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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build-ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS are the build- ing blocks of modern society. Efficient and safe movement. How- ever, transportation systems by their very nature also affect the environment through operations, construction, and maintenance of transportation facilities, and through the travel behaviors they encourage

Wang, Yuhang

2

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Cool Roofs | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

section of the guide and focus on cool roofs, which are recommended for metal building roofs and roofs with insulation entirely above deck. Publication Date: Wednesday,...

3

BEETIT: Building Cooling and Air Conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-E’s BEETIT Project, short for “Building Energy Efficiency Through Innovative Thermodevices,” are developing new approaches and technologies for building cooling equipment and air conditioners. These projects aim to drastically improve building energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions such as carbon dioxide (CO2) at a cost comparable to current technologies.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Effect of Daylighting Strategies on Building Cooling Loads...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Daylighting Strategies on Building Cooling Loads and Overall Energy Performance Title The Effect of Daylighting Strategies on Building Cooling Loads and Overall...

5

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tankthe chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tank,of thermal energy storage in building cooling systems.

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Title Potential benefits of cool roofs on...

9

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alternative system used to meet a building’s heating and coolingof US$117/kW of cooling. The alternative system is assumed

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

care resources Small business resources State and local government resources ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual Chapter 9: Heating and Cooling Upgrades The Building Upgrade...

11

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Introduction Chapter 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offer- ings. The label now covers new homes, commercial and institutional buildings, residential heating and cooling equipment, major appliances, office equipment, lighting,...

12

Gas cooling for large commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

Energy costs typically account for 10% to 20% of the operating costs for commercial buildings. These costs have continued to rise over the past several years notwithstanding the implementation of energy conservation programs. Increasing electric demand charges have been a major cause of the problem, and as capital-intensive nuclear and coal plants under construction are rolled into the rate base, these demand penalties are likely to become more severe. Electric cooling is the major contributor to seasonal and daily electric peaks. The use of natural gas for cooling can provide relief from high peak period electric prices either directly through absorption systems and engine-driven chillers or indirectly via cogeneration and recovered heat-driven absorption cooling. Although a window of opportunity exists for gas cooling in some parts of the country today, technological advancement and cost reduction are required in order for gas cooling to realize widespread applicability. The Gas Research Institute has implemented a comprehensive development program in cooperation with industry to evolve engine-driven chiller systems in the 100-ton and larger size range with gas coefficients of performance of 2.4, first-cost premiums of less than $100/ton, and service intervals of 4000 hours. Maintenance records of several engine-driven systems installed in the early 1970's were studied. System reliability was found to be in-line with HVAC market requirements.

Davidson, K.; Brattin, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution Impact on Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Pollution Impact on Cool Roof Efficacy Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

14

Building Technologies Office: Global Cool Cities Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

15

Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" 1. Heated, Cooled, and Lit Buildings, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Heated Buildings",,"Cooled Buildings",,"Lit Buildingsc" ,,"Total Floorspacea","Heated Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Cooled Floorspaceb","Total Floorspacea","Lit Floorspaceb" "All Buildings ................",67338,61602,53812,58474,42420,64085,54696 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6774,5684,5055,4879,3958,5859,4877 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",8238,7090,5744,6212,4333,7421,5583 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11153,9865,8196,9530,6195,10358,8251

16

Application of Building Precooling to Reduce Peak Cooling Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A building cooling control strategy was developed and tested for a 1.4 million square foot (130,000 square meter) office building located in Hoffman Estates, IL. The goal of the control strategy was to utilize building thermal mass to limit the peak cooling load for continued building operation in the event of the loss of one of the four central chiller units. The algorithm was first developed and evaluated through simulation and then evaluated through tests on two identical buildings. The east building utilized the existing building control strategy while the west building used the precooling strategy developed for this project. Consistent with simulation predictions, the precooling control strategy successfully limited the peak load to 75 % of the cooling capacity for the west building, while the east building operated at 100 % of capacity. Precooling of the building mass provided an economical alternative to the purchase of an additional chiller unit. The estimated cost of installing an additional chiller was approximately $500,000. Computer models developed for this project also showed that precooling based upon cooling cost minimization could result in savings of approximately $25,000 per month during the peak cooling season. The building model was validated with experimental results and could be used in the development of a cost minimization strategy.

Kevin R. Keeney; James E. Braun, Ph.D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Auxiliary Cooling Loads in Passively Cooled Buildings: An Experimental Research Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently accepted methods of passive cooling offset only sensible building loads. In the warm, humid southeastern gulf coast climates the latent building load can comprise 35% of the building load in the typical residence. As the sensible load on residences in these climates is reduced or offset by passive cooling techniques, this latent cooling load percentage increases rapidly. In such residences the auxiliary cooling load cannot be effectively met by conventional cooling equipment . The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) is examining the auxiliary cooling requirements of residences in warm, humid climates. The study addresses both the thermal and moisture response of buildings. A total of eight wall systems, three frame wall types and five concrete block wall types are under test at the FSEC Passive Cooling Laboratory (PCL) in Cape Canaveral. Moisture studies involve examination of the absorption and desorption rates of building materials and furnishings and the development of improved moisture migration modeling techniques for inclusion in building energy analysis programs. TARP (Thermal Analysis Research program), developed at NBS by George Walton, and FLOAD, by FCHART Software, have been chosen as the analysis programs with which cooling examined.

Fairey, P.; Vieira, R.; Chandra, S.; Kerestecioglu, A.; Kalaghchy, S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Energy Star Building Upgrade Manual Heating and Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9. Heating and 9. Heating and Cooling Revised January 2008 9.1 Overview 2 9.2 Central Cooling Systems 3 Chiller Plant Operations and Maintenance 4 Chiller Plant Retrofits 6 9.3 Central Heating Systems 10 Boiler System Operations and Maintenance 11 Boiler System Retrofits 11 Improving Furnace Efficiency 13 9.4 Unitary Systems 14 Packaged Rooftop Units 16 Split-System Packaged Units 18 Air-Source Heat Pumps 18 Ground-Source, Closed-Loop Heat Pumps 19 9.5 Additional Strategies 20 Air-Side Economizer 20 Energy Recovery 20 Desiccant Dehumidification 20 Night Precooling 21 Cool Storage 22 Evaporative Cooling 22 9.6 Summary 22 Bibliography 23 Glossary G-1 1 ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual ENERGY STAR ® Building Manual 9. Heating and Cooling 9.1 Overview Although heating and cooling systems provide a useful service by keeping occupants comfort-

19

Use advisability of heat pumps for building heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the actual economic and energetic juncture, the reduction of thermal energy consumption in buildings became a major, necessary and opportune problem, general significance. The heat pumps are alternative heating installations more energy efficiency ... Keywords: "Geoterm" system, building heating/cooling, energy and economic analysis, heat pump performances, heat pumps, renewable energy sources

Ioan Sârbu; C?lin Sebarchievici

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool CBE UFAD Cooling Design Tool logo The Center for the Built Environment's research team has developed a simplified, practical design procedure and associated software tool to determine cooling load requirements of underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems. These are provided to improve the accuracy of airflow, thermal decay data, thermal comfort calculations, system design, and the operation of UFAD buildings. Screen Shots Keywords UFAD, underfloor, Cooling load calculator, cooling, stratification, thermal comfort Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required Knowledge about cooling load calculation and UFAD. Users N/A Audience Practicing architects and engineers involved in the design, specification, and analysis of UFADs. Instructional tool in colleges and universities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Cooling and Heating Loads | Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling and Heating Loads Cooling and Heating Loads The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment should be calculated in accordance with generally accepted engineering standards and handbooks such as ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_cooling_and_heating_loads.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999

22

Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-Cooling with Zone Temperature Reset in an Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.to reduce peak cooling loads with thermal mass control.

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Peak demand reduction from pre-cooling with zone temperature reset in an office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.to reduce peak cooling loads with thermal mass control.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Braun, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Title Potential benefits of cool roofs on commercial buildings: conserving energy, saving money, and reducing emission of greenhouse gases and air pollutants Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson, Ronnen M., and Hashem Akbari Journal Energy Efficiency Volume 3 Pagination 53-109 Publisher Springer Netherlands ISSN 1570-646X Keywords cool roof, Heat Island Abstract Cool roofs-roofs that stay cool in the sun by minimizing solar absorption and maximizing thermal emission-lessen the flow of heat from the roof into the building, reducing the need for space cooling energy in conditioned buildings. Cool roofs may also increase the need for heating energy in cold climates. For a commercial building, the decrease in annual cooling load is typically much greater than the increase in annual heating load. This study combines building energy simulations, local energy prices, local electricity emission factors, and local estimates of building density to characterize local, state average, and national average cooling energy savings, heating energy penalties, energy cost savings, and emission reductions per unit conditioned roof area. The annual heating and cooling energy uses of four commercial building prototypes-new office (1980+), old office (pre-1980), new retail (1980+), and old retail (pre-1980)-were simulated in 236 US cities. Substituting a weathered cool white roof (solar reflectance 0.55) for a weathered conventional gray roof (solar reflectance 0.20) yielded annually a cooling energy saving per unit conditioned roof area ranging from 3.30 kWh/m2 in Alaska to 7.69 kWh/m2 in Arizona (5.02 kWh/m2 nationwide); a heating energy penalty ranging from 0.003 therm/m2 in Hawaii to 0.14 therm/m2 in Wyoming (0.065 therm/m2 nationwide); and an energy cost saving ranging from $0.126/m2 in West Virginia to $1.14/m2 in Arizona ($0.356/m2 nationwide). It also offered annually a CO2 reduction ranging from 1.07 kg/m2 in Alaska to 4.97 kg/m2 in Hawaii (3.02 kg/m2 nationwide); an NOx reduction ranging from 1.70 g/m2 in New York to 11.7 g/m2 in Hawaii (4.81 g/m2 nationwide); an SO2 reduction ranging from 1.79 g/m2 in California to 26.1 g/m2 in Alabama (12.4 g/m2 nationwide); and an Hg reduction ranging from 1.08 μg/m2 in Alaska to 105 μg/m2 in Alabama (61.2 μg/m2 nationwide). Retrofitting 80% of the 2.58 billion square meters of commercial building conditioned roof area in the USA would yield an annual cooling energy saving of 10.4 TWh; an annual heating energy penalty of 133 million therms; and an annual energy cost saving of $735 million. It would also offer an annual CO2 reduction of 6.23 Mt, offsetting the annual CO2 emissions of 1.20 million typical cars or 25.4 typical peak power plants; an annual NOx reduction of 9.93 kt, offsetting the annual NOx emissions of 0.57 million cars or 65.7 peak power plants; an annual SO2 reduction of 25.6 kt, offsetting the annual SO2 emissions of 815 peak power plants; and an annual Hg reduction of 126 kg.

25

Interaction of lighting, heating, and cooling systems in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The interaction of building lighting and HVAC systems, and the effects on cooling load and lighting system performance, are being evaluated using a full-scale test facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from a number of test configurations are described, including lighting system efficiency and cooling load due to lighting. The effect of lighting and HVAC system design and operation on performance is evaluated. Design considerations are discussed.

Treado, S.J.; Bean, J.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cooling commercial buildings with off-peak power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large commercial buildings use more electricity for cooling than for heating, and can account for 40% of summer peak demand. A cool storage technique in which compressors chill or freeze water during off-peak periods and the water is circulated during peak hours is in use in 100 commercial buildings. Reports indicate that these systems are economical, although little information is available, but engineers are hesitant to incorporate them because of possible damage from leaks or rust and other uncertainties. The Electric Power Research Institute is evaluating the performance of several systems to answer some of the operating and maintenance questions raised by engineers. 3 references, 3 figures. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Rabl, V.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings  

SciTech Connect

We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants with little or no internal loads. The evaporative roof cooling system keeps the building from heating up during the day by misting the roof surface with a fine spray of water -just enough to evaporate. This process keeps the roof surface at 90° levels instead of 150° and knocks out the radiant heat transfer from the roof into the building. The system is controlled by a thermostat and automatically shuts off at night or when the roof surface cools below the set point. The same control system turns on exhaust fans to load the building with cool night air. Air circulators are installed to provide air movement on workers during the day. Best results are achieved by closing dock doors and minimizing hot air infiltration during the day. The typical application will maintain inside temperatures that will average 84° -86° when outside ambient temperatures range from 98 °-100°. Many satisfied users will attest to marked improvements in employee moral and productivity, along with providing safe storage temperatures for many products. Installed "Flywheel" systems' costs are usually less than 20% of comparable air-conditioning equipment. By keeping a built up roof cooler, the system will eliminate thermal shock and extend roof life while reducing maintenance.

Abernethy, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

30

Effects of Material Moisture Adsorption and Desorption on Building Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Moisture adsorption and desorption (MAD) by internal building materials and furnishings can be significant in buildings. For many building cooling strategies, MAD may have overriding effects on building cooling loads. For example, natural ventilation of buildings in hot, humid climates has been shown to induce higher latent loads and higher room relative humidities during periods following the ventilation.

Fairey, P.; Kosar, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

What`s new in building energy research: Thermal distribution technology. DOE looks at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy takes a look at cutting energy losses in a building`s heating and cooling distribution system.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Desiccant cooling and dehumidification opportunities for buildings workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Desiccant cooling and dehumidification technology is gaining acceptance as an option for air-conditioning buildings. Over the last few years, significant advances have been made in desiccant cooling and dehumidification in the private and public sectors. market penetration of desiccant systems in the past has been limited to unique applications. This workshop was an open forum for discussing these unique and potential applications. Workshop participants discussed the state of the art of desiccant materials, components, systems, and applications, both theoretically and experimentally. This document is a compilation of the papers presented in the workshop sessions.

Penney, T.R. (comp.)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Potential of Evaporative Cooling Systems for Buildings in India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaporative cooling potential for building in various climatic zones in India is investigated. Maintainable indoor conditions are obtained from the load - capacity analysis for the prevailing ambient conditions. For the assumed activity level, clothing and air velocity, the predicted mean vote (PMV), predicted percentage dissatisfied (PPD), and cumulative dissatisfaction levels for each month are estimated. Time - air condition contours of ambient, supply air and indoor air are plotted on a psychrometric chart for different cities in India like Ahmadabad, Jodhpur, Nagpur and New Delhi representing different climatic conditions of India. While satisfactorily comfort can be achieved at cool and dry weather conditions by evaporative cooling system throughout the year, some discomfort prevailed for few months around July at hot and dry/humid weather conditions. The results are also quantified in terms of PMV, PPD and their cumulative factors; PMV-hour and PPD-hour.

Maiya, M. P.; Vijay, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Cool roofs as an energy conservation measure for federal buildings  

SciTech Connect

We have developed initial estimates of the potential benefits of cool roofs on federal buildings and facilities (building scale) as well as extrapolated the results to all national facilities under the administration of the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). In addition, a spreadsheet ''calculator'' is devised to help FEMP estimate potential energy and cost savings of cool roof projects. Based on calculations for an average insulation level of R-11 for roofs, it is estimated that nationwide annual savings in energy costs will amount to $16M and $32M for two scenarios of increased roof albedo (moderate and high increases), respectively. These savings, corresponding to about 3.8 percent and 7.5 percent of the base energy costs for FEMP facilities, include the increased heating energy use (penalties) in winter. To keep the cost of conserved energy (CCE) under $0.08 kWh-1 as a nationwide average, the calculations suggest that the incremental cost for cool roofs should not exceed $0.06 ft-2, assuming that cool roofs have the same life span as their non-cool counterparts. However, cool roofs usually have extended life spans, e.g., 15-30 years versus 10 years for conventional roofs, and if the costs of re-roofing are also factored in, the cutoff incremental cost to keep CCE under $0.08 kWh-1 can be much higher. In between these two ends, there is of course a range of various combinations and options.

Taha, Haider; Akbari, Hashem

2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Distributed Generation, Absorption Cooling, Space Cooling,use heat to drive an absorption cooling cycle, and the heatlargest drivers for absorption cooling technology adoption

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system is scheduled to be on.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Bank District Heating-to-Cooling Conversion Plan Check the date your building's cooling system Coal Storage Building 39 NA Cooke Hall 56 Donhowe Building 044 East Gateway District Steam Distr. 199

Webb, Peter

38

Building codes as barriers to solar heating and cooling of buildings  

SciTech Connect

The application of building codes to solar energy systems for heating and cooling of buildings is discussed, using as typical codes the three model building codes most widely adopted by states and localities. Some potential barriers to solar energy systems are found, federal and state programs to deal with these barriers are discussed, and alternatives are suggested. To remedy this, a federal program is needed to encourage state adoption of standards and acceptance of certification of solar systems for code approval, and to encourage revisions to codes based on model legislation prepared for the federal government by the model codes groups.

Meeker, F.O. III

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements Incorporating Solar Assisted Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat recovery and absorption cooling are selected in allself- generated and absorption cooling displaces a further

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: Pre-cooling; Demand response; Thermal mass; Auto-discharged cooling energy from building thermal mass. If theand Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Implications of office building thermal mass and multi-day temperature profiles for cooling strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a study of the cooling energy requirements that result from thermal storage in building mass, and suggests methods for predicting and controlling its energy cost implications. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. Increased Monday cooling energy requirements resulting from the weekend shut-down of HVAC systems are documented. Predictors of energy use and peak demands, which account for thermal storage in building mass, are described. Load-shifting, sub-cooling and pre-cooling equipment operating strategies are evaluated with explicit reference to utility rate schedules.

Eto, J.H.; Powell, G.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Preconditioning Outside Air: Cooling Loads from Building Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC equipment manufacturers, specifiers and end users interacting in the marketplace today are only beginning to address the series of issues promulgated by the increased outside air requirements in ASHRAE Standard 62- 1989, "Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality", that has cascaded into building codes over the early to mid 1990's. There has been a twofold to fourfold increase in outside air requirements for many commercial building applications, compared to the 1981 version of the standard. To mitigate or nullify these additional weather loads, outdoor air preconditioning technologies are being promoted in combination with conventional HVAC operations downstream as a means to deliver the required fresh air and control humidity indoors. Preconditioning is the term applied for taking outside air to the indoor air setpoint (dry bulb temperature and relative humidity). The large humidity loads from outside air can now be readily recognized and quantified at cooling design point conditions using the extreme humidity ratios/dew points presented in the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals Chapter 26 "Climatic Design Information". This paper presents an annual index called the Ventilation Load Index (VLI), recently developed by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) that measures the magnitude of latent (and sensible) loads for preconditioning outside air to indoor space conditions over the come of an entire year. The VLI has units of ton-hrs/scfm of outside air. The loads are generated using new weather data binning software called ~BinMaker, also from GRI, that organizes the 239 city, 8760 hour by hour, TMY2 weather data into user selected bidtables. The VLI provides a simple methodology for accessing the cooling load impact of increased ventilation air volumes and a potential basis for defining a "humid" climate location.

Kosar, D.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Predictive pre-cooling control for low lift radiant cooling using building thermal mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low lift cooling systems (LLCS) hold the potential for significant energy savings relative to conventional cooling systems. An LLCS is a cooling system which leverages existing HVAC technologies to provide low energy cooling ...

Gayeski, Nicholas (Nicholas Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tankin parallel), an array of cooling towers, a 7000 m 3 chilledthe chillers and cooling towers, the thermal storage tank,

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Gas Cooling Guide PRO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

user-defined cooling and dehumidification equipment characteristics, annual energy usage and cost, summary of key calculated performance variables, monthly cooling and heating...

47

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements Incorporating Solar Assisted Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

year-round cooling loads and a 1.6 MW summer peak electrical load near midnight. Electricity consumption

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DG with TAC - retail electricity rates, high cooling load,California. Retail electricity rates change between utilityaverage values of electricity rates or temperature can

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

A Control Scheme of Enhanced Reliability for Multiple Chiller Plants Using Mergerd Building Cooling Load Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a control scheme which utilizes the enhanced instantaneous cooling load measurements to improve the reliability of chiller sequencing control. The enhanced measurement is obtained by merging two different measurements of building cooling load using data fusion technique. One is the direct cooling load measurement, which is obtained directly using the differential water temperature and water flow rate measurements. The other is the indirect cooling load measurement, which estimates the cooling load using chiller models based on the instantaneous chiller electrical power input and condition measured variables. The control performance of the proposed scheme is validated in this paper.

Wang, S.; Sun, Y.; Huang, G.; Zhu, N.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Field Measurements of Cooling Energy Consumption in a Multi-Zone Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses cooling energy use in a small office building with the objective of developing an understanding of where energy is used and identifying relationships between cooling energy and other energy end uses. Attributes of the building metered are discussed to provide a perspective for the data presented on energy performance of the building with an emphasis on the cooling energy use. The data are reviewed to develop an understanding of cooling loads in the building as well as the HVAC system's response. Despite the detailed instrumentation of the building it is evident that collection of additional data is required to go beyond quantifying the building's energy consumption and explain why the building exhibits its characteristic cooling behavior. Additional data needed are suggested to assist other researchers in developing metering programs. The final section of the paper summarizes a comparison of the metered data with a calibrated DOE 2.1 energy simulation. The results of the calibrated simulation highlight the limitations of simulations in understanding building energy use as well as the need for metering to develop realistic operating schedules.

Heidell, J. A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For detached residential buildings located in the tropics, it is more challenging and difficult to deal with the space cooling load due to hot and humid climates. In this paper, daily and monthly computer simulations of solar heat gain and cooling load for a detached residential building are carried out using Design Builder software. Different glazing systems ranging from single glazed clear glass to double glaze with electro chromic reflective colored have been analyzed in terms of their impact on solar heat gain and cooling load. The simulation results show reductions in solar heat gain, cooling load and better thermal comfort can be achieved using proper glazing systems for a specific orientation of the building. The significance of these results stems from the fact that they are obtained under local weather conditions, a matter of importance to building architects, designers, contractors, and builders as well as air conditioning equipment manufacturers.

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-Cooling with Zone Temperature Reset in an Office Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-Cooling with Zone TemperatureUniversity of California. Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Potential of Vegetation in Reducing Summer Cooling Loads in Residential Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential of trees and other vegetation to reduce building cooling loads has been recorded in a number of studies but the meso- and microclimate changes producing such savings are not well understood. This paper describes a preliminary ...

Y. J. Huang; H. Akbari; H. Taha; A. H. Rosenfeld

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cooling (TABS) with a cooling tower providing chilled waterevaporative cooling (cooling tower) for radiant ceiling slabradiant cooling with a cooling tower providing chilled water

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Cool Roof Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Calculator Cool Roof Calculator Cool Roof Calculator logo. Many reflective roof coatings and membranes are now available for low-slope roofs. These coatings help to reduce summer air-conditioning loads, but can also increase the winter heating load. The Cool Roof Calculator will estimate both how much energy you'll save in the summer and how much extra energy you'll need in the winter. Cool Roof Calculator provides answers on a 'per square foot' basis, so you can then multiply by the area of your roof to find out your net savings each year. Keywords reflective roof, roofing membrane, low-slope roof Validation/Testing The Radiation Control Fact Sheet describes both the analytical and experimental results that went into the calculator's development. Expertise Required

57

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center Title Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3348e Year of Publication 2008 Authors Yin, Rongxin, Peng Xu, and Sila Kiliccote Keywords auto-dr, building energy simulation tool, demand response, demand shifting (pre-cooling), DRQAT, market sectors, pre-cooling, technologies, testbed tools and guides, thermal mass Abstract Over the several past years, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has conducted field tests for different pre-cooling strategies in different commercial buildings within California. The test results indicated that pre-cooling strategies were effective in reducing electric demand in these buildings during peak periods. This project studied how to optimize pre-cooling strategies for eleven buildings in the Tri-City Corporate Center, San Bernardino, California with the assistance of a building energy simulation tool - the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) developed by LBNL's Demand Response Research Center funded by the California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. From the simulation results of these eleven buildings, optimal pre-cooling and temperature reset strategies were developed. The study shows that after refining and calibrating initial models with measured data, the accuracy of the models can be greatly improved and the models can be used to predict load reductions for automated demand response (Auto-DR) events. This study summarizes the optimization experience of the procedure to develop and calibrate building models in DRQAT. In order to confirm the actual effect of demand response strategies, the simulation results were compared to the field test data. The results indicated that the optimal demand response strategies worked well for all buildings in the Tri-City Corporate Center. This study also compares DRQAT with other building energy simulation tools (eQUEST and BEST). The comparison indicate that eQUEST and BEST underestimate the actual demand shed of the pre-cooling strategies due to a flaw in DOE2's simulation engine for treating wall thermal mass. DRQAT is a more accurate tool in predicting thermal mass effects of DR events.

58

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building thermal mass and multi-day regimes of hot weather are important, yet poorly understood, contributors to cooling energy requirements. This paper develops load-shifting sub-cooling and precooling equipment operating strategies to address a specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using the DOE-2 building energy analysis program. The economic value of the strategies is evaluated with direct reference to utility rate schedules and a crude measure of thermal storage is related to the energy impacts of the strategies. The indicators are based on core zone air temperatures, which are sampled a t night when HVAC systems are not in use. The suggestion is made that the results and proposed strategies could be adapted for use by computerized energy management systems to reduce building energy operating costs.

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on DistributedCombined Heat and Power, Electricity Tariffs, Demand Charge,California electricity tariffs for large buildings typically

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predictive control of thermal energy storage in buildingsystems which use thermal energy storage. In particular thepredictive control of thermal energy storage in building

Ma, Yudong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low Energy Ventilation and Cooling of Non-Domestic Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Contact: Paul Mathew Short's Cambridge University-based research group develops passive and hybrid low-energy design strategies for non-domestic buildings in different...

63

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for Estimating Building Adoption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May-4 June, 2005 electricity (and demand) charges and a lowdisproportionately to summer electricity demand peaks in hotreduce building peak electricity demands in California using

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 22.1- 22.12, Electric Power Research Institute Report,pp. 21.1-21.33, Electric Power Research Institute Report,Commercial Cool Storage," Electric Power Research Institute

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

The Analysis of Dynamic Thermal Performance of Insulated Wall and Building Cooling Energy Consumption in Guangzhou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The summer in Guangzhou, China, is hot and long. Heat proofing is very important for the energy efficiency of buildings and improvement of the indoor thermal environment. The residential buildings in the southern region are cooled by air conditioning mainly with the increase of the live level. This study investigates the influence of the thermal dynamic performance on the yearly cooling load and yearly maximum cooling demand in typical residential flats by employing KVALUE and DeST. The simulation predictions indicate that reductions in the cooling load and maximum cooling demand are obtained when the insulation is added in the wall, but the potential of energy saving is quite limited when the wall only is insulated.

Zhao, L.; Li, X.; Li, L.; Gao, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radiant cooling in US office buildings: Towards eliminating the perception of climate-imposed barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much attention is being given to improving the efficiency of air-conditioning systems through the promotion of more efficient cooling technologies. One such alternative, radiant cooling, is the subject of this thesis. Performance information from Western European buildings equipped with radiant cooling systems indicates that these systems not only reduce the building energy consumption but also provide additional economic and comfort-related benefits. Their potential in other markets such as the US has been largely overlooked due to lack of practical demonstration, and to the absence of simulation tools capable of predicting system performance in different climates. This thesis describes the development of RADCOOL, a simulation tool that models thermal and moisture-related effects in spaces equipped with radiant cooling systems. The thesis then conducts the first in-depth investigation of the climate-related aspects of the performance of radiant cooling systems in office buildings. The results of the investigation show that a building equipped with a radiant cooling system can be operated in any US climate with small risk of condensation. For the office space examined in the thesis, employing a radiant cooling system instead of a traditional all-air system can save on average 30% of the energy consumption and 27% of the peak power demand due to space conditioning. The savings potential is climate-dependent, and is larger in retrofitted buildings than in new construction. This thesis demonstrates the high performance potential of radiant cooling systems across a broad range of US climates. It further discusses the economics governing the US air-conditioning market and identifies the type of policy interventions and other measures that could encourage the adoption of radiant cooling in this market.

Stetiu, C.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CL4M Commercial Cooling and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CL4M Commercial Cooling and Heating Loads CL4M Commercial Cooling and Heating Loads Uses ASHRAE methods and algorithms to calculate cooling loads, heating loads and air requirements for each space, and coil specifications, for commercial buildings. CLTD's, SHGF's, CLF's and almost all other factors in the ASHRAE load calculations for each surface and space are calculated and displayed for the engineer's inspection. Latitude and longitude of building location may be specified to the degree, altitude to the foot, and calculations are made for any range of days of the year, and range of hours desired. Building may be rotated or reflected and construction types easily changed for studies. &nsbsp; Handles variations in sky clarity, ground reflectivity, building shading, humidity and altitude. Almost unlimited flexibility in wall, roof and glass

68

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the Load Profile. $1 is the daily coolingload,c) illus- trates a design load profile for a partial storageDay Design Day Hourly Load Profile for a Building with a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the estimated national energy consumption for residentialand cooling energy consumption of the national building

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

SciTech Connect

Over the several past years, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has conducted field tests for different pre-cooling strategies in different commercial buildings within California. The test results indicated that pre-cooling strategies were effective in reducing electric demand in these buildings during peak periods. This project studied how to optimize pre-cooling strategies for eleven buildings in the Tri-City Corporate Center, San Bernardino, California with the assistance of a building energy simulation tool -- the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT) developed by LBNL's Demand Response Research Center funded by the California Energy Commission's Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program. From the simulation results of these eleven buildings, optimal pre-cooling and temperature reset strategies were developed. The study shows that after refining and calibrating initial models with measured data, the accuracy of the models can be greatly improved and the models can be used to predict load reductions for automated demand response (Auto-DR) events. This study summarizes the optimization experience of the procedure to develop and calibrate building models in DRQAT. In order to confirm the actual effect of demand response strategies, the simulation results were compared to the field test data. The results indicated that the optimal demand response strategies worked well for all buildings in the Tri-City Corporate Center. This study also compares DRQAT with other building energy simulation tools (eQUEST and BEST). The comparison indicate that eQUEST and BEST underestimate the actual demand shed of the pre-cooling strategies due to a flaw in DOE2's simulation engine for treating wall thermal mass. DRQAT is a more accurate tool in predicting thermal mass effects of DR events.

Yin, Rongxin; Xu, Peng; Kiliccote, Sila

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Comparative study of different solar cooling systems for buildings in subtropical city  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, more and more attention has been paid on the application potential of solar cooling for buildings. Due to the fact that the efficiency of solar collectors is generally low at the time being, the effectiveness of solar cooling would be closely related to the availability of solar irradiation, climatic conditions and geographical location of a place. In this paper, five types of solar cooling systems were involved in a comparative study for subtropical city, which is commonly featured with long hot and humid summer. The solar cooling systems included the solar electric compression refrigeration, solar mechanical compression refrigeration, solar absorption refrigeration, solar adsorption refrigeration and solar solid desiccant cooling. Component-based simulation models of these systems were developed, and their performances were evaluated throughout a year. The key performance indicators are solar fraction, coefficient of performance, solar thermal gain, and primary energy consumption. In addition, different installation strategies and types of solar collectors were compared for each kind of solar cooling system. Through this comparative study, it was found that solar electric compression refrigeration and solar absorption refrigeration had the highest energy saving potential in the subtropical Hong Kong. The former is to make use of the solar electric gain, while the latter is to adopt the solar thermal gain. These two solar cooling systems would have even better performances through the continual advancement of the solar collectors. It will provide a promising application potential of solar cooling for buildings in the subtropical region. (author)

Fong, K.F.; Chow, T.T.; Lee, C.K.; Lin, Z.; Chan, L.S. [Division of Building Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Assessment of solar-powered cooling of buildings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three solar-powered cooling concepts are analyzed and evaluated. These are: (1) the solar Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by solar energy is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, (2) the solar-assisted Rankine concept in which a Rankine cycle driven by both solar energy and fuel combustion is used to drive a vapor compression refrigeration machine, and (3) the solar absorption concept in which solar energy is used to drive an absorption refrigeration machine. These concepts are compared on the bases of coefficient of performance, requirements for primary fuel input, and economic considerations. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

Curran, H.M.

1975-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Analysis of advanced solar hybrid desiccant cooling systems for buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an assessment of the energy savings possible from developing hybrid desiccant/vapor-compression air conditioning systems. Recent advances in dehumidifier design for solar desiccant cooling systems have resulted in a dehumidifier with a low pressure drop and high efficiency in heat and mass transfer. A recent study on hybrid desiccant/vapor compression systems showed a 30%-80% savings in resource energy when compared with the best conventional systems with vapor compression. A system consisting of a dehumidifier with vapor compression subsystems in series was found to be the simplest and best overall performer.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Thermally Activated Cooling: A Regional Approach for EstimatingBuilding Adoption  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic potential for thermally-activated cooling (TAC) technologies as a component of distributed energy resource (DER) systems in California. A geographic information system (GIS) is used to assess the regional variation of TAC potential and to visualize the geographic pattern of potential adoption. The economic potential and feasibility of DER systems in general, and especially TAC, is highly dependent on regional factors such as retail electricity rates, building cooling loads, and building heating loads. Each of these factors varies with location, and their geographic overlap at different sites is an important determinant in a market assessment of DER and TAC. This analysis uses system payback period as the metric to show the regional variation of TAC potential in California office buildings. The DER system payback with and without TAC is calculated for different regions in California using localized values of retail electricity rates and the weather-dependent variation in building cooling and heating loads. This GIS-based method has numerous applications in building efficiency studies where geographically dependent variables, such as space cooling and heating energy use, play an important role.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Passive Cooling of a Micromechanical Oscillator with a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Closely related passive cooling has been reported in [9,20 ... Although rather modest cooling is obtained here ... eventually provide ground state cool- ing ...

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

76

26 ASHRAE Transactions: Research Cooling-dominated commercial and institutional build-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

26 ASHRAE Transactions: Research ABSTRACT Cooling-dominated commercial and institutional build Simulation Approach Mahadevan Ramamoorthy Hui Jin Student Member ASHRAE Student Member ASHRAE Andrew D. Chiasson Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E. Associate Member ASHRAE Member ASHRAE Mahadevan Ramamoorthy

77

Disaggregating Cooling Energy Use of Commercial Buildings Into Sensible and Latent Fractions From Whole-Building Monitored Data: Methodology and Advantages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In hot and humid climates, where summers are both warm and humid, the latent cooling can be a significant portion of the total cooling load (as much as 40%). Typically the monitored data only includes whole-building heating and cooling energy use and total electric consumption. A method to disaggregate the latent cooling energy use from the measured whole-building heating and cooling energy use would be of particular interest. This paper presents such a method and discusses its benefits. It is shown that the overall heat transfer coefficient including the conduction, infiltration, and ventilation effects of a building, can be evaluated. Subsequently this enables the disaggregation of the total cooling energy use into sensible and latent cooling fractions. The benefits of such a method include: (i) better understanding of the sensible and latent fractions in the total cooling energy use of a building, and (ii) better regression models for energy analysis. In addition to the whole-building cooling and heating energy use and the ambient conditions, the required system parameters include: (i) cold deck supply temperature, (ii) hot deck supply temperature, (iii) mixed air temperature or ventilation rate, (iv) internal gains, and (v) total mass flow rate of the dual duct constant volume system. If continuous measurements of the system parameters are not available, then one-time measurements may be used to disaggregate the latent cooling energy use.

Katipamula, S.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Monitoring the energy-use effects of cool roofs on Californiacommercial buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such 'cool' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a four-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas. Results showed that installing a cool roof reduced the daily peak roof surface temperature of each building by 33-42 K. In the retail store building in Sacramento, for the monitored period of 8 August-30 September 2002, the estimated savings in average air conditioning energy use was about 72 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (52%). On hot days when the afternoon temperature exceeded 38 C, the measured savings in average peak demand for peak hours (noon-5 p.m.) was about 10 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. In the school building in San Marcos, for the monitored period of 8 July-20 August 2002, the estimated savings in average air conditioning energy use was about 42-48 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (17-18%). On hot days, when the afternoon temperature exceeded 32 C, the measured savings in average peak demand for hours 10 a.m.-4 p.m. was about 5 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. In the cold storage facility in Reedley, for the monitored period of 11 July-14 September 2002, and 11 July-18 August 2003, the estimated savings in average chiller energy use was about 57-81 Wh/m{sup 2}/day (3-4%). On hot days when the afternoon temperature exceeded 38 C, the measured savings in average peak-period demand (average cooling-power demand during peak demand hours, typically noon-6 p.m.) was about 5-6 W/m{sup 2} of conditioned area. Using the measured data and calibrated simulations, we estimated savings for similar buildings installing cool roofs in retrofit applications for all 16 California climate zones. For similar retail stores in climate zones 2 and 4-16, installing a cool roof can save about 6-15 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned area. In climate zones 2-16, estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 2.9 to 5.8 W/m{sup 2}. For similar school buildings in climate zones 2-16, installing a cool roof can save from 3 to 6 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned roof area. For all 16 climate zones estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 2.6 to 3.8 W/m{sup 2}. In similar cold storage buildings in all 16 climate zones, installing a cool roof can save about 4.5-7.4 kWh/m{sup 2}/year of conditioned roof area. In all 16 climate zones, estimates of average peak demand savings for hours noon-5 p.m. range from 3.9 to 6.6 W/m{sup 2}.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rainer, Leo

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

have higher cooling capacity because the thermal resistancethe thermal comfort requirement unless the cooling capacitysurface cooling system and TABS systems THERMAL COMFORT

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Integrated Modeling of Building Energy Requirements IncorporatingSolar Assisted Cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper expands on prior Berkeley Lab work on integrated simulation of building energy systems by the addition of active solar thermal collecting devices, technology options not previously considered (Siddiqui et al 2005). Collectors can be used as an alternative or additional source of hot water to heat recovery from reciprocating engines or microturbines. An example study is presented that evaluates the operation of solar assisted cooling at a large mail sorting facility in southern California with negligible heat loads and year-round cooling loads. Under current conditions solar thermal energy collection proves an unattractive option, but is a viable carbon emission control strategy.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris; Wang, Juan

2005-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Central unresolved issues in thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document explores the frontier of the rapidly expanding field of thermal energy storage, investigates unresolved issues, outlines research aimed at finding solutions, and suggests avenues meriting future research. Issues related to applications include value-based ranking of storage concepts, temperature constraints, consistency of assumptions, nomenclature and taxonomy, and screening criteria for materials. Issues related to technologies include assessing seasonal storage concepts, diurnal coolness storage, selection of hot-side storage concepts for cooling-only systems, phase-change storage in building materials, freeze protection for solar water heating systems, and justification of phase-change storage for active solar space heating.

Swet, C.J.; Baylin, F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Monitoring of the performance of a solar-heated-and-cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 12-unit student apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The retrofit of the all-electric building resulted in a system consisting of an array of 1280 square feet of concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vesel, a 25-ton absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for temperature, flow rate, electrical power, and meteorological measurements. The data indicate that 11.2% of the cooling load was met by solar and 8.2% of the total load (cooling plus hot water) was met by solar. The performance of the collector array was determined to be approximately 60% of that suggested by the manufacturer. Steady-state chiller operation exhibited a C.O.P. very close to the manufacturer's specified performance values, but the time-averaged chiller C.O.P. is degraded due to cycling. The composite solar fraction (8.2%) is less than solar cooling only (11.2%) because there was no solar domestic hot water delivery during this monitoring period. The evaluation of system performance for the cooling season indicates a lower performance than expected. However, system performance in the cooling mode can be improved by better adjustment of the thermostats and controls. Continued data collection and analysis should be performed, to improve system operations, assess performance limits, and compare results with design projections.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt.% phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably ``fully charged``. In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboards that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degrees. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort. 7 figs.

Stovall, T.K.; Tomlinson, J.J.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Method of energy load management using PCM for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of energy load management for the heating and cooling of a building. The method involves utilizing a wallboard as a portion of the building, the wallboard containing about 5 to about 30 wt. % a phase change material such that melting of the phase change material occurs during a rise in temperature within the building to remove heat from the air, and a solidification of the phase change material occurs during a lowering of the temperature to dispense heat into the air. At the beginning of either of these cooling or heating cycles, the phase change material is preferably "fully charged". In preferred installations one type of wallboard is used on the interior surfaces of exterior walls, and another type as the surface on interior walls. The particular PCM is chosen for the desired wall and room temperature of these locations. In addition, load management is achieved by using PCM-containing wallboard that form cavities of the building such that the cavities can be used for the air handling duct and plenum system of the building. Enhanced load management is achieved by using a thermostat with reduced dead band of about the upper half of a normal dead band of over three degree. In some applications, air circulation at a rate greater than normal convection provides additional comfort.

Stovall, Therese K. (Knoxville, TN); Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Computer Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical equipment. A simple computer program was developed to simulate airflow through a wind tower based on tower dimensions and air temperature. The program was compared to experimental results with reasonable agreement. Parametric analysis indicates that interior air temperature approaches outdoor air temperature asymptotically as tower height and cross-sectional area are increased, and that it may be more cost effective to increase the tower?s height than its cross sectional area. The program was then used to simulate hour-by-hour indoor air temperatures of an occupied auditorium in Dayton, OH. The results indicate that a large wind tower was able to keep the temperature of an occupied auditorium at a comfortable level year round.

Seryak, J.; Kissock, J. K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Roof shading and wall glazing techniques for reducing peak building heating and cooling loads. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The roof shading device proved to be effective in reducing peak building cooling loads under both actual testing conditions and in selected computer simulations. The magnitude of cooling load reductions varied from case to case depending on individual circumstances. Key variables that had significant impacts on its thermal performance were the number of months of use annually, the thermal characteristics of the roof construction, hours of building use, and internal gains. Key variables that had significant impacts upon economic performance were the costs of fuel energy for heating and cooling, and heating and cooling equipment efficiency. In general, the more sensitive the building is to climate, the more effective the shading device will be. In the example case, the annual fuel savings ($.05 psf) were 6 to 10% of the estimated installation costs ($.50 to .75 psf). The Trombe wall installation at Roxborough High School proved to be effective in collecting and delivering significant amounts of solar heat energy. It was also effective in conserving heat energy by replacing obsolete windows which leaked large amounts of heat from the building. Cost values were computed for both solar energy contributions and for heat loss reductions by window replacement. Together they amount to an estimated three hundred and ninety dollars ($390.00) per year in equivalent electric fuel costs. When these savings are compared with installation cost figures it is apparent that the Trombe wall installation as designed and installed presents a potentially cost-effective method of saving fuel costs. The study results indicate that improved Trombe wall efficiency can be achieved by making design and construction changes to reduce or eliminate outside air leakage into the system and provide automatic fan control.

Ueland, M.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

3 3 Main Commercial Primary Energy Use of Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995 Heating Equipment | Cooling Equipment Packaged Heating Units 25% | Packaged Air Conditioning Units 54% Boilers 21% | Room Air Conditioning 5% Individual Space Heaters 2% | PTAC (2) 3% Furnaces 20% | Centrifugal Chillers 14% Heat Pumps 5% | Reciprocating Chillers 12% District Heat 7% | Rotary Screw Chillers 3% Unit Heater 18% | Absorption Chillers 2% PTHP & WLHP (1) 2% | Heat Pumps 7% 100% | 100% Note(s): Source(s): 1) PTHP = Packaged Terminal Heat Pump, WLHP = Water Loop Heat Pump. 2) PTAC = Packaged Terminal Air Conditioner BTS/A.D. Little, Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume 1: Chillers, Refrigerant Compressors, and Heating Systems, Apr. 2001, Figure 5-5, p. 5-14 for cooling and Figure 5-10, p. 5-18 for heating

88

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Instrumentation and performance analysis of the New Mexico Department of Agriculture solar heated and cooled building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An instrumentation system was designed and installed on the New Mexico Department of Agriculture (NMDA) building to evaluate the performance of the solar system. The NMDA building is the first specifically designed solar heated and cooled building constructed in the United States. The solar system utilizes the flat plate collectors with liquid as the thermal transfer fluid, hot and cold storage tanks, and an absorption chiller. Over two years of operating experience now exists in regard to the NMDA building. Operation of the NMDA building heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system involves three modes. The full heating mode utilizes the collected solar thermal energy for space heating. The full cooling mode utilizes the energy input from the solar collectors in driving the absorption chiller to provide space cooling. The intermediate mode requires heating during the morning hours and cooling during the afternoon. Cooling for the intermediate mode utilizes the cooling tower due to the low ambient relative humidity. The requirement of auxiliary energy is met with a gas fired boiler within the building. The instrumentation system installed on the NMDA building monitored solar insolation, 45 temperatures, 15 flow rates, the rate of electrical energy consumption, local meterology and the relative humidity. The data was recorded on a 15 minute time interval during daylight and every hour during the night.

San Martin, R.L.; Fenton, D.L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Evaluation of cooling performance of thermally activated building system with evaporative cooling source for typical United States climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

allows the use of alternative cooling sources, for example,allows the use of alternative cooling sources, for example,system, and alternative radiant cooling technology, i.e.

Feng, Jingjuan; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Elaboration of global quality standards for natural and low energy cooling in French tropical island buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric load profiles of tropical islands in developed countries are characterised by morning, midday and evening peaks arising from all year round high power demand in the commercial and residential sectors, due mostly to air conditioning appliances and bad thermal conception of the building. The work presented in this paper has led to the conception of a global quality standards obtained through optimized bioclimatic urban planning and architectural design, the use of passive cooling architectural components, natural ventilation and energy efficient systems such as solar water heaters. We evaluated, with the aid of an airflow and thermal building simulation software (CODYRUN), the impact of each technical solution on thermal comfort within the building. These technical solutions have been implemented in 280 new pilot dwelling projects through the year 1996.

Garde, F; Gatina, J C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

93

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

94

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings*...

95

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings...

96

Advances in the application of passive down-draft evaporative cooling technology in the cooling of buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A passive down-draft evaporative cooling (PDEC) tower is a component that is designed to capture the wind at the top of a tower and cool… (more)

Kang, Daeho

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a hot California climate zone with the Demand Responsetested in this hot climate zone. Keywords: Pre-cooling;buildings in a hot climate zone in California, the use of

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Solar heating and cooling of buildings: activities of the private sector of the building community and its perceived needs relative to increased activity  

SciTech Connect

A description of the state of affairs existing in the private sector of the building community between mid-1974 and mid-1975 with regard to solar heating and cooling of buildings is presentd. Also, information on the needs perceived by the private sector with regard to governmental actions (besides research) required to induce widespread application of solar energy for the heating and cooling of buildings is given. The information is based on surveys, data obtained at workshops, sales literature of manufacturers, symposia, and miscellaneous correspondence. Selected interests and projects of individuals and organizations are described. (WHK)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating  

SciTech Connect

BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Solar Energy to Drive Absorption Cooling Systems Suitable for Small Building Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air conditioning systems have a major impact on energy demand. With fossil fuels fast depleting, it is imperative to look for cooling systems that require less high-grade energy for their operation. In this context, absorption cooling systems have become increasingly popular in recent years from the viewpoints of energy and environment. Two types of the absorption chillers, the single effect and the half-effect systems, can operate using low temperature hot water. This paper presents the simulation results and an overview of the performance of low capacity single stage and half-effect absorption cooling systems, suitable for residential and small building applications. The primary heat source is solar energy supplied from flat plate collectors. The complete systems (solar collectors and absorption cooling system) were simulated using a developed software program. The energy and exergy analysis is carried out for each component of the two systems. When evaporator temperature is maintained constant at 5 C and the condenser temperature is fixed at 28 C, 32 C and 36 C respectively the percentage of the used energy covered by solar collectors and the percentage of auxiliary heating load were calculated versus time of day.

Gomri, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An all-electric apartment building was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The resulting system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. With support from the State of Texas Energy Development Fund and the Department of Energy the system was fully instrumented for monitoring.

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Monitoring of the performance of a solar heated and cooled apartment building. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An all-electric apartment building in Texas was retrofitted for solar heating and cooling and hot water. The system consists of an array of 1280 square feet of Northrup concentrating tracking collectors, a 5000-gallon hot water storage vessel, a 500-gallon chilled water storage vessel, a 25-ton Arkla Industries absorption chiller, and a two-pipe hydronic air conditioning system. The solar air conditioning equipment is installed in parallel with the existing conventional electric heating and cooling system, and the solar domestic water heating serves as preheat to the existing electric water heaters. The system was fully instrumented for monitoring. Detailed descriptions are given of the solar system, the performance monitoring system, and the data reduction processes. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Vliet, G.C.; Srubar, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Assessment of Energy Use and Comfort in Buildings Utilizing Mixed-Mode Controls with Radiant Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can often be met by cooling towers, heat exchange with theradiant surfaces, and cooling towers that chill water toby evaporative chillers or cooling towers) and/or night

Borgeson, Samuel Dalton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation on Cooling Energy Load with Varied Envelope Design for High-Rise Residential Buildings in Malaysia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the development of the economy in the recent years, Malaysia is maintaining a high economic growth and therefore, its energy consumption increases dramatically. Residential buildings are characterized by being envelope-load dominated buildings, hence are greatly influenced by the outside climatic conditions. Due to the hot humid climate of Malaysia, air conditioning system accounts for more than 45% of the total electricity used in the residential sector which is required to remove substantial amount of gained heat due to poor thermal envelope performance. This paper uses Ecotect software to analyze the impact of building envelope design on energy cooling load for residential building in Penang, Malaysia, which include area ratio of window to floor, exterior wall thermal insulation, and several kinds of shading system. This paper describes an integrated passive design approach to reduce the cooling requirement for high-rise apartments through an improved building envelope design. Comparing with the other passive strategies investigated in this paper, the results indicated that exterior wall thermal insulation is the best strategy to decrease both annual cooling energy load and peak cooling load which achieved a reduction of 10.2% and 26.3% respectively. However, the other passive strategies applied also have some marginal effect on decreasing the cooling load.

Al-Tamimi, N.; Fadzil, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Influence of raised floor on zone design cooling load in commercial buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design day zone cooling load profile is evaluated for anThe zone cooling load profiles and the thermal performanceaffects the zone cooling load profile and the peak cooling

Schiavon, Stefano; Lee, Kwang Ho; Bauman, Fred; Webster, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Solar heating and cooling system for an office building at Reedy Creek Utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes in detail the solar energy system installed in a new two-story office building at the Reedy Creek Utilities Company, which provides utility service to Walt Disney World at Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The solar components were partly funded by the Department of Energy under Contract EX-76-C-01-2401, and the technical management was by NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The solar energy system application is 100 percent heating, 80 percent cooling, and 100 percent hot water. The collector is a modular cylindrical concentrator type with an area of 3.840 square feet. The storage medium is water with a capacity of 10,000 gallons hot and 10,000 gallons chilled. Design, construction, operation, cost, maintenance, and performance are described in depth. Detailed drawings are included.

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

None

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

110

Solar heating and cooling of buildings, Phase 1 (non-residential). Recommendation for solar heating and cooling demonstrations as an integrated package  

SciTech Connect

Recommendations to ERDA of four solar heating and cooling demonstration projects are presented. Recommendations include (1) the Westchester Work Center Building owned by Bell Telephone Company of Pennsylvania, (2) the Scottsdale County Courts Building in Scottsdale, Arizona, (3) Howard Johnson's Inc. Hotel in North Miami, Florida, and (4) a combination warehouse, manufacturing facility offered by Mr. John I. Ladd of Ladd Brothers, Pueblo, Colorado. A conceptual diagram and a fact sheet is included for each proposed demonstration site. The combined estimated cost for the four projects is $334,586. (WHK)

1976-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Life Cycle cost Analysis of Waste Heat Operated Absorption Cooling Systems for Building HVAC Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) of waste heat operated vapour absorption air conditioning system (VARS) incorporated in a building cogeneration system is presented and discussed. The life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) based on present worth cost (PWC) method, which covers the initial costs, operating costs, maintenance costs, replacement costs and salvage values is the useful tool to merit various cooling and power generation systems for building applications. A life cycle of 23 years was used to calculate the PWC of the system for annual operating hours of 8760 and the same is compared with the electric based vapour compression chiller (VCRS) of same capacity. The life cycle cost (LCC) of waste heat operated absorption chiller is estimated to be US $ 1.5 million which is about 71.5 % low compared to electric powered conventional vapour compression chiller. From the analysis it was found that the initial cost of VARS system was 125 % higher than that of VCRS, while the PWC of operating cost of VARS was 78.2 % lower compared to VCRS. The result shows that the waste heat operated VARS would be preferable from the view point of operating cost and green house gas emission reduction.

Saravanan, R.; Murugavel, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cooling-Only Prism Analysis of Eleven College Station Homes and Interpretation of Building Physical Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling-only PRISM analysis has been performed on eleven new residences in College Station using electricity billing data over an entire year. This study revealed that, provided one corrects for effects such as vacation periods, erroneous utility meter readings and abnormal occupancy patterns during holiday periods, the PRISM approach can accurately model whole-building electricity use (R^2 in the range of 0.92 to 0.99). The physical interpretation of the building parameters determined by PRISM has also been evaluated against continuous measurements of indoor temperature and air-conditioned electricity consumption made during the summer as part of another study. We find that the PRISM estimates for balance point temperature are within a few degrees of actually "measured" values and seem to be unbiased. The PRISM estimates for base-load consumption. on the other hand, are consistently higher by 50% to 100% of the measured base-loads, and factors which may contribute to this bias have also been briefly discussed.

Griffith, L.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Nonresidential Buildings, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1995, 1998,2006. The Application of Building Energy Simulation andTwo High-rise Commercial Buildings in Shanghai, Proceedings

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Performance evaluation of passive cooling in office buildings based on uncertainty and sensitivity analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural night ventilation is an interesting passive cooling method in moderate climates. Driven by wind and stack generated pressures, it cools down the exposed building structure at night, in which the heat of the previous day is accumulated. The performance of natural night ventilation highly depends on the external weather conditions and especially on the outdoor temperature. An increase of this outdoor temperature is noticed over the last century and the IPCC predicts an additional rise to the end of this century. A methodology is needed to evaluate the reliable operation of the indoor climate of buildings in case of warmer and uncertain summer conditions. The uncertainty on the climate and on other design data can be very important in the decision process of a building project. The aim of this research is to develop a methodology to predict the performance of natural night ventilation using building energy simulation taking into account the uncertainties in the input. The performance evaluation of natural night ventilation is based on uncertainty and sensitivity analysis. The results of the uncertainty analysis showed that thermal comfort in a single office cooled with single-sided night ventilation had the largest uncertainty. The uncertainties on thermal comfort in case of passive stack and cross ventilation were substantially smaller. However, since wind, as the main driving force for cross ventilation, is highly variable, the cross ventilation strategy required larger louvre areas than the stack ventilation strategy to achieve a similar performance. The differences in uncertainty between the orientations were small. Sensitivity analysis was used to determine the most dominant set of input parameters causing the uncertainty on thermal comfort. The internal heat gains, solar heat gain coefficient of the sunblinds, internal convective heat transfer coefficient, thermophysical properties related to thermal mass, set-point temperatures controlling the natural night ventilation, the discharge coefficient C{sub d} of the night ventilation opening and the wind pressure coefficients C{sub p} were identified to have the largest impact on the uncertainty of thermal comfort. The impact of the warming climate on the uncertainty of thermal comfort was determined. The uncertainty on thermal comfort appeared to increase significantly when a weather data set with recurrence time of 10 years (warm weather) was applied in the transient simulations in stead of a standard weather data set. Natural night ventilation, designed for normal weather conditions, was clearly not able to ensure a high probability of good thermal comfort in warm weather. To ensure a high probability of good thermal comfort and to reduce the performance uncertainty in a warming climate, natural night ventilation has to be combined with additional measures. Different measures were analysed, based on the results of the sensitivity analysis. All the measures were shown to significantly decrease the uncertainty of thermal comfort in warm weather. The study showed the importance to carry out simulations with a warm weather data set together with the analysis under typical conditions. This approach allows to gain a better understanding of the performance of a natural night ventilation design, and to optimize the design to a robust solution. (author)

Breesch, H. [Building Physics, Construction and Services, Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sustainable Building Research Group, Department of Construction, Catholic University College Ghent, Gebroeders Desmetstraat 1, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Janssens, A. [Building Physics, Construction and Services, Department of Architecture and Urban Planning, Ghent University, J. Plateaustraat 22, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can also reduce peak electricity demand. Cool roofs transferthe cool roof on peak electricity demand, we inspected theEstimate of Peak Electricity Demand Use and Savings Using

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

New Buildings Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Program New Buildings Program Eligibility Commercial State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction...

117

Thermal energy storage for building heating and cooling applications. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities at ORNL to develop thermal energy storage (TES) technology applicable to building heating and cooling. Studies to be carried out will emphasize latent heat storage in that sensible heat storage is held to be an essentially existing technology. Development of a time-dependent analytical model of a TES system charged with a phase-change material was started. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources is nearing completion. Studies into the physical chemistry of TES materials were initiated. Preliminary data were obtained on the melt-freeze cycle behavior and viscosities of sodium thiosulfate pentahydrate and a mixture of Glauber's salt and Borax; limited melt-freeze data were obtained on two paraffin waxes. A subcontract was signed with Monsanto Research Corporation for studies on form-stable crystalline polymer pellets for TES; subcontracts are being negotiated with four other organizations (Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Franklin Institute, and Suntek Research Associates). Review of 10 of 13 unsolicited proposals received was completed by the end of June 1976.

Hoffman, H.W.; Kedl, R.J.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A solar thermal cooling and heating system for a building: Experimental and model based performance analysis and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar thermal cooling and heating system at Carnegie Mellon University was studied through its design, installation, modeling, and evaluation to deal with the question of how solar energy might most effectively be used in supplying energy for the operation of a building. This solar cooling and heating system incorporates 52 m{sup 2} of linear parabolic trough solar collectors; a 16 kW double effect, water-lithium bromide (LiBr) absorption chiller, and a heat recovery heat exchanger with their circulation pumps and control valves. It generates chilled and heated water, dependent on the season, for space cooling and heating. This system is the smallest high temperature solar cooling system in the world. Till now, only this system of the kind has been successfully operated for more than one year. Performance of the system has been tested and the measured data were used to verify system performance models developed in the TRaNsient SYstem Simulation program (TRNSYS). On the basis of the installed solar system, base case performance models were programmed; and then they were modified and extended to investigate measures for improving system performance. The measures included changes in the area and orientation of the solar collectors, the inclusion of thermal storage in the system, changes in the pipe diameter and length, and various system operational control strategies. It was found that this solar thermal system could potentially supply 39% of cooling and 20% of heating energy for this building space in Pittsburgh, PA, if it included a properly sized storage tank and short, low diameter connecting pipes. Guidelines for the design and operation of an efficient and effective solar cooling and heating system for a given building space have been provided. (author)

Qu, Ming [School of Civil Engineering, Purdue University, 550 Stadium Mall Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2051 (United States); Yin, Hongxi [School of Engineering Education, Purdue University, 701 W. Stadium Ave., West Lafayette, IN 47907-2061 (United States); Archer, David H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Insolation: LADWP: LBNL: Peak demand: PIER: Plenum: Pre:Sacramento: Estimated peak demand savings of buildings withSan Marcos: Estimated peak demand savings of buildings with

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Low energy cooling in multi-storey buildings for hot, arid climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis discusses passive and low energy cooling strategies and systems in hot arid climates. The choice of a certain strategy, as well as determining the appropriate cooling schemes for such a context becomes of prime ...

Mostafa, Amira M

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, thus they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typical roofs in the United States are dark, which creates a potential for savings energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. In this report, the authors make quantitative estimates of the impact of roof color by simulating prototypical buildings with light- and dark-colored roofs and calculating savings by taking the differences in annual cooling and heating energy use, and peak electricity demand. Monetary savings are calculated using local utility rates. Savings are estimated for 11 U.S. Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) in a variety of climates.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Pomerantz, M.; Gabersek, S.; Gartland, L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment of Energy Use and Comfort in Buildings Utilizing Mixed-Mode Controls with Radiant Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration, and Air-conditioning Engineers. ASHRAE researches and publishes many detailed references on building design,

Borgeson, Samuel Dalton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Roof aperture system for selective collection and control of solar energy for building heating, cooling and daylighting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The amount of building heating, cooling and daylighting is controlled by at least one pair of solar energy passing panels, with each panel of the pair of panels being exposed to a separate direction of sun incidence. A shutter-shade combination is associated with each pair of panels and the shutter is connected to the shade so that rectilinear movement of the shutter causes pivotal movement of the shade.

Sanders, William J. (Kansas City, KS); Snyder, Marvin K. (Overland Park, KS); Harter, James W. (Independence, MO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An analysis of heating and cooling conservation features in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

One purpose of this study is to estimate the relationship in commercial buildings between conservation investments, fuel prices, building occupancy and building characteristics for new buildings and for existing buildings. The database is a nationwide survey of energy in commercial buildings conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in 1906. Some simple cross-tabulations indicate that conservation measures vary with building size, building age, and fuel used for building heating. Regression estimates of a conservation model indicate that the number of conservation model indicate that the number of conservation features installed during construction is a positive function of the price of the heating fuel at the time of construction. Subsequent additions of conservation features are positively correlated with increases in heating fuel prices. Given the EIA projection of relatively stable future energy prices, the number of retrofits may not increase significantly. Also, energy efficiency in new buildings may not continue to increase relative to current new buildings. If fuel prices affect consumption via initial conservation investments, current fuel prices, marginal or average, are not the appropriate specification. The fuel price regression results indicate that conservation investments in new buildings are responsive to market signals. Retrofits are less responsive to market signals. The number of conservation features in a building is not statistically related to the type of occupancy (owner versus renter), which implies that conservation strategies are not impeded by the renting or leasing of buildings.

Sutherland, R.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

An analysis of heating and cooling conservation features in commercial buildings  

SciTech Connect

One purpose of this study is to estimate the relationship in commercial buildings between conservation investments, fuel prices, building occupancy and building characteristics for new buildings and for existing buildings. The database is a nationwide survey of energy in commercial buildings conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in 1906. Some simple cross-tabulations indicate that conservation measures vary with building size, building age, and fuel used for building heating. Regression estimates of a conservation model indicate that the number of conservation model indicate that the number of conservation features installed during construction is a positive function of the price of the heating fuel at the time of construction. Subsequent additions of conservation features are positively correlated with increases in heating fuel prices. Given the EIA projection of relatively stable future energy prices, the number of retrofits may not increase significantly. Also, energy efficiency in new buildings may not continue to increase relative to current new buildings. If fuel prices affect consumption via initial conservation investments, current fuel prices, marginal or average, are not the appropriate specification. The fuel price regression results indicate that conservation investments in new buildings are responsive to market signals. Retrofits are less responsive to market signals. The number of conservation features in a building is not statistically related to the type of occupancy (owner versus renter), which implies that conservation strategies are not impeded by the renting or leasing of buildings.

Sutherland, R.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

072010 Keywords auto-dr, demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, demand shed, demand shifting (pre-cooling),...

127

Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for all California climate zones. CTZ Jan. Feb. Mar. Apr.A/C: Albedo: ASTM: Climate Zone: Cooling energy: DAS: EnergyCalifornia Climate Zones. . 44

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve; Rainer, Leo

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

InterTechnology Corporation proposed systems level plan for solar heating and cooling commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the National Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program for non-residential buildings are embodied in the following: (1) Demonstrate the ultimate economic and technical feasibility of solar heating and combined heating and cooling. (2) Stimulate industry to produce and market solar equipment. (3) Stimulate a commercial market for solar systems. The systems level plan is designed to address the above stated goals as they relate to the building community associated with the commercial sector of the economy. (WDM)

None

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Buildings Technologies Reference Case, Second Edition (Revised), Sept. 2007, p. 26-31. Efficiency U.S. Average Best-Available Parameter Efficiency New Efficiency New Efficiency...

130

Table B24. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water",,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","District Chilled Water" "All Buildings...

131

Investigation of Peak Load Reduction Strategies in Residential Buildings in Cooling Dominated Climates.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This investigation of peak load reduction strategies in residential buildings contributes to the global international efforts in reducing energy consumption and is related directly to… (more)

Atallah, Fady

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicted the actual electric usage throughout the summerincluding sub-metering the electric usage of lighting, plug,energy usage and predicting hourly building electric demand.

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation...  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Lifetimes and Ages Median Equipment Type Lifetime Air Conditioners Through-the-Wall 15 Water-CooledPackage 24 (1) Roof-Top 15 Chillers Reciprocating 20 Centrifugal 25 (1)...

134

Cooling energy savings potential of light-colored roofs for residential and commercial buildings in 11 US metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) sponsored this project to estimate potential energy and monetary savings resulting from the implementation of light-colored roofs on residential and commercial buildings in major U.S. metropolitan areas. Light-colored roofs reflect more sunlight than dark roofs, so they keep buildings cooler and reduce air-conditioning demand. Typically, rooftops in the United States are dark, and thus there is a potential for saving energy and money by changing to reflective roofs. Naturally, the expected savings are higher in southern, sunny, and cloudless climates. In this study, we make quantitative estimates of reduction in peak power demand and annual cooling electricity use that would result from increasing the reflectivity of the roofs. Since light-colored roofs also reflect heat in the winter, the estimates of annual electricity savings are a net value corrected for the increased wintertime energy use. Savings estimates only include direct reduction in building energy use and do not account for the indirect benefit that would also occur from the reduction in ambient temperature, i.e. a reduction in the heat island effect. This analysis is based on simulations of building energy use, using the DOE-2 building energy simulation program. Our methodology starts with specifying 11 prototypical buildings: single-family residential (old and new), office (old and new), retail store (old and new), school (primary and secondary), health (hospital and nursing home), and grocery store. Most prototypes are simulated with two heating systems: gas furnace and heat pumps. We then perform DOE-2 simulations of the prototypical buildings, with light and dark roofs, in a variety of climates and obtain estimates of the energy use for air conditioning and heating.

Konopacki, S.; Akbari, H.; Gartland, L. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Table E6. Electricity Consumption (kWh) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

136

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

137

Cool Roofs and Heat Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(510) 486-7494 Links Heat Island Group The Cool Colors Project Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and...

138

National program plan for research and development in solar heating and cooling for building, agricultural, and industrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main feature of the directed program is the focus on specific approaches, called paths, to the application of solar energy. A path is the linking of a method of energy collection or rejection with a particular application. Eleven such paths are identified for building applications and eleven for agricultural and industrial process applications. Here, an overview is given of the program plan. The 11 paths to the solar heating and cooling of buildings and the 11 paths for agricultural and industrial process applications are described. Brief descriptions of these tasks and of the non-engineering tasks are included. The importance of each non-engineering task to the overall R and D program is indicated. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

2 2 Main Commercial Heating and Cooling Equipment as of 1995, 1999, and 2003 (Percent of Total Floorspace) (1) Heating Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Cooling Equipment 1995 1999 2003 (2) Packaged Heating Units 29% 38% 28% Packaged Air Conditioning Units 45% 54% 46% Boilers 29% 29% 32% Individual Air Conditioners 21% 21% 19% Individual Space Heaters 29% 26% 19% Central Chillers 19% 19% 18% Furnaces 25% 21% 30% Residential Central Air Conditioners 16% 12% 17% Heat Pumps 10% 13% 14% Heat Pumps 12% 14% 14% District Heat 10% 8% 8% District Chilled Water 4% 4% 4% Other 11% 6% 5% Swamp Coolers 4% 3% 2% Other 2% 2% 2% Note(s): Source(s): 1) Heating and cooling equipment percentages of floorspace total more than 100% since equipment shares floorspace. 2) Malls are no longer included in most CBECs tables; therefore, some data is not directly comparable to past CBECs.

140

Cooling Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings, including sub-metering the electric usage ofinternal loads without sub-metering. The winter data can becould be improved by sub-metering key HVAC equipment. Direct

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Peak demand reduction from pre-cooling with zone temperature reset in an office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an Energy-Efficient Economy. Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Peak Demand Reduction from Pre-shifted in time and the peak demand is reduced. The building

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Braun, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Auto-DR and Pre-cooling of Buildings at Tri-City Corporate Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

able to predict the load profiles of the buildings within aload schedules predicted the load profiles of the buildingstemp set up” strategy load profile was much flatter than the

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

New and Existing Buildings Heating and Cooling Opportunities: Dedicated Heat Recovery Chiller  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Langfitt Langfitt U S Department of State Overseas Buildings Operations Mechanical Engineering Division *Engineers are working Harder AND Smarter *New Energy Economy *Heating Is Where The Opportunity Is  39% of total US energy goes into non-residential buildings.  Gas for heating is about 60% of energy used in a building  Gas for heating is at least 25% of total energy used in the US. Heat Generation System Heat Disposal System What's Wrong With This Picture? Keep the heat IN the system Don't run main plant equipment until necessary ! Less rejected heat Less gas consumption High Temp >160F with conventional boilers Hydronic heating... condensing style modular boilers. The entire heating system... designed for low temperature water, recommend maximum temperature of 135ºF.

145

Overview of developing programs in solar desiccant cooling for residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview is provided of the ongoing work in desiccant cooling under the national solar heating and cooling research program. Open cycle adsorption and absorption systems are examined. The different dehumidifier bed configurations are the distinguishing features of these systems. The basic operating principles of each dehumidifier concept are explained along with some discussion of their comparative features. Performance predictions developed by SERI for a solar desiccant solar system employing an axial-flow desiccant wheel dehumidifier are presented. In terms of life-cycle cost and displaced fossil-fuel energy, the results indicate that it should be beneficial to use solar desiccant coolers in residential applications. Although no prototype testing of any of these concepts is currently underway, test results are expected and will be reported within one year.

Not Available

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

STEM-ing the Tide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide STEM-ing the Tide September 29, 2010 - 4:29pm Addthis Ali Zaidi Special Assistant to the Secretary of Energy Yesterday, the MacArthur Foundation rolled out its latest class of "geniuses" - 23 Americans who stand out because of their creativity and enterprise. Each recipient of the honor (and the $500,000 prize) has made an extraordinary contribution. One of those recipients is Amir Abo-Shaeer, an engineer in the aerospace and telecommunications industries who decided 10 years ago to go back to high school - this time as a teacher. At his alma mater, Dos Pueblos High School (in Santa Barbara, California), Amir created "a school within a school" built around a hands-on curriculum that helps students learn by connecting the ideas of physics, engineering and mathematics through

147

Quantifying Changes in Building Electricity Use, with Application to Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

build- ings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,buildings,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120,modeling,” Journal of Solar Energy Engineering, vol. 120, p.

Mathieu, Johanna L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Model document for code officials on solar heating and cooling of buildings. First draft  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this document is to promote the use and further development of solar energy through a systematic categorizing of all the attributes in a solar energy system that may impact on those requirements in the nationally recognized model codes relating to the safeguard of life or limb, health, property, and public welfare. Administrative provisions have been included to integrate this document with presently adopted codes, so as to allow incorporation into traditional building, plumbing, mechanical, and electrical codes. In those areas where model codes are not used it is recommended that the requirements, references, and standards herein be adopted to regulate all solar energy systems. (MOW)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solar collector related research and development in the United States for heating and cooling of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the research funded by the Research and Development Branch of the Heating and Cooling Division of Solar Energy of the United States Energy Research and Development Administration is described. Specifically, collector and collector materials research is reported on during FY-1977. The R and D Branch has funded research in open and closed cycle liquid heating flat plate collectors, air heating flat plate collectors, heat pipe collectors, concentrating collectors, collector heat transfer studies, honeycomb glazings, evacuated tube collectors, ponds both salt gradient and viscosity stabilized, materials exposure testing, collector testing standards, absorber surface coatings, and corrosion studies. A short description of the nature of the research is provided as well as a presentation of the significant results.

Collier, R.K.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Consumer demand analysis: solar heating and cooling of buildings. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study concerns the acceptability of solar heating and cooling to homebuyers for residential applications. The study assesses the extent of homeowner awareness of solar technologies, estimates the acceptability of elevated first costs including willingness to trade higher initial costs for life cycle savings, and investigates the impact of solar aesthetics. Also explored are other areas of potential concern to homeowners in evaluating a solar alternative as well as positive motivations that would encourage purchase. Finally, the socioeconomic and attitudinal characteristics of individuals more likely to purchase a solar home rather than a conventional home were studied. The results are based on group depth interviews and personal interviews with active homeseekers, top executives of large residential development firms, and architects. The sample was split evenly between Denver, Colorado and the Philadelphia, Pa./Wilmington, Del. areas. Implications of the results for the commercialization of solar energy and possible public policy decisions are also discussed.

Scott, J.E.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the existence of the principal-agent (PA) problem in non-government, non-mall commercial buildings in the U.S. in 2003. The analysis concentrates on space heating and cooling energy consumed by centrally installed equipment in order to verify whether a market failure caused by the PA problem might have prevented the installation of energy-efficient devices in non-owner-occupied buildings (efficiency problem) and/or the efficient operation of space-conditioning equipment in these buildings (usage problem). Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003 data for single-owner, single-tenant and multi-tenant occupied buildings were used for conducting this evaluation. These are the building subsets with the appropriate conditions for assessing both the efficiency and the usage problems. Together, these three building types represent 51.9percent of the total floor space of all buildings with space heating and 59.4percent of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings; similarly, for space cooling, they represent 52.7percent of floor space and 51.6percent of energy consumption. Our statistical analysis shows that there is a usage PA problem. In space heating it applies only to buildings with a small floor area (<_50,000 sq. ft.). We estimate that in 2003 it accounts for additional site energy consumption of 12.3 (+ 10.5 ) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 14.6 [+- 12.4] TBtu), corresponding to 24.0percent (+- 20.5percent) of space heating and 10.2percent (+- 8.7percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings. In space cooling, however, the analysis shows that the PA market failure affects the complete set of studied buildings. We estimate that it accounts for a higher site energy consumption of 8.3 (+-4.0) TBtu (primary energy consumption of 25.5 [+- 12.2]TBtu), which corresponds to 26.5percent (+- 12.7percent) of space cooling and 2.7percent (+- 1.3percent) of total site energy consumed in those buildings.

Blum, Helcio; Sathaye, Jayant

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cooling load estimation methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Personnel Change Notification ImagIng: GRSF/T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personnel Change Notification OGS Form 3 ImagIng: GRSF/T Admit Year/Term: GS Web Front Desk: Office., reviewers, coordinators and chairs) Update: View all AIM Graduate Studies pages and enter decisions on GS02: Search for and view applicants; edit emails Connect: Add, search for and communicate with prospects

Hart, Gus

154

Comparison of energy modeling and laboratory tests on green roof potential to decrease the cooling demand for North European office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenroofs have been shown to reduce the rooftop heat transfer, offering enhancement to a building's thermal resistance or R-value in warm climate zones. However a comprehensive study of neither the magnitude of that effect, nor the impact of green roof ... Keywords: cooling load, energy efficiency, energy modeling, greenroofs

Hendrik Voll; Teet-Andrus Kõiv

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5 5 Commercial Equipment Efficiencies Equipment Type Chiller Screw COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.02 / 4.45 Scroll COP 2.80 / 3.06 2.96 / 4.40 N.A. Reciprocating COP(full-load / IPLV) 2.80 / 3.05 2.80 / 3.05 3.52 / 4.40 Centrifugal COP(full-load / IPLV) 5.0 / 5.2 6.1 / 6.4 7.3 / 9.0 Gas-Fired Absorption COP 1.0 1.1 N.A. Gas-Fired Engine Driven COP 1.5 1.8 N.A. Rooftop A/C EER 10.1 11.2 13.9 Rooftop Heat Pump EER (cooling) 9.8 11.0 12.0 COP (heating) 3.2 3.3 3.4 Boilers Gas-Fired Combustion Efficiency 77 80 98 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 80 84 98 Electric Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Furnace AFUE 77 80 82 Water Heater Gas-Fired Thermal Efficiency 78 80 96 Oil-Fired Thermal Efficiency 79 80 85 Electric Resistance Thermal Efficiency 98 98 98 Gas-Fired Instantaneous Thermal Efficiency 77 84 89 Source(s): Parameter Efficiency

156

Monthly average clear-sky broadband irradiance database for worldwide solar heat gain and building cooling load calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper establishes the formulation of a new clear-sky solar radiation model appropriate for algorithms calculating cooling loads in buildings. The aim is to replace the ASHRAE clear-sky model of 1967, whose limitations are well known and are reviewed. The new model is derived in two steps. The first step consists of obtaining a reference irradiance dataset from the REST2 model, which uses a high-performance, validated, two-band clear-sky algorithm. REST2 requires detailed inputs about atmospheric conditions such as aerosols, water vapor, ozone, and ground albedo. The development of global atmospheric datasets used as inputs to REST2 is reviewed. For the most part, these datasets are derived from space observations to guarantee universality and accuracy. In the case of aerosols, point-source terrestrial measurements were also used as ground truthing of the satellite data. The second step of the model consists of fits derived from a REST2-based reference irradiance dataset. These fits enable the derivation of compact, but relatively accurate expressions, for beam and diffuse clear-sky irradiance. The fitted expressions require the tabulation of only two pseudo-optical depths for each month of the year. The resulting model, and its tabulated data, are expected to be incorporated in the 2009 edition of the ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals. (author)

Gueymard, Christian A. [Solar Consulting Services, P.O. Box 392, Colebrook, NH 03576 (United States); Thevenard, Didier [Numerical Logics Inc., 498 Edenvalley Cres., Waterloo, Ont. (Canada)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cooling Plant Optimization Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central cooling plants or district cooling systems account for 22 percent of energy costs for cooling commercial buildings. Improving the efficiency of central cooling plants will significantly impact peak demand and energy usage for both building owners and utilities. This guide identifies opportunities for optimizing a central cooling plant and provides a simplified optimization procedure. The guide focuses on plant optimization from the standpoint of minimizing energy costs and maximizing efficiencies...

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Artificial neural networks for predicting indoor temperature using roof passive cooling techniques in buildings in different climatic conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three passive cooling methods (e.g. roof pond, reflective roof cooling and using insulation over the roof) have been experimentally evaluated using an experimental test structure. The objective of this work is to train an artificial neural network (ANN) ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Energy saving, India, Passive cooling, Thermal comfort

Shrikant Pandey; D. A. Hindoliya; Ritu Mod

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high impact technologies, systems, and practices. The...

160

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Mass, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 125 (building, Journal of Solar Energy Engineering 125 (2003),

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

162

Building Technologies Office: Contact the Building Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

163

Space Heating and Cooling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A wide variety of technologies are available for heating and cooling homes and other buildings. In addition, many heating and cooling systems have certain supporting equipment in common, such as...

164

Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings to Grid Buildings to Grid Integration to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Buildings to Grid Integration on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

165

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

166

Evaluation of Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Two Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing building thermal mass for cooling load shiftingUse of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Study on Auto-DR and Pre-Cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

influence the load profile of the whole building and HVACtemp set up” strategy load profile was much flatter thantemp set up” strategy load profile was also better than

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

furnaces, chillers, and cooling towers, including the energyheating, chiller and cooling towers. Gas Plant Factors in

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EPIC Muon Cooling Simulations using COSY INFINITY  

SciTech Connect

Next gen­er­a­tion mag­net sys­tems need­ed for cool­ing chan­nels in both neu­tri­no fac­to­ries and muon col­lid­ers will be in­no­va­tive and com­pli­cat­ed. De­sign­ing, sim­u­lat­ing and op­ti­miz­ing these sys­tems is a chal­lenge. Using COSY IN­FIN­I­TY, a dif­fer­en­tial al­ge­bra-based code, to sim­u­late com­pli­cat­ed el­e­ments can allow the com­pu­ta­tion and cor­rec­tion of a va­ri­ety of high­er order ef­fects, such as spher­i­cal and chro­mat­ic aber­ra­tions, that are dif­fi­cult to ad­dress with other sim­u­la­tion tools. As an ex­am­ple, a he­li­cal dipole mag­net has been im­ple­ment­ed and sim­u­lat­ed, and the per­for­mance of an epicyclic para­met­ric ion­iza­tion cool­ing sys­tem for muons is stud­ied and com­pared to sim­u­la­tions made using G4Beam­line, a GEAN­T4 toolk­it.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling...

171

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... residential energy consumption. Field Study of the Effect of Wall Mass on the Heating and Cooling Loads of Residential Buildings. ...

172

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

173

Investigation of Cooling and Dehumidification Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Conditions in Polk County Schools Permanent Replacement Classroom Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing enrollment in grades K-12 coupled with the spiraling costs of construction has pushed school boards to develop more cost-effective classrooms, from the perspective of initial cost, longterm energy consumption, and ease of maintenance. To this end, the Florida's Polk County School Board has developed a four-quad permanent replacement classroom building. Each classroom is equipped with a package terminal heat pump (PTHP) with a thermostat control with a four-hour crank timer. The objective of this research was to compare the energy consumption and interior conditions of the autoclaved aerated concrete (AAC) construction with an unvented roof assembly to that of the conventional metal framing and concrete panel buildings. Four buildings, 2 metal-framed and 2 AAC buildings with dehumidifiers were chosen for extensive testing and monitoring. The goal was to maintain a relative humidity of 50% as well as an interior temperature of 75oF.

Moyer, N. A.; Cummings, J. B.; Chasar, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings...

175

RESFEN 3.0: Program Description - a PC program for calculating the heating and cooling energy use of windows in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Today`s energy-efficient windows can dramatically lower the heating and cooling costs associated with windows while increasing occupant comfort and minimizing window surface condensation problems. However, consumers are often confused about how to pick the most efficient window for their residence. They are typically given window properties such as U-factors or R-values, Solar Heat Gain Coefficients or Shading Coefficients, and air leakage rates. However, the relative importance of these properties depends on the site and building specific conditions. Furthermore, these properties are based on static evaluation conditions that are very different from the real situation the window will be used in. Knowing the energy and associated cost implications of different windows will help consumers and builders make the best decision for their particular application, whether it is a new home, an addition, or a window replacement. A computer tool such as RESFEN can help consumers and builders pick the most energy-efficient and cost-effective window for a given application. It calculates the heating and cooling energy use and associated costs as well as the peak heating and cooling demand for specific window products. Users define a problem by specifying the house type (single story or two story), geographic location, orientation, electricity and gas cost, and building configuration details (such as wall type, floor type, and HVAC systems). Window options are defined by specifying the window`s size, shading, and thermal properties: U-factor, Solar Heat Gain Coefficient, and air leakage rate. RESFEN calculates the energy and cost implications of the windows compared to insulated walls. The relative energy and cost impacts of two different windows can be compared against each other. RESFEN 3.0 is a major improvement over previous versions of RESFEN because it performs hourly calculations using a version of the DOE 2.1E energy analysis simulation program.

Huang, J.; Sullivan, R.; Arasteh, D.; Mitchell, R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial numbers of existing plants and buildings are found to depend solely upon Mechanical Cooling even though Natural Cooling techniques could be employed utilizing ambient air. Most of these facilities were constructed without Natural Cooling capability due to 'first cost' budget constraints when the cost and availability of energy were of little concern.

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cooling load differences between radiant and air systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the effect of thermal mass on cooling loads, and thereforelift radiant cooling using building thermal mass, Departmentlevel thermal modelling are recommended for design cooling

Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial...

179

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

180

"Dark Web: Exploring and Min-ing the Dark Side of the Web"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: "Dark Web: Exploring and Min- ing the Dark Side of the Web" Speaker: Director, Prof will review the emerging research in Terrorism Informatics based on a web mining perspective. Recent progress in the internationally re- nowned Dark Web project will be reviewed, including: deep/dark web spider- ing (web sites

Michelsen, Claus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

13:00 Begrung und Symposiumserffnung Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerd Holbach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Windenergie-Gewinnung Dipl.-Ing. Jörgen Thiele Stiftung Offshore-Windenergie, Varel 14:45 Evolution der Meyer Werft GmbH, Papenburg 14:00 Energiewende als Chance und Heraus- forderung am Beispiel der Offshore challenges for ships and offshore structures (Englisch) Dr.-Ing. Bas Buchner, Maritime Research Institute

Berlin,Technische Universität

182

Cooling concept integration. Phase I final technical report, October 1, 1979-July 31, 1981. [For pre-engineered metal buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Before specific test prototypes were developed, six potential evaporative roof cooling configurations with alternative storage and heat transfer mechanisms were examined, and preliminary cost estimates were made. Each system uses a wet roof system which sprays or floods the roof, allowing evaporative heat transfer to the environment. Finite difference thermal network methods were used for the evaluation of the systems. Detailed results including charts of the hourly heat flows during particular days are presented, and the performance is summarized for Las Vegas. (LEW)

Fraker, H.; Glennie, W.; Snyder, M.K.

1981-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Using EnergyPlus to Simulate the Dynamic Response of a Residential Building to Advanced Cooling Strategies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the ability of EnergyPlus to accurately model complex cooling strategies in a real home with a goal of shifting energy use off peak and realizing energy savings. The house was retrofitted through the Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) deep energy retrofit demonstration program; field tests were operated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The experimental data were collected as part of a larger study and are used here to validate simulation predictions.

Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An improved procedure for developing a calibrated hourly simulation model of an electrically heated and cooled commercial building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increased use of building energy simulation programs, calibration of simulated data to measured data has been recognized as an important factor in substantiating how well the model fits a real building. Model calibration to measured monthly utility data has been utilized for many years. Recently, efforts have reported calibrated models at the hourly level. Most of the previous methods have relied on very simple comparisons including bar charts, monthly percent difference time-series graphs, and x-y scatter plots. A few advanced methods have been proposed as well which include carpet plots and comparative 3-D time-series plots. Unfortunately, at hourly levels of calibration, many of the traditional graphical calibration techniques become overwhelmed with data and suffer from data overlap. In order to improve upon previously established techniques, this thesis presents new calibration methods including temperature binned box-whisker-mean analysis to improve x-y scatter plots, 24-hour weather-daytype box-whisker-mean graphs to show hourly temperature-dependent energy use profiles, and 52-week box-whisker-mean plots to display long-term trends. In addition to the graphical calibration techniques, other methods are also used including indoor temperature calibration to improve thermostat schedules and architectural rendering as a means of verifying the building envelope dimensions and shading placement. Several statistical methods are also reviewed for their appropriateness including percent difference, mean bias error (MBE), and the coefficient of variation of the root mean squared error. Results are presented using a case study building located in Washington, D.C. In the case study building, nine months of hourly whole-building electricity data and site-specific weather data were measured and used with the DOE-2. 1D building simulation program to test the new techniques. Use of the new calibration procedures were able to produce a MBE of-0.7% and a CV(RMSE) of 23. 1 % which compare favorably with the most accurate hourly neural network models.

Bou-Saada, Tarek Edmond

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Toxicological evaluation of liquids proposed for use in direct contact liquid--liquid heat exchangers for solar heated and cooled buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of the toxicological evaluation part of the project entitled, ''Direct Contact Liquid-Liquid Heat Exchangers for Solar Heated and Cooled Buildings.'' Obviously any liquid otherwise suitable for use in such a device should be subjected to a toxicological evaluation. 34 liquids (24 denser than water, 10 less dense) have physical and chemical properties that would make them suitable for use in such a device. In addition to the complexity involved in selecting the most promising liquids from the standpoint of their chemical and physical properties is added the additional difficulty of also considering their toxicological properties. Some of the physical and chemical properties of these liquids are listed. The liquids are listed in alphabetical order within groups, the denser than water liquids are listed first followed by those liquids less dense than water.

Buchan, R.M.; Majestic, J.R.; Billau, R.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Study on Control Performance of HVAC System or Interior Zone and Perimeter Zone in Office Building; Estimation of Optimal PI Tuning in Cooling Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In office buildings there are generally two HVAC systems installed, one in the perimeter zone (PZ) and one in the interior zone (IZ), and the temperatures of each zone are independently controlled. In the present paper, in order to the solve problem of not being able to satisfy the requirements of room temperature control during the cooling period in summer, an optimal PID parameter (O-PI) is selected through simulation of its two feedback control systems with mutual influence using the models identified with the experimental data. The step response characteristics of the system with optimal parameters compared to those with the parameters selected by the Ziegler-Nichols Method (ZNM-PI) that are generally used for PID parameter tuning on site. The result shows O-PI improved control performance, and the difference between O-PI and ZNM-PI can be used to readjust ZNM-PI selected on site.

Maehara, K.; Sagara, N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Evaluation and Analysis of an Integrated PEM Fuel Cell with Absorption Cooling and Water Heating System for Sustainable Building Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, a parametric study of a PEM fuel cell integrated with a double effect absorption system is carried out in order to study the effect of different operating conditions on the efficiency of the PEM fuel cell, utilization factor of the over all system, COPs of the double effect cooling and heating system, and power and heat output of the PEM fuel cell. It is found that the efficiency of the cell decreases, ranging from 46.2% to 24.4% with increase in membrane thickness and current density, and at the same time the COP increases ranging from 0.65 to 1.52. The heat and power output of the fuel cell decreases from 10.54 kW to 5.12 kW, and 9.12 kW to 6.99 kW, respectively for the increase in membrane thickness. However, when the temperature of the cell is increased the heat and power output increases from 5.12 kW to 10.54 kW, and 6.9 kW to 7.02 kW, respectively. The COP is found to be decreasing ranging from 1.53 to 0.33 with the increase in temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. As for the utilization factor, it increases ranging from 17% to 87% with increase in the temperature of the cell and heat input to the HTG. This study reveals that an integrated PEM fuel cell with a double effect absorption cooling systems has a very high potential to be an economical and environmental solution as compared with conventional systems of high electricity and natural gas prices which emit lots of harmful gasses and are not that efficient.

Gadalla, M.; Ratlamwala, T.; Dincer, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Home and Building Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

191

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

192

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey website.Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 2003of the total end-use energy consumption of such buildings;

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ABSTRACT Cooling of residential California buildings contributes significantly to electrical consumption and peak power demand

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Buffer Gas Cooling: A Tool for Trapping Neutral Atoms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

195

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quad. The estimates for total energy usage are within 12% ofthe total heating and cooling energy usages represented bythe total heating and cooling energy usages represented by

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 25. Cooling Energy Sources, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1995 Table 26. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 27. Water-Heating Energy...

197

Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Hydronic Radiant Cooling Systems Cooling nonresidential buildings in the U.S. contributes significantly to electrical power consumption and peak power demand. Part of the electrical energy used to cool buildings is drawn by fans transporting cool air through the ducts. The typical thermal cooling peak load component for California office buildings can be divided as follows: 31% for lighting, 13% for people, 14% for air transport, and 6% for equipment (in the graph below, these account for 62.5% of the electrical peak load, labeled "chiller"). Approximately 37% of the electrical peak power is required for air transport, and the remainder is necessary to operate the compressor. DOE-2 simulations for different California climates using the California

198

Hydronic rooftop cooling systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

Bourne, Richard C. (Davis, CA); Lee, Brian Eric (Monterey, CA); Berman, Mark J. (Davis, CA)

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buckeye - Green Building Incentive Town of Buckeye - Green Building Incentive Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home...

200

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Title Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Publication Type...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SOLERAS solar cooling project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of the increasing demand for cooling in both the United States and Saudi Arabia, solar cooling systems are being considered as serious alternatives to the energy intensive conventional systems, especially when confronted with rising fossil fuel costs. Saudi Arabia and the hot, southern regions of the United States, having abundant sunshine and high cooling demand, are obvious candidates for solar active cooling systems and passive cooling design. Solar active cooling has yet to be shown to be either technologically mature or economically feasible, but efforts have been, and are presently being made within the United States National Solar Cooling Program to develop reliable systems which can compete economically with conventional cooling systems. Currently, the program is funding research and development projects in the areas of absorption, Rankine, dessicant, and advanced technologies. Saudi Arabia has a long and successful tradition of building cooling using passive architectural designs. Combining these past achievements with a program of research and development in both active and passive solar cooling should permit an early economical introduction of entirely solar cooled buildings to Saudi Arabia and the southern United States.

Corcoleotes, G.; Williamson, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Some potential material supply constraints in solar systems for heating and cooling of buildings and process heat. (A preliminary screening to identify critical materials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (SHACOB) designs and three Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat (AIPH) designs have been studied to identify potential future material constraints to their large scale installation and use. The nine SHACOB and three AIPH systems were screened and found to be free of serious future material constraints. The screening was carried out for each individual system design assuming 500 million m/sup 2/ of collector area installed by the year 2000. Also, two mixed design scenarios, containing equal portions of each system design, were screened. To keep these scenarios in perspective, note that a billion m/sup 2/ containing a mixture of the nine SHACOB designs will yield an annual solar contribution of about 1.3 Quads or will displace about 4.2 Quads of fossil fuel used to generate electricity. For AIPH a billion square meters of the mixed designs will yield about 2.8 Quads/year. Three materials were identified that could possibly restrain the deployment of solar systems in the specific scenarios investigated. They are iron and steel, soda lime glass and polyvinyl fluoride. All three of these materials are bulk materials. No raw material supply constraints were found.

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Nelson, T.A.; Smith, S.A.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalMW) solar thermal for absorption cooling (MW) adopoted heatdisplaced due to absorption building cooling (GWh/a) annual

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1b] over different ranges of building area. Table 5. Results6. Results from Model [1b] for Different Ranges of BuildingArea Building Area ?50k sq. ft. 50<…<600k sq. ft. ?600k sq.

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Marin County - Green Building Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marin County - Green Building Requirements Marin County - Green Building Requirements Eligibility Commercial Construction Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home...

206

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan Eligibility Institutional State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

207

"Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 ... "Cook"ing at Y-12 for 70 years Posted: December 5, 2013 - 4:48pm At a Nov. 14 visit to Y-12, National Nuclear Security Administration's Deputy Administrator for Defense Don Cook shared his outlook on the future and his thanks to employees for continuing their 70-year tradition of making America safer. "There are three things to remember," Cook told a meeting of NNSA Production Office and Y-12 employees. "We have an enduring mission. Y-12 plays a key role in it. And a nuclear deterrent remains the ultimate insurance policy for America." Cook also shared his thanks for preparing for the potential furlough in October because of the government shutdown and lack of appropriations. During what was the longest government shutdown to date, Cook said Y-12

208

Cool Roof Colored Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cool Roof Colored Materials Cool Roof Colored Materials Speaker(s): Hashem Akbari Date: May 29, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% can reduce cooling-energy use in buildings in excess of 20%. Cool roofs also result in a lower ambient temperature that further decreases the need for air conditioning and retards smog formation. Reflective roofing products currently available in the market are typically used for low-sloped roofs. For the residential buildings with steep-sloped roofs, non-white (colored) cool roofing products are generally not available and most consumers prefer colors other than white. In this collaborative project LBNL and ORNL are working with the roofing industry to develop and produce reflective, colored roofing products and make yhrm a market reality within three to

209

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

210

Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Challenging conventional Challenging conventional cooling systems Rack/row-mounted cooling devices can replace or supplement conventional cooling systems and result in energy savings. Conventional data center cool- ing is achieved with computer room air conditioners (CRACs) or computer room air handlers (CRAHs). These CRAC and CRAH units are typically installed in data centers on top of raised-floors that are used for cooling air distribution. Such under-floor air distribution is not required by the new rack/row-mounted devices. Consequently, the vagaries of under-floor airflow pathways for room conditioning are avoided. Importantly, close-coupled devices may be better

211

Water is used for many purposes, includ-ing growing crops, producing copper,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WATER USES Water is used for many purposes, includ- ing growing crops, producing copper, generating electricity, watering lawns, keeping clean, drinking and recreation. Bal- ancing the water budget comes down of the water budget. Reducing demand involves re- ducing how much water each person uses, lim- iting the number

212

A bottom-up engineering estimate of the aggregate heating and cooling loads of the entire U.S. building stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information is useful for estimating the national conservation potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy

Huang, Yu Joe; Brodrick, Jim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water,...

214

Inproved Performance of an Air Cooled Condenser (ACC) Using SPX...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved performance of an aIr cooled condenser (acc) UsIng spX WInd gUIde Technology aT coal-fIred ThermoelecTrIc poWer planTs promIsprojecT no. : de-nT0006549 Background As the...

215

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization...

216

Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for State Buildings Eligibility State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

217

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's...

218

More on the buildings at Y-12  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

constructed at Y-12. In addition to the support structures and buildings, pump houses, cooling towers, closely associated with the Alpha and Beta calutron buildings, there were...

219

ing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2002 ... GAs are search algorithms based on the mechanics of natural selection and natural genetics. They combine the concept of survival of the.

220

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cool Roof Coatings and New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt Shingles Meng-Dawn Cheng Oak Ridge National Laboratory chengmd@ornl.gov; 865-241-5918 April 4, 2013 PM: Andre Desjarlais PI: Meng-Dawn Cheng, Ph.D. David Graham, Ph.D. Sue Carroll Steve Allman Dawn Klingeman Susan Pfiffner, Ph.D. (FY12) Karen Cheng (FY12) Partner: Joe Rokowski (Dow) Roof Testing Facility at ORNL Building Technologies Research and Integration Center 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov * Building accounted for 41% of the US energy consumption in 2010 greater than either transportation (28%) or industry (31%).

222

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Field Tests, Simulation and Audits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Use of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ASHRAEpeak hours, storing cooling in the building thermal mass and

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip; Piette, Mary Ann; Zagreus, Leah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Test and evaluation of a solar-powered laboratory turbocompressor system for building heating and cooling. Final technical report. [Rankine cycle  

SciTech Connect

Extensive testing of an available laboratory Rankine-cycle turbocompressor cooling system was conducted over a range of temperatures consistent with present-day flat-plate and advanced medium-concentration solar collectors and at air- and water-cooled condenser temperature levels. Over 700 hours of testing demonstrated the high performance potential of such systems over a wide range of operational conditions and has provided design guidelines and preliminary specifications for future systems. Minor modifications were made to the laboratory system. These modifications included: (1) demonstration of three tons of cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of about 160 F, (2) efficient operation (i.e., COP of approximately 0.45) at turbine inlet temperatures of 240 F at air-cooled condenser temperatures, and (3) a COP in excess of 0.5 and more than five tons of cooling at system turbine inlet temperature levels of 200 F with water-cooled condenser temperatures. Generally, the test data correlated very well with detailed analytical design and off-design performance projections over the range of operating conditions. These data correlations indicate that the achieved performance levels were limited by mismatching of the existing turbomachinery elements. Data and experience obtained in this program substantiate the judgment that incorporating well-matched turbomachinery, based on existing technology, would result in the achievement of the full potential of a turbocompressor system for both air- and water-cooled operation. Prototype turbocompressor systems can be designed and developed which demonstrate high performance, (i.e., a COP approaching 1.0 and 0.75 for water and air-cooled operation, respectively), versatile operational features, permitting use of different collectors with a range of temperature capability, and potential for significant energy savings when used as solar-powered heating and cooling systems.

Biancardi, F.R.; Meader, M.D. Melikian, G.; Landerman, A.M.; Hall, J.B.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on cooling and heating energy use in single-family new residential buildings.solar- reflective roof on the heating- and cooling-energy uses of a residential-building

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

226

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

227

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Data from the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey ... and energy-using equipment types (heating, cooling, refrigeration, water ...

228

cooling | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cooling cooling Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

229

Cool Colored Roofs to Save Energy and Improve Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Absorptance, Attic, and Duct Insulation on Cooling and Heating Energy Use in Single-Family New Residential Buildings,”

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Miller, William; Berdahl, Paul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar absorptance, attic, and duct insulation on cooling and heating energy use in single- family new residential buildings.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Global Cool Cities Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance Global Cool Cities Alliance The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the worldwide installation of cool roofs, pavements, and other surfaces. GCCA is dedicated to advancing policies and actions that increase the solar reflectance of our buildings and pavements as a cost-effective way to promote cool buildings, cool cities, and to mitigate the effects of climate change through global cooling. The alliance was launched in June of 2011. Cool reflective surfaces are an important near-term strategy for improving city sustainability by delivering significant benefits such as increased building efficiency and comfort, improved urban health, and heat

232

what is a cool roof? what is the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

samples the 2008 building energy efficiency standards for cool roofs: There are two approaches Building Energy Efficiency Standards California contact more about cool roof requirements for more to the building below The sun's heat hits the roof surface A non-residential cool roof Coating for a low

233

Building Requirements for State-Funded Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Program Information New Hampshire Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings New Hampshire enacted legislation (SB 409) in July 2010...

234

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Light and Heavy Mass Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effort to understand pre-cooling thermal mass as a Demandof Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ” ASHRAEKey words: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

EMCS and time-series energy data analysis in a large government office building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

percent. There are four cooling tower cells, with a variableretrofit will allow the cooling towers to be used to coolhandling units and one cooling tower. The building achieved

Piette, Mary Ann; Kinney, Satkartar; Friedman, Hannah

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Stochastic Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

Blaskiewicz, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Program Design Analysis using BEopt Building Energy Optimization Software: Defining a Technology Pathway Leading to New Homes with Zero Peak Cooling Demand; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

An optimization method based on the evaluation of a broad range of different combinations of specific energy efficiency and renewable-energy options is used to determine the least-cost pathway to the development of new homes with zero peak cooling demand. The optimization approach conducts a sequential search of a large number of possible option combinations and uses the most cost-effective alternatives to generate a least-cost curve to achieve home-performance levels ranging from a Title 24-compliant home to a home that uses zero net source energy on an annual basis. By evaluating peak cooling load reductions on the least-cost curve, it is then possible to determine the most cost-effective combination of energy efficiency and renewable-energy options that both maximize annual energy savings and minimize peak-cooling demand.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Glossary | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone A space or group of spaces within a building with any combination of heating, cooling, or lighting requirements sufficiently similar so that desired conditions can be...

239

High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings High-Performance Building Requirements for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Office of the State Engineer In March 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation mandating the use of high-performance building standards in new state construction and renovations. This policy requires that new and renovated state buildings

240

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings Energy Efficiency and Green Building Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Wisconsin Department of Administration In March, 2006, Wisconsin enacted SB 459, the Energy Efficiency and Renewables Act. With respect to energy efficiency, this bill requires the Department of Administration (DOA) to prescribe and annually review energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healthy Zero Energy Buildings ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH PIER Environmental Research www from buildings. Ventilation, however, comes with a significant energy cost. Currently, heating, cooling and ventilating commercial buildings represents 29 percent of their total onsite energy use

242

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Evaluation of the Heating & Cooling Energy Demand of a Case Residential Building by Comparing The National Calculation Methodology of Turkey and EnergyPlus through Thermal Capacity Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In all around the world, because of the rapid population growth and exhausting energy sources over time, energy efficiency and energy conservation gradually come into prominence. Hence, in 2002, a directive (EPBD) which obligates reducing energy usage and energy performance in buildings was published by European Union. In this scope, Turkey has developed a National Building Energy Performance Calculation Methodology, BepTr, which is based on simple hourly method in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document to determine the energy performance of buildings. The aim of the paper is to display the energy demand differences resultant from only the envelope’s thermal capacity between simplified method which is projected in ISO EN 13790 Umbrella Document and EnergyPlus which is based on full dynamic simulation method.

Atamaca, Merve; Kalaycioglu, Ece; Yilmaz, Zerrin

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Bartholomew Heating and Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heating and Cooling Heating and Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Name Bartholomew Heating and Cooling Place Linwood, NJ Website http://bartholomewheatingandco References Bartholomew Heating and Cooling[1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Bartholomew Heating and Cooling is a company located in Linwood, NJ. References ↑ "Bartholomew Heating and Cooling" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bartholomew_Heating_and_Cooling&oldid=381585" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

245

Direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger for solar heated and cooled buildings. Final report, January 1, 1979-May 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of using a direct contact liquid-liquid heat exchanger (DCLLHE) storage unit in a solar heating and cooling system is established. Experimental performance data were obtained from the CSU Solar House I using a DCLLHE for both heating and cooling functions. A simulation model for the system was developed. The model was validated using the experimental data and applied in five different climatic regions of the country for a complete year. The life-cycle cost of the system was estimated for each application. The results are compared to a conventional solar system, using a standard shell-and-tube heat exchanger. It is concluded that while thare is a performance advantage with a DCLLHE system over a conventional solar system, the advantage is not sufficiently large to overcome slightly higher capital and operating costs for the DCLLHE system.

Karaki, S.; Brothers, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Building Technologies Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that selectively accepts or rejects solar radiation and outdoor air, depending on the need for heating, cooling rooftop unit inside the large "outdoor" environmental chamber (Building 5800, D-103) Heat pump water

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

247

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incentives City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home...

248

Effectiveness of External Window Attachments Based on Daylight Utilization and Cooling Load Reduction for Small Office Buildings in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the effectiveness of selected external shading devices and glazing treatments used to minimize the total annual energy consumption in small office buildings in hot humid climates. The external shading devices included a permanent horizontal overhang and a light shelf. The selected types of glazing included clear, reflective, tinted, low-emissivity coating, and heat-mirror glass. One concern about using external window attachments is that while reducing the solar heat gains, they also reduce the amount of the daylight needed to supplement interior lighting. Therefore the objective of this study was to explore which strategy would give a balance between solar heat gain reduction and daylight utilization and result in the most energy savings in the building. Computer simulations using an hourly energy calculation model were conducted to predict the building's total energy consumption using each strategy. The economics of each strategy were analyzed with lifecycle costing techniques using the present value technique. Results show that properly designed overhangs that shade clear glazing are slightly more cost-effective than specialized low-e glazing systems. These results are unique for hot humid climates where winter heating is not an issue. On the contrary, when used in cold climates, external shading devices tend to increase the building's energy consumption.

Soebarto, V. I.; Degelman, L. O.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Guidelines for Selecting Cool Roofs July 2010 V. 1.2 Prepared by the Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program and Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Additional technical support provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Federal Energy Management Program. Authors: Bryan Urban and Kurt Roth, Ph.D. ii Table of Contents Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 3 Why Use Cool Roofs .............................................................................................................. 3

250

Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliances Research to Appliances Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Appliances Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub Building Energy Modeling

251

Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Cool Roofs July 26, 2013 - 10:36am Addthis White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk White painted roofs have been popular since ancient times in places like Greece. Similar technology can be easy to adapt to modern homes and other buildings. | Credit: ©iStockphoto/PhotoTalk If you live in a hot climate, a cool roof can: Save you money on air conditioning Make your home more comfortable in hot weather How does it work? By making your roof more reflective, you reduce heat gain into your home. Check out these resources for more information. A cool roof is one that has been designed to reflect more sunlight and

252

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Cooling Strategies and Building Features on EnergyPerformance of Office Buildings. ”Energy and Buildings 34(2002): Braun, J. E. 1990. “Reducing

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Building Energy Code Provider State Board of Building Regulations and Standards ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards has authority

254

Demand Shifting with Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings in a California Hot Climate Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Building Thermal Mass to Offset Cooling Loads. ” ASHRAEThe Role of Thermal Mass on the Cooling Load of Buildings.Keywords: Pre-cooling, demand response, thermal mass, hot

Xu, Peng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters Building to Save Money by Saving Energy Energy Department Completes Cool Roof Installation on DC Headquarters Building to Save Money by Saving Energy December 14, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington - Secretary Steven Chu today announced the completion of a new cool roof installation on the Department of Energy's Headquarters West Building. There was no incremental cost to adding the cool roof as part of the roof replacement project and it will save taxpayers $2,000 every year in building energy costs. Cool roofs use lighter-colored roofing surfaces or special coatings to reflect more of the sun's heat, helping improve building efficiency, reduce cooling costs and offset carbon emissions. The cool roof and increased insulation at the facility were

256

Broward County - Green Building Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Broward County - Green Building Policy Broward County - Green Building Policy Eligibility Local Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

257

Building Technologies Office: Draft Job and Task Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tax Incentives for Residential Buildings Tax Incentives for Commercial Buildings News Energy Department Invests in Heating, Cooling, and Lighting August 21, 2013 Energy Department...

258

Building the Intelligent City - Integrating Mobility and Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Buildings Lighting Systems...

259

LBNL Building 90 Monitoring: Status Update and New Energy Information...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings...

260

Energy Efficiency Program for State Government Buildings | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program for State Government Buildings Energy Efficiency Program for State Government Buildings Eligibility State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EnergyPlus: Energy Simulation Software for Buildings - Energy ...  

EnergyPlus is a building energy simulation program for modeling building heating, cooling, lighting, ventilating, and other energy flows. While it is based on the ...

262

Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement Guam - Solar-Ready Residential Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling...

263

Beyond Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

without compromising future generations SUSTAINABLE INL Buildings Beyond Buildings Sustainability Beyond Buildings INL is taking sustainability efforts "beyond buildings" by...

264

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the flow of heat from the roof into the building and reducing the need for space cooling energy in conditioned buildings. Cool roofs may also increase the need for heating...

265

Buildings | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Buildings Home > Features > Groups Content Group Activity By term Q & A Feeds Content type Blog entry Discussion Document Event Poll Question Keywords Author Apply Dc Living Walls Posted by: Dc 15 Nov 2013 - 13:26 Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more... Tags: ancient building system, architect, biomimicry, building technology, cooling, cu, daylight, design problem, energy use, engineer, fred andreas, geothermal, green building, heat transfer, heating, living walls, metabolic adjustment, net zero, pre-electricity, Renewable Energy, Solar, university of colorado, utility grid, Wind

266

Section 4.1.3 Natural Ventilation: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in and through build- ings. These airflows may be used both for ventilation air and for passive cooling strategies. Natural ventila- tion is often strongly preferred by building...

267

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South- and west-facing windows allow more South- and west-facing windows allow more natural light into the building and reduce electricity use * Extensive awnings and overhangs control the light and heat entering the building during the day to reduce cooling loads * Rooftop light monitors in the garden area provide controllable natural light from above to save on electricity consumption * Insulating concrete form block construction with an R-22 insulation value helps control the temperature of the building and maximize

268

Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Policy for County Government Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings Santa Clara County - Green Building Policy for County Government Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Santa Clara County Executive's Office In February 2006, the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors approved a Green Building Policy for all county-owned or leased buildings. The standards were revised again in September 2009. All new buildings over 5,000 square feet are required to meet LEED Silver

269

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Ohio Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Ohio Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Board of Building Standards is the primary state agency that protects

270

Solar-assisted heat pumps for the heating and cooling of buildings. Six month technical report, November 6, 1978-May 5, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of this study deals with the determination of the most cost-effective SAHP (Solar-assisted Heat Pump) system. The series (solar-assisted), parallel (solar-boosted), and standard heat pump systems with electric resistance heat backup are emphasized. Performance characteristics of all major SAHP components are determined and used in conjunction with the TRNSYS simulation program to obtain heating and cooling system performance for four different climates: Phoenix, Arizona; New York, New York; Fort Worth, Texas; and Madison, Wisconsin. Material and installation costs are obtained for the SAHP components and are used in a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the economic viability of the various systems. Ground coupling, evacuated tube collectors, and power demand distributions are studied. A marketing analysis is performed to assess the potential of SAHP systems in the residential marketplace. The results of this study indicate that solar-boosted heat pumps (parallel) will be more cost effective than solar-assisted (series) heat pumps for the foreseeable future. Since all components for solar-boosted heat pumps are now commercially available, no further development work is needed to optimize the heat pumps for such a system. Furthermore, SAHP systems are not currently cost effective when compared to standard air-to-air heat pumps, nor is there evidence that they will be in the foreseeable future.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cool Roofs Are Ready to Save Energy, Cool Urban Heat Islands, and Help Slow Global Warming  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofing is the fastest growing sector roofing is the fastest growing sector of the building industry, as building owners and facility managers realize the immediate and long-term benefits of roofs that stay cool in the sun. Studies exploring the energy efficiency, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of cool roofs show that in warm or hot climates, substituting a cool roof for a conventional roof can: * Reduce by up to 15% the annual air-

272

Re-Building Greensburg | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Wind Turbines Energy 101: Solar PV Sec. Chu Online Town Hall Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps Why Cool Roofs? Chu at COP-16: Building a...

273

User's Manual: Cooling-Tower-Plume Prediction Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities planning to build generating plants that use evaporative cooling are required to estimate potential seasonal and annual environmental effects of cooling-tower plumes. An easy-to-use computerized method is now available for making such estimates.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

FOCUS COOLING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

www.datacenterdynamics.com www.datacenterdynamics.com FOCUS COOLING Issue 28, March/April 2013 LBNL'S NOVEL APPROACH TO COOLING Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and APC by Schneider Electric test a unique double-exchanger cooling system LBNL program manager Henry Coles says can cut energy use by half A s part of a demonstration sponsored by the California Energy Commission in support of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group's data center summit, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with APC by Schneider Electric to demonstrate a novel prototype data center cooling device. The device was installed at an LBNL data center in Berkeley, California. It included two air-to-water heat exchangers. Unlike common single-heat-exchanger configurations, one of these was supplied with

276

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Specifying Fenestration Products for Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

brochure which explains how this relatively new and low-cost technology can reduce cooling loads in commercial buildings without any loss in visible light or change in...

278

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: CAMEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CAMEL Calculates the design heating and cooling loads and associated psychrometrics for air conditioning plant in buildings. CAMEL is one of the leading air conditioning load...

279

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Information Oklahoma Program Type Building Energy Code ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the...

280

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: SUNDAY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of residential and small commercial buildings on a daily basis, using typical weather data. SUNDAY 3.0 determines heating and cooling loads, accounts for solar effects,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development Photo of NREL researcher Jeff Tomberlin working on a data acquisition panel at the Building Efficiency Data Acquisition and Control Laboratory at NREL's Thermal Test Facility. The Building Technology Program funds research that can dramatically improve energy efficiency in commercial buildings. Credit: Dennis Schroeder, NREL PIX 20181 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) invests in technology research and development activities that can dramatically reduce energy consumption and energy waste in buildings. Buildings in the United States use nearly 40 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy for space heating and cooling, lighting, and appliances, an amount equivalent to the annual amount of electricity delivered by more than 3,800 500-megawatt coal-fired power plants. The BTO technology portfolio aims to help reduce building energy requirements by 50% through the use of improved appliances; windows, walls, and roofs; space heating and cooling; lighting; and whole building design strategies.

282

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings High Performance Building Standards in State Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Oklahoma Department of Central Services In June 2008, the governor of Oklahoma signed [http://webserver1.lsb.state.ok.us/2007-08bills/HB/hb3394_enr.rtf HB 3394] requiring the state to develop a high-performance building certification program for state construction and renovation projects. The standard, which

283

City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings City of Chandler - Green Building Requirement for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing a requirement for all new occupied city buildings larger than 5,000 square feet to be designed and built to achieve the Silver level

284

Using Cool Roofs to Reduce Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

roofs on commercial buildings in the Metropolitan Hyderabad region, corresponding to cooling energy savings of 10 19%. With the assumption of an annual increase...

285

Passive cooling system for a vehicle - Energy Innovation Portal  

The passive cooling system includes one or more heat pipes (112) having an evaporator section ... Building Energy Efficiency; ... Solar Thermal; Startup America;

286

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

287

Comparative report: performance of active-solar space-cooling systems, 1981 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. There is comprehensive data on four absorption chiller cooling systems and one Rankine cooling system. Three of these systems, including the Rankine system, demonstrated that solar cooling can be operated efficiently and provide energy savings. Good designs and operating procedures are discussed. Problems which reduce savings are identified. There is also a comparison of solar cooling by absorption, Rankine, and photovoltaic processes. Parameters and performance indices presented include overall system delivered loads, solar fraction of the load, coefficient of performance, energy collected and stored, and various subsystem efficiencies. The comparison of these factors has allowed evaluation of the relative performance of various systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data are provided include: energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; energy savings in terms of dollars; overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; hourly building cooling loads; actual and long-term weather conditions; collector performance; collector area to tons of chiller cooling capacity; chiller performance; normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and cooling solar fractions, design and measured.

Wetzel, P.; Pakkala, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Western Cooling Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Efficiency Center Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place Davis, CA Website http://http://wcec.ucdavis.edu References Western Cooling Efficiency Center [1] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections Western Cooling Efficiency Center is a research institution located in Davis, CA, at the University of California at Davis (UC Davis). References ↑ "Western Cooling Efficiency Center" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Western_Cooling_Efficiency_Center&oldid=382319" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

289

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/

290

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Alabama Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites.'' Legislation passed in March 2010 authorized the Alabama Energy and

291

Green Building Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement Green Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider District Department of the Environment The District of Columbia City Council enacted [http://dcclims1.dccouncil.us/images/00001/20061218152322.pdf B16-515] on December 5, 2006, establishing green building standards for public buildings and privately-owned commercial buildings of 50,000 square feet or

292

System identification and optimal control for mixed-mode cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of commercial buildings today are designed to be mechanically cooled. To make the task of air conditioning buildings simpler, and in some cases more energy efficient, windows are sealed shut, eliminating ...

Spindler, Henry C. (Henry Carlton), 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Wind Turbines Energy 101: Solar PV Sec. Chu Online Town Hall Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps Why Cool Roofs? Chu at COP-16: Building a Sustainable Energy Future...

294

Why Cool Roofs? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Wind Turbines Energy 101: Solar PV Sec. Chu Online Town Hall Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps Chu at COP-16: Building a Sustainable Energy...

295

Cool Roofs: An Introduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction August 9, 2010 - 4:43pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Lately, I've been hearing a lot about cool roof technologies, so I welcomed the chance to learn more at a recent seminar. Cool roofs, also referred to as white roofs, have special coatings that reflect sunlight and emit heat more efficiently than traditional roofs, keeping them cooler in the sun. Cool roofing technologies can be implemented quickly and at a relatively low cost, making it the fastest growing sector of the building industry. U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is among the many cool roof enthusiasts. The Secretary recently announced plans to install cool roofs

296

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Description This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment. Duration 2:17 Topic Tax Credits, Rebates, Savings Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Credit Energy Department Video MR. : Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is or what it's made of, but your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. Think about it this way: In the summertime, we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter clothes reflect rather than absorb the heat of the sun. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is

297

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs February 1, 2011 - 10:50am Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Editor's Note: This entry has been cross-posted from DOE's Energy Blog. In this edition of Energy 101 we take a look at one of Secretary Chu's favorite energy efficiency techniques, cool roofs. Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb a great deal of sunlight, which in turn transfers heat to a building. Cool roofs use light-colored, highly reflective materials to regulate building temperatures without increasing electricity demand, which can result in energy savings of up to 10 to 15 percent. Cool roofs can also reduce the "heat island" effect in cities and suburbs, a phenomenon that produces higher temperatures in densely populated areas

298

Abstract Radiative Cooling in Hot Humid Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Passive radiative cooling of buildings has been an underachieving concept for decades. The few deployments have generally been in dry climates with low solar angles. The greatest need for cooling is in the tropics. The high humidity endemic to many of these regions severely limits the passive cooling available per radiative area. To wrest temperature relief from humid climates, not just nocturnal cooling but solar irradiance, both direct and indirect, must be addressed. This investigation explores the extent to which thermal radiation can be used to cool buildings in the tropics. It concludes that inexpensive materials could be fabricated into roof panels providing passive cooling day and night in tropical locations with an unobstructed view of sky.

Aubrey Jaffer

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

300

Commercial Cool Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art handbook provides comprehensive guidance for designing ice and chilled-water storage systems for commercial buildings. HVAC engineers can take advantage of attractive rates and incentives offered by utilities to increase the market for cool storage systems.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

Weldon, W.F.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a simple thermal energy storage system that already exists in almost every structure - concrete. Thermal storage calculations simulate sub-cooling of a building's structure during unoccupied times. During occupied times, the sub-cooled concrete reduces peak cooling demand, thereby lowering demand and saving money. In addition, significant savings are possible in the first cost of chilled water equipment, and the smaller chillers run at peak capacity and efficiency during a greater portion of their run time. The building, controlled by an Energy Management and Control System (EMCS), "learns" from past experience how to run the building efficiently. The result is an optimized balance between energy cost and comfort.

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Table B19. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings and Floorspace...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manufact-uring",,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water...

304

Research on the Integration Characteristics of Cooling Energy Recovery from Room Exhausting Cool Air in Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, the design and construction of buildings and building energy systems are far from reasonable. The requirement and consumption of primary energy resources is aggravated, the use of building energy is free and wasteful, and pollution of the earth's atmosphere from building energy consumption is also aggravated. Therefore, the research and applications of energy efficiency and environmentally benign building energy systems are very important and urgent. Until now, much work on building energy conservation methods, measures and evaluations have been done by people in many countries. Some theoretical achievements have been already put into practice, but most of them put undue emphasis on some parts of the whole system. The complete idea of building energy conservation by integrating the building energy systems has not been put forward, and unequivocal guidance and a complete evaluation index and theoretical system for building energy consumption and its impact on the environment have not been formed. In this paper, we make further suggestions for improvement, and present some new concepts such as building energy flow, building mass flow, couple recovering of building discharge energy, integrated system of building energy , factor of building energy integration I, and effect factor on atmospheric environment of building energy F. The positive effects of these new concepts and methods on traditional approaches are also predicted. Theoretical research on an energy recovery unit that recovers cooling energy from indoor exhausting cool air in summer has been done in this paper, and demonstrates great advantages of its integration characteristics of building thermal systems.

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Simulation of a method for forming a laser-cooled positron plasma A. S. Newbury,* B. M. Jelenkovic,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

axis at the same frequency as the 9 Be ions . Therefore, a centrifugal separation will occur, forcing beams of high brightness for a number of different ex- periments 4,6,18 . A dense gas of positrons-temperature buffer gas of N2 to provide trapping and cooling. By remov- ing the buffer gas, the base pressure

306

Energy and building envelope  

SciTech Connect

This book presents the papers given at a conference on building thermal insulation, energy efficiency, and solar architecture. Topics considered at the conference include thermal comfort, heating loads, the air change rate in residential buildings, core-insulated external walls, passive solar options, cooling loads, daylighting, solar gain, the energy transmittance of glazings, heat storage units in phase change materials, heat transfer through windows, and rock bed heat storage for solar heating systems.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

308

Guam - Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code Guam - Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Department of Public Works NOTE: In September 2012, The Guam Building Code Council adopted the draft [http://www.guamenergy.com/outreach-education/guam-tropical-energy-code/ Guam Tropical Energy Code]. It must be adopted by the legislature before it is official. This entry and information will be updated accordingly. Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the

309

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Cool Roofs video. The video opens with "Energy 101: Cool Roofs." This is followed by images of residential rooftops. Maybe you've never given much thought about what color your roof is, or what it's made of. But your roof could be costing you more money than you know to cool your home or office building, especially if you live in a warmer climate. The video shows pedestrians walking on a city street. Think about it this way... in the summertime we wear light-colored clothes because they keep us cooler. Lighter colors reflect - rather than absorb - the heat of the sun. The video shows images of a white roof. It's the same with your roof. A cool roof is often light in color and made

310

Energy Efficiency in Buildings Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and publicity, space reservations, and developing tarrifs and flight schedules for publication. ( Air Carrier

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

311

Experiment Study on Tower Cooling Energy-Saving Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the transition season periods the technology of tower cooling is used to cool the internal heat source region in the buildings, which is energy saving and environment friendly technology. To aim at climatic conditions of the transition season ... Keywords: towers cooling, experiments, fluence factors, energy saving

Ji Amin; He Li; Yue Zhiqiang; Jie Li; Gang Yin; Zhang Qinggang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

One Cool Roof | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One Cool Roof One Cool Roof One Cool Roof November 9, 2010 - 10:28am Addthis Deputy Director Salmon Deputy Director, Resource Management The Office of Science occupies many buildings around the country, but it owns only two of them. One of them is making some news. The 134,629 sq. ft. (about 3 acres) roof of the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee is now officially a "Cool Roof" -- making it energy efficient in ways that darker roofs are not. Cool roofs are light in color, and therefore, reflect rather than absorb sunlight. The previous roof was black, but worse, it was leaky and those leaks, controlled for years in some very innovative ways by the OSTI staff, were going to cause significant problems if not addressed. OSTI needed to invest

313

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Roofs Cool Roofs Energy 101: Cool Roofs January 31, 2011 - 12:38pm Addthis This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Dark-colored roofing materials absorb a great deal of sunlight, which transfers heat into a building. This can also cause the "heat island" effect in cities and suburbs, a phenomenon that produces higher temperatures in densely populated areas due to extensive changes in the landscape. Cool roofs use light-colored, highly reflective materials to regulate building temperatures without increasing electricity demand, which can result in energy savings of up to 10 to 15 percent.

314

City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings City of Greensburg - Green Building Requirement for New Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greensburg City Hall In the aftermath of a May 2007 tornado that destroyed 95% of the city, the Greensburg City Council passed an ordinance requiring that all newly constructed or renovated municipally owned facilities larger than 4,000

315

Status of cool roof standards in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Since 1999, several widely used building energy efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool roof credits or requirements. We review the technical development of cool roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discuss the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy standards worldwide.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Photo of NREL senior engineer Eric Kozubal examining a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner with a graph superimposed on the photo that shows how hot humid air, in red, changes to cool dry air, in blue, as the air passes through the DEVap core. National Renewable Energy Laboratory senior engineer Eric Kozubal examines a prototype airflow channel of the desiccant enhanced evaporative (DEVap) air conditioner, an example of the advanced technology research the Building Technologies Office supports. The superimposed graph shows hot humid air (red) changing to cool dry air (blue) as the air passes through the DEVap core. Credit: Pat Corkery, NREL PIX 17437 The Building Technologies Office (BTO) researches advanced technologies, systems, tools, and strategies to improve the energy performance of commercial buildings. Industry partners and national laboratories help identify market needs and solutions that accelerate the development of highly energy-efficient buildings. This page outlines some of BTO's principal research projects. For more BTO research results, visit the Commercial Buildings Resource Database.

317

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.1 Building Materials/Insulation 5.2 Windows 5.3 Heating, Cooling, and Ventilation Equipment 5.4 Water Heaters 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems 5.6 Lighting 5.7 Appliances 5.8 Active Solar Systems 5.9 On-Site Power 6Energy Supply 7Laws, Energy Codes, and Standards 8Water 9Market Transformation Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Building Descriptions Other Data Books Biomass Energy Transportation Energy Power Technologies Hydrogen Download the Entire Book Skip down to the tables Chapter 5 contains market and technology data on building materials and equipment. Sections 5.1 and 5.2 cover the building envelope, including building assemblies, insulation, windows, and roofing. Sections 5.3 through 5.7 cover equipment used in buildings, including space heating, water heating, space cooling, lighting, thermal distribution (ventilation and hydronics), and appliances. Sections 5.8 and 5.9 focus on energy production from on-site power equipment. The main points from this chapter are summarized below:

318

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TECHNOLOGIES RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings...

319

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liquid cooling, dry cooler, cooling tower 1. INTRODUCTIONsolutions for cooling. Substituting cooling towers,hybrid cooling towers, or dry coolers that provide warmer

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Heating Research Water Heating Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Water Heating Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research Sensors & Controls Research Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Comparative report: performance of active solar space cooling systems, 1982 cooling season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed analysis of solar absorption cooling and solar Rankine cooling processes as represented by the National Solar Data Network (NSDN) systems. Five solar cooling systems were monitored in 1982; four of these have absorption chillers and one has a Rankine engine. Of the four absorption chillers, two are directly solar fired and two are boiler fired using solar energy as the preheat to the boiler. The composite data for the five sites covers the period from September 1981 through December 1982. There are 36 site months of data covered in the report. These are all commercial systems with buildings ranging in size from 5000 to 84,000 square feet. There are three evacuated-tube, one flat-plate, and one linear concentrating collector systems. Analyses performed for which comparative data is provided include: Energy savings and operating costs in terms of Btu; Overall solar cooling efficiency and coefficient of performance; Hourly building cooling loads; Actual and long-term weather conditions; Collector performance; Chiller performance; Normalized building cooling loads per cooling degree-day and building area; and Cooling solar fractions, design and measured. Conclusions and lessons learned from the comparative analysis are presented.

Logee, T.; Kendall, P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Green Cooling: Improving Chiller Efficiency  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Green Cooling: Improving Chiller Efficiency This new chiller simulation module being developed by Building Performance Assurance Project members will help building managers compare optimal and actual chiller efficiency. Chillers are the single largest energy consumers in commercial buildings. These machines create peaks in electric power consumption, typically during summer afternoons. In fact, 23% of electricity generation is associated with powering chillers that use CFCs and HCFCs, ozone-depleting refrigerants. Satisfying the peak demand caused by chillers forces utilities to build new power plants. However, because chiller plants run the most when the weather is hot and very little at other times, their load factors - and hence the utilities' load factors (the percentage of time the

323

REACTOR COOLING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

Quackenbush, C.F.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BuildingSim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BuildingSim BuildingSim BuildingSim logo BuildingSim allows users to model a building and analyze the heating and cooling energy costs in any climate. Users can create any building—from a one-room apartment up to a 100+ floor skyscraper--and account for everything from window coverings to shade trees. BuildingSim uses actual hourly weather data from over 90 climates around the world to numerically solve the full thermodynamic differential equations every minute of the year, giving the user the actual energy use down to the cent. The simulation algorithm fully accounts for thermostat and HVAC controls, allowing the user to analyze the effects of different thermostat algorithms (programmable thermostats, setback, split-zone, etc.) on the energy costs for a specific building and climate. Screen Shots

325

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass inthe high thermal storage during the pre-cooling period. Forwith low thermal mass is limited, the pre-cooling period can

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cases. In the alternative case, space cooling sees a shiftAlternative Case Table 8 Office Buildings: Space CoolingCooling Tables 4-10 detail the assumptions of technology change for each end use between the reference and alternative

Fridley, David G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid cooling is key to reducing energy consumption for this generation of supercomputers and remains on the roadmap for the foreseeable future. This is because the heat capacity of liquids is orders of magnitude larger than that of air and once heat has been transferred to a liquid, it can be removed from the datacenter efficiently. The transition from air to liquid cooling is an inflection point providing an opportunity to work collectively to set guidelines for facilitating the energy efficiency of liquid-cooled High Performance Computing (HPC) facilities and systems. The vision is to use non-compressor-based cooling, to facilitate heat re-use, and thereby build solutions that are more energy-efficient, less carbon intensive and more cost effective than their air-cooled predecessors. The Energy Efficient HPC Working Group is developing guidelines for warmer liquid-cooling temperatures in order to standardize facility and HPC equipment, and provide more opportunity for reuse of waste heat. This report describes the development of those guidelines.

IBM Corporation; Energy Efficient HPC Working Group; Hewlett Packard Corporation; SGI; Cray Inc.; Intel Corporation; U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center; Coles, Henry; Ellsworth, Michael; Martinez, David J.; Bailey, Anna-Maria; Banisadr, Farhad; Bates, Natalie; Coghlan, Susan; Cowley, David E.; Dube, Nicholas; Fields, Parks; Greenberg, Steve; Iyengar, Madhusudan; Kulesza, Peter R.; Loncaric, Josip; McCann, Tim; Pautsch, Greg; Patterson, Michael K.; Rivera, Richard G.; Rottman, Greg K.; Sartor, Dale; Tschudi, William; Vinson, Wade; Wescott, Ralph

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Assessment of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems - Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cool- ing needs of the building and offers general guidelines Assessment of Hybrid Geothermal Heat Pump Systems Geothermal heat pumps offer attractive choice for space...

329

New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems October 4, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for evaporated pre-cooling systems within the Federal sector. Benefits Evaporative pre-cooling systems install ahead of the condenser to lower the condenser pressure. These systems can also work with an economizer. Evaporative pre-cooling reduces the requirement for energy intensive DX cooling. Application Evaporative pre-cooling systems are applicable in most building categories. Climate and Regional Considerations Evaporative pre-cooling systems are well suited in dry climates. Key Factors for Deployment Water usage needs to be taken into account in evaporative pre-cooling

330

New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems New and Underutilized Technology: Evaporative Pre-Cooling Systems October 4, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for evaporated pre-cooling systems within the Federal sector. Benefits Evaporative pre-cooling systems install ahead of the condenser to lower the condenser pressure. These systems can also work with an economizer. Evaporative pre-cooling reduces the requirement for energy intensive DX cooling. Application Evaporative pre-cooling systems are applicable in most building categories. Climate and Regional Considerations Evaporative pre-cooling systems are well suited in dry climates. Key Factors for Deployment Water usage needs to be taken into account in evaporative pre-cooling

331

Indirect evaporative cooling in retail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JCPenney Co., Inc., recently opened a 126,000-sq ft, two-level retail store in Albuquerque, NM. The project construction was accomplished using a design-build format. This process allows preliminary construction processes to begin while the design is finalized. Law/Kingdom, Inc. was assigned the architectural and engineering services for this building. During the process of design, the team decided to study the addition of evaporative cooling into the air system. This article reviews system design, selection, and performance using an indirect evaporative system in the HVAC system. It also demonstrates the company`s design approach on the original equipment selection for a typical anchor store.

Bartlett, T.A. [JCPenney Co., Plano, TX (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Commercial Building Ventilation and Indoor Environmental Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

333

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Green Building and New Construction Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Maximum Rebate Commercial Green Building: $75,000 Residential Green Building: $100,000 LEED Certification: $30,000 Green Building Rater Incentive: $6,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program

334

City of San Diego - Sustainable Building Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Diego - Sustainable Building Policy San Diego - Sustainable Building Policy City of San Diego - Sustainable Building Policy < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Local Government Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider San Diego Environmental Services Department The City of San Diego's Sustainable Building Policy is directed by Council Policy 900-14. The policy contains regulations regarding building

335

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program City of Boulder - Green Points Building Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider City of Boulder The Boulder Green Points Building Program is a mandatory residential green building program that requires a builder or homeowner to include a variety of sustainable building components based on the size of the proposed structure. Similar to the US Green Building Council's LEED program, the

336

City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greenprint Denver Executive Order 123, signed in October 2007, established the Greenprint Denver Office and the Sustainability Policy for the city. The Sustainability Policy includes several goals and requirements meant to increase the sustainability of Denver by having the city government lead by

337

Cool Roofs: An Introduction | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roofs: An Introduction Roofs: An Introduction Cool Roofs: An Introduction August 9, 2010 - 4:43pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Lately, I've been hearing a lot about cool roof technologies, so I welcomed the chance to learn more at a recent seminar. Cool roofs, also referred to as white roofs, have special coatings that reflect sunlight and emit heat more efficiently than traditional roofs, keeping them cooler in the sun. Cool roofing technologies can be implemented quickly and at a relatively low cost, making it the fastest growing sector of the building industry. U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu is among the many cool roof enthusiasts. The Secretary recently announced plans to install cool roofs

338

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider California Energy Commission '''''Note: The California Energy Commission adopted the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for new residential and commercial construction on May 31, 2012. The new standards are expected to take effect on January 1, 2014, and represent significant energy and water savings compared to the current standards. Among many notable provisions, the new standards will

339

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: IDA Indoor Climate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Method in Appendix G of ASHRAE 90.1-2007, which is used in Green Building Programs like LEED and BREEAM. Slab Cooling and Heating The Slab Cooling and Heating extension allows...

340

Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A serious problem of scale and other solid material settling in heat transfer equipment was threatening to shut down our ethylene plant. All evidence pointed to the cooling tower as the source of the contamination. Visual inspection of the cooling tower pump suction basin was accomplished by diving into the basin using SCUBA gear. It was possible to see a build-up of debris on the pump suction basket strainers and on the floor of the sumps. Also, it was discovered that one of the four baskets had been installed incorrectly. Photographs of the basket strainers were taken to aid in describing their exact condition. With the aid of SCUBA it was possible to sufficiently clean the pump sumps so that costly downtime was avoided. Likewise, using this technique, steps were taken to greatly reduce the chance for further contamination of the circulating cooling water system.

Brenner, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

342

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

343

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

344

Electronic thermostat with selectable mode to control heating only, cooling only or both heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a thermostat for use in a building having means for cooling the building and means for heating the building, the thermostat being connected to the cooling means and the heating means and operative to generate an energizing signal for only one of the heating means or cooling means at a given time, the thermostat comprising: means for measuring the ambient temperature within the building; manual data entry means; means for storing a program of desired heating temperatures over a repetitive time cycle, programmed by the manual data entry means; a clock operative to generate time signals within the repetitive time cycle; means for generating a signal representative of a desired heating temperature and a desired cooling temperature at the present time based upon the signals from the clock in the stored temperature program; means for placing the thermostat in either a first mode where control signals are generated only for the heating means as a function of the difference between the measured temperature within the building and the desired heating temperature signal. Control signals are generated for either the heating means or the cooling means based upon the measured temperature and the respective desired heating and cooling temperature signals.

Levine, M.R.

1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy utilization analysis of buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the energy requirements and heating and cooling equipment sizes for buildings is one of the most important, as well as one of the most difficult, problems facing the engineer. The fundamental principles utilized in the procedures developed by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) are explained and brief descriptions of the computer programs using these procedures are given. Such computer programs generally are capable of: simulating the thermal response of a building to all sources of heat gains and losses, accounting for all non-thermal energy requirements in the building or on the sites, translating the building operating schedules into energy demand and consumption, identifying the peak capacity requirements of heating and cooling equipment, and performing an economic analysis that would select the most economical overall owning and operating cost equipment and energy source that minimize the building's life cycle cost.

Lokmanhekim, M.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Building Technologies Office: Building America: Bringing Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market America: Bringing Building Innovations to Market Building America logo The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program has been a source of innovations in residential building energy performance, durability, quality, affordability, and comfort for more than 15 years. This world-class research program partners with industry (including many of the top U.S. home builders) to bring cutting-edge innovations and resources to market. For example, the Solution Center provides expert building science information for building professionals looking to gain a competitive advantage by delivering high performance homes. At Building America meetings, researchers and industry partners can gather to generate new ideas for improving energy efficiency of homes. And, Building America research teams and DOE national laboratories offer the building industry specialized expertise and new insights from the latest research projects.

347

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research

348

Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanolubricants Research Nanolubricants Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Nanolubricants Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

349

Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Controls Sensors and Controls Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Sensors and Controls Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research Water Heating Research Lighting Research

350

Tips: Heating and Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling Tips: Heating and Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Household Heating Systems: Although several different types of fuels are available to heat our homes, more than half of us use natural gas. | Source: Buildings Energy Data Book 2010, 2.1.1 Residential Primary Energy Consumption, by Year and Fuel Type (Quadrillion Btu and Percent of Total). Heating and cooling your home uses more energy and costs more money than any other system in your home -- typically making up about 54% of your

351

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Energy Asset Score  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Asset Score Energy Asset Score Photo of a laptop with energy asset score image on the screen The free online Asset Scoring Tool will generate a score based on inputs about the building envelope and buildling systems (heating, ventilation, cooling, lighting, and service hot water). Launch Energy Asset Score The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a Commercial Building Energy Asset Score (Asset Score) program to allow building owners and managers to more accurately assess building energy performance. The Asset Score program will act as a national standard and will include the Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool (Asset Scoring Tool) to evaluate the physical characteristics and as-built energy efficiency of buildings. The Asset Scoring Tool will identify cost-effective energy efficient improvements that, if implemented, can reduce energy bills and potentially improve building asset value. View the Asset Score fact sheet for a brief overview of the program.

352

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: DesignBuilder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

code compliance checking, OpenGL EnergyPlus interface, building stock modelling, hourly weather data, heating and cooling equipment sizing ValidationTesting The EnergyPlus...

353

City of Portland - Streamlined Building Permits for Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Savings For Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Information Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive The City of Portland's...

354

City of Ashland - Green Building Incentive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of...

355

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Tools by Subject -...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

buildings, heating load, cooling load, HVAC RadTherm convection, conduction, radiation, weather, solar, transient Software has been updated. RHVAC residential HVAC, residential...

356

Soleras solar active cooling field test operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SOLERAS Program has designed and built four solar cooling systems, which have been installed on buildings in Phoenix, Arizona. The projects represent the latest state-of-the-art solar cooling systems of small commercial size. The systems use a variety of storage concepts. Because of time limitations, only one system is described in detail. Operational results of 1981 are discussed. The overall system performance was very close to engineering predictions.

Williamson, J.; Martin, R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

production and cooling energy savings from installation of a production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Title Electricity production and cooling energy savings from installation of a building-integrated photovoltaic roof on an office building Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Ban-Weiss, George, Craig P. Wray, William W. Delp, Peter Ly, Hashem Akbari, and Ronnen M. Levinson Journal Energy and Buildings Volume 56 Pagination 210 - 220 ISSN 0378-7788 Keywords Advanced Technology Demonstration, building design, Building heat transfer, cool roof, energy efficiency, Energy Performance of Buildings, energy savings, Energy Usage, energy use, Heat Island Abstract Reflective roofs can reduce demand for air conditioning and warming of the atmosphere. Roofs can also host photovoltaic (PV) modules that convert sunlight to electricity. In this study we assess the effects of installing a building integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) roof on an office building in Yuma, AZ. The system consists of thin film PV laminated to a white membrane, which lies above a layer of insulation. The solar absorptance of the roof decreased to 0.38 from 0.75 after installation of the BIPV, lowering summertime daily mean roof upper surface temperatures by about 5 °C. Summertime daily heat influx through the roof deck fell to ±0.1 kWh/m2from 0.3-1.0 kWh/m2. However, summertime daily heat flux from the ventilated attic into the conditioned space was minimally affected by the BIPV, suggesting that the roof was decoupled from the conditioned space. Daily PV energy production was about 25% of building electrical energy use in the summer. For this building the primary benefit of the BIPV appeared to be its capacity to generate electricity and not its ability to reduce heat flows into the building. Building energy simulations were used to estimate the cooling energy savings and heating energy penalties for more typical buildings.

358

Winter, a valuable cooling energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Frigid winters can now be thought of as a valuable energy resource. Ice frozen naturally during the winter could prove to be an energy-saving summertime blessing for cost-conscious owners of buildings or homes in the near future. Modern techniques involve freezing large blocks of ice in insulated storage tanks under or near the building to be cooled. Cooling with winter's ice is an idea whose time has come. The author discusses some methods of growing blocks of ice. These methods under development at various research organizations are heat pipes, layer by layer, earth freezing, and water spray.

Gorski, A.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Space cooling demands from office plug loads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Undersizing space cooling systems for office buildings can result in uncomfortable and angry tenants on peak cooling days. However, oversizing wastes money because more capacity is installed than is needed, and oversized systems have a lower energy efficiency which makes operating costs higher than necessary. Oversizing can adversely affect comfort as well, because oversized systems may provide poor humidity control and large temperature variations. Correct system sizing requires estimating building heat loads accurately. This paper discusses the heat load generated by the plug load, which includes any electrical equipment that is plugged into outlets.

Komor, P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New York Program Type Building Energy Code Provider NYS Department of State ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (ECCCNYS) requires that all government, commercial and residential buildings,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Building Energy Code Note: Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] web sites. New Hampshire adopted a mandatory statewide building code in 2002 based on the 2000 IECC. SB 81 was enacted in July 2007, and it upgraded the New

362

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Washington State Department of Commerce ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The State Building Code Council revised the [https://fortress.wa.gov/ga/apps/sbcc/Page.aspx?nid=14 Washington State

363

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Oregon Building Codes Division ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' [http://www.oregon.gov/ENERGY/CONS/Codes/cdpub.shtml The Oregon Energy

364

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Montana Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Building Codes Bureau ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The energy codes are reviewed on a three-year cycle corresponding to the adoption of new versions of the International Code Conference (ICC) Uniform

365

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Building Activities on Delicious...

366

Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings Performance Database on Delicious...

367

Building Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hVac controls guide hVac controls guide for Plans examiners and Building inspectors September 2011 authors: Eric Makela, PNNL James Russell, PECI Sarah Fujita, PECI Cindy Strecker, PECI Prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program 2 contents introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 how to use the guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 code requirements and compliance checks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Performance Path 10 Control Requirements for All Systems 11 Thermostatic Control of Heating and Cooling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Supply Fan Motor Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

368

RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D Contractors'been supported by the Solar Heating and Cooling Research andof Energy. 3rd Annual Solar Heating and Cooling R&D

Martin, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings City of Santa Monica - Expedited Permitting for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Santa Monica The City of Santa Monica allows for priority plan check processing for building projects that are registered with the United States Green Building Council for certification under the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. The priority status applies to

370

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings Solar Design Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Arizona Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Arizona Department of Commerce Arizona law requires that new state building projects over six thousand square feet follow prescribed solar design standards. Solar improvements should be evaluated on the basis of life cycle costs. Affected buildings include buildings designed and constructed by the department of

371

Local Option - Green Building Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives Local Option - Green Building Incentives < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 6/11/2009 State North Carolina Program Type Green Building Incentive To encourage sustainable building practices, North Carolina law allows all counties and cities to provide reductions or partial rebates for building permit fees. To qualify for a fee reduction, buildings must meet guidelines established by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)

372

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings Chandler - Expedited Plan Review for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Schools Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Chandler The mayor and city council of Chandler, AZ adopted Resolution 4199 in June 2008, establishing incentives for green building in the private sector. Permit applications for buildings registered with the US Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for

373

Around Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Around Buildings W h y startw i t h buildings and w o r k o u t wa r d ? For one, buildings are difficult t o a v o i d these

Treib, Marc

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Buildings Energy Data Book  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Glossary Glossary Acronyms and Initialisms Technology Descriptions Residential Space Heating Residential Space Cooling Residential Water Heating Commercial Space Cooling Commercial Space Heating Commercial Refrigeration Lighting Building Descriptions Commercial Residential Acronyms and Initialisms A B C D E F G H I L M N O P Q R S U V AAMA - American Architectural Manufacturers Association ACEEE - American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy AEO - EIA's Annual Energy Outlook AFEAS - Alternative Fluorocarbons Environmental Acceptability Study AFUE - Annual Fuel Utilization Efficiency AHAM - Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers ARI - Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute ASHRAE - American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers BTS - DOE's Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs

375

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BUILDING INSPECTION Building, Infrastructure, Transportation City of Redwood City 1017 Middlefield Sacramento, Ca 95814-5514 Re: Green Building Ordinance and the Building Energy Efficiency Standards Per of Redwood City enforce the current Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards as part

376

City of Los Angeles - Green Building Retrofit Requirement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Retrofit Requirement Green Building Retrofit Requirement City of Los Angeles - Green Building Retrofit Requirement < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Los Angeles Department of Water and Power In April 2009, Los Angeles enacted [clkrep.lacity.org/onlinedocs/2006/06-1963_ord_180633.pdf Ordinance 180636], known as the Green Building Retrofit Ordinance. This ordinance was later amended by Ordinance 182259. The law requires all city-owned

377

International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Buildings and Community Systems Solar Heating and CoolingBuildings and Community Systems (ECBCS) Heat Pumps Solar HeatingBuildings and Community Systems, • Heat Pumping Technologies, • Solar Heating

Evans, Meredydd

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

380

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling Ventilation Systems for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 6:19pm Addthis Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Proper ventilation helps you save energy and money. | Photo courtesy of JD Hancock. Ventilation is the least expensive and most energy-efficient way to cool buildings. Ventilation works best when combined with methods to avoid heat buildup in your home. In some cases, natural ventilation will suffice for cooling, although it usually needs to be supplemented with spot ventilation, ceiling fans, and window fans. For large homes, homeowners might want to investigate whole house fans. Interior ventilation is ineffective in hot, humid climates where

382

Education Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Education Education Characteristics by Activity... Education Education buildings are buildings used for academic or technical classroom instruction, such as elementary, middle, or high schools, and classroom buildings on college or university campuses. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Education Buildings... Seventy percent of education buildings were part of a multibuilding campus. Education buildings in the South and West were smaller, on average, than those in the Northeast and Midwest. Almost two-thirds of education buildings were government owned, and of these, over three-fourths were owned by a local government. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

383

Lodging Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a nursing home, assisted living center, or other residential care building a half-way house some other type of lodging Lodging Buildings by Subcategory Figure showing lodging...

384

Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior glass windows of office tower Commercial Buildings Commercial building systems research explores different ways to integrate the efforts of research in windows, lighting,...

385

EERE: Buildings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Commercial Building Initiative works with commercial builders and owners to reduce energy use and optimize building performance, comfort, and savings. Solid-State Lighting...

386

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) Eagle County - Eagle County Efficient Building Code (ECO-Green Build) < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Eagle County In an effort to reduce county-wide energy consumption and improve the environment, Eagle County established their own efficient building code (ECO-Green Build) which applies to all new construction and renovations/additions over 50% of the existing floor area of single-family and multifamily residences, and commercial buildings.

387

City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider The City of Fort Collins The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed and constructed to

388

Practical Integration Approach and Whole Building Energy Simulation of Three Energy Efficient Building Technologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Three technologies that have potential to save energy and improve sustainability of buildings are dedicated outdoor air systems, radiant heating and cooling systems and tighter building envelopes. To investigate the energy savings potential of these three technologies, whole building energy simulations were performed for a barracks facility and an administration facility in 15 U.S. climate zones and 16 international locations.

Miller, J. P.; Zhivov, A.; Heron, D.; Deru, M.; Benne, K.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effects of evaporative cooling on the regulation of body water and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

building, causing air to be drawn through the cooling pads. The study was conducted during two ...... of gut water in living ruminants. Aust J Agric Res 15:

390

Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pre-cooling of Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass inthe discharge of thermal mass from pre-cooling reduces theby thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans

Dudley, Junqiao Han

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

392

Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Buildings NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Building...

393

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

building sector by at least 50%. Photo of people walking around a new home. Visitors Tour Solar Decathlon Homes Featuring the Latest in Energy Efficient Building Technology...

394

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'Radio Wave Cooling' Offers New Twist on Laser Cooling. From NIST Tech Beat: September 13, 2007. ...

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

Proceedings: Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Papers presented at EPRI's 1994 Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. Specific topics include cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid cooling systems.

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Building Envelopes | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Envelope Envelope SHARE Building Envelopes MFEL.jpg The building envelope-the materials that separate the indoor and outdoor environments-primarily determines the amount of energy required to heat, cool, and ventilate a building. The envelope also can significantly influence energy needs in areas accessible to sunlight. To cost-effectively improve the energy efficiency, moisture-durability, and environmental sustainability of building envelopes, ORNL is exploring new and emerging materials, components, and systems as well as the fundamentals of heat, air, and moisture transfer. Research is also focused on multifunctional solutions where the envelope serves as a filter that selectively accepts or rejects solar radiation and outdoor air, depending on the need for heating, cooling, ventilation, and lighting.

397

Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

995. Evolution of cool roof standards in the United StatesMar/Apr, pp. 52-58. ASHRAE. 1999. ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999: Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low- Rise

Akbari, Hashem

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Development of the Passive Cooling Technique in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With more and more energy and environmental issues, the energy-saving and sustainable development of buildings is of utmost concern to the building industry. Passive cooling techniques can optimally utilize natural resources in order to reduce the energy consumption of buildings. At the same time, it can improve the buildings' thermal environment, so that it has gained the attention of many researchers and has been applied in many different zones of China. The author summarizes various passive cooling techniques, analyzes the research methods and simulation tools, and presents the results of a survey on actual applied conditions. We put forward the pivotal factors and the development direction of the technique. Comparing the thermal comfort zone of the passive cooling technique and the mechanical types, the passive cooling technique is found to be more suitable to people.

Zhou, J.; Wu, J.; Zhang, G.; Xu, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

400

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Mississippi Development Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Mississippi's existing state code is based on the 1977 Model Code for Energy Conservation (MCEC). The existing law does not mandate enforcement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider West Virginia Division of Energy ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' The West Virginia State Fire Commission is responsible for adopting and promulgating statewide construction codes. Local jurisdictions must adopt

402

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Colorado Energy Office ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Colorado is a home rule state so no statewide energy code exists. Voluntary

403

Building Energy Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Code Building Energy Code Building Energy Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Georgia Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Georgia Environmental Finance Authority ''Much of the information presented in this summary is drawn from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program and the Building Codes Assistance Project (BCAP). For more detailed information about building energy codes, visit the [http://www.energycodes.gov/states/ DOE] and [http://bcap-ocean.org/ BCAP] websites.'' Georgia's Department of Community Affairs periodically reviews, amends and/or updates the state minimum standard codes. Georgia has "mandatory"

404

Geothermal district heating and cooling system for the city of Calistoga, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calistoga has long been known for having moderate (270/sup 0/F maximum) hydrothermal deposits. The economic feasibility of a geothermal heating and cooling district for a portion of the downtown commercial area and city-owned building was studied. Descriptions of existing and proposed systems for each building in the block are presented. Heating and cooling loads for each building, retrofit costs, detailed cost estimates, system schematics, and energy consumption data for each building are included. (MHR)

Frederick, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hybrid Cooling Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water consumption by power plants has become an increasingly contentious siting issue. In nearly all fossil-fired and nuclear plants, water for plant cooling is by far the greatest water requirement. Therefore, the use of water-conserving cooling systems such as dry or hybrid cooling is receiving increasing attention. This technology overview from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provides a brief introduction to hybrid cooling systems. As defined in the report, the term "hybrid cooling" refer...

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

406

Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$100­$200 per home in hardware, and less than $0.10 per square foot in office buildings. It will also a 28% reduction per household in the energy required for heating and cooling, at the cost of only $25. This energy savings is a low hanging fruit: a large amount of energy can be saved at a very low cost

Whitehouse, Kamin

407

Rankine cycle machines for solar cooling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vigorous effort to develop and demonstrate practical uses of solar energy to heat and cool buildings, to process agricultural products, and to provide thermal and electrical energy for industry has been initiated. One significant part of this effort is the research, development, and demonstration of Rankine cycle machines using fluids heated by solar energy. Recent developments in three such devices are discussed briefly.

Weathers, H.M.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Solar heating and cooling demonstration project summaries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brief descriptive overviews are presented of the design and operating characteristics of all commercial and Federal residential solar heating and cooling systems and of the structures themselves. Also included are available pictures of the buildings and simplified solar system diagrams. A list of non-Federal residential installations is provided.

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Passive cooling with solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer models have been developed to describe the operation of both solar updraft and evaporative downdraft chimneys. Design studies are being conducted at the present time to use the towers for cooling an experimental, well instrumented, structure to study passive cooling in residential buildings. (MHR)

Mignon, G.V.; Cunningham, W.A.; Thompson, T.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Energy-Efficient Building Standards for State Facilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy-Efficient Building Standards for State Facilities Energy-Efficient Building Standards for State Facilities Energy-Efficient Building Standards for State Facilities < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State Energy Program Via Executive Order 27, Maine requires that construction or renovation of state buildings must incorporate "green building" standards that would achieve "significant" energy efficiency and environmental sustainability,

411

Los Angeles County - LEED for County Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Angeles County - LEED for County Buildings Los Angeles County - LEED for County Buildings Los Angeles County - LEED for County Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Los Angeles County In January 2007, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors adopted rules to require that all new county buildings greater than 10,000 square feet be LEED Silver certified. All buildings authorized and fully funded on or

412

City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cincinnati - Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate For buildings with permits received on or before January 31, 2013: $562,792 maximum improved market value for residential buildings except no limitation with LEED Platinum certification (the maximum incentive increases by 3% every year) For buildings with permits received after January 31, 2013:

413

Energy Efficient State Building Initiative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient State Building Initiative Efficient State Building Initiative Energy Efficient State Building Initiative < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Department of Administration In June 2008, Governor Mitch Daniels issued an executive order establishing an energy efficient state buildings initiative. The order requires the Indiana Department of Administration (DOA) to develop design standards for all new state buildings which require a cost-effectiveness analysis of the

414

Durham County - High-Performance Building Policy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Durham County - High-Performance Building Policy Durham County - High-Performance Building Policy Durham County - High-Performance Building Policy < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Durham City and County Durham County adopted a resolution in October 2008 that requires new non-school public buildings and facilities to meet high-performance standards. New construction of public buildings and facilities greater than

415

Arlington County - Green Building Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Arlington County - Green Building Incentive Program Arlington County - Green Building Incentive Program Arlington County - Green Building Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Arlington County In October 1999, the County Board of Arlington adopted a Pilot Green Building Incentive Program using the standards established by the U. S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design

416

Energy Efficiency Standards for Public Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Standards for Public Buildings Efficiency Standards for Public Buildings Energy Efficiency Standards for Public Buildings < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Idaho Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Idaho Office of Energy Resources In May 2008, Idaho enacted HB 422 (the Energy Efficient State Building Act) to reduce the amount of energy consumed by state facilities. To the extent feasible and practical, all major facility projects must be designed, constructed and certified to meet a target of at least 10% to 30% better efficiency than a comparable building on a similar site. A major facility

417

Global Cooling: Policies to Cool the World and Offset Global Warming from CO2 Using Reflective Roofs and Pavements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the solar reflectance of the urban surface reduce its solar heat gain, lowers its temperatures, and decreases its outflow of thermal infrared radiation into the atmosphere. This process of 'negative radiative forcing' can help counter the effects of global warming. In addition, cool roofs reduce cooling-energy use in air conditioned buildings and increase comfort in unconditioned buildings; and cool roofs and cool pavements mitigate summer urban heat islands, improving outdoor air quality and comfort. Installing cool roofs and cool pavements in cities worldwide is a compelling win-win-win activity that can be undertaken immediately, outside of international negotiations to cap CO{sub 2} emissions. We propose an international campaign to use solar reflective materials when roofs and pavements are built or resurfaced in temperate and tropical regions.

Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Rosenfeld, Arthur; Elliot, Matthew

2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

418

CCHP System with Interconnecting Cooling and Heating Network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The consistency between building heating load, cooling load and power load are analyzed in this paper. The problem of energy waste and low equipment usage in a traditional CCHP (combined cooling, heating and power) system with generated electricity not supplied to the grid is analyzed in detail. Further, the new concept of CCHP system with cooling and heating network interconnecting is developed. Then, the Olympic Park energy system is presented to illustrate the advantage and improvement both in economy performance and energy efficiency.

Fu, L.; Geng, K.; Zheng, Z.; Jiang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Title Cooling Energy and Cost Savings with Daylighting Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-19734 Year of Publication 1985 Authors Arasteh, Dariush K., Russell Johnson, Stephen E. Selkowitz, and Deborah J. Connell Conference Name 2nd Annual Symposium on Improving Building Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates Date Published 09/1985 Conference Location Texas A&M University Call Number LBL-19734 Abstract Fenestration performance in nonresidentialsbuildings in hot climates is often a large coolingsload liability. Proper fenestration design andsthe use of daylight-responsive dimming controls onselectric lights can, in addition to drasticallysreducing lighting energy, lower cooling loads,speak electrical demand, operating costs, chillerssizes, and first costs. Using the building energyssimulation programs DOE-2.1B and DOE-2.1C , wesfirst discuss lighting energy savings from daylighting.sThe effects of fenestration parametersson cooling loads, total energy use, peak demand,schiller sizes, and initial and operating costs aresalso discussed. The impact of daylighting, asscompared to electric lighting, on cooling requirementssis discussed as a function of glazingscharacteristics, location, and shading systems.

420

Service Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Service Service Characteristics by Activity... Service Service buildings are those in which some type of service is provided, other than food service or retail sales of goods. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Service Buildings... Most service buildings were small, with almost ninety percent between 1,001 and 10,000 square feet. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics Number of Service Buildings by Predominant Building Size Category Figure showing number of service buildings by size. If you need assistance viewing this page, please contact 202-586-8800. Equipment Table: Buildings, Size, and Age Data by Equipment Types Predominant Heating Equipment Types in Service Buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Material development in the SI sub 3 N sub 4 system using glass encapsulated Hip'ing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a two-year program to develop fully dense Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix SiC whisker composites with enhanced properties over monolithic Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. The primary goal was to develop a composite with a fracture toughness > 10 MPa{radical}m, capable of using high pressure glass encapsulated HIP'ing. Coating methods were developed to apply thin (<150nm) stoichiometric BN layers to SiC whiskers and also to apply a dual coating of SiC over carbon to the whiskers. Fracture toughness of the composites was determined to increase as the quantity of whiskers (or elongated grains) with their axis perpendicular to the crack plane increased. Of the interface compositions evaluated in this effort, carbon was determined to be the most effective for increasing toughness. The highest toughnesses (6.8--7.0 MPa{radical}m) were obtained with uniaxially aligned carbon coated whiskers. There was no evidence of the carbon coating compromising the oxidation resistance of the composites at 1370{degree}C.

Corbin, N.D.; Sundberg, G.J.; Siebein, K.N.; Willkens, C.A.; Pujari, V.K.; Rossi, G.A.; Hansen, J.S.; Chang, C.L.; Hammarstrom, J.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Mercantile Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mercantile Mercantile Characteristics by Activity... Mercantile Mercantile buildings are those used for the sale and display of goods other than food (buildings used for the sales of food are classified as food sales). This category includes enclosed malls and strip shopping centers. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Mercantile Buildings... Almost half of all mercantile buildings were less than 5,000 square feet. Roughly two-thirds of mercantile buildings housed only one establishment. Another 20 percent housed between two and five establishments, and the remaining 12 percent housed six or more establishments. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

423

Other Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Other Other Characteristics by Activity... Other Other buildings are those that do not fit into any of the specifically named categories. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Other Buildings... Other buildings include airplane hangars; laboratories; buildings that are industrial or agricultural with some retail space; buildings having several different commercial activities that, together, comprise 50 percent or more of the floorspace, but whose largest single activity is agricultural, industrial/manufacturing, or residential; and all other miscellaneous buildings that do not fit into any other CBECS category. Since these activities are so diverse, the data are probably less meaningful than for other activities; they are provided here to complete

424

Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-Enabled Titanium Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide

425

Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate 100% project financing Program Info Start Date 1/8/2010 State Arkansas Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount 100% project financing Provider Arkansas Energy Office The Sustainable Building Design Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Arkansas Energy

426

City of Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program City of Indianapolis - Green Building Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info Start Date 08/01/2010 State Indiana Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Indianapolis The Indianapolis Office of Sustainability and the Department of Code

427

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Primary Space-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Primary Space-Heating Energy Source Used a" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1258,1999,282,63 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,699,955,171,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,233,409,58,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,211,372,32,"Q" "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,63,140,8,9

428

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 6. Space Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Space Heating","Space-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane","Other a" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,1766,2165,360,65,372,113 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,888,1013,196,"Q",243,72 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,349,450,86,"Q",72,"Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,311,409,46,18,38,"Q"

429

Buildings*","Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 1. Water-Heating Energy Sources, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Buildings with Water Heating","Water-Heating Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Elec- tricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","Propane" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3472,1910,1445,94,27,128 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,1715,1020,617,41,"N",66 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,725,386,307,"Q","Q",27 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,607,301,285,16,"Q",27

430

Essays on the Impact of Climate Change and Building Codes on Energy Consumption and the Impact of Ozone on Crop Yield  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trend & Dummy Building Code Intensity Building Code Construction Share Heating Degree Days Cooling Degree Days Per Capita Income Natural Gas Price

Aroonruengsawat, Anin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Vacant Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of 275 thousand cubic feet per building, 29.9 cubic feet per square foot, at an average cost of 475 per thousand cubic feet. Energy Consumption in Vacant Buildings by Energy...

432

Building America  

SciTech Connect

IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

Brad Oberg

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

433

DOE Science Showcase - Cool roofs, cool research, at DOE | OSTI...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Accelerator returns cool roof documents from 6 DOE Databases Executive Order on Sustainability Secretary Chu Announces Steps to Implement One Cool Roof Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler...

434

Prototype Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The SDC D buildings, designed for Seattle, Washington, used special moment frames (SMFs) with reduced beam section (RBS) connections. ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

435

Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings Green Energy Standards for Public Buildings < Back Eligibility Fed. Government Local Government State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider West Virginia Department of Administration In March 2012, West Virginia enacted the Green Buildings Act, which applies to all new construction of public buildings, buildings receiving state grant funds, and buildings receiving state appropriations. For those buildings that have not entered the schematic design phase prior to July 1, 2012, buildings must be designed and construction to comply with the ICC

436

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

437

Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Thermal Performance of Phase-Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Cooling residential buildings in milder climates contributes significantly to peak demand mainly because of poor load factors. Peak cooling load determines the size of equipment and the cooling source. Several measures reduce cooling-system size and allow the use of lower-energy cooling sources; they include incorporating exterior walls or other elements that effectively shelter interiors from outside heat and cold, and providing thermal mass, to cool interior spaces during the day by absorbing heat and warm them at night as the mass discharges its heat. Thermal mass features may be used for storage only or serve as structural elements. Concrete, steel, adobe, stone, and brick all satisfy requirements

438

Cooling System Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...size Flow restrictions Heat exchanger size and design All of these factors must be considered. Every component in the cooling

439

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Search Search Help Better Buildings Neighborhood Program HOME ABOUT BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNERS INNOVATIONS RUN A PROGRAM TOOLS & RESOURCES NEWS EERE » Building Technologies Office » Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Neighborhood Program on Delicious

440

Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Codes Building Energy Codes Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Advancing Building Energy Codes on AddThis.com... Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Warming Up to Pump Heat.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building America Building America Meetings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building America Meetings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance Solution Center Partnerships Meetings Publications Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR

442

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cranfield University Building 41 (Stafford Cripps Building) Building 41, formally known as the Stafford Cripps Building, has been transformed into a new Learning and Teaching Facility. Proposed ground

443

Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Building Residential Building Activities to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Building Activities on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Home Energy Score Home Performance with ENERGY STAR Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Challenge Home Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals

444

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Buildings Residential Network to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Residential Network on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings...

445

Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Better Buildings Challenge on Delicious Rank...

446

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Building Energy Optimization Software to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Optimization Software on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America Research Innovations Research Tools Building Science Education Climate-Specific Guidance

447

SOLERAS - Saudi University Solar Cooling Laboratories Project: University of Petroleum and Minerals. Solar cooling system. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides details of the proposed solar cooling laboratory, including descriptions of the building and design conditions; the collector/storage subsystem; the Rankine cycle engine subsystem; instrumentation and data acquisition; and an implementation plan. Appendices of relevant data including computer programs for building load and engine system calculations and descriptions of equipment are included.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Building Science  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Science The "Enclosure" Joseph Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng, ASHRAE Fellow www.buildingscience.com * Control heat flow * Control airflow * Control water vapor flow * Control rain * Control ground water * Control light and solar radiation * Control noise and vibrations * Control contaminants, environmental hazards and odors * Control insects, rodents and vermin * Control fire * Provide strength and rigidity * Be durable * Be aesthetically pleasing * Be economical Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 2 Water Control Layer Air Control Layer Vapor Control Layer Thermal Control Layer Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 3 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 4 Building Science Corporation Joseph Lstiburek 5 Building Science Corporation

449

Buildings Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

blog Office of Energy Efficiency & blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk http://energy.gov/eere/articles/energyplus-boosts-building-efficiency-help-autodesk building-efficiency-help-autodesk" class="title-link">EnergyPlus Boosts Building Efficiency with Help from Autodesk

450

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower performance. To understand the importance of the optimization techniques, cooling tower theory will be discussed first.

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roofs: Your Questions Answered Roofs: Your Questions Answered Cool Roofs: Your Questions Answered January 6, 2011 - 2:58pm Addthis John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Last month Secretary Chu announced that the Department of Energy had installed a "cool roof" atop the west building of our Washington, DC headquarters. The announcement elicited a fair number of questions from his Facebook fans, so we decided to reach out to the people behind the project for their insight on the specific benefits of switching to a cool roof, and the process that went into making that choice. Jim Bullis (Facebook): So what is the percentage saving of energy bills for this building? Answer: The West Building cool roof is estimated to save about $2,000 per

453

One Cool Change at Energy HQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

One Cool Change at Energy HQ One Cool Change at Energy HQ One Cool Change at Energy HQ July 6, 2012 - 3:49pm Addthis Officials from the Energy Department and NORESCO cut the ribbon at the new chiller plant in the Forrestal building. The chiller is expected to save $600,000 per year from the Department's energy bills. | Energy Department photo Officials from the Energy Department and NORESCO cut the ribbon at the new chiller plant in the Forrestal building. The chiller is expected to save $600,000 per year from the Department's energy bills. | Energy Department photo Karissa Marcum Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? 126 new cool roofs were installed in fiscal year 2012 on buildings across the Department. New solar panels at the Department's Germantown campus in Maryland

454

One Cool Change at Energy HQ | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cool Change at Energy HQ Cool Change at Energy HQ One Cool Change at Energy HQ July 6, 2012 - 3:49pm Addthis Officials from the Energy Department and NORESCO cut the ribbon at the new chiller plant in the Forrestal building. The chiller is expected to save $600,000 per year from the Department's energy bills. | Energy Department photo Officials from the Energy Department and NORESCO cut the ribbon at the new chiller plant in the Forrestal building. The chiller is expected to save $600,000 per year from the Department's energy bills. | Energy Department photo Karissa Marcum Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? 126 new cool roofs were installed in fiscal year 2012 on buildings across the Department. New solar panels at the Department's Germantown campus in Maryland

455

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

456

InterTechnology Corporation technology summary, solar heating and cooling. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of systems technology for solar-thermal heating and cooling of buildings is given. Solar collectors, control systems for solar heating and cooling, selective surfaces, thermal energy storage, solar-assisted heat pumps, and solar-powered cooling systems are discussed in detail. Also, an ITC specification for a solar control system is included. (WHK)

None

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron July 15, 2011 - 5:42pm Addthis Berkeley Lab's iconic building, the Advanced Light Source, is getting a new cool roof, righ, that will reflect sunlight back into the atmosphere, playing a small part in mitigating global warming. On left, Ernest Orlando Lawrence talks to colleagues at the construction site of the cyclotron, built in 1941. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Public Affairs Berkeley Lab's iconic building, the Advanced Light Source, is getting a new cool roof, righ, that will reflect sunlight back into the atmosphere, playing a small part in mitigating global warming. On left, Ernest Orlando Lawrence talks to colleagues at the construction site of the cyclotron,

458

A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron A Cool Roof for the Iconic Cyclotron July 15, 2011 - 5:42pm Addthis Berkeley Lab's iconic building, the Advanced Light Source, is getting a new cool roof, righ, that will reflect sunlight back into the atmosphere, playing a small part in mitigating global warming. On left, Ernest Orlando Lawrence talks to colleagues at the construction site of the cyclotron, built in 1941. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Roy Kaltschmidt, Berkeley Lab Public Affairs Berkeley Lab's iconic building, the Advanced Light Source, is getting a new cool roof, righ, that will reflect sunlight back into the atmosphere, playing a small part in mitigating global warming. On left, Ernest Orlando Lawrence talks to colleagues at the construction site of the cyclotron,

459

Suncatcher and cool pool. Project report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Suncatcher is a simple, conical solar concentrating device that captures light entering clerestory windows and directs it onto thermal storage elements at the back of a south facing living space. The cone shape and inclination are designed to capture low angle winter sunlight and to reflect away higher angle summer sunlight. It is found that winter radiation through a Suncatcher window is 40 to 50% higher than through an ordinary window, and that the average solar fraction is 59%. Water-filled steal culvert pipes used for thermal storage are found to undergo less stratification, and thus to be more effective, when located where sunlight strikes the bottom rather than the top. Five Suncatcher buildings are described. Designs are considered for 32/sup 0/, 40/sup 0/ and 48/sup 0/ north latitude, and as the latitude increases, the inclination angle of the cone should be lowered. The Cool Pool is an evaporating, shaded roof pond which thermosiphons cool water into water-filled columns within a building. Preliminary experiments indicate that the best shade design has unimpeded north sky view, good ventilation, complete summer shading, a low architectural profile, and low cost attic vent lowers work. Another series of experiments established the satisfactory performance of the Cool Pool on a test building using four water-filled cylinders, two cylinders, and two cylinders connected to the Cool Pool through a heat exchanger. Although an unshaded pool cools better at night than a shaded one, daytime heat gain far offsets this advantage. A vinyl waterbag heat exchanger was developed for use with the Cool Pool. (LEW)

Hammond, J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Reference Commercial Reference Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Commercial Reference Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Buildings Performance Database Data Centers Energy Asset Score

462

Monitoring and Optimization of Building Operations of a Low-Energy School Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ambitious design and energy concept of the new Gebhard-Müller-Schule (GMS) school building in Biberach/Riss, Germany proved itself during the first three school years of operation. The intended target value of 30 kWh/(m2a) overall heating energy consumption was almost met during the second year of operation in 2006 and finally achieved in 2007, due to well-working optimization measures, which were identified through monitoring of the building operation. Heating and cooling energy is mainly provided by a groundwater well plant, which serves as a heat source for two heat pumps as well as a direct cooling source for supplying the radiant heating and cooling system that is integrated in the concrete floor and ceiling slabs (thermally activated building component systems – TABS). Indoor air conditioning and server room cooling are also connected to the groundwater cooling system. The main component of the groundwater well plant is a submersible pump on the bottom of the well which is located underneath the building. The pump supplies the building reliably with geothermal energy, but also consumes a significant amount of electricity. Monitoring and optimization of the building’s operation, funded by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology in Germany, revealed fundamental findings about the operation of the system and the possibilities to improve the building’s performance. Since 2005, the measurements show a continuous increase in efficiency, particularly in the field of auxiliary energies. This significantly increased performance clearly shows the potential of the use of groundwater for heating and cooling purposes and of thermally activated building component systems. In addition the measurements reveal the sensitivity of the system efficiency in terms of operating parameters.

Koenigsdorff, R.; Heinrich, S.; Baumann, O.; Reiser, C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

ancient building system | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ancient building system ancient building system Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid).

464

Buildings*","Energy Used For  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 4. Energy End Uses, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Energy Used For (more than one may apply)" ,,"Space Heating","Cooling","Water Heating","Cooking","Manu- facturing" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,3982,3625,3472,801,119 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2100,1841,1715,354,"Q" "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,782,732,725,155,29 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",738,659,629,607,127,28 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",241,225,216,217,69,"Q" "50,001 to 100,000 ............",129,123,118,119,50,8

465

New York City - Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York City - Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing New York City - Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing Buildings New York City - Energy Conservation Requirements for Existing Buildings < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State New York Program Type Building Energy Code Provider New York City Mayor's Office of Operations In December 2009 the New York City Council enacted a series of bills intended to improve the energy efficiency of existing buildings in the city. Each of the four bills addresses a different aspect of improving energy efficiency in the city's buildings as follows: energy conservation

466

San Bernardino County - Green Building Requirement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bernardino County - Green Building Requirement Bernardino County - Green Building Requirement San Bernardino County - Green Building Requirement < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings In August 2007, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors approved a policy requiring that all new county buildings and major renovations be built to LEED Silver standards. The decision was part of the Green County San Bernardino project, which also includes incentives to encourage residents, builders, and businesses to adopt more sustainable practices. Source http://www.dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=CA73R

467

Energy Reduction Plan for State Buildings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Plan for State Buildings Reduction Plan for State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Local Government Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) In April 2007, Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick signed Executive Order 484, titled "Leading by Example: Clean Energy and Efficient Buildings." This order establishes numerous energy targets and mandates for state government

468

State Building Energy Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Building Energy Efficiency Program State Building Energy Efficiency Program State Building Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Utah Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider State of Utah Department of Administrative Services On March 17, 2006, [http://www.le.state.ut.us/~2006/bills/hbillenr/hb0080.pdf House Bill 80] was enacted in Utah, requiring the Division of Facilities Construction and Management to administer the State Building Energy Efficiency Program. The Division is responsible for developing guidelines, incentives and procedures for energy efficiency and reduction of costs in state

469

Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process Miami-Dade County - Expedited Green Buildings Process < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider Miami-Dade Permitting and Inspection Center In an effort to promote environmentally sensitive design and construction, the Miami-Dade County Commissioners passed an ordinance in June 2005 to expedite the permitting process for "green" buildings certified by a recognized environmental rating agency. Commercial, industrial, and

470

City of San Francisco - Green Building Code | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of San Francisco - Green Building Code City of San Francisco - Green Building Code < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Building Energy Code Provider San Francisco San Francisco adopted a mandatory green building code for new construction projects in September 2008, establishing strict guidelines for residential and commercial buildings according to the following schedule:

471

Green Building and Energy Reduction Standards for State Agencies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Green Building and Energy Reduction Standards for State Agencies Green Building and Energy Reduction Standards for State Agencies < Back Eligibility State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Washington Department of General Administration On January 5, 2005, Washington's governor signed Executive Order 05-01, directing state agencies to adopt green building practices in the construction of all new buildings and in major (over 60%) renovation of

472

City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives City of Scottsdale - Green Building Incentives < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Arizona Program Type Green Building Incentive Provider City of Scottsdale Scottsdale's Green Building Program, established in 1998, was the first such program in Arizona with an emphasis on residential home construction.

473

City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings City of Asheville - Efficiency Standards for City Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Asheville In April 2007, the Asheville City Council adopted carbon emission reduction goals and set LEED standards for new city buildings. The council committed to reducing carbon emissions by 2% per year until the city reaches an 80%

474

Design of Complex Systems to Achieve Passive Safety: Natural Circulation Cooling of Liquid Salt Pebble Bed Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings cool. Minarets are tall towers with windows at thetall N ATURAL C IRCULATION - I NTEGRAL E FFECTS T ESTS towers,

Scarlat, Raluca Olga

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Methodology for the evaluation of natural ventilation in buildings using a reduced-scale air model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commercial office buildings predominantly are designed to be ventilated and cooled using mechanical systems. In temperate climates, passive ventilation and cooling techniques can be utilized to reduce energy consumption ...

Walker, Christine E. (Christine Elaine)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) Place Livermore, California Zip 94550 Product CoolEarth is a concentrated PV developer using inflatable concentrators to focus light onto triple-junction cells. References CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) is a company located in Livermore, California . References ↑ "CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoolEarth_formerly_Cool_Earth_Solar&oldid=343892" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

477

Office Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Since they comprised 18 percent of commercial floorspace, this means that their total energy intensity was just slightly above average. Office buildings predominantly used...

478

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Better Buildings Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Better Buildings Partners on AddThis.com... Better Buildings Residential Network Progress Stories Interviews Videos Events Quick Links to Partner Information AL | AZ | CA | CO | CT FL | GA | IL | IN | LA ME | MD | MA | MI | MO NE | NV | NH | NJ | NY

479

Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories Supporting Building America to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: National Laboratories Supporting Building America on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Solar Decathlon Building America

480

Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Building Integrated Building Management System Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Integrated Building Management System Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "build ings cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Stochastic cooling in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greensburg State Bank Greensburg State Bank When a tornado leveled 95% of Greensburg, the only thing left of Greensburg State Bank was the original vault. So the bank was rebuilt on its original site and re-opened for business just one year later. It was the second commercial building in Greensburg to do so. The new bank boasts a variety of green building features including an east-west building orientation that maximizes natural daylight inside, insulated concrete form (ICF) construction for an energy- efficient building envelope, and a high efficiency heating and cooling system. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * An east-west building orientation maximizes natural daylighting in the interior and reduces the wall area on the east and west that the sun can heat up, decreasing the need for cooling

483

Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Windows, Skylights, and Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Windows, Skylights, and Doors Research on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research Space Heating & Cooling Research

484

Gas turbine cooling system  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? August 12, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Erin discussed cool roof technologies and how they can improve the comfort of buildings while reducing energy costs. Would you consider installing a cool roof? Why or why not? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles Would You Consider Driving a Vehicle that Can Run on Biodiesel? Would You Consider Installing a Cool Roof? Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs How Do You Save Water When Caring for Your Lawn?

486

Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, J. [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z