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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Title The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6181E Year of Publication...

2

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. (2011). Utilities and Building Energy Codes: Air QualityUtility Programs and Building Energy Codes: How utilityUtility Programs and Building Energy Codes: How utility

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Energy Code Compliance in New Mexico's Buildings.Improving Energy Code Compliance in New Mexico's Buildings.Energy Code Ambassadors Program. Building Codes Assistance Project and New Mexico

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development » Commercial Development » Commercial Site Map Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) evaluates published model codes and standards to help states and local jurisdictions better understand the impacts of updating commercial building energy codes and standards. A methodology was used for evaluating the energy and economic performance of commercial energy codes and standards and proposed changes thereto. This method serves to ensure DOE proposals are both energy efficient and cost-effective. The DOE methodology contains two primary assessments: Energy savings Cost-effectiveness Energy and economic calculations are performed through a comparison of

5

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the 2009 IECC. Washington, DC : Building Codes AssistanceBuilding Energy Codes. Washington, DC : Institute for MarketGuide for Policy Makers. Washington, DC : U.S. Department of

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA Clean Energy-Environment Guide to Actio: Policies, BestIn EPA Clean Energy-Environment Guide to Actio: Policies,Program. Building Energy Codes Resource Guide for Policy

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of North Dakota is considering updating its commercial building energy code. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in the analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST simulation combined with a Life-cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess correspodning economic costs and benefits.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

565). Chicago, IL: International Energy Program EvaluationB. (2005). Residential Energy Code Evaluatinons: Review andInc. (2007). 2007 Commercial Energy Code Compliance Study.

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

piloting a state-level training program for code officialsrecommended three-tier training program are also available,year on education and training programs in four Northwest

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by state Maine: 5 inspectors, 3 office employees (salary andfunds five inspectors and three office employees, exclusiveInspectors and Plan Reviewers for the Non-Residential Energy Code. Olympia, WA: Washington State Energy Office.

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Updating the Commercial Building Energy Code in Iowa  

SciTech Connect

The state of Iowa is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Texas State Building Energy Code: Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Commercial Lighting Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Conservation Office of Texas has asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 IECC as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of IECC 2003 include new lighting power densities (LPD) and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls. The potential effect of the new LPD values is analyzed as a comparison with previous values in the nationally available IECC codes and ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1. The basis for the analysis is a set of lighting models developed as part of the ASHRAE/IES code process, which is the basis for IECC 2003 LPD values. The use of the models allows for an effective comparison of values for various building types of interest to Texas state. Potential effects from control requirements are discussed, and available case study analysis results are provided but no comprehensive numerical evaluation is provided in this limited analysis effort.

Richman, Eric E.; Belzer, David B.; Winiarski, David W.

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Green Building Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Building Codes Green Building Codes Green building codes go beyond minimum code requirements, raising the bar for energy efficiency. They can serve as a proving ground for future standards, and incorporate elements beyond the scope of the model energy codes, such as water and resource efficiency. As regional and national green building codes and programs become more available, they provide jurisdictions with another tool for guiding construction and development in an overall less impactful, more sustainable manner. ICC ASHRAE Beyond Codes International Green Construction Code (IgCC) The International Code Council's (ICC's) International Green Construction code (IgCC) is an overlay code, meaning it is written in a manner to be used with all the other ICC codes. The IgCC contains provisions for site

14

Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Development Commercial Residential Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Development The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports and participates in the model building energy code development processes administered by the ASHRAE and the International Code Council (ICC). DOE activities include developing and submitting code change proposals, conducting analysis of building energy efficiency and cost savings, and formulating underlying evaluation methodologies. Through participation in model energy code development for both commercial and residential buildings, DOE strives to make cost-effective, energy efficient upgrades to current model codes. DOE also establishes energy efficiency standards for federal buildings and manufactured housing. Further information on this process is defined under

15

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

16

Appliance Standards and Building Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Manager Presentation Program Manager Presentation Appliance Standards and Building Codes John Cymbalsky U.S Department of Energy - Building Technologies Office john.cymbalsky@ee.doe.gov 202.287.1692 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Appliance Standards and Building Codes Program Goals Appliance Standards Program Goals Provide cost-effective energy savings through national appliance and equipment standards: Issue 23 final rules by end of FY2015 Deliver at least 1 qBtu of savings annually by

17

Nebraska | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Nebraska Last updated on 2013-11-04 Current News Nebraska Legislature adopted the 2009 IECC/ASHRAE 90.1-2007. The code became effective August 27, 2011. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Cities and counties may adopt codes that differ from the Nebraska Energy Code; however, state law requires the adopted code to be equivalent to the Nebraska Energy Code. For existing buildings, only those renovations that will cost more than 50 percent of the replacement cost of the building must comply with the code. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Nebraska (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC

18

Building Energy Code  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

19

Model Building Energy Code  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

20

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Regulations Resource Center About Building Energy Codes U.S. Energy Consumption by Sector (2011) Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Annual Energy Review According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Electric Power Annual, U.S. residential and commercial buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in significant cost savings in both the private and public sectors of the U.S. economy. Efficient buildings reduce power demand and have less of an environmental impact. The Purpose of Building Energy Codes Energy codes and standards set minimum efficiency requirements for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and emissions over

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residential Code Methodology | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Site Map...

22

Residential Building Code Compliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Residential Building Code Compliance: Recent Findings and Implications Energy use in residential buildings in the U.S. is significant-about 20% of primary energy use. While several approaches reduce energy use such as appliance standards and utility programs, enforcing state building energy codes is one of the most promising. However, one of the challenges is to understand the rate of compliance within the building community. Utility companies typically use these codes as the baseline for providing incentives to builders participating in utility-sponsored residential new construction (RNC) programs. However, because builders may construct homes that fail to meet energy codes, energy use in the actual baseline is higher than would be expected if all buildings complied with the code. Also,

23

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035, Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely. Learn More 75% of U.S. Buildings will be New or Renovated by 2035; Building Codes will Ensure They Use Energy Wisely Learn More Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings We offer guidance and technical resources to policy makers, compliance verification professionals, architects, engineers, contractors, and other stakeholders who depend on building energy codes.

24

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for energy efficienty design and construction of new commercial buildings. This report assesses the benefits and costs of adopting this standard as the building energy code in Illinois. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using BLAST combined with a Life-Cycle Cost approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.; Friedrich, Michele

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Arkansas | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arkansas Arkansas Last updated on 2013-12-10 Current News ASHRAE 90.1-2007 became the effective commercial code in Arkansas on January 1, 2013. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Arkansas Supplements and Amendments Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Arkansas Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 01/01/2013 Adoption Date 01/13/2012 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No Energy cost savings for Arkansas resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $100 million annually by 2030.

26

Connecticut | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

27

Maryland | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

28

Oregon | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

29

Indiana | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

30

California | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

31

About Building Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage. Building energy codes increase energy efficiency in buildings, resulting in...

32

Alaska | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Alaska Last updated on 2013-12-10 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Alaska (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Effective Date Code Enforcement DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No Energy cost savings for Alaska resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $50 million annually by 2030. Alaska DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

33

Residential Code Development | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Code Development Subscribe to updates To receive news and updates about code development activities subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. The model residential building...

34

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes OVERVIEW BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our...

35

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 as the Commercial Building Energy Code in Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (hereafter referred to as ASHRAE 90.1-2001 or 90.1-2001) was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The State of Tennessee is considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-2001 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropriate code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered in this report. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using the Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics (BLAST) simulations combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits. Tennessee currently has ASHRAE Standard 90A-1980 as the statewide voluntary/recommended commercial energy standard; however, it is up to the local jurisdiction to adopt this code. Because 90A-1980 is the recommended standard, many of the requirements of ASHRAE 90A-1980 were used as a baseline for simulations.

Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Belzer, David B.; Richman, Eric E.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Nevada Energy Code for Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more...

37

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

The state of Michigan is considering adpoting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as its commercial building energy code. In an effort to evaluate whether or not this is an appropraite code for the state, the potential benefits and costs of adopting this standard are considered. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits are assessed. The energy simulation and economic results suggest that adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 would provide postitive net benefits to the state relative to the building and design requirements currently in place.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.; Halverson, Mark A.; Richman, Eric E.; Winiarski, David W.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

38

Maine | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maine Maine Last updated on 2013-11-04 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Amendments / Additional State Code Information As of September 28, 2011, municipalities over 4,000 in population were required to enforce the new code if they had a building code in place by August 2008. Municipalities under 4,000 are not required to enforce it unless they wish to do so and have the following options: 1. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code 2. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Building Code (the building code without energy) 3. Adopt and enforce the Maine Uniform Energy Code (energy code only) 4. Have no code Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Maine (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

39

2009 Solar Decathlon Building Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING CODE Last Updated: September 29, 2008 2009 Solar Decathlon Building Code i September 29, 2008 Contents Section 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................. 1 Section 2. Adopted Codes ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 Section 3. Building Planning and Construction .............................................................................................................. 1 3-1. Fire Protection and Prevention ................................................................................................................................. 1

40

Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes 101: An Introduction Codes 101: An Introduction In order to provide a basic introduction to the varied and complex issues associated with building energy codes, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program, with valued assistance from the International Codes Council and ASHRAE, has prepared Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction. This guide is designed to speak to a broad audience with an interest in building energy efficiency, including state energy officials, architects, engineers, designers, and members of the public. Publication Date: Wednesday, February 17, 2010 BECP_Building Energy Codes 101_February2010_v00.pdf Document Details Last Name: Britt Initials: M Affiliation: PNNL Document Number: PNNL-70586 Focus: Adoption Code Development Compliance Building Type:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Compliance with Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance with Energy Codes Compliance with Energy Codes Energy code compliance must be achieved to realize the considerable benefits inherent in energy codes. BECP supports successful compliance by making no-cost compliance tools, REScheck(tm) and COMcheck(tm), and other resources widely available to everyone. BECP has also developed several resources to help states uniformly assess the rate of compliance with their energy codes for residential and commercial buildings. It is important to note that regardless of the level of enforcement, as a law the building owner/developer is ultimately responsible to comply with the energy code. Compliance will be increased if the adopting agency prepares the building construction community to comply with the energy code and provides resources to code officials to enforce it.

42

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A N OTE S BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS for Architects Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) and the American...

43

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Building Commercial Building Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities Partner with DOE Commercial Buildings Resource Database Research & Development Codes & Standards Popular Commercial Links

44

News | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News A variety of resources and news from BECP, states, and other news sources are available for anyone interested in learning more about building energy codes. This includes newsletters, articles, links and more. To receive BECP News and other updates from the Building Energy Codes Program via email, join our mailing list. Featured Codes News DOE Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes RFI Mayors Urge Cities to Strengthen Energy Code AZ Legislature Preserves Local Control of Building Energy Efficiency Codes Washington State Home Builders Lead the Nation in Energy Code Compliance Mississippi Invests in Future Growth With Adoption of Best-in-Class Energy Efficiency Legislation Energy 2030 Report Calls for Stricter Energy Building Codes

45

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial...

46

Building Energy Codes News | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes News Building Energy Codes News News Category: National Policy DOE Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes RFI Posted: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 On August 6, DOE published an RFI on its methodology for assessing code compliance into the Federal Register. Based on feedback received from the individual state compliance pilot studies in 2011-2012, the RFI seeks input on DOE's methodology and fundamental assumptions from the general public. Read the full article... Source: U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Energy 2030 Report Calls for Stricter Energy Building Codes Posted: Tuesday, February 12, 2013 The Alliance Commission on National Energy Efficiency Policy aims to double US energy productivity by 2030, and one of its many ways to achieve that

47

Appliance Standards and Building Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Manager Presentation Appliance Standards and Building Codes John Cymbalsky U.S Department of Energy - Building Technologies Office john.cymbalsky@ee.doe.gov 202.287.1692 2...

48

Utah | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compliance with the energy code requirements. The Division of Facilities Construction Management is responsible for enforcement for all state-owned or -funded buildings....

49

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IECC IECC BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES 1 The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs. Uninsulated piping systems that transport fluids can create water temperature irregularities, which ultimately requires additional heating or cooling and associated energy costs to bring the water to operating temperature. Any piping that carries heated or cooled water, including piping systems with external heating (e.g., heat trace or impedance heating), should be thermally insulated to reduce heat loss or gain, allowing the fluid to be delivered at the intended temperature.

50

Codes 101 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes 101 Codes 101 This course covers basic knowledge of energy codes and standards, the development processes of each, historical timelines, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of energy codes and standards, and voluntary energy efficiency programs. Most sections have links that provide additional details on that section's topic as well as additional resources for more information. Begin Learning! Estimated Length: 1-2 hours CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Self-paced, online Building Type: Commercial Residential Focus: Adoption Code Development Compliance Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Model Energy Code (MEC) Target Audience: Advocate Architect/Designer Builder

51

State Building Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption Updated: 121708 - 1 - Code Adoption Process Checklist Para-Technical Adoption of Code Effective Date Responsible Chief Policy Analyst Support Staff: Boards Coordinator...

52

Washington | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington Washington Last updated on 2013-11-05 Current News The Washington State Building Code Council recently completed deliberations on adoption and amendment of the 2012 codes. This includes adoption of the 2012 IECC with state amendments. The new codes became effective July 1, 2013. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information WA 2012 Nonresidential Codes Approved Compliance Tools Nonresidential Energy Code Compliance Tools Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Effective Date 07/01/2013 Adoption Date 02/01/2013 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: Yes Washington DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Washington State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes

53

Alabama | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption » Status of State Energy Code Adoption Adoption » Status of State Energy Code Adoption Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Adoption Process State Technical Assistance Status of State Energy Code Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Alabama Last updated on 2013-05-31 Current News The Alabama Energy and Residential Codes Board adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for Commercial Buildings and the 2009 International Residential Code (IRC) for Residential Construction. The new codes will become effective on October 1, 2012. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in Alabama (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

54

Commercial Codes and Standards | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(or non-residential) buildings, in the context of building energy codes and standards, are all buildings other than low-rise residential buildings, including multi-family...

55

Florida | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Florida Florida Last updated on 2013-11-18 Current News The triennial code change process is currently underway. Florida expects to be equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-10 and IECC 2012 by early 2014. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools Can use State specific EnergyGauge Summit FlaCom State Specific Research Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 03/15/2012 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Florida DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Florida State Certification of Commercial Building Codes Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information Florida Building Code

56

Wyoming | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wyoming Wyoming Last updated on 2013-06-03 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) Uniform Building Code, which is based on the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC), may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Wyoming (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Less energy efficient than 2003 IECC Effective Date 08/13/2008 Code Enforcement Voluntary DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No Wyoming DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Current Code None Statewide

57

Kentucky | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky Last updated on 2013-08-02 Current News Kentucky moves forward with the 2009 IECC by reference in their updated 2007 Kentucky Building Code. 2009 IECC is effective 3/6/2011 with mandatory compliance beginning 6/1/2011. Kentucky residential code was also updated to the 2009 IECC. The code is effective 7/1/2012 with an enforcement date of 10/1/2012. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Amendments are contained in the latest update to the 2007 Kentucky Building Code. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Kentucky (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC

58

Minnesota | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Minnesota Minnesota Last updated on 2013-06-03 Current News The 2009 editions of the International Residential Code (IRC), International Building Code (IBC), and International Fire Code (IFC) will be published soon and the Construction Codes and Licensing Division and the State Fire Marshal Division have been discussing this adoption. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Commercial Energy Code Approved Compliance Tools Compliance forms can be downloaded from ASHRAE State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Minnesota (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Less energy efficient than ASHRAE 90.1-2004 Effective Date 06/01/2009

59

Georgia | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Georgia Georgia Last updated on 2013-07-18 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information GA Amendments Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck Must choose ASHRAE 90.1-2007 as code option. State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Georgia (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 01/01/2011 Adoption Date 11/03/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Georgia State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Codes Extension Request Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information GA Amendments Approved Compliance Tools Can use REScheck

60

State building energy codes status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the State Building Energy Codes Status prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 and dated September 1996. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards has developed this document to provide an information resource for individuals interested in energy efficiency of buildings and the relevant building energy codes in each state and U.S. territory. This is considered to be an evolving document and will be updated twice a year. In addition, special state updates will be issued as warranted.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Building and Fire Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cinder-concrete encased beams and girders probably absorbed much of the energy of the ... Structural Collapse ? 2004 LaSalle Bank Building, ...

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Vermont | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vermont Vermont Last updated on 2013-06-03 Current News The Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) became effective January 3, 2012. The CBES incorporates elements of the 2012 IECC. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information 2011 Vermont Commercial Building Energy Standards (CBES) are based on the 2009 IECC. Commercial Building Energy Standards Approved Compliance Tools State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Vermont (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency More energy efficient than 2009 IECC Effective Date 01/03/2012 Adoption Date 10/03/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No

63

Hawaii | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at least as energy efficient as the statewide code. State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Hawaii (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)...

64

Summary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary Summary The impact of energy codes on our future is apparent. From environmental and resource conservation to national security, energy concerns, and our economic challenges, energy codes will continue to be a key component of a sound public policy. For further information on building energy code adoption, compliance, and enforcement, review the ACE toolkits Adoption Compliance Enforcement Popular Links ACE Learning Series ACE Overview Top 10 Reasons for Energy Codes Development of Energy Codes Adoption of Energy Codes Compliance with Energy Codes Enforcement of Energy Codes Going Beyond Code Summary Acronyms and Abbreviations Toolkit Definitions Adoption Toolkit Compliance Toolkit Enforcement Toolkit Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, January 31, 2013 - 15:19

65

Tennessee | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tennessee Tennessee Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2006 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Tennessee (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2006 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2011 Adoption Date 06/02/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Tennessee DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Tennessee State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code 2006 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use REScheck State Specific Research Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings in the State of Tennessee (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

66

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization...

67

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes...

68

New Mexico | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Adoption ...

69

Building Energy Code (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

modified on September 28, 2012. Rules Regulations Policies Program Place Connecticut Name Building Energy Code Incentive Type Building Energy Code Applicable Sector Commercial,...

70

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Building Energy Code Provider State Board of Building Regulations and Standards ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority

71

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling...

72

Delaware | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Adoption Process State Technical Assistance Status of State Energy Code Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Delaware Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Agriculture structures are excluded. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Delaware (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2010 Adoption Date 07/29/2009 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Delaware DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Delaware State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes

73

Michigan | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Michigan Michigan Last updated on 2013-06-03 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information 2009 Commercial MI Uniform Energy Code Rules Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Michigan (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 03/09/2011 Adoption Date 11/08/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Michigan DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information 2009 Residential MI Uniform Energy Code Rules Approved Compliance Tools Can use REScheck

74

Ohio | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ohio Ohio Last updated on 2013-10-21 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Ohio's commercial code is the 2009 IECC with a direct reference to ASHRAE 90.1-07. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Ohio (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 11/01/2011 Adoption Date 03/07/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Ohio DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Ohio State Certification of Commercila and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Effective January 1, 2013 the residential code in Ohio is based on Chapter 11 of the 2009 IRC. It includes the 2009 IECC and state-specific alternative compliance paths. The 2013 Residential Code of Ohio (RCO) contains amendments to allow compliance to be demonstrated in three ways: (1) 2009 IECC; or (2) RCO Sections 1101 through 1104; or RCO Section 1105 ("The Ohio Homebuilder's Association Alternative Energy Code Option").

75

Pennsylvania | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Last updated on 2013-11-05 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Pennsylvania's current code is the 2009 IECC with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Pennsylvania (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 12/31/2009 Adoption Date 12/10/2009 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Pennsylvania DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Pennsylvania State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Pennsylvania's current residential code is the 2009 IECC, 2009 IRC, Chapter 11, and/or PA-Alt. Adherence to Pennsylvania's Alternative Residential Energy Provisions 2009 is an acceptable means of demonstrating compliance with the energy conservation code requirements of the Uniform Construction Code.

76

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Ohio Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects

77

Northern Mariana Islands | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No Code Change Process Legislative Code Change Cycle None Timeline of Cycle None Adoption Process The Building Safety Code was developed through legislative action. The rules and...

78

Mississippi | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: Yes Energy cost savings for Mississippi resulting from the state updating its commercial and...

79

Colorado | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Energy cost savings for Colorado resulting from the state updating its commercial and...

80

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Alabama Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites.'' Legislation passed in March 2010 authorized the Alabama Energy and

82

Guam - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Department of Public Works NOTE: In September 2012, The Guam Building Code Council adopted the draft [http://www.guamenergy.com/outreach-education/guam-tropical-energy-code/ Guam Tropical Energy Code]. It must be adopted by the legislature before it is official. This entry and information will be updated accordingly. Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the

83

Advancing Building Energy Codes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Advancing Building Energy Codes Advancing Building Energy Codes 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. 75% of U.S. buildings will be new or renovated by 2035. Building codes will ensure they use energy wisely. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) supports greater adoption of residential and commercial building energy codes through collaborative efforts with local governments and industry groups, and by providing key tools and assistance for code development, adoption, and implementation. Through advancing building codes, we aim to improve building energy efficiency by 50%, and to help states achieve 90% compliance with their energy codes. Energy Codes Ensure Efficiency in Buildings

84

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Glossary The following is a compilation of building energy-code related terms and acronyms used on the Building Energy Codes website and throughout the building construction industry. Select a letter to navigate through the glossary: Filter A (25) B (22) C (41) D (27) E (27) F (15) G (12) H (21) I (20) K (5) L (11) M (16) N (15) O (11) P (21) R (22) S (37) T (14) U (12) V (11) W (10) Z (1) AAMA Architectural Aluminum Manufacturers Association. Above-Grade Wall A wall that is not a below-grade wall. Above-Grade Walls Those walls (Section 802.2.1) on the exterior of the building and

85

Kansas | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas Last updated on 2013-06-03 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The State has adopted the 2006 IECC as the applicable EE standard for commercial and industrial buildings in Kansas (KSA 66-1227). The same law also states that "the state corporation commission has no authority to adopt or enforce energy efficiency standards for residential, commercial, or industrial structures." Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Kansas (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Effective Date 04/10/2007 Code Enforcement Voluntary DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Kansas DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

86

Idaho | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Idaho Last updated on 2013-06-03 Current News As of January 1, 2011, all jurisdictions are required to comply with the 2009 IECC. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Idaho (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 01/01/2011 Adoption Date 06/08/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Idaho DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Current Code 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use REScheck State Specific Research Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings in the State of Idaho (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

87

Louisiana | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Louisiana (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 07/20/2011 Adoption Date 07/20/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Louisiana DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Louisiana State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code 2006 IRC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Louisiana's current residential code is the 2006 IRC with direct reference to the 2006 IECC. All AC duct insulation is R6 instead of R8 and to include Section R301.2.1.1 of the 2003 edition of the IRC in lieu of Section R301.2.1.1 of the 2006 edition.

88

Building Energy Code | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Code Code Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial and/or residential construction to adhere to certain energy standards. While some governmental bodies have developed their own building energy codes, many use existing codes, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), developed and published by the International Code Council (ICC); or ASHRAE 90.1, developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). A few local building energy codes require certain commercial facilities to meet green building standards. [1] Building Energy Code Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 85) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

89

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

90

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Fan Efficiency Residential Fan Efficiency 2012 IECC Over the past several code cycles, mechanical ventilation requirements have been added to ensure adequate outside air is provided for ventilation whenever residences are occupied. These ventilation requirements can be found in the International Residential Code for homes and the International Mechanical Code for dwelling units in multifamily buildings. As a result of the new ventilation requirements, fans designated for whole-house ventilation will have many more operating hours than bathroom or kitchen exhaust fans that are temporarily operated to remove local humidity or odors. Earlier ventilation practices relied on infiltration or operable windows as the primary source of ventilation air. Homes and

91

Going Beyond Code | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Going Beyond Code Beyond the energy codes are stretch, green, or sustainable codes and associated labeling programs. Codes are written to lend themselves to mandatory enforcement...

92

Massachusetts | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Massachusetts Massachusetts Last updated on 2013-11-04 Current News The BBRS voted to adopt the 2012 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 on July 9, 2013. They will be phased in over an extended concurrency period, and is expected to become the sole effective baseline energy code on July 1, 2014. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information 13.0 Energy Conservation- 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Massachusetts (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2010 Adoption Date 01/01/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: Yes

93

Virginia | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Virginia Virginia Last updated on 2013-11-05 Current News BHCD/DHCD workgroups are currently meeting over the next 12+ months for the 2012 USBC/IECC regulatory process, with an anticipated effective date in early 2014. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information Virginia's current code is the 2009 IECC with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Virginia (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 03/01/2011 Adoption Date 07/26/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Virginia DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

94

Contacts | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts Provide feedback, ask questions, or formally request assistance: Website Contact Report broken links and suggest content and/or updates to information on this website. Please use the Online Help Desk for questions or issues with the compliance software tools. Online Help Desk Submit questions regarding energy codes, compliance, REScheck(tm), COMcheck(tm), or other BECP tools to a building energy codes expert. Technical Assistance Request Submit a formal, state or local jurisdiction-level request for technical assistance. Program Contacts U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contacts for the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP). Federal (DOE) Contact Program Area Jeremy Williams, Project Manager Adoption Compliance Compliance Tools- REScheck& COMcheck Technical Assistance

95

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Montana Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Building Codes Bureau ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The energy codes are reviewed on a three-year cycle corresponding to the adoption of new versions of the International Code Conference (ICC) Uniform

96

Minimum cost model energy code envelope requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the analysis underlying development of the U.S. Department of Energy`s proposed revisions of the Council of American Building Officials (CABO) 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal envelope requirements for single-family and low-rise multifamily residences. This analysis resulted in revised MEC envelope conservation levels based on an objective methodology that determined the minimum-cost combination of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) for residences in different locations around the United States. The proposed MEC revision resulted from a cost-benefit analysis from the consumer`s perspective. In this analysis, the costs of the EEMs were balanced against the benefit of energy savings. Detailed construction, financial, economic, and fuel cost data were compiled, described in a technical support document, and incorporated in the analysis. A cost minimization analysis was used to compare the present value of the total long-nm costs for several alternative EEMs and to select the EEMs that achieved the lowest cost for each location studied. This cost minimization was performed for 881 cities in the United States, and the results were put into the format used by the MEC. This paper describes the methodology for determining minimum-cost energy efficiency measures for ceilings, walls, windows, and floors and presents the results in the form of proposed revisions to the MEC. The proposed MEC revisions would, on average, increase the stringency of the MEC by about 10%.

Connor, C.C.; Lucas, R.G.; Turchen, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Texas | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Texas Texas Last updated on 2013-12-10 Current News Cities in Texas are beginning to move their energy codes forward. The city of Cedar Park adopted the 2012 IECC, effective October 1, 2012. Amarillo has also adopted the 2012 IECC, although with some weakining provisions. In addition, the Houston City Council recently voted to require all new residential construction to be 10% higher than the 2009 IECC. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Texas (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 04/01/2011 Adoption Date 06/04/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes

98

Illinois | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois Illinois Last updated on 2013-11-04 Current News Senate Bill 3724, signed by the Governor on August 17, 2012, amends the effective date of the 2012 IECC to January 1, 2013. Administrative Rules to adopt the 2012 IECC with amendments were approved by the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules on December 11, 2012. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2012 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Illinois (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2012 IECC Effective Date 01/01/2013 Adoption Date 12/11/2012 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No

99

Nevada | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nevada Nevada Last updated on 2013-06-27 Current News On November 10, 2011, The Nevada State office of Energy adopted the 2009 IECC with an effective date of July 1, 2012. Jurisdictions in southern Nevada adopted the 2009 IECC effective July 5, 2011. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information The commercial code in Nevada effective July 1, 2012 is the 2009 IECC with reference to 90.1-2007. Jurisdictions in southern Nevada adopted the 2009 IECC Effective July 5, 2011. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Nevada (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2012

100

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Oregon Building Codes Division ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/Codes/cdpub.shtml The Oregon Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES i Building Energy Codes ENFORCEMENT TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90467 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes ACE

102

Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES III Building Energy Codes COMPLIANCE TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-90466 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

103

Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ADOPTION TOOLKIT ADOPTION TOOLKIT BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Building Energy Codes ACE LEARNING SERIES I Building Energy Codes ADOPTION TOOLKIT Prepared by: Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) is an information resource on energy codes and standards for buildings. They work with other government agencies, state and local jurisdictions, organizations that develop model codes and standards, and building industry to promote codes that will provide for energy and environmental benefits and help foster adoption of, compliance with, and enforcement of those codes. September 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-SA-89963 LEARNING SERIES OVERVIEW Building Energy Codes

104

Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Jump to: navigation, search Name Mainstreaming Building Energy...

105

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

required the Department of Commerce (DOC) to create codes for energy conservation in public buildings and places of employment and to review that code. In conducting the review,...

106

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New York Program Type Building Energy Code Provider NYS Department of State ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (ECCCNYS) requires that all government, commercial and residential buildings,

107

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Building Energy Code Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites. New Hampshire adopted a mandatory statewide building code in 2002 based on the 2000 IECC. SB 81 was enacted in July 2007, and it upgraded the New

108

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Washington State Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The State Building Code Council revised the [https://fortress.wa.gov/ga/apps/sbcc/Page.aspx?nid=14 Washington State

109

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program...

110

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Virginia Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

111

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

112

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

113

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Montana Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

114

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arizona Program Type Building Energy Code ''Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes...

115

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kentucky Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

116

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program...

117

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and...

118

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the...

119

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed...

120

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Mississippi Development Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Mississippi's existing state code is based on the 1977 Model Code for Energy Conservation (MCEC). The existing law does not mandate enforcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Photo of two inspectors looking at a clipboard on a commercial building site with the steel frame of a commercial building in the background. Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by including it in state and local codes is an effective strategy for achieving that goal. The Building Energy Codes Program works with the International Code Council (ICC), American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), American Institute of Architects (AIA), the building industry, and state and local officials to develop and promote more stringent and easy-to-understand building energy codes and to assess potential code barriers to new energy-efficient technologies.

122

COMcheck | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance » Software & Web Tools Compliance » Software & Web Tools Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center COMcheck Subscribe to updates To receive updates about compliance tools subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. Commercial Compliance Using COMcheck(tm) The COMcheck product group makes it easy for architects, builders, designers, and contractors to determine whether new commercial or high-rise residential buildings, additions, and alterations meet the requirements of the IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1, as well as several state-specific codes. COMcheck also simplifies compliance for building officials, plan checkers, and inspectors by allowing them to quickly determine if a building project

123

Wisconsin | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin Wisconsin Last updated on 2013-07-18 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information SPS Chapter 363 specifically addresses amendments to the 2009 IECC. For example, if there is reference to SPS 363.0503, then the SPS 363 references only those amendments associated with the 2009 IECC (as based on language adopted in SPS 361.05), and 0503 indicates that section 503 of the 2009 IECC is being amended. WI Amendments as addressed by SPS 361.05 Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Wisconsin (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 09/01/2011 Adoption Date 07/01/2011

124

Building Energy Codes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Codes Codes Jump to: navigation, search Building energy codes adopted by states (and some local governments) require commercial and/or residential construction to adhere to certain energy standards. While some governmental bodies have developed their own building energy codes, many use existing codes, such as the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), developed and published by the International Code Council (ICC); or ASHRAE 90.1, developed by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). A few local building energy codes require certain commercial facilities to meet green building standards. [1] Contents 1 Building Energy Code Incentives 2 References Building Energy Code Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 85) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active

125

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider West Virginia Division of Energy ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. Local jurisdictions must adopt

126

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Colorado Energy Office ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Colorado is a home rule state so no statewide energy code exists. Voluntary

127

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Georgia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Georgia Environmental Finance Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Georgia's Department of Community Affairs periodically reviews, amends and/or updates the state minimum standard codes. Georgia has "mandatory"

128

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Michigan Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Michigan Department of Labor and Economic Growth ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Bureau of Construction Codes is responsible for the administration of the State Construction Code Act (1972 PA 230), also known as the Uniform Construction Code. The state energy code is evaluated for revisions or modifications every three years. The new code requirements are adopted at the beginning of each state building code cycle (which corresponds with the three-year cycle of

129

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Insulation and Duct Insulation and Sealing Requirements in Commercial Buildings 2009 and 2012 IECC; ASHRAE 90.1-2007 and 2010; 2009 and 2012 IMC Duct insulation and sealing, especially insulated supply ducts delivering conditioned air within a building, save energy. The intent of energy efficiency codes, as related to duct insulation and sealing, is to keep mechanically warmed or cooled air as close to a constant, desired temperature as possible and prevent the conditioned air from escaping the duct system while it is being moved to spaces where it is needed. If reduced heat transfer through insulated ducts is accounted for in the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) load calculations, it may even be possible to reduce the size of HVAC equipment.

130

Publications | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center » [all items] Center » [all items] Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Publications To receive updates about BECP publications subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. Additional resources are also available from the Building America Solution Center. 189.1 Progress Indicator Report Energy Use Comparison between 189.1-2009 and 90.1-2010 Document type: Presentation Publication Date: June 2011 Focus: Code Development, Green and Advanced Codes Presentation given at the ASHRAE Annual Meeting, ASHRAE Standard 189.1 Committee; June 29, 2011; Montreal Canada.Main topics included: Progress Indicator and Prototype Models developed by Pacific

131

REScheck | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance » Software & Web Tools Compliance » Software & Web Tools Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center REScheck Subscribe to updates To receive updates about compliance tools subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. Residential Compliance Using REScheck(tm) The REScheck product group makes it fast and easy for builders, designers, and contractors to determine whether new homes, additions, and alterations meet the requirements of the IECC or a number of state energy codes. REScheck also simplifies compliance determinations for building officials, plan checkers, and inspectors by allowing them to quickly determine if a low-rise residence meets the code. REScheck is appropriate for insulation and window trade-off calculations in

132

Could Building Energy Codes Mandate Rooftop Solar in the Future?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores existing requirements and compliance options for both commercial and residential code structures. Common alternative compliance options are discussed including Renewable Energy Credits (RECs), green-power purchasing programs, shared solar programs and other community-based renewable energy investments. Compliance options are analyzed to consider building lifespan, cost-effectiveness, energy trade-offs, enforcement concerns and future code development. Existing onsite renewable energy codes are highlighted as case studies for the code development process.

Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.; Williams, Jeremiah

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will

134

Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: Code Officials Edition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in it FOR ME? DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (www.energycodes.gov) and ICC (www.iccsafe.org) offer many resources for commercial code of cials. Examples in this section...

135

Building Energy Code Resource Guide: Code Officials Edition ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

includes practical plan review and inspection resources, including the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program's REScheck(tm) and COMcheck(tm) quick reference...

136

Arizona | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

None Statewide Amendments Additional State Code Information Arizona has no statewide energy code. However, many counties have adopted the IECC 2006 as an energy efficiency code....

137

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NAECA NAECA The National Appliance Energy Conservation Act of 1987, 42 USC 6291 et seq., as amended, Public Law 100-12. NAGDM National Association of Garage Door Manufacturers. NCSBCS The National Conference of States on Building Codes and Standards. NEEA Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance. NEEP Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships. Net Wall Area The net wall area includes the opaque wall area of all above-grade walls enclosing conditioned spaces, the opaque area of conditioned basement walls less than 50% below grade (including the below-grade portions), and peripheral edges of floors. The net wall area does not include windows, doors, or other such openings, because they are treated separately. NFPA National Fire Protection Association. NFRC National Fenestration Rating Council.

138

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indiana Indiana Program Type Building Energy Code Provider TSREI ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Indiana Residential Building Code is based on the 2003 IRC with state amendments (eff. 9/11/05). This code applies to 1 and 2 family dwellings and townhouses. During the adoption process, certain seismic provisions were weakened, primarily affecting nine southwestern counties. Local jurisdictions may amend to make the code more stringent with state approval only.

139

Compliance Toolkit | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operation and maintenance of the building-however important that might be to the overall energy usage of the building-is not considered in current national model energy codes and...

140

Adoption Process | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption Process Energy codes are adopted at the state and local jurisdiction levels and, in most cases, are part of a broader set of codes addressing building, fire, electrical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Information Oklahoma Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the...

142

Alabama State Certification of Residential Building Codes | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Name: Adams Initials: TL Affiliation: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Focus: Adoption Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: 2009 IECC 2009 IRC...

143

Building Energy Codes Resource Guide: Commerical Buildings for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide: Commerical Buildings for Architects This guide provides key information on energy codes tailored for architects and provides guidance on how they can support the adoption of...

144

Colorado -- Building & Energy Codes Survey Results | Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Target Audience: Advocate Code Official Policy Maker State Official State: Colorado Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Friday,...

145

Iowa | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

utility company must obtain a written statementcertification from the builder or homeowner attesting to their compliance with the state energy code. Code enforcement is...

146

BECP News | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BECP News BECP News BECP News December 2012 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program newsletter (BECP News) encourages the exchange of information among stakeholders in the buildings arena. BECP News targets building professionals, state and local code officials, researchers, contractors, and utilities, as well as national associations and others involved in the design, construction, and commissioning of buildings. The goal of the newsletter is to facilitate the timely development and early adoption of, and compliance with, building energy codes and standards. Subscribe to updates Subscribe to BECP News to receive the latest on building energy code activities, software, and resources, or update your subscription to receive updates on specific topics of interest, including Compliance Tools,

147

Commercial Prototype Building Models | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prototype Building Models Prototype Building Models The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of commercial building energy codes and standards by participating in review processes and providing analyses that are available for public review and use. To calculate the impact of ASHRAE Standard 90.1, researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) created a suite of 16 prototype buildings covering 80% of the commercial building floor area in the United States for new construction, including both commercial buildings and mid- to high-rise buildings. These prototype buildings-derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models-cover all the reference building types except supermarkets, and also add a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings. As ASHRAE Standard 90.1

148

Code Compliance Technical Meeting: Building Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Technical Meeting: Building Technologies Office Department of Energy Washington, DC APRIL 2013 1 Welcome Welcome to The Building Technologies Office's Code Compliance Technical Meeting and to Washington, DC. On behalf of the Department of Energy Building Technology Office (BTO), we would like to thank you for attending, for your participation. The goal of this meeting is to review and discuss ongoing projects and existing activities that improve compliance with model energy codes. DOE

149

Statutory Requirements | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Statutory Requirements DOE activities surrounding building energy codes are defined by the following statutory requirements. Specific language outlining federal requirements and associated regulations are outlined below. References are also provided to individual statutes. State Building Energy Efficiency Codes Statutory Authority: Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) (Pub. L. No. 94-385), as amended1 Section 304(a) of ECPA, as amended, provides that when the 1992 Model Energy Code (MEC), or any successor to that code2, is revised, the Secretary must determine, not later than 12 months after the revision, whether the revised code would improve energy efficiency in residential

150

BECP News | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BECP News BECP News BECP News January 2012 Introduction The BECP News newsletter encourages the exchange of information among building professionals and organizations, state and local code officials, and researchers. Its goal is to facilitate timely development and early adoption of the building energy conservation standards. What can be done to curb the significant and ever-growing impact of building energy use? Adoption and implementation of building energy codes in communities across the United States are critical components in overall efforts to promote energy savings in buildings. Building energy codes lead to long-term energy savings by promoting construction of new energy-efficient buildings and introducing energy-efficient construction methods and technologies during

151

Impacts of lateral code changes associated with the 2006 International Building Code and the 2008 California Building Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 2008 California Building Code (CBC) will adopt the structural section of the 2006 International Building Code (IBC), which includes alterations to the procedure to determine earthquake design loading, and a drastic ...

Ratley, Desire Page

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

New York | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

York York Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of New York (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 12/28/2010 Adoption Date 09/29/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No New York DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 New York State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code State Specific Amendments / Additional State Code Information The Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State 2010 can be obtained from ICC.

153

Resource Guides | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Guides Resource Guides Download a Guide Air Leakage Architects Beyond Code Code Officials Residential section only Commercial section only HVAC Controls Lighting Guide Policy Makers Energy code compliance often requires more than a list of basic requirements. In many cases, additional information is needed to better understand the intent of and need for energy code provisions. This critical need for information can help clarify the code intent, empowering those who effectively design and construct buildings to meet code, as well as those who conduct plan reviews and inspections to verify compliance. This helps to assure the intent behind the energy code is implemented in practice. To address these needs, the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program has developed a number of guides available to support the model

154

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Iowa Iowa Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Iowa Office of Energy Independence ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://coolice.legis.state.ia.us/Cool-ICE/default.asp?Category=billinfo&... House File 2361] was signed in April 2006. This law rescinded Iowa's minimum energy efficiency standard for residential construction, the "home heating index," and instead requires the state building commissioner to adopt energy conservation requirements based on a nationally recognized

155

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delaware Delaware Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' In 2004, the governor signed [http://delcode.delaware.gov/sessionlaws/ga142/chp418.shtml SB 306] adopting the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential construction and American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-1999 for commercial

156

Toolkit Definitions | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Toolkit Definitions The following are definitions for common terms used within the adoption, compliance, and enforcement toolkits. Building code refers to a law or regulation used by state or local governments that establishes specifications for the design and construction of residential or commercial buildings. Building codes help ensure that new and existing residential and commercial structures meet minimum health, safety, and performance standards. In addition, building codes offer a baseline to which structures can be compared. Code adoption refers to the vehicle that establishes code requirements and their administration. Adoption can be mandatory, voluntary, or a combination of the two. The means of adoption vary with respect to the

157

Alabama State Certification of Commercial Building Codes | Building Energy  

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Commercial Building Codes Commercial Building Codes In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 20, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register regarding ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007, Alabama certifies that it has reviewed and adopted the provisions of its Alabama Energy and Residential Code to include the requirement for non-state-funded buildings to comply with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, and by reference ASHRAE 90.1-2007. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 15, 2013 Alabama Commercial Certification.pdf Document Details Last Name: Adams Initials: TL Affiliation: Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Focus: Adoption Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: State-specific Target Audience:

158

Commercial Building Codes and Standards | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes and Standards Codes and Standards Commercial Building Codes and Standards Local code officials enforce building energy codes. Credit: iStockphoto Once an energy-efficient technology or practice is widely available in the market, it can become the baseline of performance through building energy codes and equipment standards. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) provides support to states and local governments as they adopt and monitor commercial building code as well as builders working to meet and exceed code. BTO also develops test procedures and minimum efficiency standards for commercial equipment. Building Energy Codes DOE encourages using new technologies and better building practices to improve energy efficiency. Mandating building energy efficiency by

159

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone A space or group of spaces within a building with any combination of heating, cooling, or lighting requirements sufficiently similar so that desired conditions can be...

160

Building Energy Code Compliance Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 4, 2013 Ian Finlayson Manager of Buildings & Climate Programs Creating A Cleaner Energy Future For the Commonwealth 2 What do we want? Improved energy performance of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Montana | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Commercial Buildings in the State of Montana (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 03262010 Adoption Date 11302009...

162

Business Models for Code Compliance | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Compliance Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Basics Compliance Evaluation Software & Web Tools Regulations Resource Center Business Models for Code Compliance The U.S. Department of Energy is coordinating strategies and activities with companies, individuals, and government entities to demonstrate, quantify, and monetize energy code compliance and coordinate deployment at the local, state, and regional levels. Consumer Assurance through Code Compliance Energy efficiency measures in the buildings sector, if properly realized and captured, provide a tremendous opportunity to reduce energy consumption and expenditures. Yet currently there is a lack of assurance that buildings as designed realize the levels of energy efficiency established in the

163

Building Energy Code (Idaho) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Building Energy Code (Idaho) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most recent. Jump...

164

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

publicactsfulltext.asp?name093-0936&GA... Public Act 093-0936 (Illinois Energy Conservation Code for Commercial Buildings) was signed into law in August, 2004. The Illinois...

165

West Virginia | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Virginia West Virginia Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of West Virginia (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 09/01/2013 Adoption Date 07/18/2012 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination Standard 90.1-2007: Yes Standard 90.1-2010: No West Virginia DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 West Virginia State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes Current Code 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools Can use REScheck State Specific Research Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings in the State of West Virginia (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)

166

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EE4 CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CODE EE4 CODE logo. Comprehensive energy analysis program used to determine the compliance of a building to Canada's Model National Energy Code for Buildings (MNECB). EE4 CODE may...

167

What is the performance approach? | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Site Map...

168

Compliance and Enforcement Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Offices Consumer Information Building Energy Codes Search Search Search Help Building Energy Codes Program Home News Events About DOE EERE BTO BECP Compliance Site...

169

U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Building Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING CODE Last Updated: April 29, 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 Building Code i April 29, 2011 Contents Section 1. Introduction ......

170

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W Watt Wall Opaque portion of the building envelope. Warm-Up Increase in space temperature to occupied set point after a period of shutdown or setback. Water Economizer A system by...

171

Rhode Island | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhode Island Rhode Island Last updated on 2013-11-05 Current News 2012 IECC adopted July 1, 2013 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2012 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information The Rhode Island commercial code is the 2012 IECC with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2010. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Rhode Island (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2012 IECC Effective Date 07/01/2013 Adoption Date 07/01/2013 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: Yes Rhode Island DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Rhode Island State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes

172

Cost and benefit of energy efficient buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common misconception among developers and policy-makers is that "sustainable buildings" may not be financially justified. However, this report strives to show that building green is cost-effective and does make financial ...

Zhang, Wenying, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

American Samoa | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Samoa American Samoa Last updated on 2012-08-21 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide DOE Determination ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No Current Code None Statewide DOE Determination 2009 IECC: No 2012 IECC: No Code Change Process Legislative Code Change Cycle None Timeline of Cycle None Adoption Process Standards are adopted through legislation. Background The Uniform Building Code is administered and enforced by the government public works department. Popular Links Status of State Energy Codes Status of State Energy Codes Select a state Alabama Alaska American Samoa Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Guam Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana

174

Regulations & Rulemaking | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determinations Federal Buildings Manufactured Housing Resource Center Regulations & Rulemaking The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required by law to establish mandatory energy efficiency requirements for new federal commercial and residential buildings and to develop energy efficiency standards for manufactured homes. Federal law also requires that DOE publish determinations as to whether new editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code will improve energy efficiency. In response, DOE, through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) undertakes rulemaking processes to facilitate full disclosure of DOE's analyses and development methodologies, to solicit public input, and to publish final rules. DOE's rulemaking process involves

175

Resource Center | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Resource Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) Resource Center, provides a comprehensive collection of information, resources, and technical assistance designed to answer questions and address issues related to energy codes. This includes frequently asked questions, publications, model adoption policies, compliance software and tools, and training/eLearning modules based on best practices. BECP's team of building energy codes experts is also available to answer specific questions submitted through the web-based help desk.

176

Model Policies | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center FAQs Publications Resource Guides eLearning Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Model Policies States and local jurisdictions across the nation have demonstrated leadership in developing programs and policies that both encourage and require compliance with energy codes, stretch codes (e.g., above-minimum codes) and green building techniques, energy-efficiency practices, and environmentally-friendly procedures. The laws and regulations behind these programs and policies can help states and jurisdictions establish unique policies to address their particular needs. Model policies for residential and commercial building construction have

177

Top 10 Reasons for Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Top 10 Reasons for Energy Codes Top 10 Reasons for Energy Codes The projected energy savings attributable to energy codes translates into an estimated cumulative savings of 800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide by 2030-that's equivalent to removing 145 million vehicles from our nation's roadways. Here are the top 10 reasons for adopting and implementing energy codes. Today's global energy, economic, and environmental challenges necessitate a U.S. strategy identifying a suite of energy-efficiency-related initiatives that is implemented by the building industry and relevant stakeholders. Energy codes are a core component of that strategy and, in addition, have an impact on other strategies to improve our built environment. Energy Codes... SAVE money and help reduce needless consumption of energy to heat,

178

Step 2. Identify a Code Support Infrastructure | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2. Identify a Code Support Infrastructure Utilities can play several roles in support of building energy codes. Examples include partnering with states and localities during code...

179

North Carolina | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carolina Carolina Last updated on 2013-11-04 Current News On Friday, June 24, 2011, Governor Beverly Perdue signed SB 708 into law and approved a new Energy Conservation Code for the residential and commercial buildings in North Carolina. This new code will save home and business owners money on their monthly energy bills and help retain and create jobs in every region of the state. It delivers significant improvements in insulation levels, window performance and building envelope air leakage reduction. The new code also includes the High Efficiency Residential Option (HERO) Appendix which delivers a 30% improvement in minimum energy efficiency over the state's current energy code. The new NC Energy Conservation Code became effective January 1, 2012 with mandatory

180

Conditioned Attics Overview | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioned Attics Overview Conditioned Attics Overview Adequate attic ventilation is a long-standing requirement in building codes. However, conditioned, unvented attics have the potential to reduce residential energy needs and are allowed by code under certain conditions. Such assemblies are sometimes called cathedralized attics because, as with cathedral ceilings, the insulation is in the rafters and/or roof deck. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_conditioned_attics_overview.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-57260 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Seminar on building codes and standards  

SciTech Connect

A seminar was conducted for state building code officials and state energy officials to discuss the following: status of the states regulatory activities for energy conservation standards for buildings; the development, administration, and enforcement processes for energy conservation standards affecting new construction; lighting and thermal standards for existing buildings; status of the development and implementation of the Title III Program, Building Energy Performance Standards (BEPS); and current status of the State Energy Conservation Program. The welcoming address was given by John Wenning and the keynote address was delivered by John Millhone. Four papers presented were: Building Energy Performance Standards Development, James Binkley; Lighting Standards in Existing Buildings, Dorothy Cronheim; Implementation of BEPS, Archie Twitchell; Sanctions for Building Energy Performance Standards, Sue Sicherman.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM CODE NOTES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Control Ventilation Demand Control Ventilation 2012 IECC A demand control ventilation (DCV) system is an integral part of a building's ventilation design. It adjusts outside ventilation air based on the number of occupants and the ventilation demands that those occupants create. In most commercial occupancies, ventilation is provided to deal with two types of indoor pollution: (1) odors from people, and (2) off-gassing from building components and furniture. When a space is vacant, it has no people pollution so the people-related ventilation rate is not needed. Many types of high-occupancy spaces, such as classrooms, multipurpose rooms, theaters, conference rooms, or lobbies have ventilation designed for a high peak occupancy that rarely occurs. Ventilation can be reduced

183

Determinations | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulations Regulations Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Determinations Federal Buildings Manufactured Housing Resource Center Determinations Commercial Determinations Residential Determinations Final Determination on ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 On October 19, 2011, DOE issued a final determination that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the standard than if they were built to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on October 19, 2011. View the complete preliminary determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 20, 2011. State Certification This final determination is being published before the two year deadline

184

New Jersey | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jersey Jersey Last updated on 2013-11-05 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information New Jersey Amendments Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck For additional information, see Bulletin 11-1 State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of New Jersey (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 09/07/2010 Adoption Date 08/12/2010 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No New Jersey DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Certification notice ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Current Code 2009 IECC with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information New Jersey Amendments

185

Washington, DC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington, DC Washington, DC Last updated on 2013-08-02 Current News In December, the DC CCCB voted 7-1 to adopt the 2012 IECC. The code will now enter administrative review and legislative process with likely adoption in the second half of 2013. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with Amendments Amendments / Additional State Code Information Based on 2008 DC Construction Code with several amendments. State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the District of Columbia (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Effective Date 12/26/2009 Adoption Date 12/26/2008 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: Yes ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No DC DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

186

South Dakota | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South Dakota South Dakota Last updated on 2013-06-03 Current News South Dakota adopted the 2009 IECC as the voluntary energy standard for new residential construction. SB 94 was signed into law on March 15, 2011 and became effective July 1, 2011. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information N/A State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of South Dakota (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Effective Date Adoption Date Code Enforcement DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No South Dakota DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013 Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The 2009 IECC is voluntary as of July 2011.

187

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in China  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in China, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope and HVAC) for commercial and residential buildings in China.

Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Lin, H.; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing; Song, Bo; Somasundaram, Sriram

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in India  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America. This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in India, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes in India, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial buildings in India.

Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Somasundaram, Sriram

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Korea  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Korea, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial buildings in Korea.

Evans, Meredydd; McJeon, Haewon C.; Shui, Bin; Lee, Seung Eon

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Australia  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Australia, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Australia.

Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd; Somasundaram, Sriram

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Japan  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Japan, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, and lighting) for commercial and residential buildings in Japan.

Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Takagi, T.

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in Canada  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America . This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in Canada, including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in Canada.

Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Country Report on Building Energy Codes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a series of reports on building energy efficiency codes in countries associated with the Asian Pacific Partnership (APP) - Australia, South Korea, Japan, China, India, and the United States of America (U.S.). This reports gives an overview of the development of building energy codes in U.S., including national energy policies related to building energy codes, history of building energy codes, recent national projects and activities to promote building energy codes. The report also provides a review of current building energy codes (such as building envelope, HVAC, lighting, and water heating) for commercial and residential buildings in the U.S.

Halverson, Mark A.; Shui, Bin; Evans, Meredydd

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C-Factor C-Factor Time rate of steady-state heat flow through the unit area of a material or construction surfaces. Units of C-Factor are Btu/h x ft2 x degrees Fahrenheit. Note that the C-factor does not include soil or air films. CABO The Council of American Building Officials. Cavity Insulation Insulation installed between structural members such as wood studs, metal framing, and Z-clips. CDD Cooling degree day. See "Cooling Degree Days." CDD50 Cooling degree days base 50°F. See "Degree Day Base 50F." CE Combustion efficiency. Ceiling The ceiling requirements apply to portions of the roof and/or ceiling through which heat flows. Ceiling components include the interior surface of flat ceilings below attics, the interior surface of cathedral or vaulted

195

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Balancing, Air Balancing, Air Adjusting air flow rates through air distribution system devices, such as fans and diffusers, by manually adjusting the position of dampers, splitter vanes, extractors, etc., or by using automatic control devices, such as constant air volume or variable air volume boxes. Balancing, Hydronic Adjusting water flow rates through hydronic distribution system devices, such as pumps and coils, by manually adjusting the position valves, or by using automatic control devices, such as automatic flow control valves. Ballast A device used in conjunction with an electric-discharge lamp to cause the lamp to start and operate under the proper circuit conditions of voltage, current, wave form, electrode heat, etc. Basement Wall Basement walls that enclose heated spaces are part of the building

196

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Labeled Labeled Devices, equipment, appliances, assemblies, or materials to which have been affixed a label, seal, symbol, or other identifying mark of a nationally recognized testing laboratory, inspection agency, or other organization concerned with product evaluation that maintains periodic inspection of the production of the above-labeled items and by whose label the manufacturer attests to compliance with applicable nationally recognized standards. Lamp A generic term for a man-made light source, often called a bulb or tube. lb Pound. Lighting Power Density (LPD) The maximum lighting power per unit area of a building classification or space function. Lighting System A group of luminaires circuited or controlled to perform a specific function. Liquid-Immersed Transformer

197

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daylight Glazing Daylight Glazing Exterior glazing over 6 feet above the finished floor. DDC See Direct Digital Control. Deadband The temperature range in which no heating or cooling is used. Decorative Lighting Lighting that is purely ornamental and installed for aesthetic effect. Decorative lighting shall not include general lighting. Degree Day See "Heating Degree Days." Degree Day Base 50F For any one day, when the mean temperature is more than 50°F, there are as many degree days as degrees Fahrenheit temperature difference between the mean temperature for the day and 50°F. Annual cooling degree days (CDDs) are the sum of the degree days over a calendar year. Demand The highest amount of power (average kilowatt over an interval) recorded for a building or facility in a selected time frame.

198

Missouri | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Missouri Missouri Last updated on 2013-11-05 Current News The Division of Energy conducted a survey in June 2012 regarding adoption activities within the state. In summary large jurisdictions in Missouri have adopted 2009 IECC or equivalent codes: - St. Louis metropolitan area cities of St. Louis, St. Charles, O'Fallon, Florissant, Wildwood, Affton, Manchester, Clayton and other smaller cities adopted the 2009 IECC along with St. Louis County. - Kansas City adopted the 2012 IECC with many metropolitan area cities planning to follow. The Kansas City metropolitan area city of Independence, the 4th largest Missouri city, adopted the 2012 IECC with energy conservation provisions mostly optional but encouraged. - The 3rd largest Missouri city, Springfield, located in southwest Missouri,

199

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

New Hampshire | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hampshire Hampshire Last updated on 2013-08-02 Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code 2009 IECC Amendments / Additional State Code Information The New Hampshire commercial code is the 2009 IECC with direct reference for compliance to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. 103.5 compliance except any structure three stories or less above grade plane in height and less than 4,000 square feet in gross floor area is permitted to show envelope compliance based on Chapter 4. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of New Hampshire (BECP Report, Sept. 2009) Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Effective Date 04/01/2010 Adoption Date 12/11/2009 Code Enforcement Mandatory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energypractice of building commissioning is a particularly potentefficiency. Although commissioning has earned increased

Mills, Evan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

N. Mariana Islands - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N. Mariana Islands - Building Energy Code N. Mariana Islands - Building Energy Code N. Mariana Islands - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Department of Public Works ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites.'' Building codes for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)

203

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Ventilation | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Ventilation The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_ventilation.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies

204

Updating Building Energy Codes: How Much Can Your State ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Updating Building Energy Codes: How Much Can Your State Save? From NIST Tech Beat: November 5, 2013. ...

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Building Energy Code Resource Guide: Air Leakage Guide | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage Guide Air Leakage Guide The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) sets the bar for energy efficiency, and air sealing requirements are one of the key provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code requirements are referenced throughout the guide. Publication Date: Friday, September 30, 2011 BECP_Buidling Energy Code Resource Guide Air Leakage

206

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 Model Energy Code in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an analysis of the cost effectiveness of the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family homes in Colorado. The goal of this analysis was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to current construction practice in Colorado based on an objective methodology that determined the total life-cycle cost associated with complying with the 1993 MEC. This analysis was performed for the range of Colorado climates. The costs and benefits of complying with the 1993 NIEC were estimated from the consumer`s perspective. The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for homes built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to vary from 0.9 year in Steamboat Springs to 2.4 years in Denver. Compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1190 to $2274, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $119 to $227 (at 10% down). The net present value of all costs and benefits to the home buyer, accounting for the mortgage and taxes, varied from a savings of $1772 in Springfield to a savings of $6614 in Steamboat Springs. The ratio of benefits to costs ranged from 2.3 in Denver to 3.8 in Steamboat Springs.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

City of Chicago - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicago - Building Energy Code Chicago - Building Energy Code City of Chicago - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Insulation Program Info State Illinois Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of Chicago The Chicago Energy Conservation Code (CECC) requires residential buildings applying for building permits to comply with energy efficient measures which go beyond those required by the [http://www.dsireusa.org/library/includes/incentive2.cfm?Incentive_Code=I... Illinois Building Energy Code]. The applicability of the CECC to commercial construction was superseded when the state of Illinois adopted the more stringent IECC 2009 model code. Illinois state law in 2009 also mandated

208

Program Impact Analysis | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Impact Analysis Program Impact Analysis BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. Since the inception of the Program 20 years ago, cumulative full-fuel-cycle (FFC) energy savings from 1992- 2012 are estimated to be approximately 4.8 quads and cost savings to consumers have been more than $44 billion. These savings have resulted primarily from the Program's activities which upgrade the model energy codes, accelerate their adoption by states and localities, and improve code compliance by means of various software tools and other types of training and technical support. The federal budgetary cost of the Program over this same period (1992-2012) was estimated to be around $110 million, resulting in a ratio of more than $400

209

Making Buildings Part of the Climate Solution by Enforcing Aggressive Commercial Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact of an aggressive commercial building codes policy in the United States. The policy would require both new construction and existing buildings that undergo major modifications to comply with higher building shell efficiency and more stringent equipment standards similar to the latest versions of the ASHRAE 90.1 Standard. Using the Georgia Tech version of the National Energy Modeling System (GT-NEMS), we estimate that the building codes policy could reduce the energy consumption of commercial buildings by 0.94 Quads in 2035, equal to 4 % of the projected energy consumption of commercial buildings in that year. In the four targeted end-uses space heating and cooling, water heating and lighting estimated energy consumption would be 17%, 15%, 20 % and 5 % less than the Reference case forecast in 2035, respectively. The reduction of electricity and natural gas prices along with the consumption decline could save commercial consumers $12.8 billion in energy bills in 2035 and a cumulative $110 billion of bill savings between 2012 and 2035. The environmental benefits of the policy could also be significant. In 2035, 47 MMT of CO2 emissions could be avoided, generating cumulative benefits of $17 billion by 2035. The estimated benefit-cost ratio of this policy within the commercial sector is 1.4, with a resulting net benefit of $59 billion. The positive spillover effect of this policy would lead to an even higher economy-wide benefit-cost ratio. *Corresponding author:

Xiaojing Sun; Marilyn A. Brown; Roderick Jackson; Matt Cox; Dr. Marilyn; A. Brown; D. M. Smith Building

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Statewide Savings Projections from the Adoption of Commercial Building Energy Codes in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings was developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. A number of jurisdictions in the state of Illinois are considering adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as their commercial building energy code. This report builds on the results of a previous study, "Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 as a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois Jurisdictions," to estimate the total potential impact of adopting ASHRAE 90.1-1999 as a statewide commercial building code in terms of Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) savings, total primary energy savings, and pollution emissions reductions.

Cort, Katherine A.; Belzer, David B.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM | Green Building Codes A Guide to Creating Effective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM | Green Building Codes A Guide to Creating Effective Green Building Programs for Energy Efficient and Sustainable Communities Going Beyond Code Preface The Going Beyond Code Guide is designed to help state and local governments design and implement successful "beyond code" programs for new commercial and residential buildings. The goal is to help states and localities establish voluntary or mandatory programs that go well beyond traditional minimum code requirements for new buildings. The guide addresses keys to successful adoption and implementation and discusses the primary areas that are typically included in beyond code or green building programs, including energy efficiency materials and resource conservation, water efficiency,

212

Southeast Enertgy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEEA's Building Energy Codes SEEA's Building Energy Codes Program Jenah Zweig Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) jzweig@seealliance.org, 404-602-9663 April 2, 2013 Significant energy efficiency advancements are underway in the Southeast 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The Southeast needs targeted energy codes adoption, implementation and compliance support Step 3: Compliance Step 2: Implementation Step 1: Adoption 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

213

Southeast Enertgy Efficiency Alliance's Building Energy Codes Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEEA's Building Energy Codes SEEA's Building Energy Codes Program Jenah Zweig Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) jzweig@seealliance.org, 404-602-9663 April 2, 2013 Significant energy efficiency advancements are underway in the Southeast 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: The Southeast needs targeted energy codes adoption, implementation and compliance support Step 3: Compliance Step 2: Implementation Step 1: Adoption 3 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov

214

Current Activities in Support of Building Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Current Activities in Support of Building Energy Codes Jeremy Williams Building Technologies Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy March 2, 2012 2 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov 2 Purpose Purpose: To provide an update on DOE activities related to the development of proposed code changes and deployment of existing codes: - Goals and direction - Activity updates - Available resources 3 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov Goals and Direction 3 4 | Building Technologies Program buildings.energy.gov 30% Initiative for Increased Energy Savings * Commercial-Published in 2010 - ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2010 with savings of

215

Analysis of Potential Benefits and Costs of Adopting a Commercial Building Energy Standard in South Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The state of South Dakota is considering adopting a commercial building energy standard. This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to South Dakota residents from requiring compliance with the most recent edition of the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2001 Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. These standards were developed in an effort to set minimum requirements for the energy efficient design and construction of new commercial buildings. The quantitative benefits and costs of adopting a commercial building energy code are modeled by comparing the characteristics of assumed current building practices with the most recent edition of the ASHRAE Standard, 90.1-2001. Both qualitative and quantitative benefits and costs are assessed in this analysis. Energy and economic impacts are estimated using results from a detailed building simulation tool (Building Loads Analysis and System Thermodynamics [BLAST] model) combined with a Life-Cycle Cost (LCC) approach to assess corresponding economic costs and benefits.

Belzer, David B.; Cort, Katherine A.; Winiarski, David W.; Richman, Eric E.

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

216

Building Technologies Office: Technology Research, Standards, and Codes in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes in Emerging Technologies Codes in Emerging Technologies Developing innovative technologies that increase building energy efficiency is one of the primary goals of research being conducted between the U.S. Department of Energy, laboratories, and industry partners. Once new technologies or practices are introduced into the broader market and become widely-adopted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) may seek to set a new baseline standard for energy efficiency, and may work with state and local governments to update building energy codes. Appliance and Equipment Standards New and innovative technologies developed by researchers and partners help improve building energy efficiency, and if these technologies become widely-adopted they may be incorporated into new appliance and equipment standards. BTP sets standards for more than 50 different products, and works with stakeholders in updating these standards as energy efficient technologies become more cost effective. Consumers and businesses save $15 billion per year from improved energy efficiency standards, with this amount expected to nearly double by 2025.

217

Costs to build Fermilab in 1984 dollars  

SciTech Connect

It is of current interest to examine the costs incurred to date to build Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and to determine what those costs are when stated in FY 1984 constant dollars. The appended tables are in support of this exercise and are based on all costs for Equipment items (reduced by obsolescence) and all Plant Projects which have been appropriated through FY 1984. Also included are non-plant costs which are required to complete the Energy Saver, Tevatron I and II projects (i.e., Equipment and R and D in support of Construction). This study makes the assumption that all funding through FY 1984 will have been costed by the end of FY 1986. Those costs incurred in FY 1985 and FY 1986 have been deflated to FY 1984 dollars. See Appendix A for the DOE inflation factors used in the conversion to FY 1984 dollars. The costs are identified in three categories. The Accelerator Facilities include all accelerator components, the buildings which enclose them and utilities which support them. The Experimental Facilities include all beam lines, enclosures, utilities and experimental equipment which are usable in current experimental programs. The Support Facilities include lab and office space, shops, assembly facilities, roads, grounds and the utilities which do not specifically support the Accelerator or Experimental Facilities, etc.

Jordan, N.G.; Livdahl, P.V.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

City of San Francisco - Green Building Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of San Francisco - Green Building Code City of San Francisco - Green Building Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider San Francisco San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the following schedule:

219

ACE Learning Series - Overview | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our environment and economy are impacted. Building energy codes and standards provide an effective response. The Building Energy Codes Program designed the Adoption, Compliance, and Enforcement (ACE) Learning Series for those in the building industry having the greatest potential to influence the adoption of and compliance with building energy codes and standards. Each toolkit in the ACE Learning Series delivers essential information to enable designers, specifiers, builders, building owners, policy makers, code officials, and others involved in building design and construction to understand the important role building energy codes play in helping us all address our

220

Establishment, Implementation and Enforcement of Building Codes and Standards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establishment, Implementation and Enforcement Establishment, Implementation and Enforcement of Building Codes and Standards Nanette Lockwood Global Director Government Affairs Solutia Inc. 2 Crystex ® Solutia Inc. Advanced Interlayers Performance Films Technical Specialties 2010 Revenue $1.9 billion USD Facilities 50+ Employees 3,300 U.S. Building Codes and Standards * Developed, updated and published on regular intervals at the national level for use locally * Adopted by federal agencies, state and local governments * Typically enforced by local building departments * Applies to new construction, additions and major renovations for nearly all buildings Model Building Codes * National development committees - Architects, engineers, builders, scientists, insurers, government researchers, agencies and building officials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ACE Learning Series - Compliance Toolkit | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Toolkit Compliance Toolkit The compliance toolkit describes the steps that should be taken by the build community to make sure that their buildings meet the requirements of the energy codes in effect where the buildings are being built and that the building designs are well documented so that the enforcement community can quickly and easily determine if the building meets the requirement of the energy code. This toolkit describes the steps that should be taken by the build community to make sure that their buildings meet the requirements of the energy codes in effect where the buildings are being built and that the building designs are well documented so that the enforcement community can quickly and easily determine if the building meets the requirement of the

222

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo...

223

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis; Non-Energy Project BLCC conducts economic analyses by evaluating the relative cost effectiveness of alternative buildings and building-related systems or components....

224

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Partner Resources You are here Home Buildings & Plants Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policy Secondary...

225

Residential Codes and Standards | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

houses, which are built in a factory and transported to the home site. ICC ASHRAE International Energy Conservation Code The International Energy Conservation Code...

226

Building Energy Codes in Arizona: Best Practices in Code Support...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Code Support, Compliance, and Enforcement A study funded by the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association to identify "the best practices in energy code support,...

227

2007 Commercial Energy Code Compliance Study | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Type: Commercial Document type: Reports and Studies Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web...

228

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Information Texas Program Type Building Energy Code '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the...

229

Puerto Rico - Building Energy Code with Mandatory Solar Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Program Information Program Type Building Energy Code In 2009, the Governor of Puerto Rico provided assurance that Puerto...

230

Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

improvement opportunities. However, it is only by mandating standards which capture the energy savings potential in every building, through a code, that large scale energy...

231

A Retrospective Analysis of Commercial Building Energy Codes: 1990 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building Energy Codes Program's efforts are designed to result in increased stringency in national model energy codes, more rapid and broader adoption by states and localities of updated codes, and increased compliance and enforcement. Report estimates the historical impact of Building Energy Codes Program in terms of energy savings achieved that are based upon various editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 (ASHRAE Standard 90.1).

Belzer, David B.; McDonald, Sean C.; Halverson, Mark A.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Sustainable Design | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Design Sustainable Design Session 5 of a seven-part webcast series presented by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program to help federal agencies comply with the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The Sustainable Design webcast provides an overview of sustainable design federal requirements and strategies. Sustainable design principles and practices are well established and can be applied at some level to any project to reduce the environmental impact and operational cost of a building, while increasing occupant satisfaction. The requirements within Executive Order 13423, the Energy Policy Act of 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 are driving the federal sector to be leaders in sustainable design. Estimated Length:

233

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

234

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems Building Codes and Regulations for Solar Water Heating Systems June 24, 2012 - 1:50pm Addthis Photo Credit: iStockphoto Photo Credit: iStockphoto Before installing a solar water heating system, you should investigate local building codes, zoning ordinances, and subdivision covenants, as well as any special regulations pertaining to the site. You will probably need a building permit to install a solar energy system onto an existing building. Not every community or municipality initially welcomes residential renewable energy installations. Although this is often due to ignorance or the comparative novelty of renewable energy systems, you must comply with existing building and permit procedures to install your system.

235

Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes Automatic Lighting Shutoff for Tenant Spaces - Code Notes Automatic shutoff capability for all interior building lighting (with exceptions) is required by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 (as well as previous versions back to 1999) and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (including versions back to 2003) for buildings over 5,000ft2. Publication Date: Thursday, March 10, 2011 cn_automatic_lighting_shutoff_for_tenant_spaces.pdf Document Details Document Number: PNNL-SA-66719 Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official

236

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

237

The approval and publication of the Building Energy Code of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pakistan has been a major milestone to encourage the adoption of Energy Efficient building designs in Pakistan. With this, Pakistan joins the ranks of these few countries of the world who have similar codes. The Code Compliance Handbook has been developed by ENERCON to be read in conjunction with the Building Energy Code. The Handbook facilitates easy comprehension of the code and shall be of great assistance to practising Architects and Engineers who wish to adopt the standards established in the Building Energy Code. The Handbook explains the salient features of the code in easy to understand language. Worked examples are generously included to illustrate how a building design may be altered for compliance with the code. Users of the Code Compliance Handbook will quickly become familiar with the host of ideas that enable energy efficient designs. They will also realise how easy it is to incorporate these ideas at the initial stages of a building design. ENERCON shall be holding workshops and seminars to introduce both the Building Energy Code and the Code Compliance Handbook. This would provide a forum for a discussion of the materials being presented and will also encourage adoption of the Code.

unknown authors

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Site Map Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Building Life Cycle Cost Programs on AddThis.com... Publications Software FAQs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs

239

COMcheck201 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

240

COMcheck Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

REScheck Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

242

Area Takeoffs | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S....

243

COMcheck for Oregon | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

244

Basement Insulation Techniques | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basement Insulation Techniques Residential basement insulation levels should be selected in accordance with the International Energy Conservation Code, or the local energy code. Be...

245

1994 Building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation  

SciTech Connect

During the spring of 1994, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards, conducted five two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the United States. Workshops were held in Chicago, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Dallas, and Denver. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing state building codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requirements for residential and commercial building energy codes, the Climate Change Action Plan, the role of the U.S. Department of Energy and the Building Energy Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, the commercial and residential codes and standards, the Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants were also encouraged to inform DOE of their needs, particularly with regard to implementing building energy codes, enhancing current implementation efforts, and building on training efforts already in place. This paper documents the workshop findings and workshop planning and follow-up processes.

Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

247

Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Assistance Project Codes Assistance Project Maureen Guttman, AIA Executive Director, BCAP Alliance to Save Energy 202-530-2211 mguttman@ase.org Tuesday, April 2, 2013 - Thursday, April 4, 2013 Reducing Energy Demand in Buildings Through State Energy Codes - Providing Technical Support and Assistance to States - 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Buildings = largest sector of energy consumption in America * Energy codes are a ready-made regulatory mechanism * States need support for implementation Impact of Project:

248

Step 1. Know the Requirements | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Know the Requirements 1. Know the Requirements Current national model energy codes and standards are limited to the design and construction of buildings. That is, the operation and maintenance of the building, however important that might be to the overall energy usage of the building, is not considered in current national model energy codes and standards.1 This toolkit is focused on the codes and standards called out in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), but most of the principles apply to any code. For the residential build community, ARRA requires states to meet or exceed the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) or achieve equivalent or greater energy savings. For the commercial build community, states must meet or exceed ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE

249

Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.ecn.nl/fileadmin/ecn/units/bs/IEC/LCDS_presentation_082010.pdf Mainstreaming Building Energy Efficiency Codes in Developing Countries: Global Experiences and Lessons from Early Adopters Screenshot References: Building Energy Efficiency[1] Summary "This report summarizes the findings of an extensive literature survey of

250

Building codes as barriers to solar heating and cooling of buildings  

SciTech Connect

The application of building codes to solar energy systems for heating and cooling of buildings is discussed, using as typical codes the three model building codes most widely adopted by states and localities. Some potential barriers to solar energy systems are found, federal and state programs to deal with these barriers are discussed, and alternatives are suggested. To remedy this, a federal program is needed to encourage state adoption of standards and acceptance of certification of solar systems for code approval, and to encourage revisions to codes based on model legislation prepared for the federal government by the model codes groups.

Meeker, F.O. III

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes Code-compliant 2X4 Walls for Zones Marine 4-8 - Code Notes The 2009 International Residential Code and International Energy Conservation Code do not permit trade-offs for installing high-efficiency heating, ventilation, and air conditioning equipment-installing a 90%+ furnace as a trade-off for 2" x 4" stud walls with R-13 insulation. The more permanent building insulation and sealing features now take precedence. However, there still remain optional strategies allowing 2" x 4" exterior stud walls. cn_code-compliant_2x4_walls_for_zones_marine_4-8.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced:

252

Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results | Building  

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Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Standard 90.1 Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Results The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of cost-effective energy codes and standards to increase efficiency in residential and commercial buildings. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a series of cost analyses for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1: Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings - the commercial model energy code. The cost analyses compare Standard 90.1-2010 to the prior 2007 edition, based on six prototype buildings in five representative U.S. climate zones. PNNL also conducted energy savings analysis for Standard 90.1-2010 and the commercial requirements of the

253

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

254

1995 building energy codes and standards workshops: Summary and documentation  

SciTech Connect

During the spring of 1995, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted four two-day Regional Building Energy Codes and Standards workshops across the US. Workshops were held in Chicago, Denver, Rhode Island, and Atlanta. The workshops were designed to benefit state-level officials including staff of building code commissions, energy offices, public utility commissions, and others involved with adopting/updating, implementing, and enforcing building energy codes in their states. The workshops provided an opportunity for state and other officials to learn more about residential and commercial building energy codes and standards, the role of the US Department of Energy and the Building Standards and Guidelines Program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Home Energy Rating Systems (HERS), Energy Efficient Mortgages (EEM), training issues, and other topics related to the development, adoption, implementation, and enforcement of building energy codes. Participants heard success stories, got tips on enforcement training, and received technical support materials. In addition to receiving information on the above topics, workshop participants had an opportunity to provide input on code adoption issues, building industry training issues, building design issues, and exemplary programs across the US. This paper documents the workshop planning, findings, and follow-up processes.

Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Puerto Rico | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Last updated on 2012-08-21 Current News The adoption date of the IECC 2009 began on January 1st, 2011; however, the effective date of this code will be transitory. Effective dates begin March 1, 2013 and continue through March 1, 2016. Commercial Residential Code Change Current Code None Statewide Amendments / Additional State Code Information The adoption date of the IECC 2009 began on January 1st, 2011; however, the effective date of this code will be transitory. Effective dates begin March 1, 2013 and continue through March 1, 2016. Approved Compliance Tools Can use COMcheck Approximate Energy Efficiency Equivalent to 2009 IECC Adoption Date 02/24/2011 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Current Code None Statewide

256

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases Additional Resources for Estimating Building Energy and Cost Savings to Reduce Greenhouse Gases October 7, 2013 - 11:06am Addthis For evaluating greenhouse gas reduction strategies and estimating costs, the following information resources can help Federal agencies estimate energy and cost savings potential by building type. When deciding what resource to use for developing energy- and cost-savings estimates, a program should consider items detailed in Table 1. Table 1.Resources for Estimating Energy Savings Resource Items to consider Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Based on representative building models of commercial buildings. Guidance available for a limited number of building types using the most common technologies.

257

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Partner: National Institute of Standards and Technology Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Finance, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www1.eere.energy.gov/femp/information/download_blcc.html Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, Building Life-Cycle Cost, BLCC References: Building Life-Cycle Cost (BLCC) Programs[1] Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BLCC[2]

258

Development of Energy Codes | Building Energy Codes Program  

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Development of Energy Codes Both the IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1 are maintained and updated in open public forums. The openness and transparency of these processes is critical to...

259

Compliance Evaluation Checklists | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Checklists For residential buildings, separate checklists are included for each climate zone. These can be customized by states and local jurisdictions to cover state...

260

Building Energy Codes Resource Guide for Policy Makers | Building Energy  

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Guide for Policy Makers Guide for Policy Makers This guide provides key information to policy makers on energy codes and standards and offers guidance on how policy makers can support the creation of statewide energy efficiency goals and standards. In addition, this guide instructs policy makers on how they can: Encourage the adoption of statewide codes. Establish energy code awareness programs. Support enforcement of and compliance with energy codes. Participate in the development of model codes and standards. Determine the viability of the new code. Publication Date: Friday, June 24, 2011 BECP_Policy_Maker_Resource Guide_June2011_v00_lores.pdf BECP_Policy_Maker_Resource Guide_June2011_v00_hires.pdf Document Details Last Name: Britt Initials: M Affiliation: PNNL Document Number: PNNL-81023

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Area Takeoffs 101 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type: Commercial Residential Focus: Compliance Software: REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

262

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

state to allow its jurisdictions to voluntarily adopt the http:www.iccsafe.orgcsIGCCPagesdefault.aspx International Green Construction Code beginning in March 2012....

263

Building Energy Code (Oregon) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 and residential construction in 2008. In October 2010 Oregon also adopted the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code which establishes structural requirements for all...

264

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a future site for electrical equipment. http:www.dsireusa.orgincentivesincentive.cfm?IncentiveCodeNM10R New Mexico Provider New Mexico Regulation and Licensing Department...

265

Site Map | Building Energy Codes Program  

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Adoption State Technical Assistance Status of State Energy Code Adoption Adoption Process State Pages Alabama Louisiana Oklahoma Alaska Maine Oregon American Samoa Maryland...

266

State Technical Assistance | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Adoption Process State Technical Assistance Status of State Energy Code Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center...

267

Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings;  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; 9.1 Enclosed Floorspace and Number of Establishment Buildings, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Floorspace and Buildings; Unit: Floorspace Square Footage and Building Counts. Approximate Approximate Average Enclosed Floorspace Average Number Number of All Buildings Enclosed Floorspace of All Buildings of Buildings Onsite NAICS Onsite Establishments(b) per Establishment Onsite per Establishment Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million sq ft) (counts) (sq ft) (counts) (counts) Total United States 311 Food 1,115 13,271 107,293.7 32,953 3.1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 126 602 443,178.6 5,207 24.8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 14 59 270,262.7 982 18.3 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

268

Building Energy Code (South Dakota) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Building Energy Code (South Dakota) This is the approved revision of this page, as well as being the most...

269

ACE Learning Series - Enforcement Toolkit | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enforcement Toolkit Enforcement Toolkit The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) developed this toolkit to help the enforcement community achieve higher levels of compliance with building energy codes. Although this toolkit is not intended for use by designers, developers, home owners or renters, building owners, or building operators, it may provide those individuals some insight into the issues facing the enforcement community. Publication Date: Saturday, September 1, 2012 EnforcementToolkit.pdf Document Details Document Number: PNNL-SA-90467 Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Enforcement Document type: Other Target Audience: Advocate Architect/Designer

270

Energy Efficiency Building Code for Commercial Buildings in Sri Lanka  

SciTech Connect

1.1.1 To encourage energy efficient design or retrofit of commercial buildings so that they may be constructed, operated, and maintained in a manner that reduces the use of energy without constraining the building function, the comfort, health, or the productivity of the occupants and with appropriate regard for economic considerations. 1.1.2 To provide criterion and minimum standards for energy efficiency in the design or retrofit of commercial buildings and provide methods for determining compliance with them. 1.1.3 To encourage energy efficient designs that exceed these criterion and minimum standards.

Busch, John; Greenberg, Steve; Rubinstein, Francis; Denver, Andrea; Rawner, Esther; Franconi, Ellen; Huang, Joe; Neils, Danielle

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Duct Testing | Building Energy Codes Program  

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Duct Testing This video offers tips and instruction for duct testing, and is a portion of the Duct Leakage Testing presentation given at Energy Codes 2009. Estimated Length: 12...

272

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

advisory group, the energy code was updated to the 1993 MEC with reference made to the ASHRAE Standard 90.1 - 1989 for commercial structures. Statewide enforcement is not required...

273

Synthesis Report on the Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China  

SciTech Connect

China building energy code and details to help improve building energy efficiency at global, national and local levels

Shui, Bin; Haiyan, Lin; Congu, Yu; Halverson, Mark A.; Bo, Song; Jingru, Liu; Evans, Meredydd; Xiajiao, Zhu; Siwei, Lang

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Complete 90.1 Prototype Building Model package | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complete 90.1 Prototype Building Model package Complete 90.1 Prototype Building Model package The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each

275

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 |  

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Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Program: National Benefits Assessment, 1992-2040 Commercial and residential buildings account for approximately 41% of all energy consumption and 72% of electricity usage in the United States. Building energy codes and standards set minimum requirements for energy-efficient design and construction for new and renovated buildings, assuring reductions in energy use and greenhouse gas emissions over the life of buildings. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP or the Program), supports the improvement of energy efficiency in buildings. BECP periodically assesses the impacts of its activities by estimating historical and projected energy savings, consumer savings, and avoided emissions. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted the

276

Step 4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption | Building Energy Codes  

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4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption 4. Select the Appropriate Code for Adoption Description To achieve the economic, environmental, and social benefits offered by energy codes, a state or jurisdiction must select the energy code that is most appropriate for their locale. States and municipalities generally choose to either adopt a model energy code or standard or create a state-specific or local energy code. States or municipalities may also select to adopt "stretch codes"-those that go beyond the minimum requirements of an adopted energy code to achieve greater energy efficiency. In addition, states and local jurisdictions may choose to adopt policies that implement a green building rating system or policies that apply to specific structures, such as state-owned or -funded buildings.

277

Office of Codes and Standards resource book. Section 1, Building energy codes and standards  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Codes and Standards has developed this Resource Book to provide: A discussion of DOE involvement in building codes and standards; a current and accurate set of descriptions of residential, commercial, and Federal building codes and standards; information on State contacts, State code status, State building construction unit volume, and State needs; and a list of stakeholders in the building energy codes and standards arena. The Resource Book is considered an evolving document and will be updated occasionally. Users are requested to submit additional data (e.g., more current, widely accepted, and/or documented data) and suggested changes to the address listed below. Please provide sources for all data provided.

Hattrup, M.P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Low-Cost Printable Wireless Sensors for Buildings Applications  

Low-Cost Printable Wireless Sensors for Buildings Applications Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing rights to this ...

279

Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Codes Collaborative Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Chris Wagner National Association of State Energy Officials cwagner@naseo.org; 703.299.8800 x 12 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement * States are committed to adopting model energy codes and developing programs to promote and measure compliance. However, many states have limited on- going funding sources to make these activities sustainable.

280

Building Energy Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Collaborative Codes Collaborative Technical Assistance for States Chris Wagner National Association of State Energy Officials cwagner@naseo.org; 703.299.8800 x 12 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement * States are committed to adopting model energy codes and developing programs to promote and measure compliance. However, many states have limited on- going funding sources to make these activities sustainable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

eLearning Catalog | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eLearning Catalog eLearning Catalog To receive updates about training events and eLearing courses subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. 2009/2012 IECC Cost-Effectiveness Analysis Webinar Course Type: Video Focus: Code Development Target Audience: Code Official, Federal Official, State Official Code Version: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), 2012 IECC, 2009 IECC This webinar provided an overview of the analyses, both national and state results, as well as the underlying methodology of the series of cost analyses, covering the 2009 and 2012 editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for... 90 Percent Compliance Course Type: Video Focus: Compliance Target Audience: State Official Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1, International Energy Conservation Code

282

Step 2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path 2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path It is important to review the submitted documentation and identify which code was used for the building. Next, to determine whether the building complies with that code, the path used to demonstrate compliance must be identified. There are several compliance paths available in the 2009 and 2012 IECC and ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. Each of these codes/standards contains a prescriptive path that clearly states specific requirements. Prescriptive paths limit design freedom. Each of these codes/standards also has a performance-based path that provides more design freedom and can lead to innovative design, but involves more complex energy simulations and tradeoffs between systems. Residential and smaller commercial buildings

283

The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) Jump to: navigation, search BCAP was established in 1994 as a joint initiative of the Alliance to Save Energy, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, and the Natural Resources Defense Council. BCAP provides custom-tailored assistance on building energy code adoption and implementation. We assist state and local regulatory and legislative bodies and help coordinate others representing environmental interests, consumers, labor, and industry. BCAP provides states with code advocacy assistance on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy and coordinates with DOE on technical assistance (see www.energycodes.gov for more information). In addition, BCAP receives funding from multiple foundations, the U.S. EPA,

284

90.1 Prototype Building Models Secondary School | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary School Secondary School The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

285

90.1 Prototype Building Models Mid-rise Apartment | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mid-rise Apartment Mid-rise Apartment The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

286

90.1 Prototype Building Models Stand Alone Retail | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stand Alone Retail Stand Alone Retail The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

287

90.1 Prototype Building Models- Medium Office | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models- Medium Office Models- Medium Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

288

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

289

90.1 Prototype Building Models Large Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

290

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Office | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Office The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

291

90.1 Prototype Building Models Strip Mall | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strip Mall Strip Mall The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

292

90.1 Prototype Building Models Small Hotel | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hotel Hotel The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

293

90.1 Prototype Building Models Primary School | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary School Primary School The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

294

90.1 Prototype Building Models Hospital | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hospital Hospital The ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype building models were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program. These prototype buildings were derived from DOE's Commercial Reference Building Models. This suite of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 prototype buildings covers all the Reference Building types except supermarket, and also adds a new building prototype representing high-rise apartment buildings.The prototype models include 16 building types in 17 climate locations for ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2004, 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. This combination leads to a set of 816 building models (in EnergyPlus Version 6.0). Also included is a scorecard for each prototype building. The scorecard is a spreadsheet that summarizes the

295

Building Energy Codes Program: National Benefits Assessment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 PNNL-22610 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Building...

296

About the AreaCalc Software | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the AreaCalc Software About the AreaCalc Software AreaCalc is a tool to simplify the process of calculating the building areas needed to demonstrate energy code compliance. A spreadsheet-like interface is used to calculate window, door, skylight, roof, wall, and floor areas. These areas can then be transferred directly into REScheck(tm) where the code compliance results for those assemblies can be displayed. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ab_about_the_areacalc_sofware.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

297

U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Building Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BUILDING CODE BUILDING CODE Last Updated: May 14, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Draft Building Code i May 14, 2013 Contents Section 1. Introduction ............................................................................................................................................................. 1 Section 2. Adopted Codes ........................................................................................................................................................ 1 Section 3. Building Planning and Construction .............................................................................................................. 1 3-1. Fire Protection and Prevention ................................................................................................................................. 1

298

Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings Life Cycle Cost Analysis for Sustainable Buildings October 4, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis To help facility managers make sound decisions, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance and resources on applying life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of energy and water efficiency investments. Federal Requirements Life cycle cost (LCC) rules are promulgated in 10 CFR 436 A, Life Cycle Cost Methodology and Procedures and conforms to requirements in the National Energy Conservation Policy Act and subsequent energy conservation legislation as well as Executive Order 13423. The LCC guidance and materials assume discount rates and energy price projections determined

299

Step 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption 1. Understand the Benefits of Code Adoption Before beginning the code adoption process, states and jurisdictions should understand the benefits realized through energy code adoption. Description The primary goal of an energy code or standard is to conserve energy. Commercial buildings and residential households in the United States consume nearly 50% of the nation's total primary energy, 70% of the nation's electricity, and account for one-third of the nation's greenhouse emissions.1 A report by the McKinsey Global Institute found that America could reduce energy use in new and existing buildings by more than one quarter by 2020 with measures that pay for themselves within 10 years.2 Energy code adoption enables new and renovated residential and commercial

300

Related Links | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Related Links Related Links Regional Energy Efficiency Organizations MEEA NEEP NEEA SEEA SWEEP SPEER Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, ND, NE, MI, MN, MO, OH, SD, WI The Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA) is a collaborative network advancing energy efficiency in the Midwest to support sustainable economic development and environmental preservation. MEEA raises awareness, facilitates energy efficiency programs and strengthens policy across the nine-state region. MEEA brings together a respected network of members, partners, board and staff, and inspires others to create new technologies, new products and new ways of thinking when it comes to energy efficiency. Codes Contact Isaac Elnecave Senior Policy Manager ielnecave@mwalliance.org phone: (312)784-7253

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of liquefaction potential for building code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard approach for the evaluation of the liquefaction susceptibility is based on the estimation of a safety factor between the cyclic shear resistance to liquefaction and the earthquake induced shear stress. Recently, an updated procedure based on shear-wave velocities (V{sub s}) has been proposed which could be more easily applied.These methods have been applied at La Plaja beach of Catania, that experienced liquefaction because of the 1693 earthquake. The detailed geotechnical and V{sub s} information and the realistic ground motion computed for the 1693 event let us compare the two approaches. The successful application of the V{sub s} procedure, slightly modified to fit historical and safety factor information, even if additional field performances are needed, encourages the development of a guide for liquefaction potential analysis, based on well defined V{sub s} profiles to be included in the italian seismic code.

Nunziata, C.; De Nisco, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Univ. Napoli Federico II (Italy); Panza, G. F. [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Univ. Trieste (Italy); Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, ESP-SAND Group, Trieste (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Understanding Energy Code Acceptance within the Alaska Building Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the technical assistance provided to the Alaska Home Financing Corporation on behalf of PNNL regarding the assessment of attitudes toward energy codes within the building community in Alaska. It includes a summary of the existing situation and specific assistance requested by AHFC, the results of a questionnaire designed for builders surveyed in a suburban area of Anchorage, interviews with a lender, a building official, and a research specialist, and recommendations for future action by AHFC.

Mapes, Terry S.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

303

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs Building Life Cycle Cost Programs October 8, 2013 - 2:14pm Addthis The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed the Building Life Cycle Cost (BLCC) Program to provide computational support for the analysis of capital investments in buildings. BLCC5 Program Register and download. BLCC 5.3-13 (for Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux). BLCC is programmed in Java with an XML file format. The user's guide is part of the BLCC Help system. BLCC version 5.3-13 contains the following modules: FEMP Analysis; Energy Project Federal Analysis; Financed Project Office of Management and Budget Analysis MILCON Analysis; Energy Project MILCON Analysis; Energy Conservation Investment Program Project MILCON Analysis; Non-Energy Project

304

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Room Air Conditioner Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator Screen capture of Room Air Conditioner Cost Estimator The cost estimator compares high-efficiency room air conditioners to standard equipment in terms of life cycle cost. It provides an alternative to complicated building simulation models, while offering more precision than simplified estimating tools that are commonly available. The cost estimator assists decision-making regarding the purchase or replacement of room air conditioning equipment, by estimating a product�s lifetime energy cost savings at various efficiency levels. Screen Shots Keywords air conditioner, life-cycle cost, energy performance, residential buildings, energy savings Validation/Testing Internal reviews at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

305

Enforcing Building Energy Codes in China: Progress and Comparative Lessons  

SciTech Connect

From 1995 to 2005, building energy use in China increased more rapidly than the world average. China has been adding 0.4 to 1.6 billion square meters of floor space annually , making it the worlds largest market for new construction. In fact, by 2020, China is expected to comprise half of all new construction. In response to this, China has begun to make important steps towards achieving building energy efficiency, including the implementation of building energy standards that requires new buildings to be 65% more efficient than buildings from the early 1980s. Making progress on reducing building energy use requires both a comprehensive code and a robust enforcement system. The latter the enforcement system is a particularly critical component for assuring that a building code has an effect. China has dramatically enhanced its enforcement system in the past two years, with more detailed requirements for ensuring enforcement and new penalties for non-compliance. We believe that the U.S. and other developed countries could benefit from learning about the multiple checks and the documentation required in China. Similarly, some of the more user-friendly enforcement approaches developed in the U.S. and elsewhere may be useful for China as it strives to improve enforcement in rural and smaller communities. In this article, we provide context to Chinas building codes enforcement system by comparing it to the U.S. Among some of the enforcement mechanisms we look at are testing and rating procedures, compliance software, and training and public information.

Evans, Meredydd; Shui, Bin; Halverson, Mark A.; Delgado, Alison

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy codes and the building design process: Opportunities for improvement  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Policy Act (EPAct), passed by Congress in 1992, requires states to adopt building energy codes for new commercial buildings that meet or exceed the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) and Illuminating Engineers Society of North America (IES) Standard 90.1-1989 by October 24, 1994. In response to EPAct many states will be adopting a state-wide energy code for the first time. Understanding the role of stakeholders in the building design process is key to the successful implementation of these codes. In 1993, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a survey of architects and designers to determine how much they know about energy codes, to what extent energy-efficiency concerns influence the design process, and how they convey information about energy-efficient designs and products to their clients. Findings of the PNL survey, together with related information from a survey by the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and other reports, are presented in this report. This information may be helpful for state and utility energy program managers and others who will be involved in promoting the adoption and implementation of state energy codes that meet the requirements of EPAct.

Sandahl, L.J.; Shankle, D.L.; Rigler, E.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Estimating demolition cost of plutonium buildings for dummies  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Rocky Flats Field Office of the US Department of Energy is to decommission the entire plant. In an effort to improve the basis and the accuracy of the future decommissioning cost, Rocky Flats has developed a powerful but easy-to-use tool to determine budget cost estimates to characterize, decontaminate, and demolish all its buildings. The parametric cost-estimating tool is called the Facilities Disposition Cost Model (FDCM).

Tower, S.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements Comparing Commercial Lighting Energy Requirements ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code include requirements for interior and exterior lighting in new construction, additions, and alterations for all commercial buildings, including residential structures with four or more stories above grade. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ta_comparing_commercial_lighting_energy_requirements.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Document Number: PNNL-SA-49098 Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 - 15:22

309

Integrating Renewable Energy Requirements Into Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates how and when to best integrate renewable energy requirements into building energy codes. The basic goals were to: (1) provide a rough guide of where were going and how to get there; (2) identify key issues that need to be considered, including a discussion of various options with pros and cons, to help inform code deliberations; and (3) to help foster alignment among energy code-development organizations. The authors researched current approaches nationally and internationally, conducted a survey of key stakeholders to solicit input on various approaches, and evaluated the key issues related to integration of renewable energy requirements and various options to address those issues. The report concludes with recommendations and a plan to engage stakeholders. This report does not evaluate whether the use of renewable energy should be required on buildings; that question involves a political decision that is beyond the scope of this report.

Kaufmann, John R.; Hand, James R.; Halverson, Mark A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

ACE Learning Series - Adoption Toolkit | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACE Learning Series - Adoption Toolkit ACE Learning Series - Adoption Toolkit This toolkit was developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) for use by states, municipalities, energy code advocates, policymakers, stakeholders, and all other groups with a vested interest in energy code adoption. This toolkit provides information and resources to help guide adopting authorities through the adoption process and setting minimum requirements for new construction. This toolkit provides some insight into how the adoption process may influence the residential and commercial build communities. Publication Date: Saturday, September 1, 2012 AdoptionToolkit.pdf Document Details Document Number: PNNL-SA-89963 Prepared by: prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department

311

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Full report (4.1 mb) Full report (4.1 mb) Heating, cooling, & water heating equipment Appendix A - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.9 mb) Appendix B - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.3 mb) Lighting and commercial ventilation & refrigeration equipment Appendix C - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Reference Case (1.1 mb) Appendix D - Technology Forecast Updates - Residential and Commercial Building Technologies - Advanced Case (1.1 mb) Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency Release date: August 7, 2013 Energy used in the residential and commercial sectors provides a wide range

312

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Options for Compliance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, use of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including envelope, mechanical and lighting, have been pressed to the end of reasonable limits. Research has been conducted to determine the mechanism for implementing this requirement (Kaufman 2011). Kaufmann et al. determined that the most appropriate way to structure an on-site renewable requirement for commercial buildings is to define the requirement in terms of an installed power density per unit of roof area. This provides a mechanism that is suitable for the installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems on future buildings to offset electricity and reduce the total building energy load. Kaufmann et al. suggested that an appropriate maximum for the requirement in the commercial sector would be 4 W/ft{sup 2} of roof area or 0.5 W/ft{sup 2} of conditioned floor area. As with all code requirements, there must be an alternative compliance path for buildings that may not reasonably meet the renewables requirement. This might include conditions like shading (which makes rooftop PV arrays less effective), unusual architecture, undesirable roof pitch, unsuitable building orientation, or other issues. In the short term, alternative compliance paths including high performance mechanical equipment, dramatic envelope changes, or controls changes may be feasible. These options may be less expensive than many renewable systems, which will require careful balance of energy measures when setting the code requirement levels. As the stringency of the code continues to increase however, efficiency trade-offs will be maximized, requiring alternative compliance options to be focused solely on renewable electricity trade-offs or equivalent programs. One alternate compliance path includes purchase of Renewable Energy Credits (RECs). Each REC represents a specified amount of renewable electricity production and provides an offset of environmental externalities associated with non-renewable electricity production. The purpose of this paper is to explore the possible issues with RECs and comparable alternative compliance options. Existing codes have been examined to determine energy equivalence between the energy generation requirement and the RECs alternative over the life of the building. The price equivalence of the requirement and the alternative are determined to consider the economic drivers for a market decision. This research includes case studies that review how the few existing codes have incorporated RECs and some of the issues inherent with REC markets. Section 1 of the report reviews compliance options including RECs, green energy purchase programs, shared solar agreements and leases, and other options. Section 2 provides detailed case studies on codes that include RECs and community based alternative compliance methods. The methods the existing code requirements structure alternative compliance options like RECs are the focus of the case studies. Section 3 explores the possible structure of the renewable energy generation requirement in the context of energy and price equivalence. The price of RECs have shown high variation by market and over time which makes it critical to for code language to be updated frequently for a renewable energy generation requirement or the requirement will not remain price-equivalent over time. Section 4 of the report provides a maximum case estimate for impact to the PV market and the REC market based on the Kaufmann et al. proposed requirement levels. If all new buildings in the commercial sector complied with the requirement to install rooftop PV arrays, nearly 4,700 MW of solar would be installed in 2012, a major increase from EIA estimates of 640 MW of solar generation capacity installed in 2009. The residential sector could contribute roughly an additional 2,300 MW based on the same code requirement levels of 4 W/ft{sup 2} of r

Dillon, Heather E.; Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Solana, Amy E.; Russo, Bryan J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Literature Review of Data on the Incremental Costs to Design and Build Low-Energy Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes findings from a literature review into the incremental costs associated with low-energy buildings. The goal of this work is to help establish as firm an analytical foundation as possible for the Building Technology Program's cost-effective net-zero energy goal in the year 2025.

Hunt, W. D.

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Step 8. Ensure the Building Operates as Intended | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8. Ensure the Building Operates as Intended 8. Ensure the Building Operates as Intended Energy codes and standards generally cover only the construction of buildings. However, the ultimate goal is that energy is used efficiently in the actual operation the building. For example, should commissioning and testing be covered as a separate step? They could and perhaps should. If the ultimate goal of compliance is to get a building that has been designed and constructed to be an energy efficient building, then "getting it right" by commissioning might be an important step in ensuring the building is truly efficient. The 2012 IECC has system commissioning requirements in Section C408. A topic brief is available that discusses testing and commissioning in greater detail (Resource 1). A topic brief discussing residential duct

315

Cost effectiveness of the 1993 model energy code in New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This is an analysis of cost effectiveness the Council of American Building Officials` 1993 Model Energy Code (MEC) building thermal-envelope requirements for single-family houses and multifamily housing units in New Jersey. Goal was to compare the cost effectiveness of the 1993 MEC to the alternate allowed in the 1993 Building Officials & Code Administrators (BOCA) National Energy Conservation Code -- American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90A-1980 -- based on a comparison of the costs and benefits associated with complying with each. This comparison was performed for Camden, New Brunswick; Somerville, and Sparta. The analysis was done for two different scenarios: a ``move-up`` home buyer purchasing a single-family house and a ``first-time`` financially limited home buyer purchasing a multifamily unit. For the single-family home buyer, compliance with the 1993 MEC was estimated to increase first costs by $1028 to $1564, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $206 to $313 (at 20% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was from 1 to 5 years. The home buyer who paid 20% down had recovered increases in down payments and mortgage payments in energy cost savings by the end of the fifth year or sooner and thereafter will save more money each year. For the multifamily unit home buyer first costs were estimated to increase by $121 to $223, resulting in an incremental down payment increase of $12 to $22 (at 10% down). The time when the homeowner realizes net cash savings (net positive cash flow) for houses built in accordance with the 1993 MEC was 1 to 3 years.

Lucas, R.G.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Buildings Sector Updated Buildings Sector Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. June 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Buildings Appliance and Equipment Costs and Efficiency 1

317

Microsoft Word - Building Energy Codes Survey Report GEO _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building & Energy Codes Building & Energy Codes Survey Results Prepared by the Governor's Energy Offi ce July 2009 The Governor's Energy Offi ce 1580 Logan Street, Suite 100 Denver, CO 80203 www.colorado.gov/energy (303) 866-2100 Executive Summary Colorado Governor Bill Ritter, Jr., issued an Executive Order on April 16, 2007, re-creating the Governor's Office of Energy Management and Conservation as the Governor's Energy Office (GEO). The GEO's mission is to lead Colorado to a New Energy Economy by advancing energy efficiency and renewable, clean energy resources. The New Energy Economy embraces energy conservation as an important component in our energy future, yet requires a broader mission to meet the goals of expanding renewable and clean energy resources and opportunities for the state's economy, environment and energy

318

Building Cost and Performance Metrics: Data Collection Protocol, Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes the process for selecting and applying the building cost and performance metrics for measuring sustainably designed buildings in comparison to traditionally designed buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Solana, Amy E.; Spees, Kathleen L.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

319

Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia Building Energy Code for the District of Columbia < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider District Department of the Environment ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The DC Energy Conservation Code is updated regularly as national codes are

320

Embedded Checker Architectures for Cyclic and Low-Cost Arithmetic Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Code checkers that monitor the outputs of a system can detect both permanent and transient faults. We present two novel architectures of embedded self-testing checkers for low-cost and cyclic arithmetic codes, one based on code word generators and adders, ... Keywords: built-in self-test, code checkers, code word accumulators, code word generators, cyclic arithmetic codes, embedded checkers, low-cost arithmetic codes, on-line test, totally self-checking checkers

Albrecht P. Stroele; Steffen Tarnick

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Floors | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floors Floors The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_floors.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

322

Commercial Envelope Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 IECC 9 IECC This training provides an overview of the commercial envelope requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 56 minutes Presenters: Eric Makela, Britt/Makela Group Original Webcast Date: Thursday, September 3, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Commercial Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 15:52

323

Commercial Mechanical Requirements of the 2006 IECC | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 IECC 6 IECC This training provides an overview of the commercial mechanical requirements of the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 58 minutes Presenters: Eric Makela, Britt/Makela Group Original Webcast Date: Thursday, June 22, 2006 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Commercial Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2006 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 15:51

324

Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 IECC 09 IECC This training includes an overview of the residential requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 9 minutes Presenters: Todd Taylor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Tuesday, June 16, 2009 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Video Transcript Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

325

Energy Efficient Residential Building Code for Arab Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an energy analysis to support the Egyptian efforts to develop a New Energy Code for New Residential Buildings in the Arab Countries. Also, the paper represents a brief summary of the code contents specially, the effectiveness of building envelope and weather data in reducing electrical energy consumption. The impacts of the following parameters were studied namely; walls and roof constructions, window size and glazing type for different geographical locations in the Arab Countries. Two different distinguish weather classification were developed and analyzed and presented in this study, the DDC18.3& DDH 25. The first was developed by the Author to calculate DD using a mathematical model on electronic spread sheet. The second depends on the hourly values for each geographical location. The analysis includes the capitals and major cities representing most of the Arab countries. It was determined that the window to wall ratio (WWR) of 15% minimizes the total annual electricity use for the buildings. The Solar Factors (SF) and Window Orientation Factors (OF) were calculated for the eight wall orientations. The Over All Transfer Value (OTTV) was calculated for each orientation for different variables, e.g. WWR, Glazing Type, Shading, wall color and mid and top floor. The results show that the mass and types of building materials; WWR (15%), glass type and shutters; orientation; wall insulation (25mm), wall solar absorptivity (a=.3); roof insulation and shading effect enhance the thermal performance and reduces the cooling load by 60%.

Hanna, G. B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Energy and Energy Cost Savings Analysis of the IECC for Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to assess the relative energy and energy cost performance of commercial buildings designed to meet the requirements found in the commercial energy efficiency provisions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Section 304(b) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, requires the Secretary of Energy to make a determination each time a revised version of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is published with respect to whether the revised standard would improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. As many states have historically adopted the IECC for both residential and commercial buildings, PNNL has evaluated the impacts of the commercial provisions of the 2006, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC. PNNL also compared energy performance with corresponding editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 to help states and local jurisdictions make informed decisions regarding model code adoption.

Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Goel, Supriya; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Liu, Bing

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies Building Energy Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Building Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies Agency/Company /Organization: The Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Buildings Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices References: Building Codes-Best Practices Report for APEC Economies[1] "This paper was developed for the purpose of encouraging continued progress and innovation on building energy codes among APEC economies. As the energy intensity of buildings steadily increases, energy codes and standards are understood to be important to reducing energy consumption and pollutants by

328

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 5, Cost Codes and the Work Breakdown Structure  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The chapter discusses the purpose of the work breakdown structure (WBS) and code of account (COA) cost code system, shows the purpose and fundamental structure ...

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

330

User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.  

SciTech Connect

PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Log Homes in REScheck | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Log Homes in REScheck Log Homes in REScheck This training includes an introduction to how log homes are handled in the REScheck(tm) software and demonstrates how to show compliance for log homes using REScheck. Estimated Length: 56 minutes Presenters: Rob Picket, Log Homes Council Heather Dillon and Pam Cole, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Original Webcast Date: Thursday, February 16, 2006 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Residential Focus: Compliance Code Version: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: REScheck Target Audience:

332

Low cost performance evaluation of passive solar buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An approach to low-cost instrumentation and performance evaluation of passive solar heated buildings is presented. Beginning with a statement of the need for a low-cost approach, a minimum list of measured quantities necessary to compute a set of recommended performance factors is developed. Conflicts and confusion surrounding the definition of various performance factors are discussed and suggestions are made for dealing with this situation. Available instrumentation and data processing equipment is presented. The recommended system would monitor approximately ten variables and compute numerous performance factors on site at a projected system cost of less than $3,000 per installation.

Palmiter, L.S.; Hamilton, L.B.; Holtz, M.J.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 16, Example Cost Codes for Construction Projects  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides an example outline of cost items and their corresponding cost codes that may be used for construction projects.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Standards, building codes, and certification programs for solar technology applicatons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a primer on solar standards development. It explains the development of standards, building code provisions, and certification programs and their relationship to the emerging solar technologies. These areas are important in the commercialization of solar technology because they lead to the attainment of two goals: the development of an industry infrastructure and consumer confidence. Standards activities in the four phases of the commercialization process (applied research, development, introduction, and diffusion) are discussed in relation to institutional issues. Federal policies have been in operation for a number of years to accelerate the development process for solar technology. These policies are discussed in light of the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular on federal interaction with the voluntary consensus system, and in light of current activities of DOE, HUD, and other interested federal agencies. The appendices cover areas of specific interest to different audiences: activities on the state and local level; and standards, building codes, and certification programs for specific technologies. In addition, a contract for the development of a model solar document let by DOE to a model consortium is excerpted in the Appendix.

Riley, J. D.; Odland, R.; Barker, H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Conservation Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential--Part 5. Energy Efficient Buildings: The Cause of Litigation Against Energy Conservation Building Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common Conservation building codes answer public concernsConservation and Development Act. Chapter 276 (AB 1575), adding Division 15 to the Public Resources Code (buildingconservation building codes offer a solution to the goals of diverse public-

Benenson, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Commercial Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents detailed information about the recommendations for achieving 15% above-code energy performance for commercial office buildings complying with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-19991. To accomplish the 15% annual energy consumption reductions, ten measures were considered. After energy savings were determined for each measure, they were then placed in several groups to accomplish a minimum of 15% total annual energy consumption reduction. The analysis in this paper uses the total annual energy consumption of a simulated commercial building to determine the 15% above-code recommendations. The analysis also reports end-use energy use, including: heating, cooling, domestic hot water use, fans, heat rejection, equipment and lighting loads, and miscellaneous loads as defined by the BEPS and BEPU reports from the DOE-2 program. Since the 15% above-code savings use annual energy cost savings, these same measures will report greater savings when compared against total heating and cooling loads, which has been used in other above-code program recommendations.

Montgomery, C.; Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J. S.; Culp, C.; Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Cho, S.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

So how much will it cost to build a nuke?  

SciTech Connect

Trying to get a better understanding of the different estimates of the cost of nuclear power, Prof. Francois Leveque of Mines ParisTech and Marcelo Saguan of Microeconomix examined seven studies published since 2000. They examined levelized cost, which captures the cost of electricity generation from nuclear reactors over the entire life cycle, including initial investment costs, operations and maintenance costs, cost of fuel, cost of capital, and decommissioning. The results, in 2007 euro/MWh, vary from 18 to 80. Making matters worse, more recent studies show an upward trend: the average value for studies published in 2003--05 is about 43 euro/MWh, while those published in 2007--09 average 63 euro2007/MWh. One reason for the different results is different assumptions about the main cost drivers and how they may vary over time. With the advent of third-generation nuclear reactors, numbers in the range of $1,000/kW (approx. 750 euro/kW) were being tossed around, suggesting a $1 billion investment for a 1,000 MW plant. A 2003 MIT study assumed an overnight cost of 1,750 euro/kW, with later studies raising the numbers to 3,000 euro/kW (approx. US$ 4,500). In 2008, Progress Energy Florida put the price tag for 2 new reactors it is planning to build on the Gulf Coast of Florida at $14 billion with another $3 billion for transmission and related expenses. Likewise, Florida Power & Light figures it would cost $20 billion for 2 new reactors at its Turkey Point site in Florida. These higher cost estimates and significant uncertainties about the true costs pose serious challenges to the competitiveness of nuclear power.

NONE

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

Recommendations for 2009 IECC 15% Above Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the 79th Legislature (2005) the Energy Systems Laboratory was required to develop three alternative methods for achieving 15% above-code energy savings in new residential, commercial and industrial construction. The Laboratory continues to work closely with code officials, energy raters, manufacturers, state officials and other stakeholders to develop cost effective energy efficiency measures. This report presents detailed information about the recommendations for achieving 15% above-code energy performance, which are based on the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), for single-family residences across the State of Texas. To estimate above-code savings (%) of energy efficiency measures, total source energy savings from heating, cooling, lighting, equipment, and DHW were considered for emissions reductions determination. The recommendations were developed for three 2009 IECC climate zones in Texas along with simple payback calculations. This information is useful to homebuilders, utility demand side energy managers, homeowners and others who wish to construct residential buildings that exceed the minimum national energy code requirements. The analysis was performed using an ESL simulation model based on the DOE-2.1e simulation of a 2009 IECC code-compliant, single family residence and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for seventeen counties in Texas for which TMY2 data is available. According to 2009 IECC Climate Zone, seventeen counties were categorized into three climate zones: Climate Zone 2, 3, and 4, and the 2009 IECC code-compliance base-case models were constructed for each climate zone. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) natural gas (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) electricity (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). A total of eighteen measures based on the energy savings above the base-case house were selected. These measures include building envelope and fenestration, HVAC system, domestic hot water (DHW) system, lighting and renewable options. The implementation costs of each individual measure were also calculated along with simple payback calculations. These measures were then combined to achieve the total source energy savings of the group is 15% above the base-case 2009 code-compliant house. As a result, three example combinations were proposed for each base case ((a) electric/gas house and (b) all-electric house) in each climate zone. Each combination was formed to have a different payback period. Finally, the corresponding emissions savings of each combination were calculated based on the eGrid for Texas.

Kim, H.; Liu, Z.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Montgomery, C.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cost-Effectiveness of Home Energy Retrofits in Pre-Code Vintage Homes in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This analytical study examines the opportunities for cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofits in residential archetypes constructed prior to 1980 (Pre-Code) in fourteen U.S. cities. These fourteen cities are representative of each of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) climate zones in the contiguous U.S. The analysis is conducted using an in-house version of EnergyGauge USA v.2.8.05 named CostOpt that has been programmed to perform iterative, incremental economic optimization on a large list of residential energy efficiency and renewable energy retrofit measures. The principle objectives of the study are as follows: to determine the opportunities for cost effective source energy reductions in this large cohort of existing residential building stock as a function of local climate and energy costs; and to examine how retrofit financing alternatives impact the source energy reductions that are cost effectively achievable.

Fairey, P.; Parker, D.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cost Savings and Energy Reduction: Bi-Level Lighting Retrofits in Multifamily Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Environmental Center implements Bi- Level Lighting fixtures as a component of cost-effective multifamily retrofits. These systems achieve substantial energy savings by automatically reducing lighting levels when common areas are unoccupied. Because there is a lack of empirical evidence documenting the performance of these systems, this paper uses electric consumption data collected from buildings before and after retrofits were performed, and analyzes the cost and consumption savings achieved through installation of Bi-Level Lighting systems. The results of this report demonstrate that common areas that are currently not making use of Bi-Level lighting systems would achieve significant financial and environmental benefits from Bi-Level focused retrofits. This project concludes that building codes should be updated to reflect improvements in Bi-Level Lighting technologies, and that government-sponsored energy efficiency programs should explicitly encourage or mandate Bi-Level Lighting installation components of subsidized retrofit projects.

Ackley, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

AEDG Recommendations - Lighting Overview | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Overview Lighting Overview This course provides an overview of the lighting recommendations provided in the ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides (30% Series). Estimated Length: 56 minutes Presenters: Michael Lane, Lighting Design Lab Original Webcast Date: Thursday, July 31, 2008 - 13:00 CEUs Offered: 1.0 AIA/CES LU (HSW); .10 CEUs towards ICC renewal certification. Course Type: Video Downloads: Presentation Slides Video Watch on YouTube Visit the BECP Online Training Center for instructions on how to obtain a certificate of completion. Building Type: Commercial Focus: Adoption Compliance Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 Target Audience: Advocate Policy Maker State Official Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Wednesday, July 18, 2012 - 16:08

343

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Unvented Crawlspaces Code Adoption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crawlspaces that are unvented and insulated Crawlspaces that are unvented and insulated along the interior or exterior sides of the walls remain drier in humid climate zones. Building America research played a major role in helping to clarify and contribute to code requirements that allow unvented crawlspaces in new home construction. This is critical because unvented crawlspaces save energy while improving comfort, health, and durability in most climate zones. In most climate zones, conditioned crawlspaces perform better than vented crawlspaces in terms of safety, health, comfort, durability and energy consumption. Building America research has demonstrated how these conditioned crawlspaces also do not cost more to construct than vented crawlspaces. Crawlspace venting is a widely accepted business practice across the country.

344

Photovoltaic and solar-thermal technologies in residential building codes, tackling building code requirements to overcome the impediments to applying new technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the building code requirements and impediments to applying photovoltaic (PV) and solar-thermal technologies in residential buildings (one- or two-family dwellings). It reviews six modern model building codes that represent the codes to be adopted by most locations in the coming years: International Residential Code, First Draft (IRC), International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), International Mechanical Code (IMC), International Plumbing Code (IPC), International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC), and National Electrical Code (NEC). The IRC may become the basis for many of the building codes in the United States after it is released in 2000, and it references the other codes that will also likely become applicable at that time. These codes are reviewed as they apply to photovoltaic systems in buildings and building-integrated photovoltaic systems and to active-solar domestic hot-water and space-heating systems. The first discussion is on general code issues that impact the s e technologies-for example, solar access and sustainability. Then, secondly, the discussion investigates the relationship of the technologies to the codes, providing examples, while keeping two major issues in mind: How do the codes treat these technologies as building components? and Do the IECC and other codes allow reasonable credit for the energy impacts of the technologies? The codes can impact the implementation of the above technologies in several ways: (1) The technology is not mentioned in the codes. It may be an obstacle to implementing the technology, and the solution is to develop appropriate explicit sections or language in the codes. (2) The technology is discussed by the codes, but the language is confusing or ambiguous. The solution is to clarify the language. (3) The technology is discussed in the codes, but the discussion is spread over several sections or different codes. Practitioners may not easily find all of the relevant material that should be considered. The so lution is to put all relevant information in one section or to more clearly reference relevant sections. (4) The technology is prohibited by the code. Examples of this situation were not found. However, energy credit for some technologies cannot be achieved with the requirements of these codes. Finally, four types of future action are recommended to make the codes reviewed in this report more accommodating to renewable energy technologies: (1) Include suggested language additions and changes in the codes; (2) Create new code sections that place all of the requirements for a technology in one section of an appropriate code; (3) Apply existing standards, as appropriate, to innovative renewable energy and energy conservation technologies; and (4) Develop new standards, as necessary, to ease code compliance. A synergy may be possible in developing suitable code language changes for both photovoltaic and solar hot-water systems. The installation of rooftop photovoltaic panels and solar hot- water collectors involves many overlapping issues. Roof loading, weather tightness, mounting systems, roof penetrations, and similar concerns are identical for both technologies. If such work can be coordinated, organizations supporting both technologies could work together to implement the appropriate revisions and additions to the codes.

Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L. [authors] and Wiechman, J.; Hayter, S.; Gwinner, D. [eds.

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High Performance Without Increased Cost: Urbane Homes, Louiseville KY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Urbane's first Urbane's first home, built for $36 per ft 2 in 2008, incorporated both energy efficiency and strategies to reduce building costs. The home won two EnergyValue Housing Awards, and homebuyers began seeking out the builder for energy-efficient, high-quality homes. Building America field projects that demonstrated minimal or cost-neutral impacts for high-performance homes have significantly influenced the housing industry to apply advanced technologies and best practices. In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America program set a goal of proving that cost-neutral energy savings of 40% over code were possible at a production scale for new home builders in every U.S. climate zone. Between 2005 and 2010, Building America research partners worked with 34 builders to

346

Mr. Roland Risser, Building Energy Codes Program Manager U.S...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(IECC) and ANSIASHRAEIESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE), respectively, the State of Ohio certifies that it has reviewed the energy provisions of its building codes and have...

347

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to build different types of power plants in the United States? EIA publishes estimates for the capital costs for different types of electricity ...

348

Current Building Energy Codes: Using the Process to Advance Energy Efficient Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12 12 NREL / Build America Stakeholders Meeting Presented by David Karmol, VP, Federal & External Affairs  The purpose of this presentation is to provide information on ICC model codes that impact the design and construction of buildings, and tactics to allow Building America advances to be incorporated into the model code and/or recognized by building code officials  The expected outcome is an ability to expand the reach of Build America innovations, by using available resources to mainstream new energy efficiency systems into building practices nationwide 2 3  Will apply to traditional commercial and high-performance buildings.  Consistent and coordinated with the ICC family of Codes & Standards.  Applicable to the construction of

349

Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Achieving Higher Performance Achieving Higher Performance with Cost Neutrality through Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting March 1, 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Agenda * Imagine Homes - An Overview * 2010 Occupied Test House - Objectives - From Modeling through Monitoring * 2012 Occupied Test House - Objectives - What's Next * Closing Remarks Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Overview: * San Antonio, TX * 68 Homes in 2011 * $140k - $425k * 1,300 - 4,500 ft 2 Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Environment: * Hot-Humid * 2,996 CDD * 1,546 HDD * 31" Rainfall Imagine Homes Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Imagine Homes History: * Established 2006 * Partnership with Beazer Homes * Builders Challenge * Building America

350

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EE4 CODE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Building Energy Software Tools Directory Search Search Help Building Energy Software Tools Directory...

351

COMcheck101 for the 2009 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2009 IECC Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

352

IECC, REScheck, and COMcheck | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code Version: 2009 IECC 2006 IECC Software: COMcheck REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

353

Comply! Energy Code Tools You May Be Missing | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Federal Official State Official...

354

REScheck for the 2006 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2006 IECC Software: REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

355

COMcheck101 for the 2006 IECC | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus: Compliance Code Version: 2006 IECC Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

356

Alterations Feature in COMcheck | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

357

Nondestructive Evaluation: ASME Code Participation and Cost Savings in 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because some utilities are unable to participate in code activities, this project provides a way for them to be represented at ASME code meetings by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program staff members, particularly for Section XI (Nuclear In-Service Inspection). Staff members prepare code revisions, inquiries, technical basis documents, and code cases for submittal to the codes consensus process. Directives to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission require the s...

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States. Residential Energy Services Network. (2013). The29, 2013, from Residential Energy Services Network: http://2010. 69. Residential Energy Services Network. The HERS

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

90% Compliance by 2017. Montpelier, VT: Vermont Department90% Compliance by 2017. Montpelier, VT : Vermont Department

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy EfficientWashington, DC: American Council for an Energy EfficientWashington, DC: American Council for an Energy Efficient-

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commerce. (2011). Home Energy Audit and Retrofit Includingof Commerce. Home Energy Audit and Retrofit Including Homeaudit plans and provide final approval However, a BCAP study noted that, because energy

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The Cost of Enforcing Building Energy Codes: Phase 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assistance Project, 2009. 46. Makela, E. , Meyers, J. andEconomy. Conver, D. , Makela, E. , Stacey, J. , & Sullivan,for Electric Efficiency. Makela, E. (2011). Measuring State

Williams, Alison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1 BIM and Demonstrating Code Compliance TOPIC BRIEF 1 Building Information Modeling and Demonstrating Code Compliance Demonstrating or verifying compliance with codes, standards, or other criteria governing building design is achieved through a set of specific tasks. These include producing construction documents; providing specifications for the products, materials, equipment, and systems to be used; and describing how they come together to create the envisioned building. W hen building construction documents and specifications are produced, they should include all information necessary to prescribe how the building is to be constructed. Plans and specifications should be readily usable to verify compliance with prescriptive requirements of codes, standards, or other desired

364

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: doe2.com/ Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, DOE-2 Building Energy Use and Cost Analysis Software References: DOE2 Home Page[1] Perform detailed comparative analysis of building designs and technologies by applying sophisticated building energy use simulation techniques; does not require extensive experience in building performance modeling. DOE-2 is a freeware building energy analysis program that can predict the

365

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

payback time versus building size Project costs and energyPayback time (commissioning cost/annual energy savings) lessenergy payback time of 41 years, while the proper allocation of costs and

Mills, Evan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

An Analysis of Statewide Adoption Rates of Building Energy Code by Local Jurisdictions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to generally inform the U.S. Department of Energys Building Energy Codes Program of the local, effective energy code adoption rate for a sample set of 21 states, some which have adopted statewide codes and some that have not. Information related to the residential energy code adoption process and status at the local jurisdiction was examined for each of the states. Energy code status information was gathered for approximately 2,800 jurisdictions, which effectively covered approximately 80 percent of the new residential building construction in the 21 states included in the study.

Cort, Katherine A.; Butner, Ryan S.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Choosing an Energy Code Compliance Path TOPIC BRIEF 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choosing an Energy Code Compliance Path TOPIC BRIEF 1 Choosing an Energy Code Compliance Path TOPIC BRIEF 1 Choosing an Energy Code Compliance Path One challenge that awaits any building designer is choosing the appropriate compliance path through the applicable building energy code. This is not a trivial decision-energy codes are marvels of flexibility, offering multiple compliance paths to suit all types of designers. E ach path has its own pluses and minuses, which may include differences in stringency, complexity, and potentially even limitations on building designs. This topic brief focuses on the compliance paths that are available in the following model codes and standards: * 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and 2012

368

U.S. Virgin Islands | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to 2009 IECC Effective Date 07012009 Code Enforcement Mandatory DOE Determination ASHRAE 90.1-2007: No ASHRAE 90.1-2010: No Current Code 2009 IECC Approved Compliance Tools...

369

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building industry determine the most  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new database of residential building measures and estimated costs helps the U.S. building at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed the National Residential Efficiency Measures with using various measures to improve the efficiency of residential buildings. This database offers

370

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Technologies in Residential Building Codes: June 15, 1998 to September 15, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report is an attempt to describe the building code requirements and impediments to the application of EE and RE technologies in residential buildings. Several modern model building codes were reviewed. These are representative of the codes that will be adopted by most locations in the coming years. The codes reviewed for this report include: International Residential Code, First Draft, April 1998; International Energy Conservation Code, 1998; International Mechanical Code, 1998; International Plumbing Code, 1997; International Fuel Gas Code, 1997; National Electrical Code, 1996. These codes were reviewed as to their application to (1) PV systems in buildings and building-integrated PV systems and (2) active solar domestic hot water and space-heating systems. A discussion of general code issues that impact these technologies is also included. Examples of this are solar access and sustainability.

Wortman, D.; Echo-Hawk, L.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. lB, Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. lB, The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and building codes consistent with the requirements of DOE 0 420.1B. BACKGROUND: The attached technical position was developed in response to line organization requests for clarification and it will be posted on the Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Policy web page for technical positions ~cto://~~~.hss.enernv.~ov~uclearSafetvlnspslintemretations.hBtomtlh) t.h e Chief of Nuclear Safety and the Chief, Defense Nuclear Safety, have

372

Low Cost Thin Film Building-Integrated Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program is to develop 'LOW COST THIN FILM BUILDING-INTEGRATED PV SYSTEMS'. Major focus was on developing low cost solution for the commercial BIPV and rooftop PV market and meet DOE LCOE goal for the commercial market segment of 9-12 cents/kWh for 2010 and 6-8 cents/kWh for 2015. We achieved the 2010 goal and were on track to achieve the 2015 goal. The program consists of five major tasks: (1) modules; (2) inverters and BOS; (3) systems engineering and integration; (4) deployment; and (5) project management and TPP collaborative activities. We successfully crossed all stage gates and surpassed all milestones. We proudly achieved world record stable efficiencies in small area cells (12.56% for 1cm2) and large area encapsulated modules (11.3% for 800 cm2) using a triple-junction amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon/nanocrystalline silicon structure, confirmed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. We collaborated with two inverter companies, Solectria and PV Powered, and significantly reduced inverter cost. We collaborated with three universities (Syracuse University, University of Oregon, and Colorado School of Mines) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and improved understanding on nanocrystalline material properties and light trapping techniques. We jointly published 50 technical papers in peer-reviewed journals and International Conference Proceedings. We installed two 75kW roof-top systems, one in Florida and another in New Jersey demonstrating innovative designs. The systems performed satisfactorily meeting/exceeding estimated kWh/kW performance. The 50/50 cost shared program was a great success and received excellent comments from DOE Manager and Technical Monitor in the Final Review.

Dr. Subhendu Guha; Dr. Jeff Yang

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

373

Code Gaps and Future Research Needs of Combustion Safety: Building America Expert Meeting Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technical Update Meeting April 2013 Technical Update Meeting April 2013 www.buildingamerica.gov Buildings Technologies Program Code Gaps and Future Research Needs for Combustion Safety 2012 Expert Meeting Larry Brand Gas Technology Institute April 29-30, 2013 Building America Technical Update Meeting Denver, Colorado installation, inspection and testing 2. Appliance Installation: clearances to combustible materials, combustion air, and testing 3. Appliance venting: allowed materials, vent type selection, sizing, installation, and testing Fundamental Combustion Safety Related Coverage: 2 | Building America Technical Update Meeting April 2013 www.buildingamerica.gov 1. Gas piping: allowed materials, sizing, Code Coverage Three Key Provisions For Combustion Safety in the Codes 1. Combustion air

374

Minimum cost multiple multicast network coding with quantized rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider multiple multicast sessions with intra-session network coding where rates over all links are integer multiples of a basic rate. Although having quantized rates over communication links is quite common, conventional minimum ... Keywords: Decomposition algorithm, Multicast networks, Network coding

M. A. Raayatpanah; H. Salehi Fathabadi; B. H. Khalaj; S. Khodayifar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

City of Chicago - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chicago) to adopt more stringent rules. The CECC establishes standards to minimize solar energy absorbed by building roofs, a condition known as the '''''urban heat island...

376

Changes to ICC Building and Fire Codes - from FY 2008 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... feet high, for buildings 75-420 feet high where failure of the enclosure would substantially jeopardize human life, and in essential facilities such as ...

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Advanced Lighting Design and the Energy Code This course addresses the lighting requirements of the...

378

Areas for Air Leakage | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Referenced: 2006 IECC 2003 IECC Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S....

379

Software and Web Tools | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software and Web Tools Subscribe to updates To receive updates about compliance tools subscribe to the BECP Mailing List. Residential Code Compliance REScheck logo REScheck(tm)...

380

Safer Buildings Are Goal of New Code Changes Based on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Fire Codes Based on Recommendations from NIST's WTC Towers Investigation. ... use of a new standard for conducting wind tunnel testing. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Buildings consume approximately 40% of the energy, and nearly 70% of the electricity used in the United States. Building surfaces are well suited to renewable energy ...

382

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

of State Energy Codes: Commercial Sector(1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current Commercial codes as of March 2012. DOEEERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, http:www...

383

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

of State Energy Codes: Residential Sector (1) Note(s): Source(s): 1) These are the current residential codes as of March 2012. DOEEERE, The Status of State Energy Codes, www...

384

Mr. Roland Risser, Building Energy Codes Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2013 9, 2013 Mr. Roland Risser, Building Energy Codes Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Buildings Technologies Program Forrestal Building, Mail Station EE-2J 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington DC, 20585-0121 RE: State Certification for Adoption of 2009 IECC & ASHRAE 90.1-2007 Dear Mr. Risser: In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 19, 2011 and July 20, 2011 Federal Register determination notices regarding the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 (ASHRAE), respectively, the State of Ohio certifies that it has reviewed the energy provisions of its building codes and have adopted these standards by reference. The Ohio Board of Building Standards (Board) formulates and adopts rules of the Ohio

385

Whole Building Cost and Performance Measurement: Data Collection Protocol Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This protocol was written for the Department of Energys Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to be used by the public as a tool for assessing building cost and performance measurement. The primary audiences are sustainable design professionals, asset owners, building managers, and research professionals within the Federal sector. The protocol was developed based on the need for measured performance and cost data on sustainable design projects. Historically there has not been a significant driver in the public or private sector to quantify whole building performance in comparable terms. The deployment of sustainable design into the building sector has initiated many questions on the performance and operational cost of these buildings.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Spees, Kathleen L.; Kora, Angela R.; Rauch, Emily M.; Hathaway, John E.; Solana, Amy E.

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Potential Job Creation in Nevada as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Potential Job Creation in Rhode Island as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Potential Job Creation in Minnesota as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

SciTech Connect

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Potential Job Creation in Tennessee as a Result of Adopting New Residential Building Energy Codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? , The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes. Each state in the country is dealing with high levels of unemployment, so job creation has become a top priority. Many programs have been created to combat unemployment with various degrees of failure and success. At the same time, many states still have not yet adopted the most current versions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) model building energy code, when doing so could be a very effective tool in creating jobs to assist states in recovering from this economic downturn.

Scott, Michael J.; Niemeyer, Jackie M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trend & Dummy Building Code Intensity Building Code Construction Share Heating Degree Days Cooling Degree Days Per Capita Income Natural Gas Price

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

2006 IECC Prescriptive Requirements | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code (IECC) envelope requirements are not coupled to the home''s glazing area percentage. A home with modest glazing area, say 13% of floor area, will likely require a more...

392

Advantages of Conditioned Basements | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

costs. In most cases, the homeowner eventually finishes the basement for additional living space by installing basement wall insulation. Because most basements are eventually...

393

An Analysis of Building Energy Code Statewide Adoption Rates by Local  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Building Energy Code Statewide Adoption Rates by Local An Analysis of Building Energy Code Statewide Adoption Rates by Local Jurisdiction The purpose of this study is to quantify the energy code adoption rate by local jurisdictions from a sample set of 21 states. Some of the states within this sample have statewide energy codes, while others do not. Using construction starts and weighting results by localities that have or have not adopted energy codes, the findings can suggest a means of identifying which states have "effectively" adopted state-wide codes through local adoption and enforcement. Publication Date: Monday, December 31, 2012 BEC_Statewide_Adoption.pdf Document Details Last Name: Cort Initials: KA Affiliation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Document Number: PNNL-21963 Prepared by:

394

Commercial Code Change Proposals for the 2015 IECC | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Printable Version Development Adoption Compliance Regulations Resource Center Commercial Code Change Proposals for the 2015 IECC This page provides archival documentation relative to DOE participation in the 2015 IECC. For official results, visit the ICC web site. DOE Proposals for the IECC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) by participating in the code development process administered by the International Code Council (ICC). As a participant in this process, DOE considers and evaluates concepts to be submitted as proposed changes to the IECC ("code"). DOE participates in the IECC development process by: Developing code change proposals for submission to the ICC Gathering public input on DOE code change proposals from interested

395

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Where can copies of the energy codes be obtained? Copies of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) can be purchased from the International Code Council website. Copies of ASHRAE standards can be purchased from the ... What are the requirements for duct leakage testing? Category: air leakage, ducts Both the 2009 and 2012 IECC require duct tightness to be verified. Verification can take place via either a post-construction test or a rough-in test.For the post-construction test, leakage measurement must be made across the entire system,... How are basement walls input in REScheck? Category: basement, walls After selecting a basement wall type, a basement wall illustration will appear with input boxes for the basement wall height, depth below grade,

396

Proposed Energy Provisions of the California Green Building Standards Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Service Water Heating in Large Restaurants ­ 15% Solar Fraction or 95% water heater efficiency Tier I · 95 · Removal of Maximum Hot Water Pipe Volume from Prerequisites for Newly Constructed Residential · Removal Building Energy Design Rating Space Cooling Space Heating Water Heating Refrigerator Dishwasher Range

397

Technical support document for the proposed Federal Commercial Building energy code  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the justification and technical documentation for all changes and updates made (since 1993) to the Energy Code for Commercial and High-Rise Residential Buildings, the codified version of ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989, ``Energy Efficient Design of New Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.`` These changes and updates, which were subject to the ASHRAE addenda approval process, include Addenda b, c, d, e, g, and i. A seventh addenda, Addenda f, which has not been officially approved by ASHRAE, has been included into the proposed rule. Also included in the changes was technical work conducted to justify revisions to the 1993 DOE lighting power densities. The updated text will be reviewed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and issued as the new Federal Commercial Building Energy Code (10 CFR 434); Mandatory for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High Rise Residential Buildings.

Somasundaram, S.; Halverson, M.A.; Jones, C.C.; Hadley, D.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Analysis of Job Creation and Energy Cost Savings From Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policy Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports

399

Model document for code officials on solar heating and cooling of buildings. First draft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this document is to promote the use and further development of solar energy through a systematic categorizing of all the attributes in a solar energy system that may impact on those requirements in the nationally recognized model codes relating to the safeguard of life or limb, health, property, and public welfare. Administrative provisions have been included to integrate this document with presently adopted codes, so as to allow incorporation into traditional building, plumbing, mechanical, and electrical codes. In those areas where model codes are not used it is recommended that the requirements, references, and standards herein be adopted to regulate all solar energy systems. (MOW)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Low-cost, Modular, Building-integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal ...  

Home CU Marketing Summaries. Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. About; Search; Categories (15) Advanced Materials; Biomass and Biofuels; Building ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Step 10. Get Assistance on Energy Code and Compliance Questions | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10. Get Assistance on Energy Code and Compliance Questions 10. Get Assistance on Energy Code and Compliance Questions Direct assistance on building energy code compliance questions is available from several sources. In addition, there are many training courses available to learn more about specific code requirements. Resources Contact the local jurisdiction having authority BECP Helpdesk ICC Technical Opinions and Interpretations ASHRAE Standards Interpretations ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 BECP Training Courses Residential Requirements of the 2009 IECC Residential Requirements of the 2012 IECC Commercial Building Envelope Requirements of the 2009 IECC Commercial Lighting Requirements of the 2009 IECC Commercial Mechanical Requirements of the 2009 IECC Requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007

402

Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.8 State Building Energy Codes  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Building Energy Rating and Disclosure Policies in the United States Commercial Buildings Commercial Buildings Public Buildings Homes Existing Policy Policy Being Considered Rating Requirement Disclosure Requirement Austin, TX Connecticut Arlington County, VA Alaska California Colorado Denver, CO Austin, TX District of Columbia Illinois Hawaii Kansas New York, NY Maine Michigan Montgomery County, MD San Francisco, CA Maryland Minnesota Nevada Seattle, WA Massachusetts Ohio New York Washington New Mexico West Chester, PA Santa Fe, NM Oregon South Dakota Portland, OR Tennessee Vermont Note(s): Source(s): Map depicts the policy landscape as of March 17, 2011. More information available at www.BuildingRating.org. Institute for Market Transformation, "Rating Policy Map and Timeline."

403

Commissioning: A Highly Cost-Effective Building Energy Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance and optimization are essential elements of any serious technological endeavor, including efforts to improve energy efficiency. Commissioning is an important tool in this respect. The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver-if not exceed-the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, one-time or repeated commissioning (often called retrocommissioning) identifies the almost inevitable drift in energy performance and puts the building back on course, often surpassing the original design intent. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to improving performance, rather than a discrete technology.

Mills, Evan

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

405

Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Estimates of Energy Cost Savings Achieved from 2009 IECC Code-Compliant, Single Family Residences in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of the energy cost savings to be achieved from 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) code-compliant, single-family residences in Texas compared to the pre-2009 IECC codes, including: the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, and the 2006 IECC w/ Houston amendments (w/ HA). A series of simulations were performed using an ESL simulation model (BDL version 4.01.07 of IC3) based on the DOE-2.1e simulation and the appropriate TMY2 weather files for three counties representing three 2009 IECC Climate Zones across Texas: Harris County for Climate Zone 2, Tarrant County for Climate Zone 3, and Potter County for Climate Zone 4. Two options based on the choice of heating fuel type were considered: (a) an electric/gas house (gas-fired furnace for space heating, and gas water heater for domestic water heating), and (b) a heat pump house (heat pump for space heating, and electric water heater for domestic water heating). The base-case building was assumed to be a 2,325 sq. ft., square-shape, one story, single-family, detached house with a floor-to-ceiling height of 8 feet. The house has an attic with a roof pitched at 23 degrees. The base-case building envelope and system characteristics were determined from the general characteristics and the climate-specific characteristics as specified in the 2001 IECC, the 2006 IECC, the 2006 IECC w/HA, and the 2009 IECC. In addition, to facilitate a better comparison with the 2009 code, several modifications were applied to the pre-2009 IECC codes. As a result, the estimated annual energy cost savings per house associated with the 2009 IECC compared to the 2001 and 2006 IECC are: (a) an electric/gas house: $462/year and $206/year for Harris County, $432/year and $216/year for Tarrant County, and $576/year and $153/year for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: $490/year and $203/year for Harris County, $487/year and $226/year for Tarrant County, and $680/year and $155/year for Potter County. The corresponding % savings of total energy cost of a 2009 IECC code-compliant house are: (a) an electric/gas house: 22.7% and 10.1% for Harris County, 21.8% and 10.9% for Tarrant County, and 28.9% and 7.7% for Potter County and (b) a heat pump house: 21.6% and 8.9% for Harris County, 20.9% and 9.7% for Tarrant County, and 25.7% and 5.8% for Potter County.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J. C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Residential Energy and Cost Analysis Methodology | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

types. National energy savings are reported, in addition to economic metrics by state and climate zone. In considering cost-effectiveness, longer term energy savings are balanced...

408

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Energy Code Compliance in a Detailed Commercial Building Sample: The Effects of Missing Data  

SciTech Connect

Most commercial buildings in the U.S. are required by State or local jurisdiction to meet energy standards. The enforcement of these standards is not well known and building practice without them on a national scale is also little understood. To provide an understanding of these issues, a database has been developed at PNNL that includes detailed energy related building characteristics of 162 commercial buildings from across the country. For this analysis, the COMcheck? compliance software (developed at PNNL) was used to assess compliance with energy codes among these buildings. Data from the database for each building provided the program input with percentage energy compliance to the ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 energy as the output. During the data input process it was discovered that some essential data for showing compliance of the building envelope was missed and defaults had to be developed to provide complete compliance information. This need for defaults for some data inputs raised the question of what the effect on documenting compliance could be due to missing data. To help answer this question a data collection effort was completed to assess potential differences. Using the program Dodge View, as much of the missing envelope data as possible was collected from the building plans and the database input was again run through COMcheck?. The outputs of both compliance runs were compared to see if the missing data would have adversely affected the results. Both of these results provided a percentage compliance of each building in the envelope and lighting categories, showing by how large a percentage each building either met or fell short of the ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999 energy code. The results of the compliance runs showed that 57.7 % of the buildings met or exceeded envelope requirements with defaults and that 68 % met or exceeded envelope requirements with the actual data. Also, 53.6 % of the buildings met or surpassed the lighting requirements in both cases. The dataset of 162 buildings is not large enough to accurately apply theses findings to all commercial buildings across the U.S., but it does provide a rough idea of what to generally expect. This database also has other uses such as characterization of commercial buildings by each specific data point and in splitting up the total of 162 buildings into smaller subsets to characterize such groups as large (>5000 sq ft) or small (<5000 sq ft) commercial buildings.

Biyani, Rahul K.; Richman, Eric E.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geothermal wells: the cost benefit of fracture stimulation estimated by the GEOCOM code. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEOCOM, a computer code that provides life cycle cost/benefit analysis of completion technologies applied to geothermal wells, is used to study fracture stimulation techniques. it is estimated that stimulation must increase flow by roughly tons per $100,000 in order to be cost effective. Typically, hydraulic fracturing costs $100,000 to $500,000 per well, and the attempts at stimulation to date have generally not achieved the desired flow increases. The cost effectiveness of hydraulic fracturing is considered for several geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, G.L.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

simple, cost-effective techniques for providing fresh air throughout the home, including exhaust-only and central fan-integrated supply ventilation. Building America has refined simple whole-house ventilation systems that cost less than $350 to install. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.3 Assured Health, Safety, and Durability Low-Cost Ventilation in Production Housing As high-performance homes get more air-tight and better insulated, attention to good indoor air quality becomes essential. Building America has effectively guided the nation's home builders to embrace whole-house ventilation by developing low-cost options that adapt well to their production processes. When the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research teams began

412

Energy and Cost Savings of Retro-Commissioning and Retrofit Measures for Large Office Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy and cost savings of seven retro-commissioning measures and 29 retrofit measures applicable to most large office buildings. The baseline model is for a hypothetical building with characteristics of large office buildings constructed before 1980. Each retro-commissioning measure is evaluated against the original baseline in terms of its potential of energy and cost savings while each retrofit measure is evaluated against the commissioned building. All measures are evaluated in five locations (Miami, Las Vegas, Seattle, Chicago and Duluth) to understand the impact of weather conditions on energy and cost savings. The results show that implementation of the seven operation and maintenance measures as part of a retro-commissioning process can yield an average of about 22% of energy use reduction and 14% of energy cost reduction. Widening zone temperature deadband, lowering VAV terminal minimum air flow set points and lighting upgrades are effective retrofit measures to be considered.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Moser, Dave; Liu, Guopeng; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

413

Find cost-effective investments | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lamps and can save 10 per sign annually in electricity costs. Swap out incandescent light bulbs with ENERGY STAR certified CFLs or LEDs in your desk, task, and floor lamps....

414

ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IES Standard 90.1-2010 IES Standard 90.1-2010 The materials for this course may be used for in-person training purposes. The presentation slides focus on the envelope; heating, ventilation, and air conditioning; power and lighting; and scope and application requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010. Presenters: Course materials originally published by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, April, 2011. Course Type: Training Materials In-person Downloads: Presentation Slides -- Scope and Application Presentation Slides -- Envelope Presentation Slides -- HVAC Presentation Slides -- Power and Lighting Building Type: Commercial Focus: Compliance Code Version: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site Policies

415

Study of Possible Applications of Currently Available Building Information Modeling Tools for the Analysis of Initial Costs and Energy Costs for Performing Life Cycle Cost Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of design, construction and maintenance of facilities is on continual rise. The demand is to construct facilities which have been designed by apply life cycle costing principles. These principles have already given strong decision making power to the manufacturing industry. The need to satisfy the environmental sustainability requirements, improve operational effectiveness of buildings and apply value engineering principles has increased the dependency on life cycle costing analysis. The objective is to obtain economically viable solutions by analyzing the alternatives during the design of a building. Though the LCCA process is able to give the desired results, it does have some problems which have stood as hindrances to the more widespread use of the LCCA concept and method. The literature study has highlighted that the problem areas are the lack of frameworks or mechanisms for collecting and storing data and the complexity of LCCA exercise, which involves the analysis of a thousand of building elements and a number of construction-type options and maintenance activities for each building element at detailed design stages. Building Information Modeling has been able to repeatedly answer the questions raised by the AEC industry. The aim of this study is to identify the areas where BIM can be effectively applied to the LCCA process and become a part of the workflow. In this study, initially four LCCA case studies are read and evaluated from the point of view of understanding the method in which the life cycle costing principles have been applied. The purpose, the type alternatives examined, the process of analysis, the type of software used and the results are understood. An attempt has been carried out to understand the workflow of the LCCA process. There is a confidence that Building Information Modeling is capable of handling changes during the design, construction and maintenance phases of the project. Since applying changes to any kind of information of the building during LCC analysis forms the core, it has become necessary to use computer building models for examining these changes. The building modeling softwares are enumerated. The case studies have highlighted that the evaluation of the alternatives are primarily to achieve energy efficient solutions for the buildings. Applying these solutions involves high initial costs. The return on investment is the means by which these solutions become viable to the owners of the facilities. This is where the LCCA has been applied. Two of the important cost elements of the LCC analysis are initial costs and the operating costs of the building. The collaboration of these modeling tools with other estimating software where the initial costs of the building can be generated is studied. The functions of the quantity take-off tools and estimating tools along with the interoperability between these tools are analyzed. The operating costs are generated from the software that focuses on sustainability. And the currently used tools for performing the calculations of the life cycle costing analysis are also observed. The objective is to identify if the currently available BIM tools and software can help in obtaining LCCA results and are able to offset the hindrances of the process. Therefore, the software are studied from the point of view of ease of handling data and the type of data that can be generated. Possible BIM workflows are suggested depending on the functions of the software and the relationship between them. The study has aimed at taking a snapshot the current tools available which can aid the LCCA process. The research is of significance to the construction industry as it forms a precursor to the application of Building Information Modeling to the LCCA process as it shows that it has the capacity of overcoming the obstacles for life cycle costing. This opens a window to the possibility of applying BIM to LCCA and furthering this study.

Mukherji, Payal Tapandev

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

417

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimizing Building Electricity Costs in a Dynamic Power Market: Algorithms and Impact on Energy of Computing, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, P. R. China 2 Department of Electrical and the electricity bills nowa- days are leading to unprecedented costs. Electricity price is market-based and dynamic

Wang, Dan

418

Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India  

SciTech Connect

India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human resources available in the state and local governments, involving third-party inspectors could rapidly expand the capacity for plan reviews and broad implementation. However, the procedures of involving third-parties need to be carefully designed in order to guarantee a fair process. For example, there should be multiple checks and certification requirements for third-party inspectors, and the government should have the final approval when third-party inspectors are used in a project. This paper discusses different approaches of involving third-parties in ECBC enforcement; the Indian states may choose the approaches that work best in their given circumstances.

Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Methodology for Residential Building Energy Simulations Implemented in the International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 2001, Texas has been proactive in initiating clean air and energy efficiency in building policies. The Texas Emissions Reduction Plan legislation (SB 5, 77TH Leg., 2001) mandates statewide adoption of energy codes, creates a 5% annual energy savings goal for public facilities in affected counties through 2007 and provides approximately $150 million in cash incentives for clean diesel emissions grants and energy research. The Texas Legislation extended this annual electric reduction goal in public facilities through 2013. Texas was the first state in the nation to create NOx emissions reduction credits for energy efficiency and renewable energy through the State Implementation Plan under the Federal Clean Air Act. This paper presents the methodology for calculating the energy usage from a proposed residential house and the corresponding 2001 International Energy Conservation Code baseline house. This methodology is applied in the International Code Compliance Calculator, which is a publicly accessible web-based energy code compliance software developed by the Energy Systems Laboratory based on the Texas Building Energy Performance Standards. This calculator evaluates and certifies above-code compliance for homes in Texas. It also calculates NOx, SOx and CO2 emissions reductions from the energy savings of the proposed house for the electric utility associated with the user using the data from the Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database provided by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Liu, Z.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.; Gilman, D.; Montgomery, C.; McKelvey, K.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Feedbacks from Focus Group Meeting on Training and Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A focus group meeting is a very effective quality research approach to collect information on a specific project. Through focus group meetings at both Changchun and Ningbo in August 2010, the project team gained a more complete understandings of key stakeholders (such as their education level), their training needs and expectations, key factors influencing their decision making, and incurred implementation difficulties. In addition, the meeting helped the project team (especially PNNL) improve its understanding of the implementation status of building energy codes in other regions (such as small cities and counties neighboring to urban areas, small townships and rural areas distant from urban areas). The collected feedbacks will serve as important input not only for better design of training materials and the development of an on-line training website, but also for development of follow-up projects to promote building energy codes in China.

Shui, Bin; Lin , Haiyan; Song, Bo; Halverson, Mark A.; Evans, Meredydd; Zhu, Xiaojiao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

423

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy-Efficiency Measures for Commercial Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the recommendations for achieving 15% above code energy performance for commercial office buildings complying with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. To accomplish the 15% annual energy consumption reductions, ten measures were considered. After energy savings were determined for each measure, they were then grouped in several groups to accomplish a minimum of 15% total annual energy consumption reduction.

Mukhopadhyay, J.; Haberl, J. S.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.; Cho, S.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Costs and benefits from utility-funded commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the costs and savings of commissioning of energy- efficiency measures in 16 buildings. A total of 46 EEMs were commissioned for all 16 buildings and 73 deficiencies were corrected. On average, commissioning was marginally cost effective on energy savings alone, although the results were mixed among all 16 buildings. When considered as a stand-alone measure, the median simple payback time of 6.5 years under the low energy prices in the Pacific Northwest. Under national average prices the median payback time is about three years. In estimating the present value of the energy savings from commissioning we considered low and high lifetimes for the persistence of savings from deficiency corrections. Under the low- lifetime case the average present value of the energy savings ($0. 21/ft{sup 2}) were about equal to the average commissioning costs ($0. 23/ft{sup 2}). Under the high-lifetime case the savings ($0.51/ft{sup 2}) were about twice the costs. Again, the savings would be about twice as large under national average prices. The results are subject to significant uncertainty because of the small sample size and lack of metered data in the evaluation. However, the findings suggest that investments in commissioning pay off. Building owners want buildings that work as intended, and are comfortable, healthy, and efficient. It is likely that the non-energy benefits, which are difficult to quantify, are larger than the energy-savings benefits.

Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Effective, low-cost HVAC controls upgrade in a small bank building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the measured results from a field study of the performance of a low-cost controls retrofit in a small bank building in Knoxville, TN. The retrofit consisted of a simple upgrade of heating and cooling system controls and new operating strategies. The project was undertaken to better understand how commercial energy use measurement studies should be performed and to demonstrate the effectiveness of a low-cost controls retrofit in a small commercial building. This report describes the details of the project, including building and building system characteristics, the HVAC control changes made, energy end use patterns, and the heating and cooling energy savings achieved. An improved control strategy involving thermostat setback/setup and on/off control was devised around a single replacement programmable thermostat. The strategy allowed thermostat setback/setup control of the primary HVAC system in the building and provided on/off (time-of-day) control for the two secondary systems. The energy efficiency improvements provided a 33% reduction in heating and a 21% reduction in cooling energy consumptions. Simple payback for the retrofit, including installation cost, was under 1 year. In addition to reducing the energy needs of the building, the replacement electronic thermostat provided improved interior comfort. 9 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Sharp, T.R.; MacDonald, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: NHA-DOE Cost Shared Activities: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Outreach Karen Miller, Vice President The National Hydrogen Association 1800 M Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20036-5802 phone: 202-223-5547 fax: 202-223-5537 Background: The Mission of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) is to foster the development of hydrogen technologies and their use in commercial and industrial applications and to promote the role of hydrogen as a major energy carrier of the future. The basic long-term goals are determined by the greatest needs tempered by activities consistent with the role of the NHA as an association. Today these are: * To educate the public and policy makers on the benefits of hydrogen; * To assist in the development of necessary hydrogen codes and standards; and

427

Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Kansas City, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of about $145 a year for an average new house. Construction cost increases are estimated at $655. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of close to $100 a year because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

Lucas, Robert G.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

428

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China Environmental Energy Technologies Division 2012 ACEEEsuitable building energy technologies in different regionssuitable building energy technologies for different building

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Public Buildings. Energy and Buildings (41), 426435.and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of theand Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as buildings energy load profile, citys solar radiationthe buildings energy load profiles. The annual energythe buildings energy load profiles. The Chinese residential

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Appendix G of 90.1-2004 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appendix G of 90.1-2004 Appendix G of 90.1-2004 Session 3 of a seven-part webcast series presented by the Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program to help federal agencies comply with the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The Appendix G of 90.1-2004 webcast provides an overview of Appendix G of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, Performance Rating Method, which is a modification of the Energy Cost Budget Method. Appendix G is intended for use in rating the energy efficiency of building designs that exceed the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. 10 CFR 433 mandates the use of Appendix G (with minor modification) for use in calculating the performance of new Federal commercial and high-rise multi-family buildings. Appendix G is also used in the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and

432

Cost Estimating for Decommissioning of a Plutonium Facility--Lessons Learned From The Rocky Flats Building 771 Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Closure Site is implementing an aggressive approach in an attempt to complete Site closure by 2006. The replanning effort to meet this goal required that the life-cycle decommissioning effort for the Site and for the major individual facilities be reexamined in detail. As part of the overall effort, the cost estimate for the Building 771 decommissioning project was revised to incorporate both actual cost data from a recently-completed similar project and detailed planning for all activities. This paper provides a brief overview of the replanning process and the original estimate, and then discusses the modifications to that estimate to reflect new data, methods, and planning rigor. It provides the new work breakdown structure and discusses the reasons for the final arrangement chosen. It follows with the process used to assign scope, cost, and schedule elements within the new structure, and development of the new code of accounts. Finally, it describes the project control methodology used to track the project, and provides lessons learned on cost tracking in the decommissioning environment.

Stevens, J. L.; Titus, R.; Sanford, P. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy and cost analysis of commercial building shell characteristics and operating schedules  

SciTech Connect

Eight prototypical commercial buildings were considered, and estimates of the energy savings realized from various conservation measures are presented. For each of four building types (hospital, office, educational, and retail) two building designs representative of both pre- and post-embargo construction were analyzed. The ongoing program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory aims to develop an engineering-economic model to forecast annual energy use in the US commercial sector. This particular study was undertaken to define relationships among energy-conservation measures, energy savings, and capital costs. Buildings were modeled and analyzed using NECAP (NASA Energy-Cost Analysis Program) based on hourly weather data in Kansas City (selected as typical of the entire country). Energy-conservation measures considered include night and weekend thermostat setback, reduction in ventilation, reduction in lighting, window alterations (shading, dual panes, and size reduction), economizer cycle, reset of supply temperature based on zone demand, and improvements in equipment efficiencies. Results indicate energy savings as a function of the capital cost of each energy-conservation measure for each of the eight buildings considered.

Johnson, W.S.; Pierce, F.E.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Towards a unified cost optimal methodology for designing low energy buildings in the mediterranean sea region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing sustainability problems our world faces because of the thoughtless energy consumption and emissions production puts an increasing pressure for immediate and drastic energy saving measures. Although the consumption of energy - through appropriate ... Keywords: cost optimal, design methodology, low energy building, mediterranean

Stratis Kanarachos; Ahmed Medhat; Georgette Kanarachou; Mona Fanny

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Building Commissioning: A Golden Opportunity for Reducing Energy Costs and Greenhouse-gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

The aim of commissioning new buildings is to ensure that they deliver, if not exceed, the performance and energy savings promised by their design. When applied to existing buildings, commissioning identifies the almost inevitable 'drift' from where things should be and puts the building back on course. In both contexts, commissioning is a systematic, forensic approach to quality assurance, rather than a technology per se. Although commissioning has earned increased recognition in recent years - even a toehold in Wikipedia - it remains an enigmatic practice whose visibility severely lags its potential. Over the past decade, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has built the world's largest compilation and meta-analysis of commissioning experience in commercial buildings. Since our last report (Mills et al. 2004) the database has grown from 224 to 643 buildings (all located in the United States, and spanning 26 states), from 30 to 100 million square feet of floorspace, and from $17 million to $43 million in commissioning expenditures. The recorded cases of new-construction commissioning took place in buildings representing $2.2 billion in total construction costs (up from 1.5 billion). The work of many more commissioning providers (18 versus 37) is represented in this study, as is more evidence of energy and peak-power savings as well as cost-effectiveness. We now translate these impacts into avoided greenhouse gases and provide new indicators of cost-effectiveness. We also draw attention to the specific challenges and opportunities for high-tech facilities such as labs, cleanrooms, data centers, and healthcare facilities. The results are compelling. We developed an array of benchmarks for characterizing project performance and cost-effectiveness. The median normalized cost to deliver commissioning was $0.30/ft2 for existing buildings and $1.16/ft2 for new construction (or 0.4% of the overall construction cost). The commissioning projects for which data are available revealed over 10,000 energy-related problems, resulting in 16% median whole-building energy savings in existing buildings and 13% in new construction, with payback time of 1.1 years and 4.2 years, respectively. In terms of other cost-benefit indicators, median benefit-cost ratios of 4.5 and 1.1, and cash-on-cash returns of 91% and 23% were attained for existing and new buildings, respectively. High-tech buildings were particularly cost-effective, and saved higher amounts of energy due to their energy-intensiveness. Projects with a comprehensive approach to commissioning attained nearly twice the overall median level of savings and five-times the savings of the least-thorough projects. It is noteworthy that virtually all existing building projects were cost-effective by each metric (0.4 years for the upper quartile and 2.4 years for the lower quartile), as were the majority of new-construction projects (1.5 years and 10.8 years, respectively). We also found high cost-effectiveness for each specific measure for which we have data. Contrary to a common perception, cost-effectiveness is often achieved even in smaller buildings. Thanks to energy savings valued more than the cost of the commissioning process, associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions come at 'negative' cost. In fact, the median cost of conserved carbon is negative - -$110 per tonne for existing buildings and -$25/tonne for new construction - as compared with market prices for carbon trading and offsets in the +$10 to +$30/tonne range. Further enhancing the value of commissioning, its non-energy benefits surpass those of most other energy-management practices. Significant first-cost savings (e.g., through right-sizing of heating and cooling equipment) routinely offset at least a portion of commissioning costs - fully in some cases. When accounting for these benefits, the net median commissioning project cost was reduced by 49% on average, while in many cases they exceeded the direct value of the energy savings. Commissioning also improves worker comfort, mitigates in

Mills, Evan

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Model Code for the Prevention of Residential HAC Distribution System Leakage and HAC-Induced Building Leakage, 1994 Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This model code is the 1994 revision of an earlier code published in the Proceedings Of The Seventh Annual Symposium On Improving Building Systems In Hot And Humid Climates, Texas A&M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering in 1990. It contains additional closure systems, application practices, and definitions, and it addresses systems unique to mobile homes.

Wemhoff, P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 Alaska-Specific Amendments to the IECC 2009 This document is a list of Alaska-specific amendments to the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, adopted by the Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) on March 9, 2011. It is meant to be read in conjunction with the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2010 which may be purchased at local bookstores or online. These amendments comprise both the residential and commercial Building Energy Efficiency Standards (BEES) for AHFC-funded residential mortgage loans and energy rebates, and energy retrofits of public buildings. These amendments supplant the BEES amendments to the 2006 IECC for residential projects as adopted on June 17, 2009, and include the amendments previously made to the 2009 IECC known as

438

Building Technologies Office: Bookmark Notice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings Printable Version...

439

Specification and cost manual for energy retrofits on small commercial and multifamily buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This specification/cost manual was prepared as part of DOE's technical assistance to the states, utilities and other groups participating in the Commercial and Apartment Conservation Service (CACS) program. The intention is to provide a set of standardized specifications and cost information for the CACS program measures. The material was designed to be used primarily by contractors and others in preparing cost estimates at the request of CACS utilities. This information can also be used by CACS participants in preparing state plans, analyzing which measures are best-suited for their particular climates, computing paybacks, and carrying out audits. In addition, this publication may be of interest to the wider audience involved in the energy retrofit field, ranging from architects and engineers to energy auditors and building inspectors. Each specification contains several categories of information: title; description; recommendations; materials; installation; maintenance; cost information; material cost variables, installation cost variables, regional variables, and safety/hazard issues. The document is divided into six sections: building envelope and service insulation measures; HVAC measures: simple systems; HVAC measures: complex systems; lighting system measures; active solar system measures; and passive solar system measures.

Bircher, C.; Carlisle, N.; Hunter, K.; MacDonald, M.; Shapira, H.; Vineyard, T.A.; Kolb, J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models ofthe National Building Stock. Golden, Colorado: Nationaland Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program, of the

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Analysis of 2009 International Energy Conservation Code Requirements for Residential Buildings in Mesa, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) contains several major improvements in energy efficiency over the 2006 IECC and the 2003 IECC. The notable changes are: (1) Improved duct sealing verified by testing the duct system; (2) Increased duct insulation; (3) Improvement of window U-factors from 0.40 to 0.35; and (4) Efficient lighting requirements. An analysis of these changes resulted in estimated annual energy cost savings of $145 a year for an average new house compared to the 2003 IECC. This energy cost saving decreases to $125 a year for the 2009 IECC compared to the 2006 IECC. Construction cost increases (per home) for complying with the 2009 IECC are estimated at $1256 relative to the 2003 IECC and $800 for 2006 IECC. Home owners will experience an annual cost savings of about $80 a year by complying with the 2009 IECC because reduction to energy bills will more than compensate for increased mortgage payments and other costs.

Lucas, Robert G.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Statewide Emissions Reduction, Electricity and Demand Savings from the Implementation of Building-Energy-Codes in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper focuses on the estimate of electricity reduction and electric demand savings from the adoption energy codes for single-family residences in Texas, 2002-2009, corresponding increase in cnstruction costs and estimates of the statewide emissions reduction.

Yazdani, B.; Haberl, J.; Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Zilbershtein, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

InterTechnology Corporation report of solar energy systems installation costs for selected commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a study in which the primary objective was to determine actual costs associated with the installation of solar collector and thermal energy storage subsystems in specific non-residential building applications are presented. A secondary objective of the study was to assemble details of existing solar collector and storage subsystem installations, including caveats concerning cost estimating, logistics and installation practices. The study began with the development of an exhaustive listing and compilation of basic data and contacts for non-residential applications of solar heating and cooling of buildings. Both existing projects and those under construction were surveyed. Survey summary sheets for each project encountered are provided as a separate appendix. Subsequently, the rationale used to select the projects studied in-depth is presented. The results of each of the detailed studies are then provided along with survey summary sheets for each of the projects studied. Installation cost data are summarized and the significance of the differences and similarities between the reported projects is discussed. After evaluating the data obtained from the detailed studies, methods for reducing installation labor costs are postulated based on the experience of the study. Some of the methods include modularization of collectors, preplumbing and preinsulating, and collector placement procedures. Methods of cost reduction and a summary discussion of prominent problems encountered in the projects are considered.(WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency in Texas State-Owned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Energy Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency" in Texas State-owned buildings project was begun in the spring of 1984 as a part of a multipronged effort to reduce rising energy costs in State operations. Energy audits of 21 million square feet (22% of total conditioned space) were conducted by three energy engineering firms and Texas Engineering Extension Service personnel under contract to the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Retrofits totaling $15.6 million with annual savings of $9.2 million were identified (59% ROI). This paper will detail the objectives of the project, summarize audit results, and outline financing options for individual projects.

Ponder, W. M.; Verdict, M. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Free Energy Code Online Discussion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Energy Code Online Discussion for Building Department Personnel Join us for this FREE 90: Online - Log-in will be sent with your registration confirmation Cost: Free Questions? Contact Wendy

446

Update on maintenance and service costs of commercial building ground-source heat pump systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An earlier paper showed that commercial ground-source heat pump systems have significantly lower service and maintenance costs than alternative HVAC systems. This paper expands on those results by adding 13 more buildings to the original 25 sites and by comparing the results to the latest ASHRAE survey of HVAC maintenance costs. Data from the 38 sites are presented here including total (scheduled and unscheduled) maintenance costs in cents per square foot per year for base cost, in-house, and contractor-provided maintenance. Because some of the new sites had maintenance costs that were much higher than the industry norm, the resulting data are not normally distributed. Analysis (O'Hara Hines 1998) indicated that a log-normal distribution is a better fit; thus, the data are analyzed and presented here as log-normal. The log-mean annual total maintenance costs for the most recent year of the survey ranged from 6.07 cents per square foot to 8.37 cents per square foot for base cost and contractor-provided maintenance, respectively.

Cane, D.; Garnet, J.M.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVELBUILDING ENERGY CODES PROGRAM IMPACTS OF THE 2009 IECC FOR RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS AT STATE LEVEL Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) recently conducted a nationwide residential energy code analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The analysis compares the requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with the residential codeor typical construction practice in the absence of a codein most states as of June 2009. The results, which include estimated typical energy savings of updating each states code to the 2009 IECC, are provided in this report in chapters specific to each state. An overview of the 2009 IECC and its major chapters, as well as a brief comparison to previous versions, is provided as introductory information. The IECC is then briefly compared to the International Residential Code, which contains a chapter with energy efficiency requirements that are very similar to the IECC. Several states have either not adopted a mandatory energy code or developed their own codes which have minimal or no connection to the IECC. The latterincluding California, Florida, Oregon, and Washington were not included in this analysis as the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to the 2009 IECC and most of these states have energy offices that have already assessed the IECC on their own. Chapter 2 is dedicated to outlining some of the major code differences in the 2009 IECC that are not contained in any previous version of the code, and to which much of the energy savings of the 2009 IECC compared to previous versions is attributable. These energy saving differences are described in further detail in the report,

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese cities and climate zones. To optimize each buildingare shown in the building climate zone map in Figure 1. Theon the following factors: Climate zones and building energy

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

426435. LBNL. (2012). Distributed Energy Resources CustomerATIONAL L ABORATORY Building Distributed Energy Performanceemployer. Building Distributed Energy Performance

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Thermal efficiency standards and codes. Volume 2. Relationships of ASHRAE standards and external factors to energy efficient building practices in new homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available data on 1976 and 1979 new home construction practices were used to develop measures of average building practice for each of the 48 contiguous states. Four possible views of the function and purpose of building energy standards and codes were posited and used to guide the search for relationships between building practice and building energy codes and standards implemented by the states. It was found that the average thermal efficiency of new single family homes improved from 1976 to 1979 in each of the 48 states. It was observed that by 1979 the average thermal efficiency of new homes in each of the 48 states exceeded American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers Standard 90-75 (ASHRAE 90). However, in all states, there were substantial numbers of new homes which did not meet the Standard. By January 1, 1979, 23 states had some type of applicable building energy code or standard in effect; 11 of these had state-wide mandatory codes. All codes and standards were either identical to or very similar to the ASHRAE Standard 90-75 in their building shell requirements. A search for statistical evidence of a relationship between state building code activities and building practice was performed. Three marginally significant relationships were found by analysis of variance; however, these relationships were not significant in regression equations with socio-economic variables present. The conclusion here is that the effects of state building code actions on building practices were not detectable by the statistical methods used.

McCold, L.N.; Collins, N.E.; Zuschneid, P.B.; Hofstra, R.B.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A brief introduction on training and public information of building energy codes in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is associated with the project of Implementation of Building Energy Codes in China (55793). The report aims to give Chinese audience a brief introduction on training and public information activities of building energy codes in the U.S. The report contains four sections: Section One is about the development history and implementation of building energy codes in the U.S. Section Two is about the organizations of training and public information activities, mainly focused on ASHRAE, ICC, federal and state government. Policy implication, which is Section Three, addresses the role of federal government and on-line training and public information activities in promoting training and public information (the current China training system lacks strong support of central government and on-line training activities). Conclusions are made in Section Four. This report will be uploaded to an upcoming Chinese website which is devoted to provide first-time free on-line training and public information of building energy codes in China.

Shui, Bin

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Analysis of low-cost building material for the MixAlco process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of biofuels as an alternative fuel source highlights the MixAlco process as one method to convert organic waste into alcohol fuels. The pretreatment and fermentation of waste is integral to the process and represents a principal cost consideration due to the large structure needed to encapsulate the fermenting materials. This research developed papercrete as a potential construction material to reduce the cost of a structure. Papercrete is a mixture of paper, cement, and sand. The strengths, thermal conductivity, and other physical properties were compared with those of conventional building materials. This research identified acceptable property ranges necessary for using a structural papercrete facility and recorded compressive and tensile strengths that were too weak to build an economical structure. The identification of a hybrid papercrete-concrete structure produced results and economics within acceptable ranges. The papercrete-concrete alternative was tested on the same basis as the papercrete for structural and economic analysis, which provided acceptable results. The results indicate that a papercrete-concrete structure is a viable alternative structurally and economically within a range of sizes for the structure.

Titzman, L. Clinton

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... high rise buildings; building collapse; disasters; fire ... adhesive strength; building codes; cohesive ... materials; thermal conductivity; thermal insulation ...

455

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EnergyPlus (DOE, 2011). The energy usage intensity is shownResidential Building Site Energy Usage Intensity in ChinaGas Residen>al Building Energy Usage Intensity Comparison

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Assessment of Impacts from Adopting the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for Residential Buildings in Michigan  

SciTech Connect

Energy and economic analysis comparing the current Michigan residential energy efficiency code to the 2009 IECC.

Lucas, Robert G.

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Usage Intensity Comparison City The retail prototype building is an internal load dominated model in which lighting,

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Design and Build- Cost-Effective Energy Conservation: An Opportunity for the Competitive Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper expands on concepts presented at the World Energy Congress and DA/DSM earlier this year. In the light of recent developments I have changed the title of the paper, merged some of the issues and updated my comments. The entire energy industry is in a state of flux in anticipation of the deregulation of the electricity supply industry. Utilities are, right now, creating subsidiary companies which will take advantage of the new competitive markets. These companies will trade as Energy Service Providers, offering a wide range of products, including conservation. They will focus on the bills the customers pay, not solely on the rates for energy. As this transition occurs the current methods for implementing energy conservation will be closely examined. We will see some of the aberrant and expensive practices created within a closely regulated Demand Side Management environment disappear. They will be replaced by traditional methodologies used in the construction industry. This paper examined the opportunity for those construction models in the competitive energy supply industry. I contend that an adaptation of the design and build method of construction offers many of the answers needed for cost effective implementation. The Design & Build contract has most of the key features needed in an energy conservation project. It is a proven method, understood by all participants, and it has inherent flexibility, needed to provide the building owner with the optimum solution for the building. Concentrating on the design of comprehensive Energy Conservation Measures (ECM), the D&B firm augments the strengths of its customers, conservation developers. The concepts offered herein are largely speculative; intended to create dialogue on the opportunities suggested. This document is not definitive. Now, can the industry make this work?

McGeown, D. I.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Transaction-Cost Economic Analysis of Institutional Change toward Design-Build Contracts for Public Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sum of Transaction and Production Costs27 Washingtonstransaction costs). Production costs and schedules are easyambiguous. In theory, production costs reflect prices on the

Whittington, Jan; Dowall, David E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Michigan State Code Adoption Analysis: Cost-Effectiveness of Lighting Requirements - ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004  

SciTech Connect

This report documents PNNL's analysis of the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2004 if this energy code is adopted in the state of Michigan, instead of the current standard.

Richman, Eric E.

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "building codes cost" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas tariff Technology costs and financial considerations (such as interests rate, policy incentives

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Comparative Study on Code-based Linear Evaluation of an Existing RC Building Damaged during 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determination of seismic performance of existing buildings has become one of the key concepts in structural analysis topics after recent earthquakes (i.e. Izmit and Duzce Earthquakes in 1999, Kobe Earthquake in 1995 and Northridge Earthquake in 1994). Considering the need for precise assessment tools to determine seismic performance level, most of earthquake hazardous countries try to include performance based assessment in their seismic codes. Recently, Turkish Earthquake Code 2007 (TEC'07), which was put into effect in March 2007, also introduced linear and non-linear assessment procedures to be applied prior to building retrofitting. In this paper, a comparative study is performed on the code-based seismic assessment of RC buildings with linear static methods of analysis, selecting an existing RC building. The basic principles dealing the procedure of seismic performance evaluations for existing RC buildings according to Eurocode 8 and TEC'07 will be outlined and compared. Then the procedure is applied to a real case study building is selected which is exposed to 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake in Turkey, the seismic action of Ms = 6.3 with a maximum ground acceleration of 0.28 g It is a six-storey RC residential building with a total of 14.65 m height, composed of orthogonal frames, symmetrical in y direction and it does not have any significant structural irregularities. The rectangular shaped planar dimensions are 16.40 mx7.80 m = 127.90 m{sup 2} with five spans in x and two spans in y directions. It was reported that the building had been moderately damaged during the 1998 earthquake and retrofitting process was suggested by the authorities with adding shear-walls to the system. The computations show that the performing methods of analysis with linear approaches using either Eurocode 8 or TEC'07 independently produce similar performance levels of collapse for the critical storey of the structure. The computed base shear value according to Eurocode is much higher than the requirements of the Turkish Earthquake Code while the selected ground conditions represent the same characteristics. The main reason is that the ordinate of the horizontal elastic response spectrum for Eurocode 8 is increased by the soil factor. In TEC'07 force-based linear assessment, the seismic demands at cross-sections are to be checked with residual moment capacities; however, the chord rotations of primary ductile elements must be checked for Eurocode safety verifications. On the other hand, the demand curvatures from linear methods of analysis of Eurocode 8 together with TEC'07 are almost similar.

Toprak, A. Emre; Guelay, F. Guelten [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Civil Eng., Maslak, Istanbul, 34469 (Turkey); Ruge, Peter [Technische Universitaet Dresden, Institut fuer Statik und Dynamik der Tragwerke, Dresden, 01062 (Germany)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

463

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with factors such as energy tariff and incentive policies.energy services requirements, usage patterns, tariffs, andelectricity tariff structure and the buildings energy load

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Building Distributed Energy Performance Optimization for China a Regional Analysis of Building Energy Costs and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other data, for example solar radiation, electricity tariff,and building energy loads Solar radiation profiles for PVload profile, citys solar radiation data, electricity and

Feng, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Lessons learned from new construction utility demand side management programs and their implications for implementing building energy codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Codes and Standards by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) through its Building Energy Standards Program (BESP). The purpose of this task was to identify demand-side management (DSM) strategies for new construction that utilities have adopted or developed to promote energy-efficient design and construction. PNL conducted a survey of utilities and used the information gathered to extrapolate lessons learned and to identify evolving trends in utili