this study for DOE, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assessed the process by which energy codes for commercial buildings were adopted and implemented in Arizona and New Mexico. Information was gathered primarily through a series of interviews with state officials, city building officials, architects and engineers, builders, and staff from utilities in the two states. Until other state processes are studied, the extent of the similarities and dissimilarities to the situation in New Mexico and Arizona are unknown. A more extensive study may show that at least some elements of the two state's experience have been paralleled in other parts of the country. General strategies to encourage the adoption of energy codes, assist implementation, and support enforcement were developed based on the research from Arizona and New Mexico and are presented in this report. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

  12. Transforming Ordinary BUildings inot Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors & Sensor Networks

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors & Sensor Networks 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Philip Feng, Ph.D., philip.feng@case.edu Case Western Reserve University Gateway Wireless Sensor Node Wireless Relay 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/01/2014 Planned end date: 09/30/2014 Key Milestones 1. Design Energy Harvesting ASIC; 12/31/2014 2. Tapeout ASIC and Test Circuit; 6/30/2015 3. Complete Sensor Node;

  13. Feedbacks from Focus Group Meeting on Training and Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin; Lin , Haiyan; Song, Bo; Halverson, Mark A.; Evans, Meredydd; Zhu, Xiaojiao

    2011-01-01

    A focus group meeting is a very effective quality research approach to collect information on a specific project. Through focus group meetings at both Changchun and Ningbo in August 2010, the project team gained a more complete understandings of key stakeholders (such as their education level), their training needs and expectations, key factors influencing their decision making, and incurred implementation difficulties. In addition, the meeting helped the project team (especially PNNL) improve its understanding of the implementation status of building energy codes in other regions (such as small cities and counties neighboring to urban areas, small townships and rural areas distant from urban areas). The collected feedbacks will serve as important input not only for better design of training materials and the development of an on-line training website, but also for development of follow-up projects to promote building energy codes in China.

  14. Building America Solution Center Shows Builders How to Save Materials Costs While Saving Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2015-06-15

    This short article was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America Update newsletter. The article identifies energy and cost-saving benefits of using advanced framing techniques in new construction identified by research teams working with the DOE's Building America program. The article also provides links to guides in the Building America Solution Center that give how-to instructions for builders who want to implement advanced framing construction. The newsletter is issued monthly and can be accessed at http://energy.gov/eere/buildings/building-america-update-newsletter

  15. Energy and Cost Savings of Retro-Commissioning and Retrofit Measures for Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Moser, Dave; Liu, Guopeng; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2012-08-03

    This paper evaluates the energy and cost savings of seven retro-commissioning measures and 29 retrofit measures applicable to most large office buildings. The baseline model is for a hypothetical building with characteristics of large office buildings constructed before 1980. Each retro-commissioning measure is evaluated against the original baseline in terms of its potential of energy and cost savings while each retrofit measure is evaluated against the commissioned building. All measures are evaluated in five locations (Miami, Las Vegas, Seattle, Chicago and Duluth) to understand the impact of weather conditions on energy and cost savings. The results show that implementation of the seven operation and maintenance measures as part of a retro-commissioning process can yield an average of about 22% of energy use reduction and 14% of energy cost reduction. Widening zone temperature deadband, lowering VAV terminal minimum air flow set points and lighting upgrades are effective retrofit measures to be considered.

  16. Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    America Top Innovation | Department of Energy Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America Top Innovation Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes - Building America Top Innovation Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production, and transportation constraints. This 2014 Top Innovation highlights research conducted by the Top Innov Manufact home attic insul -guy blowing

  17. Cost Control Best Practices for Net Zero Energy Building Projects: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-02-01

    For net zero energy (NZE) buildings to become the norm in commercial construction, it will be necessary to design and construct these buildings cost effectively. While industry leaders have developed workflows (for procurement, design, and construction) to achieve cost-effective NZE buildings for certain cases, the expertise embodied in those workflows has limited penetration within the commercial building sector. Documenting cost control best practices of industry leaders in NZE and packaging those strategies for adoption by the commercial building sector will help make the business case for NZE. Furthermore, it will promote market uptake of the innovative technologies and design approaches needed to achieve NZE. This paper summarizes successful cost control strategies for NZE procurement, design, and construction that key industry users (such as building owners, architects, and designers) can incorporate into their everyday workflows. It will also evaluate the current state of NZE economics and propose a path forward for greater market penetration of NZE buildings. By demonstrating how to combine NZE technologies and design approaches into an overall efficiency package that can be implemented at minimal (zero, in certain cases) incremental capital cost, the domain of NZE design and construction can be expanded from a niche market to the commercial construction mainstream.

  18. Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Meeting of the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics and the Energy Information Administration This is an unedited Transcript of the Fall Meeting of the Energy Information Administration and the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. The meeting took place October 16 and 17, 2003 in the Forrestal Building at 1000 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20585. Most of the sessions were in 8E-089, although several break out sessions were in

  19. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-09-30

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of about $145 a year for an average new house. Construction cost increases are estimated at $655. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of close to $100 a year because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  20. ACTION MEMO: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. I B.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1b Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and...

  1. AVTA: Vehicle to Grid Power Flow Regulations and Building Codes Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following report is a review of Vehicle-to-Grid power flow regulations and building codes, as informed by the AVTA's testing on plug-in electric vehicle charging equipment. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  2. Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PET Power Distribution System | Department of Energy High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a PET Power Distribution System Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls using a PET Power Distribution System Lead Performer: VoltServer Inc. - East Greenwich, RI DOE Total Funding: $999,122 Project Term: July 28, 2015 - July 27, 2017 Funding Opportunity: FY2015 Phase II Release 2 SBIR Awards PROJECT OBJECTIVE This project will demonstrate a novel

  3. DOE Fact Sheet: Cost-Effectiveness of Deep Green Alterations of Multi-family Buildings in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fact Sheet: Cost-Effectiveness of Deep Green Alterations of Multi-family Buildings in Seattle Overview The City of Seattle was a multiple awardee of the Climate Action Champions (CAC) Notice of Technical Assistance (NOTA). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy offered technical assistance from its Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) Program to provide CACs with additional opportunities for technical assistance to support and advance their

  4. NREL: News - New Design Tool Analyzes Cost of Operating a Building Over its

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lifetime Design Tool Analyzes Cost of Operating a Building Over its Lifetime Golden, Colo., August 2, 2002 Imagine being able to estimate the energy life-cycle costs of a new building by simply entering numbers into a software program. Thanks to the new Energy-10 design tool, this is now possible. The new software - Energy-10 Version 1.5 - is an upgrade to the original program developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The new Energy-10

  5. Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mesa, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2011-03-31

    The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the 2003 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of $145 a year for an average new house compared to the 2003 IECC. This energy cost saving decreases to $125 a year for the 2009 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Construction cost increases (per home) for complying with the 2009 IECC are estimated at $1256 relative to the 2003 IECC and $800 for 2006 IECC. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of about $80 a year by complying with the 2009 IECC because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

  6. Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Evan

    2009-07-16

    The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are

  7. Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

    2002-02-26

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

  8. Costs of Building Waste Facilities; Price Per Shipment to Recoup Costs

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-05-14

    The Automated Pricing Schedule is a computer model for evaluating the economics of developing, operating, and closing a low-level radioactive waste disposal site. It provides pricing for individual shipments based on the characteristics of the shipment, and calculates a disposal fee to be charged for each shipment to recover the costs of the facility. It includes a sensitivity analysis module to evaluate the effect of varying the parameters of the model.

  9. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype,more » we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.« less

  10. Cost-effective retrofit technology for reducing peak power demand in small and medium commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutaro, James J.; Fugate, David L.; Kuruganti, Teja; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Starke, Michael R.

    2015-05-27

    We describe a cost-effective retrofit technology that uses collective control of multiple rooftop air conditioning units to reduce the peak power consumption of small and medium commercial buildings. The proposed control uses a model of the building and air conditioning units to select an operating schedule for the air conditioning units that maintains a temperature set point subject to a constraint on the number of units that may operate simultaneously. A prototype of this new control system was built and deployed in a large gymnasium to coordinate four rooftop air conditioning units. Based on data collected while operating this prototype, we estimate that the cost savings achieved by reducing peak power consumption is sufficient to repay the cost of the prototype within a year.

  11. A brief introduction on training and public information of building energy codes in the U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2010-12-01

    This report is associated with the project of Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China (55793). The report aims to give Chinese audience a brief introduction on training and public information activities of building energy codes in the U.S. The report contains four sections: Section One is about the development history and implementation of building energy codes in the U.S. Section Two is about the organizations of training and public information activities, mainly focused on ASHRAE, ICC, federal and state government. Policy implication, which is Section Three, addresses the role of federal government and on-line training and public information activities in promoting training and public information (the current China training system lacks strong support of central government and on-line training activities). Conclusions are made in Section Four. This report will be uploaded to an upcoming Chinese website which is devoted to provide first-time free on-line training and public information of building energy codes in China.

  12. Update on maintenance and service costs of commercial building ground-source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cane, D.; Garnet, J.M.

    2000-07-01

    An earlier paper showed that commercial ground-source heat pump systems have significantly lower service and maintenance costs than alternative HVAC systems. This paper expands on those results by adding 13 more buildings to the original 25 sites and by comparing the results to the latest ASHRAE survey of HVAC maintenance costs. Data from the 38 sites are presented here including total (scheduled and unscheduled) maintenance costs in cents per square foot per year for base cost, in-house, and contractor-provided maintenance. Because some of the new sites had maintenance costs that were much higher than the industry norm, the resulting data are not normally distributed. Analysis (O'Hara Hines 1998) indicated that a log-normal distribution is a better fit; thus, the data are analyzed and presented here as log-normal. The log-mean annual total maintenance costs for the most recent year of the survey ranged from 6.07 cents per square foot to 8.37 cents per square foot for base cost and contractor-provided maintenance, respectively.

  13. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program Rois Langner, Bob Hendron, and Eric Bonnema Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-60976 August 2014 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National

  14. Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2009-10-18

    Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.0 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that VisualDOE version 4.1 build 0002 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing ... high performance, cost-effective alternative envelope designs that will meet stringent energy code requirements. ...

  18. Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, Eric E.

    2006-09-29

    This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

  19. Funding Opportunity Coming Soon: Commercial Energy Codes Field Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO has issued a notice of intent to release a funding opportunity announcement (FOA) focused on identifying the energy code requirements for commercial buildings that can provide the maximum cost-effective energy and cost savings through increased compliance.

  20. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Historically, only Industrial Facilities (ISO 50003 Industry - light to medium and ... is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ...

  1. Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, B.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Danko, S.L.; Gilbride, T.L.

    1994-07-01

    This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utility new-construction DSM programs. The ultimate goal of the task is to identify opportunities where states might work collaboratively with utilities to promote the adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy-efficient building energy codes.

  2. Introduction to Cost Control Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings: High-Performance Design and Construction on a Budget (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    Momentum behind zero energy building design and construction is increasing, presenting a tremendous opportunity for advancing energy performance in the commercial building industry. At the same time, there is a lingering perception that zero energy buildings must be cost prohibitive or limited to showcase projects. Fortunately, an increasing number of projects are demonstrating that high performance can be achieved within typical budgets. This factsheet highlights replicable, recommended strategies for achieving high performance on a budget, based on experiences from past projects.

  3. Comparison of the Supplement to the 2004 IECC to the Current New York Energy Conservation Code - Residential Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.

    2004-09-01

    The New York State Department of State requested the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a report consisting of two components. The first component is an analysis comparing the effects on energy usage as a result of implementation of the 2004 Supplement to the IECC with the current New York code. The second component is an engineering analysis to determine whether additional costs of compliance with the proposal would be equal to or less than the present value of anticipated energy savings over a 10-year period. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed the requested assessment of the potential code upgrade.

  4. Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Technical Update meeting on April 29-30, 2013, in Denver, Colorado.

  5. Stretch/Reach Codes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transcript PDF icon Presentation More Documents & Publications Green Codes and Programs Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Effective O&M Policy in ...

  6. PNNL Energy Codes Portfolio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PNNL Energy Codes Portfolio 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review ADOPT COMPLY DEVELOP Bing Liu bing.liu@pnnl.gov Rosemarie Bartlett rosemarie.bartlett@pnnl.gov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Multi-year program in support of DOE statutory requirements Key Milestones: 1. DOE's Determinations on 90.1-2013 and 2015 IECC 2. Update DOE's Energy odes ost-Effectiveness Methodology 3. Commercial Codes Roadmap 4. 90.1-2013 and 2015 IECC Cost Analyses 5.

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software … Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Green Building Studio Web Service version 3.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software-EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated January 31, 2007, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Regional Analysis of Building Distributed Energy Costs and CO2 Abatement: A U.S. - China Comparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Goncalo; Feng, Wei; Stadler, Michael; Steinbach, Jan; Lai, Judy; Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Ding, Yan; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Zhe; Zhu, Neng

    2014-04-09

    The following paper conducts a regional analysis of the U.S. and Chinese buildings? potential for adopting Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The expected economics of DER in 2020-2025 is modeled for a commercial and a multi-family residential building in different climate zones. The optimal building energy economic performance is calculated using the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER CAM) which minimizes building energy costs for a typical reference year of operation. Several DER such as combined heat and power (CHP) units, photovoltaics, and battery storage are considered. The results indicate DER have economic and environmental competitiveness potential, especially for commercial buildings in hot and cold climates of both countries. In the U.S., the average expected energy cost savings in commercial buildings from DER CAM?s suggested investments is 17percent, while in Chinese buildings is 12percent. The electricity tariffs structure and prices along with the cost of natural gas, represent important factors in determining adoption of DER, more so than climate. High energy pricing spark spreads lead to increased economic attractiveness of DER. The average emissions reduction in commercial buildings is 19percent in the U.S. as a result of significant investments in PV, whereas in China, it is 20percent and driven by investments in CHP. Keywords: Building Modeling and Simulation, Distributed Energy Resources (DER), Energy Efficiency, Combined Heat and Power (CHP), CO2 emissions 1. Introduction The transition from a centralized and fossil-based energy paradigm towards the decentralization of energy supply and distribution has been a major subject of research over the past two decades. Various concerns have brought the traditional model into question; namely its environmental footprint, its structural inflexibility and inefficiency, and more recently, its inability to maintain acceptable reliability of supply. Under such a troubled setting

  10. A Comparison of the 2003 and 2006 International Energy Conservation Codes to Determine the Potential Impact on Residential Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Therese K; Baxter, Van D

    2008-03-01

    The IECC was updated in 2006. As required in the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1992, Title 3, DOE has a legislative requirement to "determine whether such revision would improve energy efficiency in residential buildings" within 12 months of the latest revision. This requirement is part of a three-year cycle of regular code updates. To meet this requirement, an independent review was completed using personnel experienced in building science but not involved in the code development process.

  11. Reducing Transaction Costs for Energy Efficiency Investments and Analysis of Economic Risk Associated With Building Performance Uncertainties: Small Buildings and Small Portfolios Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langner, R.; Hendron, B.; Bonnema, E.

    2014-08-01

    The small buildings and small portfolios (SBSP) sector face a number of barriers that inhibit SBSP owners from adopting energy efficiency solutions. This pilot project focused on overcoming two of the largest barriers to financing energy efficiency in small buildings: disproportionately high transaction costs and unknown or unacceptable risk. Solutions to these barriers can often be at odds, because inexpensive turnkey solutions are often not sufficiently tailored to the unique circumstances of each building, reducing confidence that the expected energy savings will be achieved. To address these barriers, NREL worked with two innovative, forward-thinking lead partners, Michigan Saves and Energi, to develop technical solutions that provide a quick and easy process to encourage energy efficiency investments while managing risk. The pilot project was broken into two stages: the first stage focused on reducing transaction costs, and the second stage focused on reducing performance risk. In the first stage, NREL worked with the non-profit organization, Michigan Saves, to analyze the effects of 8 energy efficiency measures (EEMs) on 81 different baseline small office building models in Holland, Michigan (climate zone 5A). The results of this analysis (totaling over 30,000 cases) are summarized in a simple spreadsheet tool that enables users to easily sort through the results and find appropriate small office EEM packages that meet a particular energy savings threshold and are likely to be cost-effective.

  12. Cost Control Strategies for Zero Energy Buildings: High-Performance Design and Construction on a Budget (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    There is mounting evidence that zero energy can, in many cases, be achieved within typical construction budgets. To ensure that the momentum behind zero energy buildings and other low-energy buildings will continue to grow, this guide assembles recommendations for replicating specific successes of early adopters who have met their energy goals while controlling costs. Contents include: discussion of recommended cost control strategies, which are grouped by project phase (acquisition and delivery, design, and construction) and accompanied by industry examples; recommendations for balancing key decision-making factors; and quick reference tables that can help teams apply strategies to specific projects.

  13. Funding Opportunity for Commercial Energy Codes Field Studies | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy for Commercial Energy Codes Field Studies Funding Opportunity for Commercial Energy Codes Field Studies March 17, 2016 - 11:58am Addthis The Building Technologies Office (BTO) has announced the availability of $4 million for the Commercial Buildings and Energy Codes Field Studies funding opportunity (DE-FOA-0001532). This funding opportunity seeks to develop and test a methodology for identifying the commercial energy code requirements that can provide the maximum cost-effective

  14. Cost Analysis of Simple Phase Change Material-Enhanced Building Envelopes in Southern U.S. Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Shukla, N.; Fallahi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional thermal designs of building envelope assemblies are based on static energy flows, yet building envelopes are subject to varying environmental conditions. This mismatch between the steady-state principles and their dynamic operation can decrease thermal efficiency. Design work supporting the development of low-energy houses showed that conventional insulations may not always be the most cost effective solution to improvement envelope thermal performance. PCM-enhanced building envelopes that simultaneously reduce the total cooling loads and shift the peak-hour loads are the focus of this report.

  15. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes a low-cost, low-tech attic insulation technique developed by the ARIES Building America team with help from Southern Energy Homes and Johns Manville. Increasing attic insulation in manufactured housing has been a significant challenge due to cost, production and transportation constraints. The simplicity of this dense-pack solution to increasing attic insulation R-value promises real hope for widespread industry adoption.

  16. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Document provides information on the use of energy savings performance contracts to reduce energy consumption and provide energy and cost savings in non-building applications.

  17. Low-Cost Bio-Based Phase Change Materials as an Energy Storage Medium in Building Envelopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Mr. Ramin; Shukla, Dr. Nitin; Kosny, Dr. Jan

    2015-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of phase change material (PCM) in building envelope systems. Several studies have reported the energy saving potential of PCM in building envelopes. However, wide application of PCMs in building applications has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel paraffin product made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application, with the ultimate goal of commercializing a low-cost PCM platform. The low-cost PCM pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation, installed in external walls and field-tested under natural weatherization conditions for a period of several months. In addition, several PCM samples and PCM-cellulose samples were prepared under controlled conditions for laboratory-scale testing. The laboratory tests were performed to determine the phase change properties of PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation both at microscopic and macroscopic levels. This article presents the data and analysis from the exterior test wall and the laboratory-scale test data. PCM behavior is influenced by the weather and interior conditions, PCM phase change temperature and PCM distribution within the wall cavity, among other factors. Under optimal conditions, the field data showed up to 20% reduction in weekly heat transfer through an external wall due to the PCM compared to cellulose-only insulation.

  18. Automated Commissioning for Lower-Cost, Widely Deployed Building Commissioning of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2007-01-31

    This book chapter takes a brief look at the benefits of building commissioning and describes a vision of the future where most of the objectives of commissioning will be accomplished automatically by capabilities built into the building systems.

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon: Challenging Students to Build Energy Efficient, Cost-Effective, and Attractive Solar-Powered Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, J.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon challenges collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. The winner of the competition is the team that best blends affordability, consumer appeal, and design excellence with optimal energy production and maximum efficiency. The paper discusses the solutions developed for the event. We believe that the solutions implemented for Solar Decathlon 2011 represent current trends and that by analyzing, critiquing, and exposing the solutions pursued, the industry can become better suited to address challenges of the future. Constructing a solar community using high-efficiency design and unique materials while remaining code compliant, safe, and effective results in solutions that are market relevant, important, and interesting to the industry as a whole.

  20. Better Buildings Challenge Saves $840 Million in Energy Costs, Adds New Water Savings Goal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Challenge partners have cut energy waste by 94 trillion British thermal units since the challenge launched in 2011.

  1. Michigan Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the Michigan Uniform Energy Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-07-03

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Michigan homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the Michigan Uniform Energy Code is cost-effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Michigan homeowners will save $10,081 with the 2012 IECC. Each year, the reduction to energy bills will significantly exceed increased mortgage costs. After accounting for up-front costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $604 for the 2012 IECC.

  2. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  3. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  4. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Charles; Green, Andrew S.; Dahle, Douglas; Barnett, John; Butler, Pat; Kerner, David

    2013-08-01

    The findings of this study indicate that potential exists in non-building applications to save energy and costs. This potential could save billions of federal dollars, reduce reliance on fossil fuels, increase energy independence and security, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Federal Government has nearly twenty years of experience with achieving similar energy cost reductions, and letting the energy costs savings pay for themselves, by applying energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) inits buildings. Currently, the application of ESPCs is limited by statute to federal buildings. This study indicates that ESPCs can be a compatible and effective contracting tool for achieving savings in non-building applications.

  5. DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Software AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Implementation Resource Type:...

  6. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test building in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. Furthermore, this article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.

  7. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Mr. Ramin

    2014-01-01

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test building in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. This article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.

  8. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores - including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets - by following the recommendations of researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

  9. NREL Recommends Ways to Cut Building Energy Costs in Half (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01

    Building designers and operators could cut energy use by 50% in large office buildings, hospitals, schools, and a variety of stores -- including groceries, general merchandise outlets, and retail outlets -- by following the recommendations of NREL researchers. The innovative energy-saving recommendations are contained in technical support documents and Advanced Energy Design Guides compiled by NREL.

  10. Virginia Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2009 Virginia Construction Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15

    The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) yields positive benefits for Virginia homeowners. Moving to the 2012 IECC from the current Virginia Construction Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Virginia homeowners will save $5,836 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $388 for the 2012 IECC.

  11. Building.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant in ITER refers to plant systems located outside the Tokamak Building. A thick wall ... The cooling water system provides for the rejection of heat from a variety of ITER systems ...

  12. Low-cost phase change material as an energy storage medium in building envelopes: Experimental and numerical analyses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Abhari, Ramin

    2014-10-03

    A promising approach to increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is the implementation of a phase change material (PCM) in the building envelope. Numerous studies over the last two decades have reported the energy saving potential of PCMs in building envelopes, but their wide application has been inhibited, in part, by their high cost. This article describes a novel PCM made of naturally occurring fatty acids/glycerides trapped into high density polyethylene (HDPE) pellets and its performance in a building envelope application. The PCM-HDPE pellets were mixed with cellulose insulation and then added to an exterior wall of a test buildingmore » in a hot and humid climate, and tested over a period of several months, To demonstrate the efficacy of the PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation in reducing the building envelope heat gains and losses, side-by-side comparison was performed with another wall section filled with cellulose-only insulation. Further, numerical modeling of the test wall was performed to determine the actual impact of the PCM-HDPE pellets on wall-generated heating and cooling loads and the associated electricity consumption. The model was first validated using experimental data and then used for annual simulations using typical meteorological year (TMY3) weather data. Furthermore, this article presents the experimental data and numerical analyses showing the energy-saving potential of the new PCM.« less

  13. Project Profile: Transformational Approach to Reducing the Total System Costs of Building-Integrated Photovoltaics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Dow Chemical Company, under the BOS-X funding opportunity, has launched a transformational product in the building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) industry: the Dow POWERHOUSE Solar Shingle.

  14. Low-Cost, High Efficiency Integration of SSL and Building Controls...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This project will demonstrate a novel approach to reduce cost of solid-state lighting ... to 90% while also providing individual luminaire control and network communications. ...

  15. Automated Commissioning for Lower-cost, Widely Deployed Building Commissioning of the Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas

    2011-08-16

    This chapter takes a brief look at the benefits of commissioning and describes a vision of the future where most of the objectives of commissioning will be accomplished automatically by capabilities built into the building systems themselves. Commissioning will become an activity that is performed continuously rather than periodically, and only repairs requiring replacement or overhaul of equipment will require manual intervention. This chapter then identifies some of the technologies that will be needed to realize this vision and ends with a call for all involved in the enterprise of building commissioning and automation to embrace and dedicate themselves to a future of automated commissioning.

  16. DOE's New Cost-Effectiveness Tool Builds the Business Case for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE released the beta version of a user-friendly tool that estimates the cost-effectiveness of a residential energy efficiency program based on a program administrator's inputs. ...

  17. DOE’s New Cost-Effectiveness Tool Builds the Business Case for Program Administrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February, DOE released the beta version of a user-friendly tool that estimates the cost-effectiveness of a residential energy efficiency program based on a program administrator’s inputs. Public...

  18. Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Halverson, Mark A.; Myer, Michael; Cho, Hee Jin; Loper, Susan A.; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2013-06-18

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed this project for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE’s BECP supports upgrading building energy codes and standards, and the states’ adoption, implementation, and enforcement of upgraded codes and standards. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, and impact energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for the life of buildings. Continuous improvement of building energy efficiency is achieved by periodically upgrading energy codes and standards. Ensuring that changes in the code that may alter costs (for building components, initial purchase and installation, replacement, maintenance and energy) are cost-effective encourages their acceptance and implementation. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 is the energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors.

  19. National Cost-effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Compared to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian; Halverson, Mark A.; Myer, Michael; Loper, Susan A.; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Rosenberg, Michael I.

    2013-11-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed this project for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE’s BECP supports upgrading building energy codes and standards, and the states’ adoption, implementation, and enforcement of upgraded codes and standards. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, and impact energy use and greenhouse gas emissions for the life of buildings. Continuous improvement of building energy efficiency is achieved by periodically upgrading energy codes and standards. Ensuring that changes in the code that may alter costs (for building components, initial purchase and installation, replacement, maintenance and energy) are cost-effective encourages their acceptance and implementation. ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 is the energy standard for commercial and multi-family residential buildings over three floors.

  20. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operation for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    Dynamic pricing electricity tariffs, now the default for large customers in California (peak demand of 200 kW and higher for PG&E and SCE, and 20 kW and higher for SDG&E), are providing Federal facilities new opportunities to cut their electricity bills and help them meet their energy savings mandates. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has created this fact sheet to help California federal facilities take advantage of these opportunities through “rate-responsive building operation.” Rate-responsive building operation involves designing your load management strategies around your facility’s variable electric rate, using measures that require little or no financial investment.

  1. Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings Effective O&M Policy in Public Buildings This webinar covered effective operations and maintenance in public buildings. Transcript Presentation (2.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Preparing for the Arrival of Electric Vehicle Low-to-No Cost Strategy for Energy Efficiency in Public Buildings Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

  2. Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Heritage Buildings, Inc., and Energy Smart Home Plans, Leland, North Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PNNL worked with North Carolina Heritage Buildings and Energy Smart Home Plans to design zero-energy ready homes that score under HERS 60 for less than 2% added cost over code construction.

  3. Wisconsin Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Wisconsin Uniform Dwelling Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Wisconsin homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Wisconsin state code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Wisconsin homeowners will save $2,484 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $10,733 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 1 year for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $149 for the 2009 IECC and $672 for the 2012 IECC.

  4. Minnesota Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the Minnesota Residential Energy Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-04-01

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Minnesota homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the current Minnesota Residential Energy Code is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Minnesota homeowners will save $1,277 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $9,873 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceed cumulative cash outlays) in 3 years for the 2009 IECC and 1 year for the 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $122 for the 2009 IECC and $669 for the 2012 IECC.

  5. Glen Canyon Dam beach/habitat-building test flow: An `ex post` analysis of hydropower cost. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpman, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    A 7-day controlled flood was conducted in late March and early April of 1996 for research purposes. This short-duration high release was designed to rebuild high elevation sandbars, deposit nutrients, restore backwater channels, and provide some of the dynamics of a natural system. The goal was to test hypotheses about sediment movements and the response of aquatic and terrestial habitats to flood events. This report describes the resultant economic and financial impact of the test flow on the hydropower system. There were two sources of economic and financial impact associated with the beach/habitat-building test flow--changes in the timing and amount of hydropower produced and the costs of the research. The purpose of this report is to describe the economic and financial impacts on the hydropower system.

  6. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: Cost-Optimized Attic Insulation Solution for Factory-Built Homes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INNOVATIONS BUILDING AMERICA Recognizing Top Innovations in Building Science - The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program was started in 1995 to provide research and development to the residential new construction and remodeling industry. As a national center for world-class research, Building America funds integrated research in market- ready technology solutions through collaborative partnerships between building and remodeling industry leaders, nationally recognized building

  7. Property:Incentive/ResCode | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mandatory statewide. Buildings must also meet requirements set by CALGreen, the statewide green building code. Building Energy Code (Colorado) + 2003 IECC or any successor edition...

  8. Preserving Envelope Efficiency in Performance Based Code Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Sullivan, Greg P.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2015-06-20

    The City of Seattle 2012 Energy Code (Seattle 2014), one of the most progressive in the country, is under revision for its 2015 edition. Additionally, city personnel participate in the development of the next generation of the Washington State Energy Code and the International Energy Code. Seattle has pledged carbon neutrality by 2050 including buildings, transportation and other sectors. The United States Department of Energy (DOE), through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) provided technical assistance to Seattle in order to understand the implications of one potential direction for its code development, limiting trade-offs of long-lived building envelope components less stringent than the prescriptive code envelope requirements by using better-than-code but shorter-lived lighting and heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) components through the total building performance modeled energy compliance path. Weaker building envelopes can permanently limit building energy performance even as lighting and HVAC components are upgraded over time, because retrofitting the envelope is less likely and more expensive. Weaker building envelopes may also increase the required size, cost and complexity of HVAC systems and may adversely affect occupant comfort. This report presents the results of this technical assistance. The use of modeled energy code compliance to trade-off envelope components with shorter-lived building components is not unique to Seattle and the lessons and possible solutions described in this report have implications for other jurisdictions and energy codes.

  9. Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  10. Best Practices: Policies for Building Efficiency and Emerging Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information about appliance standards, building energy codes, ENERGY STAR program and tax incentives for building efficiency.

  11. MeshVoro: A Three-Dimensional Voronoi Mesh Building Tool for the TOUGH Family of Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, C. M.; Boyle, K. L.; Reagan, M.; Johnson, J.; Rycroft, C.; Moridis, G. J.

    2013-09-30

    Few tools exist for creating and visualizing complex three-dimensional simulation meshes, and these have limitations that restrict their application to particular geometries and circumstances. Mesh generation needs to trend toward ever more general applications. To that end, we have developed MeshVoro, a tool that is based on the Voro (Rycroft 2009) library and is capable of generating complex threedimensional Voronoi tessellation-based (unstructured) meshes for the solution of problems of flow and transport in subsurface geologic media that are addressed by the TOUGH (Pruess et al. 1999) family of codes. MeshVoro, which includes built-in data visualization routines, is a particularly useful tool because it extends the applicability of the TOUGH family of codes by enabling the scientifically robust and relatively easy discretization of systems with challenging 3D geometries. We describe several applications of MeshVoro. We illustrate the ability of the tool to straightforwardly transform a complex geological grid into a simulation mesh that conforms to the specifications of the TOUGH family of codes. We demonstrate how MeshVoro can describe complex system geometries with a relatively small number of grid blocks, and we construct meshes for geometries that would have been practically intractable with a standard Cartesian grid approach. We also discuss the limitations and appropriate applications of this new technology.

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 1.3.0.018

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 1.3.0.018 version 130 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 1.4.0.025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 1.4.0.025 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.0.0.025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.0.0.025 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.34 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.31 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  18. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.1.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  19. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.0.0 meets Internal Revenue Code 179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  20. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- DOE-21.E-JJH version 130

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that DOE-2.1E-JJH version 130 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  1. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- DOE-21.E version 119

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that DOE-21.E version 119 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  2. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  3. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  4. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  5. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.1.2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.1.2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  6. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyPlus version 2.2.0.023

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that EnergyPlus version 2.1.0.023 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  7. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.4 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  8. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.41 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  9. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.40 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated April 10, 2009, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  10. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) version 4.50 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  11. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.5 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  12. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.9

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.9 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  13. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.7 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  14. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.6 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  15. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- TRACE 700 version 6.2.8

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Provides required documentation that TRACE 700 version 6.2.8 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnerSim version 07.11.30

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnerSim version 07.11.30 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of South Carolina.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Kentucky.

  19. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Oklahoma.

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Massachusetts.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-26

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Arkansas.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Colorado.

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Iowa.

  4. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of New Jersey.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Texas.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Alabama.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Delaware

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Delaware.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of North Carolina.

  9. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of New York.

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Rhode Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Rhode Island.

  11. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Utah.

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Virginia.

  13. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Wisconsin.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Montana.

  15. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Georgia.

  16. Cost Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in teh State of Connecticut.

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the District of Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the District of Columbia.

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Nebraska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-12-13

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Nebraska.

  19. Resources for Sustainable Federal Buildings and Campuses | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Codes Program: Website provides information about the 2015 International ... Find information about Commercial Buildings Integration and Residential Buildings ...

  20. The Cost-Effectiveness of Investments to Meet the Guiding Principles for High-Performance Sustainable Buildings on the PNNL Campus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Judd, Kathleen S.

    2014-08-29

    As part its campus sustainability efforts, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has invested in eight new and existing buildings to ensure they meet the U.S. Department of Energy’s requirements for high performance sustainable buildings (HPSB) at DOE sites. These investments are expected to benefit PNNL by reducing the total life-cycle cost of facilities, improving energy efficiency and water conservation, and making buildings safer and healthier for the occupants. This study examines the cost-effectiveness of the implementing measures that meet the criteria for HPSBs in 3 different types of buildings on the PNNL campus: offices, scientific laboratories, and data centers. In each of the three case studies examined the investments made to achieve HPSB status demonstrated a high return on the HPSB investments that have taken place in these varied environments. Simple paybacks for total investments in the three case study buildings ranged from just 2 to 5 years; savings-to-investment ratios all exceeded the desirable threshold of 1; and the net present values associated with these investments were all positive.

  1. Roof-top solar energy potential under performance-based building energy codes: The case of Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izquierdo, Salvador; Montanes, Carlos; Dopazo, Cesar; Fueyo, Norberto

    2011-01-15

    The quantification at regional level of the amount of energy (for thermal uses and for electricity) that can be generated by using solar systems in buildings is hindered by the availability of data for roof area estimation. In this note, we build on an existing geo-referenced method for determining available roof area for solar facilities in Spain to produce a quantitative picture of the likely limits of roof-top solar energy. The installation of solar hot water systems (SHWS) and photovoltaic systems (PV) is considered. After satisfying up to 70% (if possible) of the service hot water demand in every municipality, PV systems are installed in the remaining roof area. Results show that, applying this performance-based criterion, SHWS would contribute up to 1662 ktoe/y of primary energy (or 68.5% of the total thermal-energy demand for service hot water), while PV systems would provide 10 T W h/y of electricity (or 4.0% of the total electricity demand). (author)

  2. Example of Environmental Restoration Code of Accounts

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter describes the fundamental structure of an example remediation cost code system, lists and describes the Level 1 cost codes, and lists the Level 2 and Level 3 cost codes.

  3. Building Science Education | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... DOE's Residential Building Energy Codes - Resource for tools to facilitate energy code compliance, development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement. Whole Building Design ...

  4. Midwest Building Energy Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Midwest Building Energy Program Midwest Building Energy Program Building Codes Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review bldgcodes02_paradis_040213.pdf (652.9 KB) More Documents & Publications Stretch/Reach Codes Appliance Standards and Building Codes Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best Practices

  5. Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation Energy Efficiency Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings At an estimated cost of 38 ... questions -- from how to lower your cooling costs to ways ...

  6. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use Electricity Use Residential Transportation 21 quads 27 quads Commercial 18 quads Industrial 31 quads U.S. Energy Bill for Buildings: $410 billion per year 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Emerging Technologies Building Codes Appliance Standards Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings

  7. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs Production Builders

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    field projects with production builders have demonstrated that high-performance homes experience significant cost trade-offs that offset other cost increases. This proved transformational, gaining builder traction with related market-based programs like ENERGY STAR for Homes and DOE Challenge Home. "Break points" or cost trade-offs that are identified during the engineering analysis of the residential construction process can yield two types of business savings: 1) reductions in costs

  8. Cost-Effective Wall Retrofit Solution for the Interior Side of Building's Exterior Wall that Supports a Phased Retrofit Cost Model- 2014 BTO Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Amy Wylie, Bayer MaterialScience/Penn State Consortium In order to achieve the required airtight envelope, commercial buildings with masonry facades in Climate Zones 4 and 5 are faced with the decision between vapor-permeable or impermeable insulation, as well as whether retrofits are needed to implement continuous insulation instead of conventional discontinuous insulation.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.2 Federal Tax Incentives

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Tax Incentive of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 Envelope Improvements to Existing Homes (1) --Increases existing tax credit to 30% of costs up to $1,500 to upgrade building envelope to be compliant with codes for new construction. Upgrades to building shell, HVAC system, and windows and doors may qualify. Improvements must be installed between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2010. Renewable Energy Production Tax Credits --Tax credit to 30% of costs for installation of

  10. Honest Buildings | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website: www.honestbuildings.com Web Application Link: www.honestbuildings.com Cost: Free Honest Buildings Screenshot References: Honest Buildings1 Logo: Honest Buildings...

  11. Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in Non-Building Applications A Joint Study by the United States Secretaries of Energy and Defense Authorized in the Energy Independence and Security Act 2007 by Congress Prepared by US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Federal Energy Management Program For questions and comments please contact: Schuyler Schell Federal Energy Management Program

  12. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  13. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  14. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  15. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Heritage Buildings, Inc., and Energy Smart Home Plans, Leland, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-10-01

    PNNL worked with North Carolina Heritage Buildings and Energy Smart Home Plans to design zero-energy ready homes that score under HERS 60 for less than 2% added cost over code construction.

  16. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that Owens Corning Commercial Energy Calculator (OC-CEC) version 1.1 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  17. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

  18. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed management of 15 nonprocess buildings (15 series) at the Weldon Spring Site Chemical Plant, Weldon Spring, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonell, M M; Peterson, J M

    1989-05-01

    The US Department of Energy, under its Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), is responsible for cleanup activities at the Weldon-Spring site, located near Weldon Spring, Missouri. The site consists of two noncontiguous areas: (1) a raffinate pits and chemical plant area and (2) a quarry. This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) report has been prepared to support a proposed removal action to manage 15 nonprocess buildings, identified as the 15 Series buildings, at the chemical plant on the Weldon Spring site. These buildings have been nonoperational for more than 20 years, and the deterioration that has occurred during this time has resulted in a potential threat to site workers, the general public, and the environment. The EE/CA documentation of this proposed action is consistent with guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that addresses removal actions at sites subject to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) of 1980, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986. Actions at the Weldon Spring site are subject to CERCLA requirements because the site is on the EPA`s National Priorities List. The objectives of this report are to (1) identify alternatives for management of the nonprocess buildings; (2) document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential threat to workers, the public, and the environment associated with these buildings; and (3) address environmental impacts associated with the proposed action.

  19. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and ... Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and ...

  20. Roadmap Toward a Predictive Performance-based Commercial Energy Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.

    2014-10-01

    Energy codes have provided significant increases in building efficiency over the last 38 years, since the first national energy model code was published in late 1975. The most commonly used path in energy codes, the prescriptive path, appears to be reaching a point of diminishing returns. The current focus on prescriptive codes has limitations including significant variation in actual energy performance depending on which prescriptive options are chosen, a lack of flexibility for designers and developers, and the inability to handle control optimization that is specific to building type and use. This paper provides a high level review of different options for energy codes, including prescriptive, prescriptive packages, EUI Target, outcome-based, and predictive performance approaches. This paper also explores a next generation commercial energy code approach that places a greater emphasis on performance-based criteria. A vision is outlined to serve as a roadmap for future commercial code development. That vision is based on code development being led by a specific approach to predictive energy performance combined with building specific prescriptive packages that are designed to be both cost-effective and to achieve a desired level of performance. Compliance with this new approach can be achieved by either meeting the performance target as demonstrated by whole building energy modeling, or by choosing one of the prescriptive packages.

  1. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating ...

  2. Green Codes and Programs | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This webinar covers green building codes, standards, and programs. Transcript Presentation (1.87 MB) More Documents & Publications Energy Code Compliance and Enforcement Best ...

  3. Energy Code Enforcement Training Manual : Covering the Washington State Energy Code and the Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality Code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington State Energy Code Program

    1992-05-01

    This manual is designed to provide building department personnel with specific inspection and plan review skills and information on provisions of the 1991 edition of the Washington State Energy Code (WSEC). It also provides information on provisions of the new stand-alone Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality (VIAQ) Code.The intent of the WSEC is to reduce the amount of energy used by requiring energy-efficient construction. Such conservation reduces energy requirements, and, as a result, reduces the use of finite resources, such as gas or oil. Lowering energy demand helps everyone by keeping electricity costs down. (It is less expensive to use existing electrical capacity efficiently than it is to develop new and additional capacity needed to heat or cool inefficient buildings.) The new VIAQ Code (effective July, 1991) is a natural companion to the energy code. Whether energy-efficient or not, an homes have potential indoor air quality problems. Studies have shown that indoor air is often more polluted than outdoor air. The VIAQ Code provides a means of exchanging stale air for fresh, without compromising energy savings, by setting standards for a controlled ventilation system. It also offers requirements meant to prevent indoor air pollution from building products or radon.

  4. Roadmap for the Future of Commercial Energy Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Michael I.; Hart, Philip R.; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.

    2015-01-26

    Building energy codes have significantly increased building efficiency over the last 38 years, since the first national energy code was published in 1975. The most commonly used path in energy codes, the prescriptive path, appears to be reaching a point of diminishing returns. The current focus on prescriptive codes has limitations including significant variation in actual energy performance depending on which prescriptive options are chosen, a lack of flexibility for designers and developers, the inability to handle optimization that is specific to building type and use, the inability to account for project-specific energy costs, and the lack of follow-through or accountability after a certificate of occupancy is granted. It is likely that an approach that considers the building as an integrated system will be necessary to achieve the next real gains in building efficiency. This report provides a high-level review of different formats for commercial building energy codes, including prescriptive, prescriptive packages, capacity constrained, outcome based, and predictive performance approaches. This report also explores a next generation commercial energy code approach that places a greater emphasis on performance-based criteria. For commercial building energy codes to continue to progress as they have over the last 40 years, the next generation of building codes will need to provide a path that is led by energy performance, ensuring a measurable trajectory toward net zero energy buildings. This report outlines a vision to serve as a roadmap for future commercial code development. That vision is based on code development being led by a specific approach to predictive energy performance combined with building-specific prescriptive packages that are designed both to be cost-effective and to achieve a desired level of performance. Compliance with this new approach can be achieved by either meeting the performance target, as demonstrated by whole building energy

  5. Building Energy Codes Program (BECP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Association Planned end date: On-going National Labs of State Energy Current Statutory ... with the City of Boise and State of Idaho to develop policies for existing ...

  6. Appliance Standards and Building Codes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Team Lead - Test Procedures and Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement Ashley Armstrong, (202) 586-6590 * Lucas Adin, (202) 287-1317 * Bryan Berringer, (202) 586-0371 * Josh ...

  7. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Building Energy Asset Tool Market Stimulation Digital Tools & Solutions Lock-In Savings ... & Standards Tools & Programs Market Transformation No Codes IECC 200912 90% Compliance ...

  8. State Building Energy Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2013 the Sustainable Coonstruction Advisory Committee responsible for adopting buildings codes was mandated to automatically adopt tne most recent version of the rating systems developed b...

  9. Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribal Government Counteracts High Energy Costs, Climate Challenges with Building Energy Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Seeking to reduce its reliance on imported diesel fuel and to lower operating costs, increase quality of life, and serve as a model of self-sufficiency for local youth and surrounding communities, Gwitchyaa Zhee Gwich’in Tribe applied for and was awarded a $125,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Tribal Energy Program to supplement the tribe’s investment in a quarter-million-dollar energy efficiency and renewable energy project.

  10. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  11. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office Peer Review Rosemarie Bartlett ... energy codes resulting in higher-performing buildings that ... feedback * Provide education and training materials in ...

  12. Clark County- Energy Conservation Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2010, Clark County adopted Ordinance 3897, implementing the Southern Nevada version of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial buildings...

  13. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for the State of New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendon, Vrushali V.; Selvacanabady, Abinesh

    2014-12-01

    This analysis was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). DOE supports the development and adoption of energy efficient and cost-effective residential and commercial building energy codes. These codes set the minimum requirements for energy-efficient building design and construction and ensure energy savings on a national level. The basis of the residential building energy codes is the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) published by the International Code Council (ICC). The IECC is developed and published on a three-year cycle, with a new edition published at the end of each cycle.

  14. Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensors and Sensor Networks Transforming Ordinary Buildings into Smart Buildings via Low-Cost, Self-Powering Wireless Sensors and Sensor Networks Lead Performer: Case ...

  15. Building America Case Study: Low-Cost Evaluation of Energy Savings at the Community Scale, Fresno, California (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  16. Building Dashboard Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    marketplacelisti Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): Building Management, Building Systems, Energy Management, Enterprise Management, Reporting, Sustainability, Tools, Water Building...

  17. Building Dashboard Kiosk | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    marketplacelisti Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): Building Management, Building Systems, Energy Management, Enterprise Management, Reporting, Sustainability, Tools, Water Building...

  18. Why build below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlings, R.

    1982-01-01

    Building homes underground is a rapidly growing concept. From less than 200 in 1977 to about 6000 homes at present, this trend is discussed in detail. Although dirt is a poor insulator, its temperature moderating properties offer advantages. The need for insulating an underground house is discussed as well as the advantages of this type of home: (1) security advantages (fewer entrances); (2) storm resistance; (3) protection against fire; (4) lower maintenance costs; (5) space for lawn and garden is greater; and (6) these homes are quieter. The three principle types of underground homes are discussed in detail and illustrated with drawings and floor plans. These are: (1) the elevational type (most popular) with all doors and windows on one wall with other walls and roof completely covered; (2) penetrational homes with windows and doors on more than one side; and (3) the atrium home which is built around an open courtyard or atrium. Problems associated with earth-sheltered homes (underground water, structural strength requirements, building codes, indoor air pollution, costs, and financing) are discussed and suggestions are made for cutting costs. 4 references. (MJJ)

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption 4.2 Federal Buildings and Facilities Characteristics 4.3 Federal Buildings and Facilities Expenditures 4.4 Legislation Affecting Energy Consumption of Federal Buildings and Facilities 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download

  20. Building Efficiency Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Buildings use 40% of total energy in the United States – more than either the industrial or transportation sectors. Technical improvements and cost reductions (see Appendix 3) in building materials...

  1. Tallahassee Program Encourages Residents to Build Green

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida city reduces operating costs by increasing energy efficiency, starting with construction of green buildings.

  2. What is Building America?

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22

    DOE's Building America program is helping to bridge the gap between homes with high energy costs and homes that are healthy, durable, and energy efficient.

  3. Residential Building Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is leading several different activities to develop, demonstrate, and deploy cost-effective solutions to reduce energy consumption across the residential building...

  4. Advanced Commercial Buildings Initiative

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Current cost share percentage is 56%. Budget History Oct 1, 2014- FY2014 (past) FY2015 ... and GoNo-Go Criteria including: * Benchmarking existing small commercial buildings * ...

  5. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Campaign quantifies actual energy savings, market uptake trajectory, and adoption by ... realize energy savings through optimal control of building subsystems. * Reduce cost to ...

  6. What is Building America?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-20

    DOE's Building America program is helping to bridge the gap between homes with high energy costs and homes that are healthy, durable, and energy efficient.

  7. Standards and Codes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to improving the energy efficiency of residential buildings in a cost-effective manner. By working with teams of researchers, industry, and organizations...

  8. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 15: 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Humid Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct highly energy-efficient homes, while addressing building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the hot-humid climate can build homes that achieve whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers.

  9. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures 1.3 Value of Construction and Research 1.4 Environmental Data 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison 1.6 Embodied Energy of Building Assemblies 2The Residential Sector 3Commercial Sector 4Federal Sector 5Envelope and Equipment 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy

  10. Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Date: November 1, 2011 Ventilation in Multifamily Buildings Welcome to the Webinar! We will start at 2:00 PM Eastern Time Be sure that you are also dialed into the telephone conference call: Dial-in number: 888-324-9601; Pass code: 5551971 Download the presentation at: www.buildingamerica.gov/meetings.html Building Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Building America: Introduction November 1, 2011 Cheryn Engebrecht

  11. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for their residential and commercial building standards. ASHRAE used 38 climate groupings ...

  12. Property:Incentive/CodeChgCycle | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    state Building Code Bureau. All suggested code revisions are processed through the state administrative rule-making process involving publication, public comments, and public...

  13. Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Building Science-Based Climate Maps - Building America Top Innovation Photo showing climate zone maps based on the IECC climate zone map. It may not be intuitively obvious why a U.S. climate zone map is so important to the construction industry. Thanks to this Building America Top Innovation, building science education, energy code development, and residential design can much more effectively integrate

  14. Tokamak Systems Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.; Gorker, G.E.; Hooper, R.J.; Kalsi, S.S.; Metzler, D.H.; Peng, Y.K.M.; Roth, K.E.; Spampinato, P.T.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged.

  15. Building Energy Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The 2015 Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) took effect on March 1, 2015. The code is based on the 2015 IECC, with amendments to incorporate ASHRAE 90.1-2013. The new guidelines ...

  16. Vehicle Cost Calculator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Choose a vehicle to compare fuel cost and emissions with a conventional vehicle. Select Fuel/Technology Electric Hybrid Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator Update Your Widget Code This widget version will stop working on March 31. Update your widget code. × Widget Code Select All Close U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  17. Commercial Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science & Innovation » Energy Efficiency » Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings At an estimated cost of $38 billion a year, lighting represents the largest source of electricity consumption in U.S. commercial buildings. A new breakthrough by the Energy Department's <a href="/node/712411">National Renewable Energy Lab</a> could help commercial buildings save on lighting and ventilation costs by improving the accuracy of motion detection. At an estimated cost of

  18. New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Codes and Standards Concerns in Energy Innovations February 24, 2016 3:00PM to 4:30PM EST The Building America Program is hosting a free webinar that will provide an overview ...

  19. Housing and Building Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Housing and Building Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance Housing and Building Energy Efficiency Technical Assistance Housing and building energy efficiency technical assistance is designed to assist Indian tribes in creating more efficient homes and buildings. Assistance options include building design review, building code creation, building inventory and assessment, and weatherization program design. To apply for housing and building energy efficiency technical assistance,

  20. Calculating impacts of energy standards on energy demand in U.S. buildings with uncertainty in an integrated assessment model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Michael J.; Daly, Don S.; Hathaway, John E.; Lansing, Carina S.; Liu, Ying; McJeon, Haewon C.; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Peterson, Marty J.; Rice, Jennie S.; Zhou, Yuyu

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, an integrated assessment model (IAM) uses a newly-developed Monte Carlo analysis capability to analyze the impacts of more aggressive U.S. residential and commercial building-energy codes and equipment standards on energy consumption and energy service costs at the state level, explicitly recognizing uncertainty in technology effectiveness and cost, socioeconomics, presence or absence of carbon prices, and climate impacts on energy demand. The paper finds that aggressive building-energy codes and equipment standards are an effective, cost-saving way to reduce energy consumption in buildings and greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. states. This conclusion is robust to significant uncertainties in population, economic activity, climate, carbon prices, and technology performance and costs.

  1. Building Component Library: An Online Repository to Facilitate Building Energy Model Creation: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every

  2. Commercial building energy efficiency standards & performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Key Issues: * Lack of data in developing Chinese reference buildings Chinese partners surveyed design drawings to get building characteristics * Lack of cost database work ...

  3. Buildings Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency Buildings Success Stories Buildings Success Stories RSS The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's (EERE) successes in technology cost reduction,...

  4. Building Component Library | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building...

  5. Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Rosemarie Bartlett, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory View the Presentation Technical Assistance: Increasing Code Compliance - 2014 BTO Peer Review (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications PNNL: Codes Portfolio - 2015 Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview -

  6. DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: David Cohan, DOE View the Presentation DOE Codes Program Overview - 2015 Peer Review (571.96 KB) More Documents & Publications Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2015 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review Building Energy Codes Program Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review

  7. Compiling Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wrappers will automatically provide the necessary MPI include files and libraries. For Fortran source code use mpif90: % mpif90 -o example.x example.f90 For C source code use...

  8. Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results

  9. City of Frisco- Residential and Commercial Green Building Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2013, existing green building codes were repealed and the 2012 International Residential Code with amendments was adopted. Among the amendments were energy efficiency requirements appr...

  10. Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX): Instructions for Implementing the Test Procedure, Calibration Test Reference Results, and Example Acceptance-Range Criteria

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Codes Program Building Energy Codes Program An estimated 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building energy codes ensure they use energy efficiently over the life of the building. An estimated 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building energy codes ensure they use energy efficiently over the life of the building. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports the development and implementation of residential and commercial building

  11. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Vapor...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    In an article published in the ASHRAE Journal August 2004, Building Science Corporation's ... In the ASHRAE paper, Lstiburek provided a detailed proposal for building code requirements ...

  12. Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation Water Management Guide - Building America Top Innovation Cover of the EEBA Water Management Guide. As energy codes and ...

  13. New Code Compliance Briefs Assist in Resolving Codes and Standards Concerns in Energy Innovations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building America Program is hosting a free webinar that will provide an overview of new Code Compliance Brief content on the Building America Solution Center. These briefs help builders...

  14. Evaluation of Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Missed Energy Saving Opportunity Based on Illinois Home Performance Program Field Data: Homeowner Selected Upgrades vs. Cost-Optimized Solutions Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Retrofit Type: Single-family homes Building Component: Envelope Location: Chicago, IL Technical Support Partner: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit, www.gastechnology.org/PARR Year Tested: 2013 Climate Zone: Zone 5 (cold) PROJECT HOUSING GROUPS The table below depicts the percent that each

  15. commercial buildings initiative | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Commercial Buildings Initiative The DOE Building Technologies Office works with the commercial building industry to accelerate the use of energy efficiency technologies in both existing and new commercial buildings. The DOE Building Technologies Office strives to reduce energy consumption across the commercial building sector by developing, demonstrating and deploying cost-effective solutions. Commercial Buildings Initiative: http://www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/commercial/index.html

  16. 2007 CBECS Large Hospital Building Methodology Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    that were present in the building, the types of energy sources used, and the amount and cost of energy used in the building in the year 2007. If the respondents to the Building ...

  17. Buildings interoperability landscape - Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, Dave B.; Stephan, Eric G.; Wang, Weimin; Corbin, Charles D.; Widergren, Steven E.

    2015-02-01

    Buildings are an integral part of our nation’s energy economy. The advancement in information and communications technology (ICT) has revolutionized energy management in industrial facilities and large commercial buildings. As ICT costs decrease and capabilities increase, buildings automation and energy management features are transforming the small-medium commercial and residential buildings sectors. A vision of a connected world in which equipment and systems within buildings coordinate with each other to efficiently meet their owners’ and occupants’ needs, and where buildings regularly transact business with other buildings and service providers (such as gas and electric service providers) is emerging. However, while the technology to support this collaboration has been demonstrated at various degrees of maturity, the integration frameworks and ecosystems of products that support the ability to easily install, maintain, and evolve building systems and their equipment components are struggling to nurture the fledging business propositions of their proponents.

  18. EERE & Buildings to Grid Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    74% electricity produced in the US (CBECS 2009) Buildings have the potential to reduce their consumption by 20%- ... is added cost to the end user, manufacturers and utilities. ...

  19. NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the adoption of cost-effective energy...

  20. Improving the Energy Performance of New and Existing Commercial Buildings: A DOE Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holuj, Brian; Nicholls, Andrew K.; Sandahl, Linda J.; Torcellini, Paul

    2010-08-01

    It is technically and economically feasible for our nations commercial buildings to consume substantially less energy--and produce substantially less carbon dioxide--than they do. Yet owners of existing buildings are not taking full advantage of todays best energy saving technologies and practices; and developers of new buildings are, most often, constructing to minimum energy codes rather than pushing for greater efficiency. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is addressing these challenges by developing cost-effective technologies and practices that deliver significant improvements in commercial building performance. DOE, through its Commercial Building Initiative, is also collaborating with industry-leading companies and organizations to demonstrate, monitor, and help move these technologies from the laboratory to the marketplace. Ultimately, DOEs dual strategy of pairing aggressive research and development with market engagement, demonstration, and deployment will dramatically improve the energy performance of new and existing commercial buildings throughout the nation.

  1. Estimating Renewable Energy Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Some renewable energy measures, such as daylighting, passive solar heating, and cooling load avoidance, do not add much to the cost of a building. However, renewable energy technologies typically...

  2. Occupation Codes

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... classifies furniture; lighting and plumbing fixtures; and floor, wall, and window coverings. ... structures (64); office, plant, and residential buildings (6403); scaffolds (6429); ...

  3. Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code (Version I)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.L.; Finn, P.A.; Gohar, M.Y.; Barrett, R.J.; Gorker, G.E.; Spampinaton, P.T.; Bulmer, R.H.; Dorn, D.W.; Perkins, L.J.; Ghose, S.

    1985-09-01

    A computer code was developed to model a Tandem Mirror Reactor. Ths is the first Tandem Mirror Reactor model to couple, in detail, the highly linked physics, magnetics, and neutronic analysis into a single code. This report describes the code architecture, provides a summary description of the modules comprising the code, and includes an example execution of the Tandem Mirror Reactor Systems Code. Results from this code for two sensitivity studies are also included. These studies are: (1) to determine the impact of center cell plasma radius, length, and ion temperature on reactor cost and performance at constant fusion power; and (2) to determine the impact of reactor power level on cost.

  4. Green Building Standards for State Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Title 22 of the Arkansas Code includes Arkansas-specific provisions for LEED and Green Globes certification. These rating systems add to the state building energy code established in 2004 for New...

  5. Building Energy Modeling | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emerging Technologies » Building Energy Modeling Building Energy Modeling About the portfolio Building energy modeling (BEM)-physics-based calculation of building energy consumption-is a multi-use tool for building energy efficiency. Established use cases include design of new buildings and deep retrofits, development of whole-building energy efficiency codes and standards (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1) and performance-path compliance with those codes (e.g., ASHRAE 90.1 "Appendix G" Performance

  6. Computer Model Buildings Contaminated with Radioactive Material

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-05-19

    The RESRAD-BUILD computer code is a pathway analysis model designed to evaluate the potential radiological dose incurred by an individual who works or lives in a building contaminated with radioactive material.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7.1 National Legislation 7.2 Federal Tax Incentives 7.3 Efficiency Standards for Residential HVAC 7.4 Efficiency Standards for Commercial HVAC 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances 7.6 Efficiency Standards for Lighting 7.7 Water Use Standards 7.8 State Building Energy Codes 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire

  8. SWEEPs Building Energy Codes Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AIA Chapters PNNLDOE ASHRAE & Chapters REEOs BCAP State Energy Offices Manufacturers ... The goal is to achieve adoption and compliance of the 2009 IECCASHRAE 90.1- 2007 or later ...

  9. Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... eere.energy.gov Approach Distinctive Characteristics 1. Identify successful and ... 2. Utilize NASEO's existing network of 56 State and Territory Energy Offices and its ...

  10. Southeast Enertgy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... CORE USA, Duke Energy, DOW Chemical, Energy Foundation, England Enterprises, Georgia Department of Community Affairs (DCA), Georgia Power, Green Coast Enterprises, Home ...

  11. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  12. Code_Saturne | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer Debugging & Profiling Performance Tools & APIs Software & Libraries Boost CPMD Code_Saturne GAMESS GPAW GROMACS LAMMPS MADNESS QBox IBM References Cooley Policies Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. [Feedback Form] Code_Saturne What is Code_Saturne? Code_Saturne is general-purpose Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software of Électricité de France (EDF), one of the

  13. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Five and Dime: Revisiting Strategies for Lowering the Costs of Delivering Energy Efficiency (101) June 2, 2016 Call Slides and Discussion Summary Call Attendee Locations 2 Agenda  Agenda Review and Ground Rules  Opening Poll  Brief Residential Network Overview  Featured Speakers  Melanie Paskevich, Program Manager, NeighborWorks of Western Vermont (Network Member)  Frank Rapley, Senior Manager, Tennessee Valley Authority  Discussion  What approaches has your organization

  14. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ... Water ......",33,32,6,8,"Q",24,"Q","N" "Propane ......",502,489,179,40,59...

  15. Local Option- Property Tax Assessment for Energy Efficient Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An energy-efficient building is defined as any building that exceeds the energy efficiency standards of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code by 30%; meets performance standards of the...

  16. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  17. Risk Code?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identify the Task Risk Code >2 Determine if a Work Control Document is needed What is the Unmitigated Risk Code? Rev.1 09/05/14 Read and Agree to Comply with appropriate mitigation and sign Work Control Documents Is there an approved Work Control Document (WCD)? WORK PLANNING, CONTROL AND AUTHORIZATION FLOW DIAGRAM 1. Define Scope of Work 2. Analyze Hazards 3. Develop and Implement Hazard Controls 4. Perform Work Within Controls 5. Feedback and Continuous Improvement Analyze Hazards and

  18. Comparison of 2006 IECC and 2009 IECC Commercial Energy Code Requirements for Kansas City, MO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yunzhi; Gowri, Krishnan

    2011-03-22

    This report summarizes code requirements and energy savings of commercial buildings in climate zone 4 built to the 2009 IECC when compared to the 2006 IECC. In general, the 2009 IECC has higher insulation requirements for exterior walls, roof, and windows and have higher efficiency requirements for HVAC equipment (HVAC equipment efficiency requirements are governed by National Appliance Conversion Act of 1987 (NAECA), and are applicable irrespective of the IECC version adopted). The energy analysis results show that residential and nonresidential commercial buildings meeting the 2009 IECC requirements save between 6.1% and 9.0% site energy, and between 6.4% and 7.7% energy cost when compared to 2006 IECC. Analysis also shows that semiheated buildings have energy and cost savings of 3.9% and 5.6%.

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts." ,,"Approximate",,,"Approximate","Average" ,,"Enclosed Floorspace",,"Average","Number","Number" ,,"of All Buildings",,"Enclosed Floorspace","of All

  1. Decommissioning Unit Cost Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, P. C.; Stevens, J. L.; Brandt, R.

    2002-02-26

    The Rocky Flats Closure Site (Site) is in the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, and remediating environmental media. A number of contaminated facilities have been decommissioned, including one building, Building 779, that contained gloveboxes used for plutonium process development but did little actual plutonium processing. The actual costs incurred to decommission this facility formed much of the basis or standards used to estimate the decommissioning of the remaining plutonium-processing buildings. Recent decommissioning activities in the first actual production facility, Building 771, implemented a number of process and procedural improvements. These include methods for handling plutonium contaminated equipment, including size reduction, decontamination, and waste packaging, as well as management improvements to streamline planning and work control. These improvements resulted in a safer working environment and reduced project cost, as demonstrated in the overall project efficiency. The topic of this paper is the analysis of how this improved efficiency is reflected in recent unit costs for activities specific to the decommissioning of plutonium facilities. This analysis will allow the Site to quantify the impacts on future Rocky Flats decommissioning activities, and to develop data for planning and cost estimating the decommissioning of future facilities. The paper discusses the methods used to collect and arrange the project data from the individual work areas within Building 771. Regression and data correlation techniques were used to quantify values for different types of decommissioning activities. The discussion includes the approach to identify and allocate overall project support, waste management, and Site support costs based on the overall Site and project costs to provide a ''burdened'' unit cost. The paper ultimately provides a unit cost basis that can be used to support cost estimates for

  2. Speech coding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravishankar, C., Hughes Network Systems, Germantown, MD

    1998-05-08

    Speech is the predominant means of communication between human beings and since the invention of the telephone by Alexander Graham Bell in 1876, speech services have remained to be the core service in almost all telecommunication systems. Original analog methods of telephony had the disadvantage of speech signal getting corrupted by noise, cross-talk and distortion Long haul transmissions which use repeaters to compensate for the loss in signal strength on transmission links also increase the associated noise and distortion. On the other hand digital transmission is relatively immune to noise, cross-talk and distortion primarily because of the capability to faithfully regenerate digital signal at each repeater purely based on a binary decision. Hence end-to-end performance of the digital link essentially becomes independent of the length and operating frequency bands of the link Hence from a transmission point of view digital transmission has been the preferred approach due to its higher immunity to noise. The need to carry digital speech became extremely important from a service provision point of view as well. Modem requirements have introduced the need for robust, flexible and secure services that can carry a multitude of signal types (such as voice, data and video) without a fundamental change in infrastructure. Such a requirement could not have been easily met without the advent of digital transmission systems, thereby requiring speech to be coded digitally. The term Speech Coding is often referred to techniques that represent or code speech signals either directly as a waveform or as a set of parameters by analyzing the speech signal. In either case, the codes are transmitted to the distant end where speech is reconstructed or synthesized using the received set of codes. A more generic term that is applicable to these techniques that is often interchangeably used with speech coding is the term voice coding. This term is more generic in the sense that the

  3. Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovation | Department of Energy Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation Building Energy Optimization Analysis Method (BEopt) - Building America Top Innovation House graphic from BEopt software. To achieve Building America's ambitious energy-efficiency goals, it becomes increasingly important that researchers can identify the most cost-effective, high-performance improvements. This Top Innovation profile describes BEopt, which has proven to be an

  4. H. R. 1726: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to deny any deduction for certain oil and hazard substance cleanup costs, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, April 11, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on April 11, 1991 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to deny any deduction for certain oil and hazardous substance cleanup costs. These discharge costs will apply if the taxpayer has a complete liability defense of if the taxpayer qualifies for a liability limitation with respect to the discharge and is not liable for any punitive damages.The amendments shall apply in the case of any applicable discharge costs paid on or after January 1, 1991.

  5. Development of probabilistic multimedia multipathway computer codes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, C.; LePoire, D.; Gnanapragasam, E.; Arnish, J.; Kamboj, S.; Biwer, B. M.; Cheng, J.-J.; Zielen, A. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Mo, T.; Abu-Eid, R.; Thaggard, M.; Sallo, A., III.; Peterson, H., Jr.; Williams, W. A.; Environmental Assessment; NRC; EM

    2002-01-01

    The deterministic multimedia dose/risk assessment codes RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD have been widely used for many years for evaluation of sites contaminated with residual radioactive materials. The RESRAD code applies to the cleanup of sites (soils) and the RESRAD-BUILD code applies to the cleanup of buildings and structures. This work describes the procedure used to enhance the deterministic RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes for probabilistic dose analysis. A six-step procedure was used in developing default parameter distributions and the probabilistic analysis modules. These six steps include (1) listing and categorizing parameters; (2) ranking parameters; (3) developing parameter distributions; (4) testing parameter distributions for probabilistic analysis; (5) developing probabilistic software modules; and (6) testing probabilistic modules and integrated codes. The procedures used can be applied to the development of other multimedia probabilistic codes. The probabilistic versions of RESRAD and RESRAD-BUILD codes provide tools for studying the uncertainty in dose assessment caused by uncertain input parameters. The parameter distribution data collected in this work can also be applied to other multimedia assessment tasks and multimedia computer codes.

  6. Compiling Codes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compiling Codes Compiling Codes Overview Open Mpi is the the only MPI library available on Euclid. This implementation of MPI-2 is described at Open MPI: Open Source High Performance Computing. The default compiler suite is from the Portland Group which is loaded by default at login, along with the PGI compiled Open MPI environment. % module list Currently Loaded Modulefiles: 1) pgi/10.8 2) openmpi/1.4.2 Basic Example Open MPI provides a convenient set of wrapper commands which you should use in

  7. Startup Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter discusses startup costs for construction and environmental projects, and estimating guidance for startup costs.

  8. State and Local Code Implementation: Southeast Region - 2014...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 2014 BTO Peer Review More Documents & Publications Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project EA-1872: Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1871: ...

  9. City of Los Angeles- Zoning Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter I of Los Angeles' Municipal Code, Height of Building or Structures, provides an exemption for solar energy devices, or similar structures. They may be erected above the height limit...

  10. Prescriptive Codes: A Cure or a Curse?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 26, 2012, and addressed the question Do codes and standards get in the way of high performance?"

  11. California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operating for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deeper Cost and Energy Savings | Department of Energy Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings California Federal Facilities: Rate-Responsive Building Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings Fact sheet from the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) describes rate-responsive building operations for cost and energy savings in California federal facilities. Download the Rate-Responsive Building Operating for Deeper Cost and Energy Savings

  12. Webinar: Energy Is Everywhere! Join the Better Buildings Challenge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multifamily residential buildings and operations can be made more energy-efficient using cost-effective energy improvements, while simultaneously creating jobs and building a stronger economy....

  13. A Utility Regulator's Guide to Data Access for Commercial Building...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    use data to help commercial customers manage energy costs through building energy benchmarking. A Utility Regulator's Guide to Data Access for Commercial Building Energy...

  14. House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation House Simulation Protocols (Building America Benchmark) - Building America Top Innovation ...

  15. Mercantile Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are...

  16. Education Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high...

  17. Better Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Initiative aims to make commercial and industrial buildings 20% more energy efficient by 2020 and accelerate private sector investment in energy efficiency.

  18. Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy ... Return to Search Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs ... gaps will lead to efficient power conversion. ...

  19. An Overview of the Building Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Driving Innovation, Speeding Adoption, Scaling Savings An Overview of the Building Technologies Office Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office National Energy Consumption Costs U.S. $410 billion to power 2 National Electricity Use Our homes and buildings use 76% of all U.S. electricity 3 The Opportunity: Energy Savings Potential for Buildings and Homes Reduce building energy use by 50% 4 BTO Budget: FY2013 - Proposed FY2016 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Residential Buildings

  20. PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, L.W.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

    1982-12-01

    Recent accomplishments in buildings energy research by the diverse groups in the Energy Efficient Buildings Program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are summarized. We review technological progress in the areas of ventilation and indoor air quality, buildings energy performance, computer modeling, windows, and artificial lighting. The need for actual consumption data to track accurately the improving energy efficiency of buildings is being addressed by the Buildings Energy Data (BED) Group at LBL. We summarize results to date from our Building Energy Use Compilation and Analysis (BECA) studies, which include time trends in the energy consumption of new commercial and new residential buildings, the measured savings being attained by both commercial and residential retrofits, and the cost-effectiveness of buildings energy conservation measures. We also examine recent comparisons of predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present the case for building energy use labels.

  1. Searching for the Optimal Mix of Solar and Efficiency in Zero Net Energy Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Anderson, R.

    2008-01-01

    Zero net energy (ZNE) buildings employ efficiency to reduce energy consumption and solar technologies to produce as much energy on site as is consumed on an annual basis. Such buildings leverage utility grids and net-metering agreements to reduce solar system costs and maintenance requirements relative to off-grid photovoltaic (PV)-powered buildings with batteries. The BEopt software was developed to efficiently identify cost-optimal building designs using detailed hour-by-hour energy simulation programs to evaluate the user-selected options. A search technique identifies optimal and near-optimal building designs (based on energy-related costs) at various levels of energy savings along the path from a reference building to a ZNE design. In this paper, we describe results based on use of the BEopt software to develop cost-optimal paths to ZNE for various climates. Comparing the different cases shows optimal building design characteristics, percent energy savings and cash flows at key points along the path, including the point at which investments shift from building improvements to purchasing PV, and PV array sizes required to achieve ZNE. From optimizations using the BEopt software for a 2,000-ft{sup 2} house in 4 climates, we conclude that, relative to a code-compliant (IECC 2006) reference house, the following are achievable: (1) minimum cost point: 22 to 38% source energy savings and 15 to 24% annual cash flow savings; (2) PV start point: 40 to 49% source energy savings at 10 to 12% annual cash flow savings; (3) break-even point: 43 to 53% source energy savings at 0% annual cash flow savings; and (4) ZNE point: 100% source energy savings with 4.5 to 8.1 kW{sub DC} PV arrays and 76 to 169% increase in cash flow.

  2. Building America Case Study: Evaluation of Passive Vents in New-Construction Multifamily Buildings, New York, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-10-15

    Exhaust ventilation and corresponding outdoor air strategies are being implemented in high-performance new construction multifamily buildings to meet program or code requirements for improved indoor air quality, but a lack of clear design guidance is resulting in poor performance of these systems despite the best intentions of the programs or standards. CARB's 2014 'Evaluation of Ventilation Strategies in New Construction Multifamily Buildings' consistently demonstrated that commonly used outdoor air strategies are not performing as expected. Of the four strategies evaluated in 2014, the exhaust ventilation system that relied on outdoor air from a pressurized corridor was ruled out as a potential best practice due to its conflict with meeting requirements within most fire codes. Outdoor air that is ducted directly to the apartments was a strategy determined to have the highest likelihood of success, but with higher first costs and operating costs. Outdoor air through space conditioning systems was also determined to have good performance potential, with proper design and execution. The fourth strategy, passive systems, was identified as the least expensive option for providing outdoor air directly to apartments, with respect to both first costs and operating costs. However, little is known about how they actually perform in real-world conditions or how to implement them effectively. Based on the lack of data available on the performance of these low-cost systems and their frequent use in the high-performance building programs that require a provision for outdoor air, this research project sought to further evaluate the performance of passive vents.

  3. code release

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    code release - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  4. Appendix C - GPRA06 building technologies (BT) program documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The Residential Building Energy Codes project improves the minimum or baseline energy efficiency of new residential buildings requiring code perm its. The project promulgates upgraded energy-efficiency requirements for residential buildings. Similarly, the project works with modeI energy code groups to upgrade the energy-efficiency requirements of their codes. Federal, state, and local jurisdictions then adopt and implement these upgraded federal and model energy codes. The long-term goal is to improve the minimum energy efficiency by 20% to 25% in new low-rise residential building construction.

  5. Codes and Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basics » Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Currently, thirteen U.S. and two international standards development organizations (SDOs) are developing and publishing the majority of the voluntary domestic codes and standards. These organizations typically work with the public and private sectors to craft standards. In the U.S., the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) coordinates standards development, provides guidance on consensus building, recommends that no more than one standard

  6. Better Buildings Alliance- Annual Open House Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Better Buildings Alliance is hosting a webinar on new energy efficiency resources and upcoming opportunities available this year through DOE's Better Building Alliance. Learn about new solutions that can help reduce energy costs for your organization.

  7. A Buildings Module for the Stochastic Energy Deployment System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Borgeson, Sam; Coffey, Brian; Komiyama, Ryoichi; Lai, Judy

    2008-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) is building a new long-range (to 2050) forecasting model for use in budgetary and management applications called the Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS), which explicitly incorporates uncertainty through its development within the Analytica(R) platform of Lumina Decision Systems. SEDS is designed to be a fast running (a few minutes), user-friendly model that analysts can readily run and modify in its entirety through a visual programming interface. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is responsible for implementing the SEDS Buildings Module. The initial Lite version of the module is complete and integrated with a shared code library for modeling demand-side technology choice developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Lumina. The module covers both commercial and residential buildings at the U.S. national level using an econometric forecast of floorspace requirement and a model of building stock turnover as the basis for forecasting overall demand for building services. Although the module is fundamentally an engineering-economic model with technology adoption decisions based on cost and energy performance characteristics of competing technologies, it differs from standard energy forecasting models by including considerations of passive building systems, interactions between technologies (such as internal heat gains), and on-site power generation.

  8. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DER) solutions for improving the building shell exterior while achieving a cost-reduction goal, including reduced labor costs to reach a 5050 split between material and labor. ...

  9. MELCOR computer code manuals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, R.M.; Cole, R.K. Jr.; Smith, R.C.; Stuart, D.S.; Thompson, S.L.; Hodge, S.A.; Hyman, C.R.; Sanders, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code that models the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants. MELCOR is being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as a second-generation plant risk assessment tool and the successor to the Source Term Code Package. A broad spectrum of severe accident phenomena in both boiling and pressurized water reactors is treated in MELCOR in a unified framework. These include: thermal-hydraulic response in the reactor coolant system, reactor cavity, containment, and confinement buildings; core heatup, degradation, and relocation; core-concrete attack; hydrogen production, transport, and combustion; fission product release and transport; and the impact of engineered safety features on thermal-hydraulic and radionuclide behavior. Current uses of MELCOR include estimation of severe accident source terms and their sensitivities and uncertainties in a variety of applications. This publication of the MELCOR computer code manuals corresponds to MELCOR 1.8.3, released to users in August, 1994. Volume 1 contains a primer that describes MELCOR`s phenomenological scope, organization (by package), and documentation. The remainder of Volume 1 contains the MELCOR Users Guides, which provide the input instructions and guidelines for each package. Volume 2 contains the MELCOR Reference Manuals, which describe the phenomenological models that have been implemented in each package.

  10. Ducts in Conditioned Space- Building America Top Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America field testing which found that moving ductwork into the home’s conditioned space can save 8%-15% on energy costs, improve comfort, reduce moisture problems, and even reduce installation costs.

  11. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Ducts in Conditioned Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes Building America field testing that found moving ductwork into the home’s conditioned space can save 8%-15% on energy costs, improve comfort, reduce moisture problems, and even reduce installation costs.

  12. Buildings*","Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  13. Fort Collins- Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    To control the construction and design costs associated with new buildings meeting this standard, the goal of Gold can be reduced to Silver for projects where the payback period for earning Gold...

  14. Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost-Effective Modeling and Savings Projections for Multifamily Projects Better Buildings Residential Network Multifamily and Low-Income Housing Peer Exchange Call Series: Cost-Eff...

  15. Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For a detailed life cycle cost analysis, the Federal Energy Management Program has developed a tool called Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC). This downloadable tool allows the user ...

  16. Energy Cost Calculator for Urinals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    For a detailed life cycle cost analysis, The Federal Energy Management Program developed a tool called Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC). This downloadable tool allows the user to ...

  17. High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders - Building America Top Innovation High Performance Home Cost Performance Trade-Offs: Production Builders - ...

  18. Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange ...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.2 Windows 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment 5.4 Water Heaters 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems 5.6 Lighting 5.7 Appliances 5.8 Active Solar Systems 5.9 On-Site Power 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the

  20. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    performance of the building enclosure, reduce the cost of energy-efficient construction, and simplify the construction process, all while accommodating higher levels of insulation. ...

  1. National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Residential Efficiency Measures Database - Building America Top Innovation ... Image of a man insulating the ceiling of a home. Robust cost data for energy-efficiency ...

  2. Anaheim Public Utilities- Green Building Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Anaheim Public Utilities (APU) offers commercial, industrial, residential, and institutional customers the Green Building Incentives Program to offset construction, installation and upgrade costs...

  3. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    how window attachments and coverings, such as storm windows and cellular shades, can be a cost-effective means of reducing energy use in residential buildings. This webinar ...

  4. Transcript for Building America Video

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of a video about how DOE’s Building America program is helping to bridge the gap between homes with high energy costs and homes that are healthy, durable, and energy efficient.

  5. TOOKUIL: A case study in user interface development for safety code application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, D.L.; Harkins, C.K.; Hoole, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Traditionally, there has been a very high learning curve associated with using nuclear power plant (NPP) analysis codes. Even for seasoned plant analysts and engineers, the process of building or modifying an input model for present day NPP analysis codes is tedious, error prone, and time consuming. Current cost constraints and performance demands place an additional burden on today`s safety analysis community. Advances in graphical user interface (GUI) technology have been applied to obtain significant productivity and quality assurance improvements for the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) input model development. KAPL Inc. has developed an X Windows-based graphical user interface named TOOKUIL which supports the design and analysis process, acting as a preprocessor, runtime editor, help system, and post processor for TRAC. This paper summarizes the objectives of the project, the GUI development process and experiences, and the resulting end product, TOOKUIL.

  6. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  7. Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: On Bill Financing: Reducing Cost Barriers to Energy Efficiency Improvements (201)

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution 6.3 Natural Gas Production and Distribution 6.4 Electric and Generic Quad Carbon Emissions 6.5 Public Benefit Funds/System Benefit Funds 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to

  9. Building America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  10. Building technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-14

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  11. Building technologies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick

    2014-07-15

    After growing up on construction sites, Roderick Jackson is now helping to make buildings nationwide far more energy efficient.

  12. Cost Effective Water Heating Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question"Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

  13. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 16: 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Mixed-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Adams, Karen; Butner, Ryan S.; Ortiz, Sallie J.

    2011-09-01

    This best practices guide is the 16th in a series of guides for builders produced by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the mixed-humid climate can build homes that have whole-house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark with no added overall costs for consumers. The best practices described in this document are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. Building America brings together the nation’s leading building scientists with over 300 production builders to develop, test, and apply innovative, energy-efficient construction practices. Building America builders have found they can build homes that meet these aggressive energy-efficiency goals at no net increased costs to the homeowners. Currently, Building America homes achieve energy savings of 40% greater than the Building America benchmark home (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code). The recommendations in this document meet or exceed the requirements of the 2009 IECC and 2009 IRC and those requirements are highlighted in the text. Requirements of the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC are also noted in text and tables throughout the guide. This document will be distributed via the DOE Building America website: www.buildingamerica.gov.

  14. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 15: 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Adams, Karen; Noonan, Christine F.

    2011-09-01

    This best practices guide is the 15th in a series of guides for builders produced by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the hot-humid climate can build homes that have whole-house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark with no added overall costs for consumers. The best practices described in this document are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. Building America brings together the nation’s leading building scientists with over 300 production builders to develop, test, and apply innovative, energy-efficient construction practices. Building America builders have found they can build homes that meet these aggressive energy-efficiency goals at no net increased costs to the homeowners. Currently, Building America homes achieve energy savings of 40% greater than the Building America benchmark home (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code). The recommendations in this document meet or exceed the requirements of the 2009 IECC and 2009 IRC and those requirements are highlighted in the text. Requirements of the 2012 IECC and 2012 IRC are also noted in text and tables throughout the guide. This document will be distributed via the DOE Building America website: www.buildingamerica.gov.

  15. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.

  16. Commercial Buildings Consortium | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consortium Commercial Buildings Consortium Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review commlbldgs07_fazeli_040213.pdf (544.57 KB) More Documents & Publications Best Practices for Controlling Capital Costs in Net Zero Energy Design and Construction - 2014 BTO Peer Review Update on U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program Goals Update on U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program Goals

  17. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicagoâ??s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  18. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.1 National Legislation

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Policy Act of 1992, Building Energy Codes --Each State must certify to the Secretary of Energy whether its energy efficiency standards with respect to residential and commercial building codes meet or exceed those of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) Model Energy Code, 1992, and of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, respectively. --Requires DOE to provide technical assistance and incentive funding to the States to promote

  20. Howard County- High Performance and Green Building Property Tax Credit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The state of Maryland permits local governments (Md Code: Property Tax § 9-242) to offer property tax credits for high performance buildings and energy conservation devices (Md Code: Property Tax §...