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Sample records for bui ldin gs

  1. GS Global Biodiesel JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Biodiesel JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Global Biodiesel JV Place: Iowa Product: JV between GS AgriFuels and Global Ethanol set-up to develop a plant that will...

  2. GS Carbon Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Carbon Corporation Place: New York, New York Zip: 10119 Sector: Carbon Product: The company offsets emissions output with...

  3. GS-PR-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GS-PR-0001-001.doc Two-Person Rule Date: 2000/04/06 1. Sign the two-person rule compliance form (GS-CO-0001-001.doc). 2. Ascertain that sufficient numbers of people are present for the work to be accomplished. 3. Do not begin work (except office-type work) until the arrival and acknowledgment (verbal) of the second person. 4. If two individuals are the only persons working in the experimental hall, exclusive of work described under exemptions of (GS-PO-0001-D004.doc), both must leave together

  4. GS Yuasa Mitsubishi JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Yuasa & Mitsubishi JV Place: Minami-ku, Kyoto, Japan Sector: Vehicles Product: Japan-based JV and manufacturer of batteries for use in...

  5. GS Yuasa Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: GS Yuasa Corp Place: Minato-Ku, Kyoto, Japan Zip: 601-8520 Sector: Solar Product: Kyoto-based company involved in battery manufacturing and...

  6. Supervisory, Intelligence Research Specialist, GS-132-14 (Director...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supervisory, Intelligence Research Specialist, GS-132-14 (Director - Intelligence Watch Officer) Supervisory, Intelligence Research Specialist, GS-132-14 (Director - Intelligence...

  7. GS-CO-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GS-CO-0001-001.doc Two-Person Rule Date: 2000/04/06 By my signature affixed below, I commit to abide by the Two-Person rule while working at CAMD. Further, I understand that failure to comply with this rule may impair my ability to access the CAMD facility. Signature: _______________________ Name: ________________ Date: _______ (print) Affiliation: ______________________ Contact Number: _____________________ Two-Person Contractor/ Visitor Compliance Form By my signature affixed below, I commit

  8. GS-AD-0009-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09-001.doc Crane Date: 2001/01/30 This directive concerns the use of the CAMD crane by individuals who have not received training by CAMD (for example a vendor) but who need to operate the CAMD crane to ensure completion their work (contract) at CAMD. This option is available only to outside contractors. Reference to this exception is detailed in GS-PO-0009-001.doc under section 8, entitled Exemptions to the rule. All individuals described above, must sign a release waiver. A sample release

  9. GS-AD-0010-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10-001.doc Forklift Date: 2001/01/17 This directive concerns the use of the CAMD forklift by individuals who have not received training by CAMD (for example a vendor) but who need to operate the CAMD forklift to ensure completion their work (contract) at CAMD. This option is available only to outside contractors. Reference to this exception is detailed in GS-PO-0009- 001.doc under section 8, entitled Exemptions to the rule. All individuals described above, must sign a release waiver. A sample

  10. GS-PO-0001-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSU/CAMD Policy Doc. ID: GS-PO-0001-001.doc Two-Person Rule Date: 2000/04/06 1. Introduction: Working at LSU/CAMD involves potential hazards including, but not limited to, electrical, radiation, chemical, occupational and industrial risks. 2. Purpose: The purpose of the two-person policy is to ensure that there is always another person available to take the appropriate action(s) in case of an emergency. 3. Definitions : Second Person: the second person is defined as one who is both competent and

  11. GS-PO-0009-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSU/CAMD Policy Doc. ID: GS-PO-0009-001.doc Crane Use Date: 2001/01/17 1. Introduction: In an effort to protect personnel and equipment, all crane use at the CAMD facility should only be carried out by duly trained individuals. Persons wishing to utilize the crane must be authorized by CAMD safety. 2. Purpose: The purpose of the crane policy is to ensure that all crane operators at CAMD have been properly and adequately trained. 3. Definitions: a. crane: specifically refers to the 360 0 crane of

  12. GS-PO-0010-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LSU/CAMD Policy Doc. ID: GS-PO-0010-001.doc Forklift Use Date: 2001/01/30 1. Introduction: OHSA regulations state that all forklift operators must be trained. This training should consist of both classroom and hands-on training and should include a test before an individual should be permitted to operate a powered industrial truck. Although Louisiana State University does not fall under the jurisdiction of the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), it is the policy of LSU and the

  13. GS-PR-0003-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GS-PR-0003.001.doc Liquid Helium/Wiggler Fill Date: 2000/05/12 1. Always Wear Insulated Gloves and Protective Glasses or Goggles 2. Open collar valve on fill stab to remove trapped air. 3. Insert stab in dewar, tighten collar and hook retaining cable. 4. Close dewar relief valve and remove fitting. 5. Open valve on helium gas bottle and remove trapped air. 6. Connect line from helium bottle to dewar relief valve and open valve. 7. Adjust regulator to 25 p.s.i.. 8. Close (4) red-handled lead

  14. Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wikiGsT Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentgeospatial-toolkit-gst Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance...

  15. Test Report : GS battery, EPC power HES RESCU.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

  16. Evaluation of Two Guralp Preamplifiers for GS21 Seismometer Application.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; Slad, George William

    2015-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated two Guralp preamplifiers for use with a GS21 seismometer application. The two preamplifiers have a gain factor of 61.39. The purpose of the preamplifier evaluation was to determine a measured gain factor, transfer function, total harmonic distortion, self-noise, application passband, dynamic range, seismometer calibration pass-through, and to comment on any issues encountered during the evaluation. The test results included in this report were in response to static, tonal, and dynamic input signals. The Guralp GS21 preamplifiers are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO). Test methodologies used were based on IEEE Standards 1057 for Digitizing Waveform Recorders and 1241 for Analog to Digital Converters

  17. Golden Sun Fujian Solar Technic Co Ltd GS Solar | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sun Fujian Solar Technic Co Ltd GS Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Golden Sun (Fujian) Solar Technic Co Ltd (GS-Solar) Place: Quanzhou, Fujian Province, China Zip: 362000...

  18. Intelligence Research Analyst, GS-132-9/11 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intelligence Research Analyst, GS-132-911 Intelligence Research Analyst, GS-132-911 Job Announcement Number: 16-0002 Who May Apply: All qualified U.S. citizens Duty Location: 2...

  19. MHK ISDB/Sensors/True North Revolution GS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GS < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help Under DevelopmentThis...

  20. Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, V. D.; Rice, K.; Murphy, R.; Munk, J.; Ally, Moonis; Shen, Bo; Craddick, William; Hearn, Shawn A.

    2013-05-24

    Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit test results and the diagnostic information coming from the field test experience, CM developed a 2nd generation (or beta) prototype in 2012. Field test verification units were fabricated and installed at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge in May 2012 and at several sites near CM headquarters in Oklahoma. Field testing of the units continued through February 2013. Annual performance analyses of the beta unit (prototype 2) with vertical well ground heat exchangers (GHX) in 5 U.S. locations predict annual energy savings of 57% to 61%, averaging 59% relative to the minimum efficiency suite and 38% to 56%, averaging 46% relative to the SOA GSHPwDS. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the test units it was projected that the 2nd generation units would achieve ~58% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at the Zebra Alliance site with horizontal GHX. A new product based on the beta unit design was announced by CM in 2012 the Trilogy 40 Q-mode (http://cmdealernet.com/trilogy_40.html). The unit was formally introduced in a March 2012 press release (see Appendix A) and was available for order beginning in December 2012.

  1. W.B.; Allison, G.S. 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nuclear fuel bundle data for use in fuel bundle handling Weihermiller, W.B.; Allison, G.S. 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; FUEL ELEMENT CLUSTERS; REMOTE...

  2. Blue Energy Co Ltd Honda GS Yuasa JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Kyoto-based JV established between Honda and GS Yuasa which will manufacture lithium-ion batteries. Coordinates: 37.766842, 139.019287 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Crystal structure of the [beta subscript 2] adrenergic receptor–Gs protein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complex (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Crystal structure of the [beta subscript 2] adrenergic receptor–Gs protein complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crystal structure of the [beta subscript 2] adrenergic receptor–Gs protein complex G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the

  4. Paducah Environmental Technical Services II GSA Contract No.: GS-10F-0198K

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Technical Services II GSA Contract No.: GS-10F-0198K Task Order No.: DE-DT0005139/0017 Page 3 of 92 SOURCE SELECTION INFORMATION - SEE FAR 2.101 and 3.104 Table of Contents SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES/PRICES ..................................................................... 9 B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT/ ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED ----------------------------------------------------- 12 B.2 DOE-B-1007 DELIVERABLE REQUIREMENTS - TIME & MATERIAL/LABOR HOUR ----------- 12 B.3

  5. A verification of the gyrokinetic microstability codes GEM, GYRO, and GS2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bravenec, R. V.; Chen, Y.; Wan, W.; Parker, S.; Candy, J.

    2013-10-15

    A previous publication [R. V. Bravenec et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 122505 (2011)] presented favorable comparisons of linear frequencies and nonlinear fluxes from the Eulerian gyrokinetic codes gyro[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] and gs2[W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)]. The motivation was to verify the codes, i.e., demonstrate that they correctly solve the gyrokinetic-Maxwell equations. The premise was that it is highly unlikely for both codes to yield the same incorrect results. In this work, we add the Lagrangian particle-in-cell code gem[Y. Chen and S. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 220, 839 (2007)] to the comparisons, not simply to add another code, but also to demonstrate that the codes' algorithms do not matter. We find good agreement of gem with gyro and gs2 for the plasma conditions considered earlier, thus establishing confidence that the codes are verified and that ongoing validation efforts for these plasma parameters are warranted.

  6. Microsoft Word - FINAL CR 2013-01 Soil Disturbance Review Plan - GS10 Flume Replacement.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    RFLMA Contact Record 2013-01 1 of 11 ROCKY FLATS SITE REGULATORY CONTACT RECORD Purpose: GS10 Flume Replacement Project and Soil Disturbance Review Plan Contact Record Approval Date: May 2, 2013 Site Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Scott Surovchak, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Rick DiSalvo, S.M. Stoller Corporation (Stoller); Linda Kaiser, Stoller; George Squibb, Stoller Regulatory Contact(s)/Affiliation(s): Carl Spreng, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE); Vera Moritz,

  7. GS Equivalency Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for General Schedule (i.e., annual) positions. The Chart provides guidance for Human Resource Specialists and Assistants in making qualification determinations when BPA...

  8. PPPO/DUF6 Engineering and Operations Technical Services GSA Contract #: GS-10F-0061R Task Order #: DE-DT0005643

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PPPO/DUF6 Engineering and Operations Technical Services GSA Contract #: GS-10F-0061R Task Order #: DE-DT0005643 B-1 PART 1 - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES PRICES / COST B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT/ ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED ...................................................... B-2 B.2 DOE-B-1007 DELIVERABLE REQUIREMENTS - TIME & MATERIALS/LABOR HOURS................................................................................................B-2 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS

  9. Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system input terminated noise seismic response adjusted test : StreckeisenSTS2-low and high gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 seismometers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rembold, Randy Kai; Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2008-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested, evaluated and reported on the Geotech Smart24 data acquisition system with active Fortezza crypto card data signing and authentication in SAND2008-. One test, Input Terminated Noise, allows us to characterize the self-noise of the Smart24 system. By computing the power spectral density (PSD) of the input terminated noise time series data set and correcting for the instrument response of different seismometers, the resulting spectrum can be compared to the USGS new low noise model (NLNM) of Peterson (1996), and determine the ability of the matched system of seismometer and Smart24 to be quiet enough for any general deployment location. Four seismometer models were evaluated: the Streckeisen STS2-Low and High Gain, Guralp CMG3T and Geotech GS13 models. Each has a unique pass-band as defined by the frequency band of the instrument corrected noise spectrum that falls below the new low-noise model.

  10. GS-PR-0002-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.001.doc Liquid Nitrogen (LN 2 ) Fill Date: 2001/01/30 This document describes the general procedure for filling large stainless steel liquid nitrogen (LN 2 ) dewars from the large external LN 2 tank located in the gas cylinder farm of the CAMD facility. 1. Always Wear Insulated Gloves and Protective Glasses or Goggles 2. Make sure all valves on the large LN 2 dewar are closed. 3. If the LN 2 dewar liquid line is attached to something, you must disconnect it before being able to move the dewar

  11. GS-PR-0009-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09-001.doc Crane Date: 2001/01/30 1. Ensure that you are certified to use the CAMD crane. 2. If not certified, make appointment with CAMD Safety to be trained in crane operation. 3. If you have previously been trained to use the CAMD crane but more than one year has elapsed since this training, you must re-certify. 4. To re-certify as a crane operator - go to www.camd.lsu.edu and take the crane test located under the Safety-MSDS button. 5. You must obtain a minimum of 80% or certification is

  12. GS-PR-0010-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10-001.doc Forklift Date: 2001/01/30 1. Ensure that you are certified to use the CAMD forklift. 2. If not certified, make appointment with CAMD Safety to be trained in forklift handling. 3. If you have previously been trained to use the forklift but more than one year has elapsed since this training, you must re-certify. 4. To re-certify as a forklift operator - go to www.camd.lsu.edu and take the test located under the Safety-MSDS button. 5. You must obtain a minimum of 80% or certification is

  13. Microsoft Word - 2007 waste return memoGS.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have the waste container removed from the SWOC TSD facility within 15 business days. Please direct any questions on the Waste Acceptance Criteria to J.A. Nielsen or A.J. Ramirez....

  14. Supervisory, Intelligence Research Specialist, GS-132-14 (Director- Intelligence Watch Officer)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Job Announcement Number: 16-0001 Who may apply: Current IN Federal Employees Only Duty Location: 1 vacancy Washington, DC Metro Area Open Period: January 14, 2016 - January 28, 2016

  15. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  16. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  17. Crystal structure of the [beta subscript 2] adrenergic receptor?Gs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The...

  18. A high performance field-reversed configuration (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M. ; Smirnov, A. ; Gota, H. ; Barnes, D. ; Deng, B. H. ; Thompson, M. C. ; Trask, E. ; Yang, X. ; Putvinski, S. ; Rostoker, N. ; Andow, R. ; Aefsky, S. ; Bolte, N. ; Bui, D. Q. ;...

  19. Glomerular-specific imprinting of the mouse Gs{alpha} gene: How does this relate to hormone resistance in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, C.M.; Dutton, E.R.; Seymour, A.

    1996-09-01

    The gene for alpha-stimulating guanine-nucleotide binding polypeptide, Gnas, has been considered as a candidate for the imprinting effects ascribed to distal mouse Chromosome (Chr) 2. Its human homologue (GNAS1) appears, from clinical and biochemical studies of patients with Albright hereditary ostodystrophy, to be paternally imprinted. GNAS1 maps to 20q13, a region that shows linkage conservation with distal mouse Chr 2. We have mapped Gnas within the imprinting region on distal Chr 2 by linkage analysis. To establish if Gnas is imprinted, we have looked for expression differences in tissues taken from mice carrying maternal duplication/paternal deficiency for distal Chr 2 (MatDp2) and its reciprocal (PatDp2). RNA in situ hybridization revealed high levels of Gnas mRNA in glomeruli of PatDp2 embryos at late gestation and lower levels in glomeruli of MatDp2 embryos. These results strongly suggest that Gnas is maternally imprinted and suggest that the mouse gene may be imprinted in a manner opposite the predicted in human. 42 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling Case Study Anh Bui and Nam Dinh Idaho National Laboratory September 28, 2012 CASL-U-2012-0162-000 CASL-U-2012-0162-000 Subcooled Flow Boiling Case Study INL-MIS-12-27303 1 INL/MIS-12-27303 September 2012 Validation Data Plan Implementation: Subcooled Flow Boiling Case Study Anh Bui Nam Dinh CASL-U-2012-0162-000 Subcooled Flow Boiling Case Study INL-MIS-12-27303 2 ABSTRACT This report presents a step forward in the development and

  1. Microsoft Word - NURETH15 Perspectives on Nuclear Reactor TH 042313.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics North Carolina State University and Idaho National Laboratory N. Dinh, R Nourgaliev, A. Bui, H. Lee May 12-17, 2013: CASL-U-2013-0104-000 The 1 5 th I nternational T opical M eeting o n N uclear R eactor T hermal --- H ydraulics, N URETH---15 NURETH15---IP15 Pisa, I taly, M ay 1 2---17, 2 013 1 Perspectives o n N uclear R eactor T hermal H ydraulics Nam Dinh, Robert Nourgaliev*, Anh Bui*, and Hyung Lee** North C arolina S tate U niversity, R

  2. CASL-U-2015-0016-000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-000 Advanced Calibration and Validation of a Mechanistic Model of Subcooled Boiling Two-Phase Flow Anh Bui, Idaho National Laboratory Brian Williams, Los Alamos National Laboratory Nam Dinh, North Carolina State University April 6, 2014 CASL-U-2015-0016-000 Proceedings of ICAPP 2014 Charlotte, USA, April 6-9, 2014 Paper 14257 Advanced Calibration and Validation of a Mechanistic Model of Subcooled Boiling Two-Phase Flow Anh Bui 1 , Brian Williams 2 , Nam Dinh 3,* 1 Idaho National Laboratory

  3. Building America Research Benchmark Definition, Updated December 19, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.

    2008-12-19

    To track progress toward aggressive multi-year whole-house energy savings goals of 40-70% and onsite power production of up to 30%, DOE's Residential Buildings Program and NREL developed the Building America Research Benchmark in consultation with the Bui

  4. BPA-2012-00196-FOIA Consult Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Virginia 6192011 GS-13 Step 9 852008 Silva, Kimberly 582011 GS-14 Step 6 10202010 Weber, Kimberly 4222012 GS-14 Step 1 10202010 Current number of IT Project Manager 7...

  5. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    being advertised at the GS-11 & GS-12 under vacancy numbers: WAPA-16-DE-068 & WAPA-16-MP-068. Recent Graduates Program affords developmental experiences intended to promote...

  6. CASL - Initial Modeling and Analysis of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge Problem Initial Modeling and Analysis of the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Challenge Problem Yixing Sung, Jin Yan, Zeses E. Karoutas of Westinghouse Electric Company LLC Anh V. Bui, Hongbin Zhang of Idaho National Laboratories Nam Dinh of North Carolina State University Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB) is one of the safety-related Challenge Problems (CP) that CASL is addressing in support of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power uprate, high fuel burnup and plant lifetime

  7. Collecting and Characterizing Validation Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Characterizing Validation Data to Support Advanced Simulation of Nuclear Reactor Hydraulics Nam Dinh North Carolina State University Anh Bui Idaho National Laboratory Hyung Lee Bettis Laboratory ASME 2013 Verification and Validation Symposium Las Vegas, NV, May 22-24, 2013 Multi-Physics, Multi-Scale Problem Validation Hierarchy (Validation Pyramid) of Subcooled Boiling Flow Model Bayesian Framework for Data Integration Nuclear System Analysis - Subcooled Boiling Flow Example * Underlying

  8. Building America Best Practices Series, Vol. 10 - Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing, A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM R Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 12, 2010 April 12, 2010 * PNNL-19284 BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 10. BuiLDiNG AmERiCA BEST PRACTiCES SERiES Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory michael

  9. Microsoft Word - appxa

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline A.1.4 GS08: South Walnut Creek at Pond B-5 Outlet A.1.5 GS10: South Walnut Creek at B-1 Bypass A.1.6 GS11: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-4 Outlet A.1.7 GS12: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-3 Outlet A.1.8 GS13: North Walnut Creek Above Pond A-1 A.1.9 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.10 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.11 GS51: Ditch South of Former 903 Pad A.1.12 GS59: Woman Creek Upstream of Antelope Springs Confluence A.1.13 B5INFLOW: South Walnut

  10. Microsoft Word - appxa.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline A.1.4 GS08: South Walnut Creek at Pond B-5 Outlet A.1.5 GS10: South Walnut Creek at B-1 Bypass A.1.6 GS11: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-4 Outlet A.1.7 GS12: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-3 Outlet A.1.8 GS13: North Walnut Creek above Pond A-1 A.1.9 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.10 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.11 GS51: Ditch South of 903 Pad A.1.12 GS59: Woman Creek Upstream of Antelope Springs Confluence A.1.13 SW018: Functional Channel 2

  11. APPENDICES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WOMPOC: Woman Creek at Eastern COU Boundary A.1.4 WALPOC: Walnut Creek at Eastern COU Boundary A.1.5 GS05: Woman Creek at West Fenceline A.1.6 GS08: South Walnut Creek at Pond B-5 Outlet A.1.7 GS10: South Walnut Creek at B-1 Bypass A.1.8 GS11: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-4 Outlet A.1.9 GS12: North Walnut Creek at Pond A-3 Outlet A.1.10 GS13: North Walnut Creek Above Pond A-1 A.1.11 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.12 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.13 GS51: Ditch South of Former

  12. Recent Graduate- Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is also being advertised at the GS-11 & GS-12 under vacancy numbers: WAPA-16-DE-111 & WAPA-16-MP-111. Recent Graduates Program affords developmental experiences intended to...

  13. Supervisory Interdisciplinary Civil Engineer/Electrical Engineer (0810/0850)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THIS IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY POSITION AND MAY BE FILLED WITH ANY OF THE FOLLOWING OCCUPATIONS: Supervisory Civil Engineer, GS-0810-15 Supervisory Electrical Engineer, GS-0850-15 This position is...

  14. BPA-2015-01558-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    number of posit ions to be filled : 1 Opening Date: 06101 0 Closing Date: 062310 Salary range: GS-13 81 ,823 - 106,369 GS-14 96,960- 125,695 Organization: Transmission...

  15. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 3 3 0 1 0 1 4 2 PAY PLAN SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 8 GS 15 2 GS 14 1 GS 13 1 GS 10 1 Associate Administrator of External Affairs (NA-EA) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 14 7 50.0% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 50.0% SES NQ GS 15 GS 14 GS 13 GS 10 7.1% 57.1% 14.3% 7.1% 7.1% 7.1% 0.0% 0.0% 21.4% 21.4% 0.0% 7.1% 0.0% 7.1% 28.6% 14.3% SUPERVISORS DISABILITY 4

  16. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-10-01

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  17. Leadership Development Series Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Frame-Breaking Leadership presented by the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. For GS 13-SES

  18. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  19. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-01

    This Notice addresses Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees.

  20. Glutathione-S-conjugate transport in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rea, Philip A.; Lu, Yu-Ping; Li, Ze-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    The invention includes an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump polypeptide and an isolated preparation of a plant GS-X pump polypeptide. Also included is an isolated preparation of a nucleic acid which is antisense in orientation to a portion or all of a plant GS-X pump gene. The invention also includes a cells, vectors and transgenic plants having an isolated DNA encoding a plant GS-X pump and methods of use thereof. In addition, the invention relates to plant GS-X pump promoter sequences and the uses thereof.

  1. APPENDICES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GS13: North Walnut Creek Above Pond A-1 A.1.11 GS31: Woman Creek at Pond C-2 Outlet A.1.12 GS33: No Name Gulch at Walnut Creek A.1.13 GS51: Ditch South of Former 903 Pad A.1.14 GS59: Woman Creek Upstream of Antelope Springs Confluence A.1.15 B5INFLOW: South Walnut Creek Above Pond B-5 A.1.16 SW027: South Interceptor Ditch at Pond C-2 A.1.17 SW093: North Walnut Creek 1,300 feet Upstream of A-1 Bypass A.2 Precipitation Data A.2.1 PG58: Gaging Station GS01 A.2.2 PG59: Gaging Station GS03 A.2.3

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - CY11 Annual Report Presentation

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 4, 2012 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Calendar Year 2011 Calendar Year 2011 3 Selected Surface Water Monitoring Locations Indiana Street W al nu t Cr ee k W o m a n C r e e k W om an Cr ee k N . W a ln u t C r e e k S . W a l n u t C r e e k C e n t r a l O U B o u n d a r y Pond C-2 Landfill Pond Pond A-3 Pond A-4 Pond B-5 GS31 GS11 GS08 GS03 GS01 GS10 SW093 SW027 WOMPOC WALPOC 4 4 Pond Operations - Calendar Year 2011  Terminal Pond

  3. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-01

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to career GS (GM) employees. (Replaces DOE N 326.7).

  4. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (SF 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-13

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure requirements. These requirements apply to persons employed at the GS-15 level and below, except for Schedule C appointees.

  5. U.S. OpenLabs - Educational Materials | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practices and Application in the U.S. Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Introduction to Hydrogen for Code Officials LEDSGPanalysisimpactsDIAWebinar on Development Impact...

  6. Geospatial Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratory (NREL). It integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) - for integrated resource assessment. The Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) is a map-based...

  7. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upper Great Plains Region, Montana Maintenance Office, System Protection (B5140), Fort Peck, MT. Find out more about living conditions at this duty station . Pay Range GS-11:...

  8. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 YEAR 2014 Males 7 Females 7 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 2 GS 13 2 GS 10 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 0 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 3 African American Female (AA F) 2 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 0 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 0 Hispanic Male (H M) 0 Hispanic Female (H F) 0 White Male (W M) 4 White Female (W F) 5 DIVERSITY TOTAL WORKFORCE GENDER

  9. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-30

    The Order establishes Departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using the General Schedule (GS) and the Federal Wage System (FWS) standards.

  10. Apprenticeships

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Apply Apprenticeships Bid List GS Equivalency Chart Interest & Training Announcements Students Benefits & New Employees Apprenticeships Who Can Apply US citizenship required...

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 14 +6 -5 β -

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 130 ± 7 β -

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 Decay g.s.

  14. The MicroBooNE LArTPC Sarah Lockwitz, FNAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weber (IB) Christoph Rudolf von Rohr (GS) Thomas Strauss (PD) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy Flavio Cavanna Ornella Palamara (IB) Virginia Tech Mindy Jen (PD)...

  15. Neutrino Interaction Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weber (IB) Christoph Rudolf von Rohr (GS) Thomas Strauss (PD) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Italy Flavio Cavanna Ornella Palamara (IB) Virginia Tech Mindy Jen (PD)...

  16. DRAFT-DOE O 325.2, Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes Departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using the General Schedule (GS) and the Federal Wage System (FWS) standards.

  17. Microsoft Word - appxb

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water-Quality Data B.3.1 Seasonal-Kendall Trend Plots and Summary Tables B.3.1.1 Sentinel Wells B.3.1.2 AOC Wells B.3.1.3 Evaluation Wells B.3.2 ANOVA and Seasonal-Kendall Results for the PLF and OLF B.3.2.1 PLF ANOVA Summary B.3.2.2 OLF ANOVA Summary B.3.2.3 PLF and OLF S-K Plots and Summary Tables B.4 PARCC Evaluation B.5 Automated Surface-Water Sample Collection Field Information B.5.1 Location GS01 B.5.2 Location GS03 B.5.3 Location GS05 B.5.4 Location GS08 B.5.5 Location GS10 B.5.6 Location

  18. DOE F 3305.8

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    8 (05-93) All Other Editions Are Obsolete U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EXECUTIVE POSITION JUSTIFICATION Org 1. Position Title 2. Type of Position 3. Current Number of Professional Positions Supervised Other SES Career-Reserved SES General Senior Level (SL) ST (Authorized Under 5 USC 3104) Managerial Supervisory GS-15 GS-14 GS-13 SES/SL/ST Other POSITION JUSTIFICATION (see reverse for instructions) Print DOE F 3305.8 (05-93) All Other Editions Are Obsolete INSTRUCTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE POSITION

  19. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at (575) 234-7423 should you have any questions concerning this audit report. Enclosure CBFO:QA:DSM:GS:080284:UFC 2300.00 Sincerely, Dave Mocay Manager Original Signature...

  20. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and up to 75% of the incremental cost of new construction projects. The program is open to all non-residential customers in BGE service territory with rate schedule G, GS,...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crystal structure of the 2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex Rasmussen, Sren G.F. ; DeVree, Brian T ; Zou, Yaozhong ; Kruse, Andrew C ; Chung, Ka Young ; Kobilka, Tong Sun ...

  2. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450-A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-09-29

    This Notice address the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designate EJ, EK, and EN.

  3. BPA-2015-01558-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unit Transmission Business Line Job: J02902 GS-160 1-13 Manager, District Operations and Maintenance Location Openings The Dalles To: Terrie Jones From: ro..+h4 liofl i 1'S At...

  4. Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-09-20

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  5. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational ... GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random ...

  6. Chemical Analysis of Soot Using Thermal Desorption/Pyrolysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A new method of soot analysis using thermalpyrolysis GS-MS has provided a faster, more efficient analytical method to understand the surface chemistry of the soot. PDF icon ...

  7. Self assembly of acetylcholinesterase on a gold nanoparticlesgraphene nanosheet hybrid for organophosphate pesticide detection using polyelectrolyte as a linker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Du, Dan; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Zhaohui; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Li, Jinghong; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-04-14

    A nanohybrid of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and chemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets (cr-Gs) was synthesized by in situ growth of Au NPs on the surface of graphene nanosheets in the presence of poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA), which not only improved the dispersion of Au NPs but also stabilized cholinesterase with high activity and loading efficiency. The obtained nanohybrid was characterized by TEM, XRD, XPS, and electrochemistry. Then an enzyme nanoassembly (AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs) was prepared by self-assembling acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on Au NP/cr-Gs nanohybrid. An electrochemical sensor based on AChE/Au NPs/cr-Gs was further developed for ultrasensitive detection of organophosphate pesticide. The results demonstrate that the developed approach provides a promising strategy to improve the sensitivity and enzyme activity of electrochemical biosensors.

  8. High-precision calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Jeremy; Meinel, Stefan; Engelhardt, Michael G.; Krieg, Stefan; Laeuchli, Jesse; Negele, John W.; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Syritsyn, Sergey

    2015-08-01

    We report a direct lattice QCD calculation of the strange nucleon electromagnetic form factors GsE and GsM in the kinematic range 0 lte Q2 \\lessapprox 1.2GeV2. For the first time, both GsE and GsM are shown to be nonzero with high significance. This work uses closer-to-physical lattice parameters than previous calculations, and achieves an unprecented statistical precision by implementing a recently proposed variance reduction technique called hierarchical probing. We perform model-independent fits of the form factor shapes using the z-expansion and determine the strange electric and magnetic radii and magnetic moment. We compare our results to parity-violating electron-proton scattering data and to other theoretical studies.

  9. OP-PR-0010-001.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by the Two-person Rule (GS-PR-0001-001.doc) 5. Do not leave the CAMD experimental hall building during your assigned shift, without first transferring your duties to an...

  10. BPA-2012-01869-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OFF WE THIS DATE: oj DUE DATE: Ib)q Ji;i LOG 2O- Di1P Description of Request: Hello, I would like to know how many GS9 or above archaeologists (0193) work for you agency....

  11. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. not observed p 0.84 ± 400 (1 + ) 2.3 ± 1.6

  12. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 O from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. 0 + ; 2 ≈ 0.40 ± 0.25 (p)

  13. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 0 + 4.35 ± 0.17 β -

  14. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 9.93 ± 0.07 β -

  15. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. ( 5 2 + ) 0.58 ± 0.20 n

  16. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be from ENSDF (unpublished, April 2015) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. 0 + 800 ± 200 n

  17. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ) 5.08 ± 0.05 β -

  18. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 193 ± 13 β - 0.295 ± 10

  19. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 1 2 - ; 3 2 109.2 ± 0.6 β +

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. (2 - ) n

  1. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mg from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay g.s. 0 + 93 ± 5 β + 1.598 ± 10 2 + ; 2 γ

  2. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 H from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) Decay g.s. (2 - ); 2 1.6 ± 0.4

  3. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 B from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ); ( 3 2 ) 801 ± 20 p

  4. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 C from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. 0 + ; 2 230 ± 50 p, (α)

  5. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instant Temperature Profiles in Winter and Summer Conditions and their Connection to the Variation of Radiation Field Koprov, B.M. and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M. Oboukhov Institute of...

  6. Structural basis for thermostability revealed through the identification and characterization of a highly thermostable phosphotriesterase-like lactonase from Geobacillus stearothermophilus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawwa, Renda; Aikens, John; Turner, Robert J.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mescar, Andrew D.

    2009-08-31

    A new enzyme homologous to phosphotriesterase was identified from the bacterium Geobacillus stearothermophilus (GsP). This enzyme belongs to the amidohydrolase family and possesses the ability to hydrolyze both lactone and organophosphate (OP) compounds, making it a phosphotriesterase-like lactonase (PLL). GsP possesses higher OP-degrading activity than recently characterized PLLs, and it is extremely thermostable. GsP is active up to 100 C with an energy of activation of 8.0 kcal/mol towards ethyl paraoxon, and it can withstand an incubation temperature of 60 C for two days. In an attempt to understand the thermostability of PLLs, the X-ray structure of GsP was determined and compared to those of existing PLLs. Based upon a comparative analysis, a new thermal advantage score and plot was developed and reveals that a number of different factors contribute to the thermostability of PLLs.

  7. Section 46

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effects of Water Vapor Continuum Absorption on Tropical Atmosphere Destabilization J.H. Mather, T.P. Ackerman, and G.S. Young Department of Meteorology, The Pennsylvania State...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - CY12 Annual Report Presentation - final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 3, 2013 2 Surface Water Monitoring Calendar Year 2012 3 RFLMA Surface Water Monitoring Locations " ) " ) # * # * # * # * ! ( ! ( ! ( Indiana Street W al nu t C re ek W o m a n C r e e k W om an C re ek N . W a ln u t C r e e k S . W a l n u t C r e e k C e n t r a l O U B o u n d a r y PLFTS Pond C-2 Pond A-4 Pond B-5 GS03 GS01 GS10 SW093 SW027 GS59 WOMPOC WALPOC Present Landfill Original Landfill Performance Monitoring at Original and Present

  9. ners-cp1-20130402104412

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (2002). 3 N.Z. Cho, G.S. Lee, and C.J. Park, "Refinement of the 2-D1-D Fusion Method for 3-D Whole Core Transport Calculation," Trans Am. Nucl. Soc., 87, pp. 417-420...

  10. NEW- DOE O 325.2, Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and for developing and administering a sound position management and classification program within the Department.

  11. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TR:GS:14-0086:UFC 1200.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 November 4, 2014 Eddy and Lea County Residents: We continue to make...

  12. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BW:GS:14-0032:UFC 1200.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 May 2, 2014 Eddy and Lea County Residents: We continue to make...

  13. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GS:14-0014:UFC 5486 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 March 12, 2014 To Eddy and Lea County Residents: As the Department of...

  14. BPA-2015-00051-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requested: As an sic candidate for 10379-12-DE (Business Analyst GS-l2) who was rated Best Qualified' and interviewed, I would like to have the rating and ranking for all the...

  15. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 1 6 2 PAY PLAN SES 2 EN 03 1 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 7 GS 15 1 GS 14 1 DIVERSITY 12 7 58.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 41.7% Associate Administrator of External Affairs (NA-EA) As of September 5, 2015 SES EN 03 NQ GS 15 GS 14 16.7% 8.3% 58.3% 8.3% 8.3% 0.0% 0.0% 8.3% 16.7% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 8.3% 50.0% 16.7% Prepared by NNSA Office of Civil Rights

  16. NNSA Annual LCDP Training Calendar_03312010 FINAL.xls

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Leadership and Career Development Programs for NNSA Employees Current NNSA employees can compete for an opportunity to participate in the learning and leadership development programs listed below. If selected into a program, NNSA will fund the participant's tuition, travel, and per diem related expenses. Program Name (in alpha order) Targeted Audience DESCRIPTION Air War College (AWC) (administered by the Department of the Air Force, Air University) GS-14 or GS-15 (or equivalent Pay Band levels)

  17. Investigating the Influence of Anthropogenic Forcing on Observed Mean and Extreme Sea Level Pressure Trends over the Mediterranean Region

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barkhordarian, Armineh

    2012-01-01

    We investigate whether the observed mean sea level pressure (SLP) trends over the Mediterranean region in the period from 1975 to 2004 are significantly consistent with what 17 models projected as response of SLP to anthropogenic forcing (greenhouse gases and sulphate aerosols, GS). Obtained results indicate that the observed trends in mean SLP cannot be explained by natural (internal) variability. Externally forced changes are detectable in all seasons, except spring. The large-scale component (spatial mean) of the GS signal is detectable in all the 17 models in winter and in 12 of the 17 models in summer. However, the small-scalemore » component (spatial anomalies about the spatial mean) of GS signal is only detectable in winter within 11 of the 17 models. We also show that GS signal has a detectable influence on observed decreasing (increasing) tendency in the frequencies of extremely low (high) SLP days in winter and that these changes cannot be explained by internal climate variability. While the detection of GS forcing is robust in winter and summer, there are striking inconsistencies in autumn, where analysis points to the presence of an external forcing, which is not GS forcing.« less

  18. Navajo Generating Station and Clean-Energy Alternatives: Options for Renewables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurlbut, D. J.; Haase, S.; Turchi, C. S.; Burman, K.

    2012-06-01

    In January 2012, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory delivered to the Department of the Interior the first part of a study on Navajo Generating Station (Navajo GS) and the likely impacts of BART compliance options. That document establishes a comprehensive baseline for the analysis of clean energy alternatives, and their ability to achieve benefits similar to those that Navajo GS currently provides. This analysis is a supplement to NREL's January 2012 study. It provides a high level examination of several clean energy alternatives, based on the previous analysis. Each has particular characteristics affecting its relevance as an alternative to Navajo GS. It is assumed that the development of any alternative resource (or portfolio of resources) to replace all or a portion of Navajo GS would occur at the end of a staged transition plan designed to reduce economic disruption. We assume that replacing the federal government's 24.3% share of Navajo GS would be a cooperative responsibility of both the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Central Arizona Water Conservation District (CAWCD).

  19. Update on Service Management project

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    GS and IT Service Management project status meeting -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Distribution: Sigurd Lettow, Frederic Hemmer, Thomas Pettersson, David Foster, Matti Tiirakari, GS&IT; Service Providers When and where: Thursday 2nd September at 10:00-11:30 in IFiltration Plant (222-R-001) Dear All, We would like to inform you about progress made on different topics like the Service Catalogue, the new Service Management Tool and the Service Desk. We would also like to present the plan for when we hope to "go live" and what this will mean for all of you running and providing services today. We will need your active support and help in the coming months to make this happen. GS&IT; Service Management Teams Reinoud Martens, Mats Moller

  20. Vacancies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vacancies Vacancies Job Title: Interdisciplinary General Engineer/Physical Scientist Series and Grade: GS-0801/1301-14/15 Job Announcement Number: DOE-MP-LM-16-00092-MP https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/425617700 Closing Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016 Job Title: Records and Information Management Specialist Series and Grade: GS-0308-14/15 Job Announcement Number: DOE-MP-LM-16-00091-MP https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/426031700 Closing Date: Thursday, January 21, 2016

  1. Microsoft Word - CY11_draft_appxa.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8: Gaging Station WOMPOC A.3 Groundwater Level Data for CY 2011 A.4 Groundwater Hydrographs A.4.1 Hydrographs for Manually Collected Water Level Data A.4.2 Hydrographs for Automated Water Level Data Appendix A, Page 1 Appendix A: Hydrologic Data A.1 Surface-Water Discharge Data This section includes mean daily discharge tables and hydrographs by monitoring location and calendar year. Appendix A, Page 2 A.1.1 GS01: Woman Creek at Indiana Street Table A-1. CY 2011 Discharge Summary for GS01: Woman

  2. Microsoft Word - S05993_CY2009 Annual Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    225 S. Walnut 50% S. Walnut (WWTP) 12% SID (SW027) 6% S. Walnut (GS10) 38% N. Walnut (SW093) 44% 80 g 625 g 713 g 538 g 174 g CY97-05 SID (SW027) 1% S. Walnut (GS10) 59% N. Walnut (SW093) 40% 13 g 360 g 523 g CY06-09 Figure 3-177. Relative Average Annual Total U Loads from Major COU Drainages and Former WWTP 3.1.5 Groundwater Data Interpretation and Evaluation This section provides a summary of groundwater monitoring performed in 2009, separated into RFLMA-required and non-RFLMA-required. A

  3. Microsoft Word - S07121_CY2010 Annual Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    256 S. Walnut 50% S. Walnut (WWTP) 12% SID (SW027) 6% S. Walnut (GS10) 38% N. Walnut (SW093) 44% 80 g 625 g 713 g 538 g 174 g CY97-05 SID (SW027) 2% S. Walnut (GS10) 56% N. Walnut (SW093) 42% 24 g 497 g 650 g CY06-09 Note: pie chart diameters relative to total load Figure 194. Relative Average Annual Total U Loads from Major COU Drainages and Former WWTP 3.1.5 Groundwater Data Interpretation and Evaluation This section provides a summary of groundwater monitoring performed in 2010, separated

  4. Microsoft Word - S08568_CY2011 Annual Rpt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    97 S. Walnut 50% S. Walnut (WWTP) 12% SID (SW027) 6% S. Walnut (GS10) 38% N. Walnut (SW093) 44% 80 g 625 g 713 g 538 g 174 g CY97-05 SID (SW027) 2% S. Walnut (GS10) 57% N. Walnut (SW093) 41% 20 g 482 g 668 g CY06-11 Note: Pie chart diameters are relative to total load. Figure 225. Relative Average Annual Total U Loads from Major COU Drainages and Former WWTP 3.1.5 Groundwater Data Interpretation and Evaluation This section provides a summary of groundwater monitoring performed in 2011, separated

  5. Microsoft Word - appxa.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9: Gaging Station WOMPOC A.3 Groundwater Level Data for CY 2012 A.4 Groundwater Hydrographs A.4.1 Hydrographs for Manually Collected Water Level Data Appendix A, Page 1 Appendix A: Hydrologic Data A.1 Surface-Water Discharge Data This section includes mean daily discharge tables and hydrographs by monitoring location and calendar year. Appendix A, Page 2 A.1.1 GS01: Woman Creek at Indiana Street Table A-1. CY 2012 Discharge Summary for GS01: Woman Creek at Indiana Street Calendar Year 2012:

  6. Learning Circles for Women Leaders (LCFWL) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Learning Circles for Women Leaders (LCFWL) Learning Circles for Women Leaders (LCFWL) Learning Circles for Women Leaders (LCFWL) Overview DOE Learning Circles for Women Leaders (LCFWL) is a new pilot initiative developed by the Office of the Chief Human Capital Officer and the Office of the Learning and Workforce Development in response to a growing need to support women at the GS-14/GS-15/EJ/EK level who are currently leaders and others who aspire to senior leaders in the DOE headquarters

  7. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LWR nuclear fuel bundle data for use in fuel bundle handling","Weihermiller, W.B.; Allison, G.S.","1979-09-01T04:00:00Z",5856990,"10.21725856990","PNL-2575","EY-76-C-06-1830","TRN...

  8. Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-10-15

    The order establishes requirements and responsibilities for the performance management program for all supervisory and non supervisory employees at grades GS 15 and below or equivalent, employees in EJ and EK pay bands IV and V in the Excepted Service, and all wage grade employees. Cancels DOE O 331.1B. Admin Chg 1, 2-16-11.

  9. BPA-2014-00664-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.00 841 Group Award - Oh 45 FY2013 Agency Success Share - Gainsharing AWD GSA B rock meyer.Lori A NHQ GS 11 2192014 242.00 0.00 841 Group Award - Oh 45 FY2013 Agency Success...

  10. Science and technology review, March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-03-01

    The articles in this month`s issue are entitled Site 300`s New Contained Firing Facility, Computational Electromagnetics: Codes and Capabilities, Ergonomics Research:Impact on Injuries, and The Linear Electric Motor: Instability at 1,000 g`s.

  11. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  12. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2012 Males 149 Females 115 YEAR 2012 SES 17 EX 1 EJEK 7 EN 05 2 EN 04 9 EN 03 2 NN (Engineering) 56 NQ (ProfTechAdmin) 165 NU (TechAdmin Support) 4 GS 13 1 YEAR 2012 American...

  13. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-01-03

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN.

  14. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-12-20

    The Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN. Cancels DOE N 326.13.

  15. Employee Performance Management System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-06-15

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for employee performance appraisals, performance-related awards, and other forms of employee recognition. This Order covers most employees at grades GS-15 and below. Cancels DOE O 331.1. Canceled by DOE O 331.1B.

  16. Annual Confidential Financial Disclosure Report (OGE Form 450 or 450A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-09-30

    This Notice addresses the Executive Branch confidential financial disclosure reporting requirements. These requirements apply to career GS/GM and prevailing rate system and administratively determined employees as well as employees serving in excepted service positions designated EJ, EK, and EN. (Note: It replaces DOE N 326.11, which expired 9-29-05.)

  17. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-01

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and for developing and administering a sound position management and classification program within the Department. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 320.1. Canceled by DOE O 325.2 Chg 1 (Admin Chg), 9-1-15.

  18. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-01

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using the general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and to develop and administer a sound position management and classification program. Supersedes DOE O 325.2, dated 4-1-15.

  19. Case study for ARRA-funded ground-source heat pump (GSHP) demonstration at Oakland University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Piljae; Liu, Xiaobing

    2015-09-01

    High initial costs and lack of public awareness of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) technology are the two major barriers preventing rapid deployment of this energy-saving technology in the United States. Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), 26 GSHP projects have been competitively selected and carried out to demonstrate the benefits of GSHP systems and innovative technologies for cost reduction and/or performance improvement. This paper highlights the findings of a case study of one of the ARRA-funded GSHP demonstration projects, a ground-source variable refrigerant flow (GS-VRF) system installed at the Human Health Building at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. This case study is based on the analysis of measured performance data, maintenance records, construction costs, and simulations of the energy consumption of conventional central heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems providing the same level of space conditioning as the demonstrated GS-VRF system. The evaluated performance metrics include the energy efficiency of the heat pump equipment and the overall GS-VRF system, pumping performance, energy savings, carbon emission reductions, and cost-effectiveness of the GS-VRF system compared with conventional HVAC systems. This case study also identified opportunities for reducing uncertainties in the performance evaluation, improving the operational efficiency, and reducing the installed cost of similar GSHP systems in the future.

  20. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Be from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 Decay g.s. ( 1 2 - ) (2.7 ± 1.8) × 10 -21 s a (n) a From (1995PE12).

  1. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne from ENSDF (unpublished, June 2014) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. ( 3 2 - ); 5 2 0.59 MeV 2p 1.900 ± 80 ( 5 2 - ) < 100 keV

  2. Impact of Primary Gleason Grade on Risk Stratification for Gleason Score 7 Prostate Cancers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, Bridget F.; Tsivian, Matvey; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Sun, Leon; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Moul, Judd; Lee, W. Robert

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the primary Gleason grade (GG) in Gleason score (GS) 7 prostate cancers for risk of non-organ-confined disease with the goal of optimizing radiotherapy treatment option counseling. Methods: One thousand three hundred thirty-three patients with pathologic GS7 were identified in the Duke Prostate Center research database. Clinical factors including age, race, clinical stage, prostate-specific antigen at diagnosis, and pathologic stage were obtained. Data were stratified by prostate-specific antigen and clinical stage at diagnosis into adapted D'Amico risk groups. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed evaluating for association of primary GG with pathologic outcome. Results: Nine hundred seventy-nine patients had primary GG3 and 354 had GG4. On univariate analyses, GG4 was associated with an increased risk of non-organ-confined disease. On multivariate analysis, GG4 was independently associated with seminal vesicle invasion (SVI) but not extracapsular extension. Patients with otherwise low-risk disease and primary GG3 had a very low risk of SVI (4%). Conclusions: Primary GG4 in GS7 cancers is associated with increased risk of SVI compared with primary GG3. Otherwise low-risk patients with GS 3+4 have a very low risk of SVI and may be candidates for prostate-only radiotherapy modalities.

  3. NEW - DOE O 325.2 Chg 1 (Admin Chg), Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using the general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and to develop and administer a sound position management and classification program. Cancels DOE O 325.2, dated 4-1-15.

  4. 07_02_2002.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (keV) g.s. 3 2 - ; 1 2 stable 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46,...

  5. 08_09_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactions g.s. 0 + ; 0 5.57 0.25 eV i 1, 2, 4, 5, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 36, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 50, 51, 52, 53,...

  6. 12_06_1990.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (MeV keV) (keV) g.s 0 + ; 0 - stable 3, 5, 6, 8, 9 ,13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43,...

  7. 09_02_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    keV) g.s. 3 2 - ; 1 2 stable 2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 41, 42, 44, 45, 47,...

  8. 14_10_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decay Reactions (MeV keV) (keV) g.s. 1 + ; 0 stable - 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48,...

  9. Vacancies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vacancies Vacancies Job Title: Interdisciplinary General Engineer/Physical Scientist Series and Grade: GS-0801/1301-14/15 Job Announcement Number: DOE-MP-LM-16-00092-MP https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/425617700 Closing Date: Tuesday, January 19, 2016

  10. Is Androgen Deprivation Therapy Necessary in All Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated in the Dose Escalation Era?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, Katherine O.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Levy, Lawrence B.; Lee, Andrew K.; Choi, Seungtaek; Nguyen, Quynh N.; Frank, Steven J.; Pugh, Thomas J.; McGuire, Sean E.; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The benefit of adding androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) to dose-escalated radiation therapy (RT) for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer is unclear; therefore, we assessed the impact of adding ADT to dose-escalated RT on freedom from failure (FFF). Methods: Three groups of men treated with intensity modulated RT or 3-dimensional conformal RT (75.6-78 Gy) from 1993-2008 for prostate cancer were categorized as (1) 326 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone, (2) 218 intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ?6 months of ADT, and (3) 274 low-risk patients treated with definitive RT. Median follow-up was 58 months. Recursive partitioning analysis based on FFF using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment PSA concentration was applied to the intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 5-year FFF. Results: Based on recursive partitioning analysis, intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were divided into 3 prognostic groups: (1) 188 favorable patients: GS 6, ?T2b or GS 3+4, ?T1c; (2) 71 marginal patients: GS 3+4, T2a-b; and (3) 68 unfavorable patients: GS 4+3 or T2c disease. Hazard ratios (HR) for recurrence in each group were 1.0, 2.1, and 4.6, respectively. When intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone were compared to intermediate-risk patients treated with RT and ADT, the greatest benefit from ADT was seen for the unfavorable intermediate-risk patients (FFF, 74% vs 94%, respectively; P=.005). Favorable intermediate-risk patients had no significant benefit from the addition of ADT to RT (FFF, 94% vs 95%, respectively; P=.85), and FFF for favorable intermediate-risk patients treated with RT alone approached that of low-risk patients treated with RT alone (98%). Conclusions: Patients with favorable intermediate-risk prostate cancer did not benefit from the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT, and their FFF was nearly as good as patients with low-risk disease. In patients with GS 4+3 or T2c disease, the addition of ADT to dose-escalated RT did improve FFF.

  11. A creep damage estimation method for in-service fossil fuel boiler superheater tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogata, F. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Takahashi, H. . Research Inst. of Fracture Technology)

    1995-02-01

    Because mechanical properties of structural materials for high-temperature use, such as boiler tubing, degrade during long-term service, it is essential to detect toughness degradation by means of a nondestructive and simple field test technique. A grain boundary etching technique is developed to detect material degradation, and assess creep strength and notch toughness. An etching test using a picric acid solution with a wetting agent or using 20 percent HNO[sub 3] with alcoholic solution was found to have great potential for the nondestructive estimation of grain boundary embrittlement caused by carbide and sigma precipitation in SUS stainless steel. The feasibility of this estimation procedure was determined showing the relationships between Charpy impact energy (CVN) and grooving width (W[sub GS]), and creep damage ratio ([Phi]) and W[sub GS]. Superheater tubes of fossil fuel boiler were tested on site to demonstrate the validity of this technique.

  12. Forward modeling of gyrosynchrotron intensity perturbations by sausage modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Van Doorsselaere, T.; Antolin, P.

    2014-04-20

    To determine the observable radio signatures of the fast sausage standing wave, we examine gyrosynchrotron (GS) emission modulation using a linear three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic model of a plasma cylinder. Effects of the line-of-sight angle and instrumental resolution on perturbations of the GS intensity are analyzed for two models: a base model with strong Razin suppression and a low-density model in which the Razin effect was unimportant. Our finding contradicts previous predictions made with simpler models: an in-phase variation of intensity between low (f < f {sub peak}) and high (f > f {sub peak}) frequencies is found for the low-density model and an anti-phase variation for the base model in the case of a viewing angle of 45. The spatially inhomogeneous character of the oscillating emission source and the spatial resolution of the model are found to have a significant effect on the resulting intensity.

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - FINAL 2014 Annual Present_RFSC-June 2015.pptx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Flats, Colorado, Site Annual Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Calendar Year 2014 Rocky Flats Stewardship Council June 1, 2015 Surface Water Monitoring Calendar Year 2014 Selected Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Surface Water Monitoring Locations 3 Indiana Street W aln ut Cr ee k W o m a n C r e e k W om an Cr ee k N . W a ln u t C r e e k S . W a l n u t C r e e k C e n t r a l O U B o u n d a r y PLFTS Pond C-2 Pond A-4 Pond B-5 GS10 SW093 SW027 GS59 WOMPOC

  14. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    91 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 0 3 17 3 6 8 10 70 58 PAY PLAN SES 12 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 2 EN 03 1 EN 00 3 NN (Engineering) 27 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 123 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear NonProliferation (NA-20) As of March 21, 2015 DIVERSITY 176 85 48.3% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 51.7% SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ NU GS 15

  15. Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-10-15

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the performance management program for all supervisory and non-supervisory employees at grades GS-15 and below or equivalent, employees in EJ and EK pay bands IV and V in the Excepted Service, and all wage grade employees. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-16-11. Admin Chg 2, dated 2-26-2013, cancels DOE O 331.1C Admin Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 331.1C Chg 3.

  16. NEW - DOE O 331.1C Chg 3, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the performance management program for all supervisory and non-supervisory employees at grades GS-15 and below or equivalent, employees in EJ and EK pay bands IV and V in the Excepted Service, and all wage grade employees. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-16-11. Admin Chg 2, dated 2-26-2013. Admin Chg 3, dated 11-13-14 cancels Admin Chg 2. Chg 3 includes additional clarification of information for QSI.

  17. 15_22_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 15 F E x in 15 F J π ; T Γ c.m. Decay Reaction (MeV) (MeV) g.s. ( 1 2 + ); 3 2 1.0 ± 0.2 p 2 1.3 ± 0.1 ( 5 2 + ); 3 2 0.24 ± 0.03 p 2 1

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Lee-Taylor J, S Madronich, B Aumont, M Camredon, A Hodzic, GS Tyndall, E Aperl, and RA Zaveri. 2012. "Explicit modeling of organic chemistry and secondary organic aerosol partitioning for Mexico City and its outflow plume." Atmospheric Chemistry and

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud-Radiation-Aerosol Experiment (1996) at IAPh, Russia Golitsyn, G.S., Anikine, P.P., and Sviridenkov, M.A., Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences Eighth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting In 1996, local measurements of the optical properties of the near-surface aerosol were carried out parallel with aureole measurements of the aerosol in the atmospheric column. The spectral radiation was measured by a complex of spectrometers. Global

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results of the Atmospheric Aerosol Condensation Activity Studies Isakov, A.A. and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics Eleventh Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Some new results are presented. of investigations of optical and microphysical characteristics of the atmospheric surface layer aerosol by means of spectropolarimeter The daily measurements were carried out in February - April 2000 at the Zvenigorod Scientific Station of the Institute

  1. CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD AND MAXIMUM

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CABLE TECHNOLOGY LABORATORIES, INC. DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD AND MAXIMUM OPERATING ELECTRIC STRESSES FOR SELECTED HIGH VOLTAGE INSULATIONS Investigation of Aged Polymeric Dielectric Cable DOE CONTRACT DE-AC 02-80RA 50156 Final Report Prepared by : Approved by: G.S. Eager, Jr. G.W. Seman B. Fryszczyn C. Katz November 1995 690 Jersey Avenue - RO. Box 707 - Fax: (908) 846-5531 New Brunswick, N.J. 08903 Tel: (908) 8463133 DETERMINATION OF THRESHOLD AND MAXIMUM OPERATING ELECTRIC STRESSES FOR

  2. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-10

    The Order implements the Department's Acquisition Career Development program, mandatory for professionals in the GS-1102 and 1105 occupational procurement series, as well as others with significant procurement responsibilities. The Order also ensures that members of the acquisition workforce are aware of and adhere to the mandatory training and certification requirements. Cancels Acquisition Letter 98-06. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 1.

  3. Vacancy Announcement Status Report, Updated 01/09/03

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacancy Announcement Status Report, Updated for 03/23/2015 Vacancy Position PP/Series/Grade Organization Status Specialist DOE-NETL-15 DE-010 General Engineer GS-0801-13 SEA & PD Opens: 12/15/14 Closed: 12/29/14 Certificate of Eligibles Issued: 12/31/14 Selection Made; Eff. Date: 4/05/15 Donna Isaac LEGEND: Open: Closes: Reviewing Applications Certificate of Eligibles Issued: Certificate of Eligibles Extended to: Selection Made: Vacancy Canceled No Selection Made

  4. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F from ENSDF (unpublished, June 2014) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. 2 - ; 2 910 ± 100 keV p 0.540 ± 180 1 - ≈ 1 MeV p 1.490 ± 72 3 - 210 ± 40 keV p 2.790 ± 110 4 - 550 ± 100 keV p

  5. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B from ENSDF (unpublished, January 2016) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. (0 - ) < 100 a n 2.320 ≈ 150 (6.020) a From (2009LE02). In that measurement the resolution was ≈ 100 keV; a fit to the spectrum, convoluted with the resolution, uses Γ ≈ 0.5 keV.

  6. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (keV) Decay g.s. (1) - < 0.2 MeV p 0.3 ± 110 2 - 5 ± 3 p 0.59 ± 120 0 - 300 ± 100 p 0.78 ± 110 1 - 900 ± 100 p 0.83 ± 110 3 - 42 ± 10 p

  7. The MicroBooNE Experiment - Collaboration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration (*) The MicroBooNE spokespeople are Bonnie Fleming (Yale) and Sam Zeller (FNAL) (+) The MicroBooNE project manager was Gina Rameika Updated collaboration list for presentations: powerpoint pdf map collaboration photo MicroBooNE organizational chart MicroBooNE contact list (password required) (IB) = Insititutional Board representative (PD) = postdoc (GS) = graduate student (UG) = undergraduate student Laboratory for High Energy Physics, University of Bern, Switzerland Martin Auger

  8. Preoperative 3-Tesla Multiparametric Endorectal Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings and the Odds of Upgrading and Upstaging at Radical Prostatectomy in Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegde, John V. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Ming-Hui [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States)] [Department of Statistics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut (United States); Mulkern, Robert V. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fennessy, Fiona M. [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); D'Amico, Anthony V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Tempany, Clare M.C., E-mail: ctempany@bwh.harvard.edu [Division of MRI, Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether 3-T esla (3T) multiparametric endorectal MRI (erMRI) can add information to established predictors regarding occult extraprostatic or high-grade prostate cancer (PC) in men with clinically localized PC. Methods and Materials: At a single academic medical center, this retrospective study's cohort included 118 men with clinically localized PC who underwent 3T multiparametric erMRI followed by radical prostatectomy, from 2008 to 2011. Multivariable logistic regression analyses in all men and in 100 with favorable-risk PC addressed whether erMRI evidence of T3 disease was associated with prostatectomy T3 or Gleason score (GS) 8-10 (in patients with biopsy GS {<=}7) PC, adjusting for age, prostate-specific antigen level, clinical T category, biopsy GS, and percent positive biopsies. Results: The accuracy of erMRI prediction of extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion was 75% and 95%, respectively. For all men, erMRI evidence of a T3 lesion versus T2 was associated with an increased odds of having pT3 disease (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 4.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.36-16.98, P=.015) and pGS 8-10 (AOR 5.56, 95% CI 1.10-28.18, P=.038). In the favorable-risk population, these results were AOR 4.14 (95% CI 1.03-16.56), P=.045 and AOR 7.71 (95% CI 1.36-43.62), P=.021, respectively. Conclusions: Three-Tesla multiparametric erMRI in men with favorable-risk PC provides information beyond that contained in known preoperative predictors about the presence of occult extraprostatic and/or high-grade PC. If validated in additional studies, this information can be used to counsel men planning to undergo radical prostatectomy or radiation therapy about the possible need for adjuvant radiation therapy or the utility of adding hormone therapy, respectively.

  9. Chemical Analysis of Soot Using Thermal Desorption/Pyrolysis Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry | Department of Energy Analysis of Soot Using Thermal Desorption/Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Chemical Analysis of Soot Using Thermal Desorption/Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry A new method of soot analysis using thermal/pyrolysis GS-MS has provided a faster, more efficient analytical method to understand the surface chemistry of the soot. PDF icon p-15_lewis.pdf More Documents & Publications Accelerated Extraction of

  10. Voices of Experience | Advanced Distribution Management Systems_brochure.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Insights into Advanced Distribution Management Systems VOICES of Experience February, 2015 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308, Subtask SG10.1011 in conjunction with Energetics Incorporated under contract No. GS-10F-0103J, Subtask J3806.0002. INSIGHTS INTO ADVANCED DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS | DOE 3 Voices of Experience | Advanced Distribution Management Systems When people think of the electric power

  11. Careers - Tips - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Application Tips & Contacts Understanding EIA's Job Announcements Federal job announcements, including EIA's, can be a little confusing to applicants who aren't used to reading them, but it's worth the effort! These announcements provide important information about qualifications, duties, salary, duty location, and benefits. Each job vacancy consists of a job title, the career path, the series number and the pay band number. For example, in the "Economist, GS-0110-04" citation:

  12. Mr. Carl Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Spreng RFLMA Project Coordinator HMWMD-B2 Department of Energy Washington , DC 20585 September 9, 2013 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South Denver, CO 80246-1530 Subject: Notification that GS01 is no longer an RFLMA Point of Compliance (POC) Reference: Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Attachment 2, Section 5.1, "Monitoring Requirements" Dear Mr. Spreng: In accordance with the criteria provided in Section 5.1 of RFLMA

  13. SES Training and Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training and Development SES Training and Development The U.S. Office of Personnel Management sponsors an SES Candidate Development Program (CDP) which is designed to develop a pool of qualified candidates and help Federal agencies meet their succession planning goals. The program provides career enhancement and executive skills development for GS-14 and 15 (or equivalent work experience) employees with high potential for the SES. Participants are selected through competitive merit staffing

  14. Office of Human Resource Services (HC-30) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Human Resource Services (HC-30) Office of Human Resource Services (HC-30) Mission and Function Statement This organization provides a full range of human capital management (HCM) operational functions, employee work life programs, workforce service delivery, and day-to-day operational support for Headquarters Federal employees GS-15 and below. Leadership Rita M. Clinton Director, Office of Human Resource Services Read Bio ‣ HC-30 Divisions HQ Operations Division (HC-32) HQ Employee/Labor

  15. Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-10-15

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the performance management program for all supervisory and non-supervisory employees at grades GS-15 and below or equivalent, employees in EJ and EK pay bands IV and V in the Excepted Service, and all wage grade employees. Admin Chg 1, dated 2-16-11. Admin Chg 2, dated 2-26-2013. Admin Chg 3, dated 11-13-14 supersedes Admin Chg 2.

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rocky Flats Regulatory Documents

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Regulatory Documents Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Regulatory Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Notification that GS01 is no longer an RFLMA Point of Compliance (POC) Third Five-Year Review Report for the Rocky Flats Site Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement Environmental Covenant, November 14, 2011 Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision Amendment for Rocky Flats Plant (USDOE) Central Operable Unit Proposed Plan for the Rocky Flats CAD/ROD Amendment (June 2011)

  17. Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Health and Safety Research Division RESULTS FROM A RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ON YARDEORO AVENUE, ALBANY, AND CENTRAL AVENUE,, COLONIE, NEW YORK PROPERTIES AL013 - AL028 July 1984 Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY ACTIVITIES PROGRAM OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 operated by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. DE-AC05840R21400 _- _^." .-. ..-.- _---.--_ -... .- Fk. 3 ,=. Y)*cx gs 1 XEC @ d +I? ,%r $ g

  18. Vacancies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Us » Careers » Vacancies Vacancies Vacancies Interested candidates can apply to the following Office of the Inspector General job opportunities at: http://www.usajobs.gov . USAJOBS is the Federal Government's official website for federal jobs and employment information. Click on the Announcement number to view the job on USAJOBS. Announcement No: OIG-16-MP-0023 Position: Auditor, GS-511-11/12 Duty Location: Washington, DC Area of Consideration: Status Candidates Open: 1/7/2016 Close:

  19. Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program The purpose of this program is to establish requirements and responsibilities for the performance management program for all supervisory and non-supervisory employees at grades GS-15 and below or equivalent, employees in EJ and EK pay bands IV and V in the Excepted Service, and all wage grade employees. Desk Reference for Employee Performance Management and Recognition

  20. Improved neutron-gamma discrimination for a 6Li-glass neutron detector using digital signal analysis methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Cai -Lin; Riedel, Richard A.

    2016-01-14

    A 6Li-glass scintillator (GS20) based neutron Anger camera was developed for time-of-flight single-crystal diffraction instruments at SNS. Traditional pulse-height analysis (PHA) for neutron-gamma discrimination (NGD) resulted in the neutron-gamma efficiency ratio (defined as NGD ratio) on the order of 104. The NGD ratios of Anger cameras need to be improved for broader applications including neutron reflectometers. For this purpose, five digital signal analysis methods of individual waveforms from PMTs were proposed using: i). pulse-amplitude histogram; ii). power spectrum analysis combined with the maximum pulse amplitude; iii). two event parameters (a1, b0) obtained from Wiener filter; iv). an effective amplitude (m)more » obtained from an adaptive least-mean-square (LMS) filter; and v). a cross-correlation (CC) coefficient between an individual waveform and a reference. The NGD ratios can be 1-102 times those from traditional PHA method. A brighter scintillator GS2 has better NGD ratio than GS20, but lower neutron detection efficiency. The ultimate NGD ratio is related to the ambient, high-energy background events. Moreover, our results indicate the NGD capability of neutron Anger cameras can be improved using digital signal analysis methods and brighter neutron scintillators.« less

  1. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Tucci

    2001-12-20

    This Analysis/Model Report (AMR) documents an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the saturated-zone, site-scale flow and transport model (CRWMS M&O 2000) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for model calibration. The previous analysis was presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01, Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (USGS 2001). This analysis is designed to use updated water-level data as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain. The objectives of this revision are to develop computer files containing (1) water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002), (2) a table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS0109083 12332.003), and (3) a potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternate concept from that presented in ANL-NBS-HS-000034, Rev 00 ICN 01 for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and data from borehole USW WT-24. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow and transport model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for ground-water management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model, as well as provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral ground-water flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment.

  2. Nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets with a 3D nanonetwork structure as supercapacitive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Tao; Li, Ruiyi; Li, Zaijun

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: The microwave heating reflux approach was developed for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets, in which ammonia and ethanol were used as the precipitator and medium for the synthesis. The obtained composite shows a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure and largely enhanced supercapacitive performance. - Highlights: The paper reported the microwave synthesis of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide/graphene composite. The novel synthesis method is rapid, green, efficient and can be well used to the mass production. The as-synthesized composite offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. The composite offers excellent supercapacitive performance. This study provides a promising route to design and synthesis of advanced graphene-based materials with the superiorities of time-saving and cost-effective characteristics. - Abstract: The study reported a novel microwave heating reflux method for the fabrication of nickelcobalt layered double hydroxide ultrathin nanoflakes decorated on graphene sheets (GS/NiCo-LDH). Ammonia and ethanol were employed as precipitant and reaction medium for the synthesis, respectively. The resulting GS/NiCo-LDH offers a 3D flowerclusters morphology with nanonetwork structure. Due to the greatly enhanced rate of electron transfer and mass transport, the GS/NiCo-LDH electrode exhibits excellent supercapacitive performances. The maximum specific capacitance was found to be 1980.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 1 A g{sup ?1}. The specific capacitance can remain 1274.7 F g{sup ?1} at the current density of 15 A g{sup ?1} and it has an increase of about 2.9% after 1500 cycles. Moreover, the study also provides a promising approach for the design and synthesis of metallic double hydroxides/graphene hybrid materials with time-saving and cost-effective characteristics, which can be potentially applied in the energy storage/conversion devices.

  3. Feedback techniques and SPS Ecloud instabilities - design estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox,J.D.; Mastorides, T.; Ndabashimiye, G.; Rivetta, C.; Van Winkle, D.; Byrd, J.; Vay, J-L.; Hofle, W.; Rumolo, G.; de Maria, R.

    2009-05-04

    The SPS at high intensities exhibits transverse single-bunch instabilities with signatures consistent with an Ecloud driven instability. While the SPS has a coupled-bunch transverse feedback system, control of Ecloud driven motion requires a much wider control bandwidth capable of sensing and controlling motion within each bunched beam. This paper draws beam dynamics data from the measurements and simulations of this SPS instability, and estimates system requirements for a feedback system with 2-4 GS/sec. sampling rates to damp Ecloud-driven transverse motion in the SPS at intensities desired for high-current LHC operation.

  4. Ontario Hydro -- Recent advances in fossil environmental management and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seckington, B.R.

    1997-12-31

    This paper provides a brief overview of various recent environmental activities within the Fossil Business Unit of Ontario Hydro, specifically those related to air emissions and acid rain. This includes: (1) an overview of involvement with current and anticipated Federal and Ontario Provincial regulatory positions and directions; (2) a brief synopsis of environmental installations of FGD at Lambton GS and Low NO{sub x} burners at Lambton and Nanticoke; (3) development of market mechanisms; and (4) R and D activities related to impact assessment and control technology.

  5. 04_01_1992.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 from (1992TI02): Energy levels of 4 H defined for channel radius a n = 4.9 fm. All energies and widths are in the cm system. E x (MeV) J π T Γ (MeV) Decay Reactions g.s. a 2 - 1 5.42 n, 3 H 1, 11 0.31 1 - 1 6.73 b n, 3 H 11, 12 2.08 0 - 1 8.92 n, 3 H 2.83 1 - 1 12.99 c n, 3 H 11, 12 a 3.19 MeV above the n + 3 H

  6. 04_24_1992.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24 from (1992TI02): Energy levels of 4 Li defined for channel radius a p = 4.9 fm. All energies and widths are in the c.m. system. E x (MeV) J π T Γ (MeV) Decay Reactions g.s. a 2 - 1 6.03 p, 3 He 3 0.32 1 - 1 7.35 b p, 3 He 3 2.08 0 - 1 9.35 p, 3 He 3 2.85 1 - 1 13.51 c p, 3 He 3 a 4.07 MeV above the p + 3 He

  7. 06_14_2002.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 from (2002TI10): Energy levels of 6 Be E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ cm Decay Reactions g.s. 0 + ; 1 92 ± 6 keV p, α 2, 3, 4 1.67 ± 50 a (2) + ; 1 1.16 ± 0.06 MeV p, α 1, 2, 3, 4 23 4 - broad γ, 3 He 1, 3 26 2 - broad 3 He 1, 3 27 3 - broad 3 He 1 a See Table 6.8 in (1974AJ

  8. 07_01_2002.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 from (2002TI10): Energy levels of 7 He E x (MeV) J π ; T Γ cm Decay Reactions g.s. ( 3 2 ) - ; 3 2 150 ± 20 keV a n 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 2.92 ± 0.09 a ( 5 2 - ); 3 2 a 1990 ± 170 keV a n 1, 5, 6 (5.8 ± 0.3) a 4 ± 1 MeV a n 5, 6 a Newly adopted in this evaluation or revised from the previous evaluation (1988AJ01)

  9. 09_16_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 9 C a E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 3 2 τ 1/2 = 126.5 ± 0.9 msec β + 1, 4, 6 a 2.218 ± 11 1 2 - Γ = 100 ± 20 keV 6 a See also (1974AJ01, 1979AJ01). b Evidence for additional levels in 9 C is presented in reaction 6

  10. 10_01_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 10 He a E x (MeV) J π ; T Γ cm (MeV) Decay Reactions g.s. (0 + ); 3 0.3 ± 0.2 n 1, 2, 3 3.24 ± 0.20 (2 + ); 3 1.0 ± 0.3 n 3 6.80 ± 0.07 (3 - ); 3 0.6 ± 0.3 n 3 a Based on data reviewed in this evaluation. 1

  11. 13_21_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    21 from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 13 O E x in 13 O J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay Reactions (MeV) or Γ (MeV) g.s. ( 3 2 - ); 3 2 τ 1/2 = 8.58 ± 0.05 β + 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 2.75 ± 0.04 3, 4 4.21 4 6.02 ± 0.08 a Γ = 1.2 MeV 4 a Corresponds to broad or unresolved states. 1

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On Aerosol Optical Depth Determination from Zenith Measurements of Scattered Light Polarization Degree Shukurov, A.Kh., Shukurov K.A., and Golitsyn G.S., A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics RAS Investigations on relationships between variations of aerosol optical depth τaer and maximal polarization degree Pmax of scattered light (from part of a sky within 90 angular distance of Sun in its almucantar or vertical) are well known (see e.g. Coulson K.L. Izvestia Atmospheric Oceanic

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Angular Distribution of Intensity in a Flux of Radiation Scattered by a Cloud Dvoryashin, S.V., Shukurov, K.A., Shukurov, A.K., and Golitsyn, G.S., A.M.Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, RAS Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting A study of the angular distribution of intensity in a flux of solar radiation scattered by a cloud was carried out in conditions of translucent clouds (the disk of the Sun is visible). Using the digital video camera KODAK DC200,

  14. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  15. YEAR

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    89 YEAR 2014 Males 98 Females 91 PAY PLAN YEAR 2014 SES 14 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 1 NN (Engineering) 32 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 130 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 2 GS 15 1 YEAR 2014 American Indian Alaska Native Male (AIAN M) 1 American Indian Alaskan Native Female (AIAN F) 0 African American Male (AA M) 5 African American Female (AA F) 14 Asian American Pacific Islander Male (AAPI M) 3 Asian American Pacific Islander Female (AAPI F) 7 Hispanic Male (H M) 7 Hispanic Female (H F) 10 White Male

  16. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LOCALIZED DEFORMATION IN IRRADIATED AUSTENITIC STEELS ORNL: M.N. Gussev*, K.G. Field, J.T. Busby, K.J. Leonard, PNNL: T.S. Byun, University of Michigan: K.J. Stephenson, G.S. Was. 1 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fuel Cycle & Isotopes Division P.O. Box 2008, MS-6151 Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA Tel. (865) 574-44-56 Fax. (865) 241-3650 gussevmn@ornl.gov Credits This presentation is based on several papers and conference talks presented/published recently. Some of these are listed below: SEM-EBSD

  17. On the neutrinoless double ?{sup +}/EC decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0??{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels ?{sup +}?{sup +}, ?{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0?ECEC) are discussed.

  18. Experimental techniques for subnanosecond resolution of laser-launched plates and impact studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.L.; Warnes, R.H.; Stahl, D.B.

    1994-09-01

    Miniature laser-launched plates have applications in shock wave physics, studying dynamic properties of materials and can be used to generate experimental data in a manner similar to a laboratory gas gun for one-dimensional impact experiments. Laser-launched plates have the advantage of small size, low kinetic energy, and can be launched with ubiquitous laboratory lasers. Because of the small size and high accelerations (10{sup 7}--10{sup 10} g`s), improved temporal resolution and optical non-contact methods to collect data are required. Traditional mechanical in-situ gauges would significantly impair the data quality and do not have the required time response.

  19. Study of {sup 11}Be structure via the p({sup 11}Be, {sup 10}Be)d reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortier, S.; Winfield, J. S.; Pita, S.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Gales, S.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Lhenry, I.; Maison, J. M.; Suomijarvi, T.; Catford, W. N.; Curtis, N.; Jones, K. L.; Shawcross, M.; Orr, N. A.; Chapman, R.; Smith, M.; Spohr, K.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Clarke, N. M.

    1998-12-21

    The reaction {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be has been studied for the first time, using a secondary {sup 11}Be beam of 35.3 MeV/nucleon. Angular distributions up to about 15{sub cm}{sup o} were measured by detecting {sup 10}Be in a spectrometer and coincident deuterons in a position sensitive silicon detector array. Preliminary analysis provides evidence for a large core excitation component in the structure of {sup 11}Be{sub GS}.

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds Re-gathered by Wind Shear Download a printable PDF Submitter: Yang, Q., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Yang Q, RC Easter, P Campuzano-Jost, JL Jimenez, JD Fast, SJ Ghan, H Wang, LK Berg, MC Barth, Y Liu, MB Shrivastava, B Singh, H Morrison, J Fan, CL Ziegler, M Bela, E Apel, GS Diskin, T Mikoviny, and A Wisthaler. 2015. "Aerosol transport and

  1. Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 25,2010 CERTIFIED MAIL Mr. Don Dickson Government Training, Inc. 5372 Sandhamn Place Longboat Key, Florida 34228 Dear Mr. Dickson: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2010-01054) You requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), a copy of the contract/delivery/task order awarded to Government Horizons, Inc., and the proposal submitted by Government Horizons, Inc., on or about February 16, 2010, procurement ID DEDT0001181. Enclosed is a copy of Contract No. GS-02f-0155T.

  2. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Mg from ENSDF (unpublished, April 2014) E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay g.s. 1 2 - ; 5 2 1.14 × 10 -4 eV 2p 1.380 ± 240 ( 3 2 - ) 0.4 ± 0.2 MeV p 2.140 ± 210 ( 5 2 - ) 0.6 ± 0.6 MeV p 2.840 ± 210 ( 3 2 - ) < 0.2 MeV p 4.740 ± 210 ( 3 2 - ) 2.0 ± 0.8 MeV

  3. TUNL Nuclear Data Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Levels of Light Nuclei, A = 3 - 20 Nuclear Data Evaluation Project Triangular Universities Nuclear Laboratory TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Home Page Information on mass chains and nuclides 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Group Info Publications HTML General Tables Level Diagrams Tables of EL's NSR Key# Retrieval ENSDF Excitation Functions Thermal N Capt. G.S. Decays TUNL Dissertations NuDat at BNL Useful Links Citation Examples Home Sitemap Directory Email Us Search WWW

  4. B13+: Photodriven Molecular Wankel Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jin; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Sparta, Manuel; Alexandrova, Anastassia N.

    2012-07-09

    Synthetic molecular motors that are capable of delivering controlled movement upon energy input are one of the key building blocks in nanomachinery. The major energy sources of molecular motors are from chemical reactions, photon beams, or electric current, which are converted into mechanical forces through the excitation of the electronic states of the molecule. The energy scale of the electronic excitation is normally two orders of magnitude larger than the molecular vibrational frequencies. To reduce the heat dissipation and increase the energy utilization efficiency, a motor running purely on the electronic ground-state (GS) potential energy surfaces is highly desirable.

  5. Magnetic and high frequency properties of nanogranular CoFe-yttrium-doped zirconia films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Guijie Tang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Huaiwu; Zhang, Dainan

    2014-05-07

    Soft magnetic nanogranular FeCo-Yttrium-doped Zirconia thin films were fabricated using RF magnetron sputtering at different sputtering power. It was found that film electrical resistivity (?) decreased steeply with the increase of sputtering power, while both saturation magnetization (4?M{sub s}) and natural ferromagnetic resonant frequency ({sub r}) increased with the sputtering power ascending from 100?W to 200?W, but decreased when sputtering power exceeded 200?W. X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the films were nanocrystalline/amorphous composites. A saturation magnetization as high as 15.4 kGs and a ferromagnetic resonance frequency above 3?GHz were obtained.

  6. VOICES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VOICES of Experience Insights on Smart Grid Customer Engagement Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by National Renewable Energy laboratory under contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308, Subtask SG10.1011 in conjunction with Energetics Incorporated under contract No. GS-10F-0103J, Subtask J3806.0002. VOICE OF EXPERIENCE | INSIGHTS ON SMART GRID CUSTOMER ENGAGEMENT | DOE 3 Background The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and Recovery Act of 2009 spurred investments in smart grid technology and

  7. Microsoft Word - Dec 22 letter to community final

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JF:GS:14-0094:UFC 1200.00 Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 December 22, 2014 Eddy and Lea County Residents: Recovery efforts continue at the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and we are pleased to report that much progress was made during November and December. At this point in time over 60% of the mine has been surveyed and confirmed to be free of radiological contamination. Soot cleaning, from the February 5 haul

  8. Microsoft Word - FINAL Rocky Flats LBNL report Batch #1.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    the First Batch of Rocky Flats Water Samples Submitted to LBNL John N. Christensen Report date 9/16/13 Thirteen samples were submitted by SM Stoller to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for uranium isotopic and concentration analysis- 12 surface water samples from two sites (WALPOC and GS10) covering the period Sept. 2011 to April 2013, and one groundwater sample taken on 5/14/12 from well 79102 (Table 1). Uranium isotopic compositions of the samples were determined at LBNL by MC- ICPMS

  9. Microsoft Word - U Isotope Report_4-8-14 to 1-6-15_Revised.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rocky Flats Water Samples Collected Over the Period 4/8/14 to 1/6/15 and Submitted to LBNL John N. Christensen Report date 2/26/15 Seven surface water samples were submitted by Stoller Newport News Nuclear to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for uranium (U) isotopic analysis. The samples include three composite samples from the WALPOC location; three composite samples from GS10; and one composite sample from the SW093 location. These samples were collected during the period from April 2014

  10. The Future of the Grid Evolving to Meet America's Needs November 2014 Final Report: An Industry-Driven Vision of the 2030 Grid and Recommendations for a Path Forward

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by Energetics Incorporated under contract No. GS-10F-0103J, Subtask J3806.0002. Foreword The GridWise Alliance recently co-hosted with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) a National Summit on the "Future of the Grid: Evolving to Meet America's Needs." The Summit was the culmination of a series of workshops during which over 400 industry stakeholders shared their vision and challenges

  11. Geospatial Toolkits and Resource Maps for Selected Countries from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    NREL developed the Geospatial Toolkit (GsT), a map-based software application that integrates resource data and geographic information systems (GIS) for integrated resource assessment. A variety of agencies within countries, along with global datasets, provided country-specific data. Originally developed in 2005, the Geospatial Toolkit was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. Toolkits are available for 21 countries and each one can be downloaded separately. The source code for the toolkit is also available. [Taken and edited from http://www.nrel.gov/international/geospatial_toolkits.html

  12. Impact Evaluation Framework for Technology Deployment Programs: An Overview and Example

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Overview and Example John H. Reed Innovologie LLC Gretchen Jordan Sandia National Laboratories Edward Vine Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 2007 IMPACT EVALUATION FRAMEWORK FOR TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAMS An ap pro ach fo r q u anti fyi ng ret ro sp ect ive en erg y savin gs, cl ean en erg y ad van ces, an d m ark et eff ect s Introduction and Background The document briefly describes a framework for evaluating the "ret- rospective" impact of technology deployment

  13. F&t++q/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    26 - %I - 2027 ' 444 326 gs-01 F&t++q/ g% tfi3 8 -r,. SJL b-b < I T&e Rcdur;~ J co. - dcrb& $+:-Aic C:. BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY d d - c+h+4 3.u.. .L -& BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT P-A-C,, cclwu 4 CAcq RESEARCH DEPARTMENT SPECIAL RER.EVTE~ FINAL l3ETERMiNATION. ,,. . .*. " , //!!.-.-.. 2 /- e$ . . ' . L' -_ rp- ' 24. *a .*+-sy&y- -- ->.. I1 &e *..* MAi? 29 1954 m.. maEQ---~zAm y* " -- ' r--*r *?: -. - -.. ---em mco - 33 m-27 . ' . . . . . . , -a. _-* MCNTHLY

  14. Lamp Divisions

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    --- /A;; i :' r%i;in~house ilEc;' i:Z3:~cra:ion Lamp Divisions , _.. (I +i. 0 :,,,rg. . I . . -= i?e p/q! qe)-' &se pw E.rcale?l iev, Je!sey 07m March 20, 1 gs? ::r . J. A. Jones I ti. 5. Muclear Regulatory Commission .> = ..- haterials Licensing Branch -s - ,.I, - - Division of Fuel Cycle and hateri al Safety LY. , $2 - _ . ' -' . 3 _- - Yeshington, C. C. 2@555 - :_ :--, =-- -- .-?J -.: y...., : :- 7 Dear Mr. Jones : y-- --, ? . *I 2=15 2 r; X -P The following is our final report of the

  15. EJ and EK Pay Table | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EJ and EK Pay Table EJ and EK Pay Table The 2014 EJ and EK pay table excludes locality pay. Refer to the General Schedule Complete Set of Locality Pay Tables to determine the locality pay for your applicable geographic area. INCORPORATING THE 1% GENERAL SCHEDULE INCREASE AND A LOCALITY PAYMENT OF 24.22% FOR THE LOCALITY PAY AREA OF WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE-NORTHERN VIRGINIA, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Special Grade Min. base Min. Locality Max. Base Max. Locality GS Grade/Step Equivalent 01 $27,705 $34,415

  16. ERI-2142 17-1401 DOE Potential Market Impact CY2014-CY2033 4-25-2014 Final.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April 25, 2014 ERI-2142.17-1401/April 2014 iii Energy Resources International, Inc. NOTICE This report was prepared for the Office of Uranium Management and Policy in the Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy (DOE) under Task 17 under GSA FABS Contract No. GS-23F0242P and DOE Contract No. DE-DT0000752. DISCLAIMER Any views expressed or conclusions made in this independent report are solely the opinion of Energy Resources International, Inc. and do not necessarily represent the views of

  17. ERI-2142 17-1401 DOE Potential Market Impact CY2014-CY2033 April 25, 2014.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Draft April 25, 2014 ERI-2142.17-1401/April 2014 iii Energy Resources International, Inc. NOTICE This report was prepared for the Office of Uranium Management and Policy in the Office of Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy (DOE) under Task 17 under GSA FABS Contract No. GS-23F0242P and DOE Contract No. DE-DT0000752. DISCLAIMER Any views expressed or conclusions made in this independent report are solely the opinion of Energy Resources International, Inc. and do not necessarily represent the

  18. Surge recovery techniques for the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Makara, J.N.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, made by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high-energy operations [1]. The compressor is designed to pump 60 g/s of 3.6 K saturated helium vapor at a pressure ratio of 2.8, with an off-design range of 40 to 70 g/s and operating speeds between 40 and 95 krpm. Since initial commissioning in 1993, Tevatron transient conditions such as quench recovery have led to multiple-location machine trips as a result of the cold compressors entering the surge regime. Historically, compressors operating at lower inlet pressures and higher speeds have been especially susceptible to these machine trips and it was not uncommon to have multiple compressor trips during large multiple-house quenches. In order to cope with these events and limit accelerator down time, surge recovery techniques have been implemented in an attempt to prevent the compressors from tripping once the machine entered this surge regime. This paper discusses the different methods of surge recovery that have been employed. Data from tests performed at the Cryogenic Test Facility at Fermilab as well as actual Tevatron operational data were utilized. In order to aid in the determination of the surge region, a full mapping study was undertaken to characterize the entire pressure field of the cold compressor. These techniques were then implemented and tested at several locations in the Tevatron with some success.

  19. Spontaneous generation of rotation in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra Diaz, Felix

    2013-12-24

    Three different aspects of intrinsic rotation have been treated. i) A new, first principles model for intrinsic rotation [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has been implemented in the gyrokinetic code GS2. The results obtained with the code are consistent with several experimental observations, namely the rotation peaking observed after an L-H transition, the rotation reversal observed in Ohmic plasmas, and the change in rotation that follows Lower Hybrid wave injection. ii) The model in [F.I. Parra, M. Barnes and P.J. Catto, Nucl. Fusion 51, 113001 (2011)] has several simplifying assumptions that seem to be satisfied in most tokamaks. To check the importance of these hypotheses, first principles equations that do not rely on these simplifying assumptions have been derived, and a version of these new equations has been implemented in GS2 as well. iii) A tokamak cross-section that drives large intrinsic rotation has been proposed for future large tokamaks. In large tokamaks, intrinsic rotation is expected to be very small unless some up-down asymmetry is introduced. The research conducted under this contract indicates that tilted ellipticity is the most efficient way to drive intrinsic rotation.

  20. Verification of gyrokinetic microstability codes ?with an LHD configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Nunami, M.; Watanabe, T. -H.; Sugama, H.; Tanaka, K.

    2014-11-01

    We extend previous benchmarks of the GS2 and GKV-X codes to verify their algorithms for solving the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations for plasma microturbulence. Code benchmarks are the most complete way of verifying the correctness of implementations for the solution of mathematical models for complex physical processes such as those studied here. The linear stability calculations reported here are based on the plasma conditions of an ion-ITB plasma in the LHD configuration. The plasma parameters and the magnetic geometry differ from previous benchmarks involving these codes. We find excellent agreement between the independently written pre-processors that calculate the geometrical coefficients used in the gyrokinetic equations. Grid convergence tests are used to establish the resolution and domain size needed to obtain converged linear stability results. The agreement of the frequencies, growth rates and eigenfunctions in the benchmarks reported here provides additional verification that the algorithms used by the GS2 and GKV-X codes are correctly finding the linear eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Poisson equations.

  1. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermorethe fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were consideredless

  2. Commissioning of helium refrigeration system at JLab for 12 GeV upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao; Dixon, Kelly D.; Knudsen, Peter N.; Norton, Robert O.; Creel, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    The new 4.5 K refrigerator system added to the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) for the 12 GeV upgrade will double its previous capacity. It includes a 4.5 K cold box system and compressor system with associated oil removal and gas management systems. At its maximum capacity condition, this new system supports an additional 238 g/s 30 K 1.16 bar cold compressor return flow, a 15 g/s 4.5 K liquefaction load and a 12.6 kW 35–55 K shield load. Five more design conditions, ranging from liquefaction to refrigeration and a stand-by/reduced load state, were specified for the sizing and selection of its components. The cold box system is comprised of a 300–60 K vertical cold box that incorporates a liquid nitrogen pre-cooler and a 60–4.5 K horizontal cold box housing seven turbines that are configured in four expansion stages including one Joule-Thompson expander. The helium compression system has five compressors to support three pressure levels in the cold box. This paper will briefly review the salient 4.5 K system design features and discuss the recent commissioning results.

  3. Foaming characteristics of refigerant/lubricant mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, D.Y.; Shah, D.O.; Jotshi, C.K.; Bhagwat, S.; Leung, M.; Gregory, A.

    1997-04-01

    The air-conditioning and refrigeration industry has moved to HFC refrigerants which have zero ozone depletion and low global warming potential due to regulations on CFC and HCFC refrigerants and concerns for the environment. The change in refrigerants has prompted the switch from mineral oil and alkylbenzene lubricants to polyolester-based lubricants. This change has also brought about a desire for lubricant, refrigerant and compressor manufacturers to understand the foaming properties of alternative refrigerant/ lubricant mixtures, as well as the mechanisms which affect these properties. The objectives of this investigation are to experimentally determine the foaming absorption and desorption rates of HFC and blended refrigerants in polyolester lubricant and to define the characteristics of the foam formed when the refrigerant leaves the refrigerant/ lubricant mixture after being exposed to a pressure drop. The refrigerants being examined include baseline refrigerants: CFC-12 (R-12) and HCFC-22 (R-22); alternative refrigerants: HFC-32 (R-32), R-125, R-134a, and R-143a; and blended refrigerants: R-404A, R-407C, and R-410A. The baseline refrigerants are tested with ISO 32 (Witco 3GS) and ISO 68 (4GS) mineral oils while the alternative and blended refrigerants are tested with two ISO 68 polyolesters (Witco SL68 and ICI RL68H).

  4. Hydroelectric redevelopment maintains heritage values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulkovshteyn, L.; Chidiac, M.; Hall, W.

    1995-12-31

    The Seymour GS is an 80 year old generating station on the historic Trent-Severn Waterway in Ontario, Canada. The rehabilitation at Seymour was approved by Provincial and Federal authorities on condition that the original appearance of the building be maintained. The capacity of the Generating Station (GS) is being uprated from 3.15 MW to 5.7 MW, by replacing five vertical double runner Francis units with five horizontal Kaplan turbines. The replacement of vertical Francis units with horizontal Kaplan units, necessitated an extensive and innovative demolition approach for the substructure modification. The new turbines required a powerhouse base slab 3.5 m below the grade of the original slab. This required removal of the existing slabs and foundation rock along with most of the interior powerhouse walls. The type of modification and demolition were carefully chosen to accommodate a very tight schedule dictated by the requirement of the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO), where in-water work is restricted to certain months of the year.

  5. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

  6. Water-Level Data Analysis for the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Rehfeldt

    2004-10-08

    This report is an updated analysis of water-level data performed to provide the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]) (referred to as the saturated zone (SZ) site-scale flow model or site-scale SZ flow model in this report) with the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target water-level data, and hydraulic gradients for calibration of groundwater flow models. This report also contains an expanded discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. The analysis of the potentiometric data presented in Revision 00 of this report (USGS 2001 [DIRS 154625]) provides the configuration of the potentiometric surface, target heads, and hydraulic gradients for the calibration of the SZ site-scale flow model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Revision 01 of this report (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) used updated water-level data for selected wells through the year 2000 as the basis for estimating water-level altitudes and the potentiometric surface in the SZ site-scale flow and transport model domain based on an alternative interpretation of perched water conditions. That revision developed computer files containing: Water-level data within the model area (DTN: GS010908312332.002); A table of known vertical head differences (DTN: GS010908312332.003); and A potentiometric-surface map (DTN: GS010608312332.001) using an alternative concept from that presented by USGS (2001 [DIRS 154625]) for the area north of Yucca Mountain. The updated water-level data presented in USGS (2004 [DIRS 168473]) include data obtained from the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) Phases I and II and data from Borehole USW WT-24. This document is based on Revision 01 (USGS 2004 [DIRS 168473]) and expands the discussion of uncertainty in the potentiometric-surface map. This uncertainty assessment includes an analysis of the impact of more recent water-level data and the impact of adding data from the EWDP Phases III and IV wells. In addition to being utilized by the SZ site-scale flow model, the water-level data and potentiometric-surface map contained within this report will be available to other government agencies and water users for groundwater management purposes. The potentiometric surface defines an upper boundary of the site-scale flow model and provides information useful to estimation of the magnitude and direction of lateral groundwater flow within the flow system. Therefore, the analysis documented in this revision is important to SZ flow and transport calculations in support of total system performance assessment (TSPA).

  7. IMPACT OF A REVISED {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al REACTION RATE ON THE OPERATION OF THE Mg-Al CYCLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Straniero, O.; Cristallo, S.; Imbriani, G.; DiLeva, A.; Limata, B.; Strieder, F.; Bemmerer, D.; Broggini, C.; Caciolli, A.; Corvisiero, P.; Costantini, H.; Lemut, A.; Formicola, A.; Gustavino, C.; Junker, M.; Elekes, Z.; Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Gervino, G.; Guglielmetti, A.; and others

    2013-02-15

    Proton captures on Mg isotopes play an important role in the Mg-Al cycle active in stellar H-burning regions. In particular, low-energy nuclear resonances in the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al reaction affect the production of radioactive {sup 26}Al{sup gs} as well as the resulting Mg/Al abundance ratio. Reliable estimations of these quantities require precise measurements of the strengths of low-energy resonances. Based on a new experimental study performed at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics, we provide revised rates of the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al{sup gs} and the {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} reactions with corresponding uncertainties. In the temperature range 50-150 MK, the new recommended rate of {sup 26}Al {sup m} production is up to five times higher than previously assumed. In addition, at T = 100 MK, the revised total reaction rate is a factor of two higher. Note that this is the range of temperature at which the Mg-Al cycle operates in a H-burning zone. The effects of this revision are discussed. Due to the significantly larger {sup 25}Mg(p, {gamma}){sup 26}Al {sup m} rate, the estimated production of {sup 26}Al{sup gs} in H-burning regions is less efficient than previously obtained. As a result, the new rates should imply a smaller contribution from Wolf-Rayet stars to the galactic {sup 26}Al budget. Similarly, we show that the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) extra-mixing scenario does not appear able to explain the most extreme values of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al, i.e., >10{sup -2}, found in some O-rich presolar grains. Finally, the substantial increase of the total reaction rate makes the hypothesis of self-pollution by massive AGBs a more robust explanation for the Mg-Al anticorrelation observed in globular-cluster stars.

  8. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  9. Forward and reverse characteristics of irradiated MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, A.; Ceschia, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Soncini, G.; Bellutti, P.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1996-06-01

    pMOSFETs biased with V{sub gs} < V{sub gd} during Co{sup 60} {gamma} irradiation have shown substantial differences between the forward and reverse subthreshold characteristics, induced by a non-uniform charge distribution in the gate oxide. Correspondingly, modest differences have been observed in the over-threshold I-V characteristics. After irradiation, the forward subthreshold curves can shift at higher or lower gate voltages than the reverse ones. The former behavior has been observed in long-channel devices, in agreement with the classical MOS theory and numerical simulations. The latter result has been obtained in short-channel devices, and it has been correlated to a parasitic punch-through conduction mechanism.

  10. Polar lipid fatty acids, LPS-hydroxy fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of three Geobacter strains, and variation with electron acceptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron; Lovley, Derek; Woodard, Trevor L.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Long, Philip E.; White, David C.

    2009-02-01

    The polar lipid fatty acids, lipopolysaccharide hydroxy-fatty acids, and respiratory quinones of Geobacter metallireducens str. GS-15, Geobacter sulfurreducens str. PCA, and Geobacter bemidjiensis str. Bem are reported. Also, the lipids of G. metallireducens were compared when grown with Fe3+ or nitrate as electron acceptors and G. sulfurreducens with Fe3+ or fumarate. In all experiments, the most abundant polar lipid fatty acids were 14:0, i15:0, 16:1*7c, 16:1*5c, and 16:0; lipopolysaccharide hydroxyfatty acids were dominated by 3oh16:0, 3oh14:0, 9oh16:0, and 10oh16:0; and menaquinone-8 was the most abundant respiratory quinone. Some variation in lipid proWles with strain were observed, but not with electron acceptor.

  11. Theoretical analysis of sound transmission loss through graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2014-11-17

    We examine the potential of using graphene sheets (GSs) as sound insulating materials that can be used for nano-devices because of their small size, super electronic, and mechanical properties. In this study, a theoretical analysis is proposed to predict the sound transmission loss through multi-layered GSs, which are formed by stacks of GS and bound together by van der Waals (vdW) forces between individual layers. The result shows that the resonant frequencies of the sound transmission loss occur in the multi-layered GSs and the values are very high. Based on the present analytical solution, we predict the acoustic insulation property for various layers of sheets under both normal incident wave and acoustic field of random incidence source. The scheme could be useful in vibration absorption application of nano devices and materials.

  12. Table

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2012KE01): Energy Levels of 11 Li E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T T 1 2 or Γ Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 5 2 T 1 2 = 8.75 ± 0.14 ms β - 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 1.220 ± 40 Γ = 0.53 ± 0.15 MeV n 2, 6, 7, 9, 10 2.420 ± 50 Γ = 1.26 ± 0.30 MeV n 2, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10 3.700 ± 130 Γ < 200 keV n 7 4.860 ± 60 Γ < 100 keV n 2, 4, 9 6.230 ± 60 Γ < 100 keV n 2, 4, 9 11.300 n 2 1

  13. 09_01_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 9 Li a E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 3 2 τ 1/2 = 178.3 ± 0.4 msec β - 1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 2.691 ± 5 1 2 - (γ) 4, 6, 7, 10 4.296 ± 15 ( 5 2 - ) Γ = 100 ± 30 b 4, 10, 11 5.38 ± 60 600 ± 100 4 6.43 ± 15 40 ± 20 4, 10 a The first evidence for T = 5 2 states of 9 Li has been obtained from 8 He + p elastic scattering (see reaction 2). b From reaction 4. See also reaction 11.

  14. 10_18_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 10 B a E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ m or Γ cm (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 3 + ; 0 stable b 1, 4, 5, 10, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 58, 59 0.71835 ± 0.04 1 + ; 0 τ m = 1.020 ± 0.005 nsec c γ 1, 4, 5, 10, 12, 17, 18, 19, 20, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 36, 42, 44, 45, 46, 47, 50, 51, 52, 53, 55, 58 1.74015 ± 0.17 0 + ; 1 7 ± 3 fsec γ 1,

  15. 10_31_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    31 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 10 C E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ or Γ cm (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 0 + ; 1 τ 1/2 = 19.290 ± 0.012 sec β + 1, 2, 3, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 3.3536 ± 0.7 2 + τ m = 155 ± 25 fsec γ 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 11, 12 5.22 ± 40 a Γ = 225 ± 45 keV 6, 8, 9, 11 5.38 ± 70 a 300 ± 60 6, 8, 9, 11 6.580 ± 20 (2 + ) 190 ± 35 6, 8, 9, 11 ≈ 9 8 ≈ 10 8 ≈ 16.5 (2 + ) b 8 c a One of these two states is presumably a 2 + state. b Presumed analog of 10 B*(18.80) (1993WA06). c

  16. 13_14_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 13 N E x (MeV±keV) J π ; T Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 1 2 - ; 1 2 τ 1/2 = 9.965 ± 0.004 min β + 1, 2, 5, 7, 8, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35, 36 2.3649 ± 0.6 1 2 + Γ c.m. = 31.7 ± 0.8 γ, p 5, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 24, 25, 28, 30, 31, 35, 36 3.502 ± 2 a 3 2 - 62 ± 4 a γ, p 2, 5, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 17, 18, 19, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 34, 35 3.547 ± 4 5 2 + 47 ± 7 p 2, 5, 7, 9, 13, 14,

  17. 14_01_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 14 B E x J π ; T τ 1/2 (ms) Decay Reactions (MeV ± keV) or Γ (MeV) g.s. a 2 - ; 2 τ 1/2 = 13.8 ± 1.0 ms β - 1, 3, 4, 5 0.74 ± 40 (1 - ); 2 4 1.38 ± 30 (3 - ); 2 4 1.86 ± 70 b 2 - ; 2 Γ = 1.0 ± 0.5 MeV 2, 4 2.08 ± 50 (4 - ); 2 4 (2.32 ± 40) 4 2.97 ± 40 4 c a See also footnote c to Table 14.3. b It is not clear that the states reported in reactions 2 and 4 are the same states. The level structure of 14 B should be studied further. I am indebted to

  18. 15Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 15Be Adopted value: 0.58 ± 0.20 MeV (2013SN02) Measured Mass Excess for 15Be Adopted value: 49821 ± 100 keV (2013SN02: from Eres(14Be + n) = 1.8 ± 0.1 MeV) Measurements 2011SP01: 9Be(17C, 2p); E = 55 MeV/nucleon; measured energy loss, time of flight, magnetic rigidity, Be fragment spectra and (Be)(n)-coin. 15Be; deduced g.s., J, π, decay mode, unbound energy. 2013SN02: 2H(14Be, 15Be); E = 59 MeV/nucleon; measured 14Be,

  19. CO2 Sequestration short course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaolo, Donald J.; Cole, David R; Navrotsky, Alexandra; Bourg, Ian C

    2014-12-08

    Given the public’s interest and concern over the impact of atmospheric greenhouse gases (GHGs) on global warming and related climate change patterns, the course is a timely discussion of the underlying geochemical and mineralogical processes associated with gas-water-mineral-interactions encountered during geological sequestration of CO2. The geochemical and mineralogical processes encountered in the subsurface during storage of CO2 will play an important role in facilitating the isolation of anthropogenic CO2 in the subsurface for thousands of years, thus moderating rapid increases in concentrations of atmospheric CO2 and mitigating global warming. Successful implementation of a variety of geological sequestration scenarios will be dependent on our ability to accurately predict, monitor and verify the behavior of CO2 in the subsurface. The course was proposed to and accepted by the Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) and The Geochemical Society (GS).

  20. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  1. DESCRIPTION BARCODE MANUFACTURER MODEL_NO COST SN BLDG ROOM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DESCRIPTION BARCODE MANUFACTURER MODEL_NO COST SN BLDG ROOM CAMCORDER PANASONIC 0000001582 PANASONIC AG-HVX200A $11,002.00 H8TCB00051 922 177 SERVER HP DL380 G7 E 0000002402 HEWLETT PACKARD DL380 $11,318.96 SGH130X5SH 922 116 STEADICAM F24LEHDVLN 0000001560 STEADICAM F24LEHDVLNNS $11,500.00 N/A 922 177 CAMERA EVOLUTION 410 0000000017 EVOLUTION 4100 $11,844.77 JRR24TA-10C 922 177 PRINTER/PLOTTER HP D C4153 HEWLETT PACKARD C6096V $16,088.00 SG18S1401H 922 1W13 APPLIANCE PART #: GS 0000002039

  2. HIGS Flux Performance Projection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIGS flux performance table for high-flux, quasi-CW operation, DFELL/TUNL, Nov. 9, 2010 (Version 2.3). HIGS Flux Performance Projection (2010 - 2011) Total Flux [g/s] CW Operation Two-Bunch (*) Collimated Flux (∆E γ /E γ = 5% FWHM) (#), (@) FEL λ [nm] Comment No-loss Mode : < 20 MeV Linear Pol. with OK-4 Circular Pol with OK-5 E γ = 1 - 2 MeV (E e = 237 - 336 MeV) 1 x 10 8 - 4 x 10 8 6 x 10 6 - 2.4 x 10 7 1064 Linear and Circular (a), (b) E γ = 2 - 2.9 MeV (E e = 336 - 405 MeV) 4 x 10

  3. Energy Levels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 He from ENSDF E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ (MeV) a Decay b g.s. 1 2 + ; 5 2 n ≈ 1.1 MeV 1 2 - 0.10 ± 0.06 ≈ 2.26 MeV 0.7 ± 0.2 (4.20 ± 150) ≈ 5.0 MeV (8.0) MeV a From 9 Be( 14 C, 14 O) (1999BO26). b %n = 100 for ground state. Decay mode for excited states is probably %n=100 based on Q-value; no mode is reported.

  4. The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

    2012-05-20

    To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

  5. I.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  6. CEma IUS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  7. DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables DOE Excepted Service Pay Tables Excepted Service EJ and EK Pay Table INCORPORATING THE 1% GENERAL SCHEDULE INCREASE AND A LOCALITY PAYMENT OF 24.22% FOR THE LOCALITY PAY AREA OF WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE-NORTHERN VIRGINIA, DC-MD-VA-WV-PA Special Grade Min. Base Min. Locality Max. Base Max. Locality GS Grade/Step Equiv. 01 $27,705 $34,415 $47,575 $59,098 5/1 to 9/5 02 $41,979 $52,146 $68,993 $85,703 9/1 to 12/5 03 $60,877 $75,621 $96,948 $120,429 12/1 to 14/5 04 $85,544

  8. TOTAL WORKFORCE Males

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    92 Females Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female Male Female 1 0 3 16 4 7 9 10 72 59 PAY PLAN SES 12 EX 1 EJ/EK 3 EN 05 1 EN 04 4 EN 03 7 EN 00 4 NN (Engineering) 28 NQ (Prof/Tech/Admin) 118 NU (Tech/Admin Support) 1 GS 15 1 ED 00 1 DIVERSITY 181 89 49.2% American Indian Alaska Native African American Asian American Pacific Islander Hispanic White 50.8% Deputy Administrator for Defense Nuclear NonProliferation (NA-20) As of September 5, 2015 SES EX EJ/EK EN 05 EN 04 EN 03 EN 00 NN NQ

  9. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System licensed hardware second certification test series and package shock mount system test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.; Moody, D.A.

    1995-10-01

    This paper presents a summary of two separate drop test a e performed in support of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). The first portion of this paper presents the second series of drop testing required to demonstrate that the RTG package design meets the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, ``Part 71`` (10 CFR 71). Results of the first test series, performed in July 1994, demonstrated that some design changes were necessary. The package design was modified to improve test performance and the design changes were incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The second full-size certification test article (CTA-2) incorporated the modified design and was tested at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With the successful completion of the test series, and pending DOE Office of Facility Safety Analysis approval of the SARP, a certificate of compliance will be issued for the RTG package allowing its use. The second portion of this paper presents the design and testing of the RTG Package Mount System. The RTG package mount was designed to protect the RTG from excessive vibration during transport, provide shock protection during on/off loading, and provide a mechanism for moving the RTG package with a forklift. Military Standard (MIL-STD) 810E, Transit Drop Procedure (DOE 1989), was used to verify that the shock limiting system limited accelerations in excess of 15 G`s at frequencies below 150 Hz. Results of the package mount drop tests indicate that an impact force of 15 G`s was not exceeded in any test from a free drop height of 457 mm (18 in.).

  10. Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb decay: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino spectrum shape [Total absorption spectroscopy study of ?Rb: A major contributor to reactor antineutrino flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ?,?Pu and ?,?U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ?Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ?Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ?Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  11. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; Estienne, M.; Agramunt, J.; Aysto, J.; Bowry, M.; Briz Monago, J. A.; Caballero-Folch, R.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cucoanes, A.; Eloma, V.; Estvez, E.; Farrelly, G. F.; Garcia, A.; Gelletly, W.; Gomez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gorlychev, V.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Jordan, M. D.; Kankainen, A.; Kondev, F. G.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E.; Molina, F.; Moore, I.; Perez, A.; Podolyak, Zs.; Penttil, H.; Regan, P. H.; Shiba, T.; Rissanen, J.; Rubio, B.; Weber, C.

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted after the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered

  12. MEASUREMENT OF THE STRANGE QUARK CONTRIBUTION TO THE VECTOR STRUCTURE OF THE PROTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Phillips

    2007-11-30

    The goal of the G0 experiment is to determine the contribution of the strange quarks in the quark-antiquark sea to the structure of the nucleon. To this end, the experiment measured parityviolating asymmetries from elastic electron-proton scattering from 0.12 ≤ Q2 ≤ 1.0 (GeV/c)2 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. These asymmetries come from the interference of the electromagnetic and neutral weak interactions, and are sensitive to the strange quark contributions in the proton. The results from the forward-angle measurement, the linear combination of the strange electric and magnetic form factors GsE +ηGsM, suggest possible non-zero, Q2 dependent, strange quark contributions and provide new information to understand the magnitude of the contributions. This dissertation presents the analysis and results of the forward-angle measurement. In addition, the G0 experiment measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry in the elastic scattering of transversely polarized 3 GeV electrons from unpolarized protons at Q2 = 0.15, 0.25 (GeV/c)2 as part of the forward-angle measurement. The transverse asymmetry provides a direct probe of the imaginary component of the two-photon exchange amplitude, the complete description of which is important in the interpretation of data from precision electron-scattering experiments. The results of the measurement indicate that calculations using solely the elastic nucleon intermediate state are insufficient and generally agree with calculations that include significant inelastic hadronic intermediate state contributions. This dissertation presents the analysis and results of this measurement.

  13. Synthesis and properties of new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} chalcogenide glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassem, M.; ULCO, LPCA, EAC CNRS 4493 F-59140 Dunkerque ; Le Coq, D.; Fourmentin, M.; Hindle, F.; Bokova, M.; Cuisset, A.; Masselin, P.; Bychkov, E.; ULCO, LPCA, EAC CNRS 4493 F-59140 Dunkerque

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Determination of the glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system. {yields} Characterization of macroscopic properties of the new CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. {yields} Far infrared transmission of chalcogenide glasses. {yields} Characterization of the total conductivity of CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glasses. -- Abstract: The glass-forming region in the pseudo-ternary CdSe-AgI-As{sub 2}Se{sub 3} system was determined. Measurements including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), density, and X-ray diffraction were performed. The effect resulting from the addition of CdSe or AgI has been highlighted by examining three series of different base glasses. The characteristic temperatures of the glass samples, including glass transition (T{sub g}), crystallisation (T{sub x}), and melting (T{sub m}) temperatures are reported and used to calculate their {Delta}T = T{sub x} - T{sub g} and their Hruby, H{sub r} = (T{sub x} - T{sub g})/(T{sub m} - T{sub x}), criteria. Evolution of the total electrical conductivity {sigma} and the room temperature conductivity {sigma}{sub 298} was also studied. The terahertz transparency domain in the 50-600 cm{sup -1} region was pointed for different chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) and the potential of the THz spectroscopy was suggested to obtain structural information on ChGs.

  14. Detailed photonuclear cross-section calculations and astrophysical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1989-06-15

    We have investigated the role of an isomeric state and its coupling to the ground state (g.s.) via photons and neutron inelastic scattering in a stellar environment by making detailed photonuclear and neutron cross-section calculations for /sup 176/Lu and /sup 210/Bi. In the case of /sup 176/Lu, the g.s. would function as an excellent galactic slow- (s-) process chronometer were it not for the 3.7-h isomer at 123 keV. Our calculations predicted much larger photon cross sections for production of the isomer, as well as a lower threshold, than had been assumed based on earlier measurements. These two factors combine to indicate that an enormous correction, a factor of 10/sup 7/, must be applied to shorten the current estimate of the half-life against photoexcitation of /sup 176/Lu as a function of temperature. This severely limits the use of /sup 176/Lu as a stellar chronometer and indicates a significantly lower temperature at which the two states reach thermal equilibrium. For /sup 210/Bi, our preliminary calculations of the production and destruction of the 3 /times/ 10/sup 6/ y isomeric state by neutrons and photons suggest that the /sup 210/Bi isomer may not be destroyed by photons as rapidly as assumed in certain stellar environments. This leads to an alternate production path of /sup 207/Pb and significantly affects presently interpreted lead isotopic abundances. We have been able to make such detailed nuclear cross-section calculations using: modern statistical-model codes of the Hauser-Feshbach type, with complete conservation of angular momentum and parity; reliable systematics of the input parameters required by these codes, including knowledge of the absolute gamma-ray strength-functions for E1, M1, and E2 transitions; and codes developed to compute large, discrete, nuclear level sets, their associated gamma-ray branchings, and the presence and location of isomeric states. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Total Absorption Spectroscopy Study of ⁹²Rb Decay: A Major Contributor to Reactor Antineutrino Spectrum Shape

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sonzogni, A.; Zakari-Issoufou, A. -A.; Fallot, M.; Porta, A.; Algora, A.; Tain, J. L.; Valencia, E.; Rice, S.; Bui, V. M.; Cormon, S.; et al

    2015-03-09

    The accurate determination of the emitted reactor antineutrino flux is still a major challenge for actual and future neutrino experiments at reactors, especially after the evidence of a disagreement between the measured antineutrino energy spectrum by Double Chooz, Daya Bay, and Reno and calculated antineutrino spectra obtained from the conversion of the unique integral beta spectra measured at the ILL reactor. Using nuclear data to compute reactor antineutrino spectra may help understanding this bias, with the study of the underlying nuclear physics. Summation calculations allow identifying a list of nuclei that contribute importantly to the antineutrino energy spectra emitted aftermore » the fission of ²³⁹,²⁴¹Pu and ²³⁵,²³⁸U, and whose beta decay properties might deserve new measurements. Among these nuclei, ⁹²Rb exhausts by itself about 16% of of the antineutrino energy spectrum emitted by Pressurized Water Reactors in the 5 to 8 MeV range. In this Letter, we report new Total Absorption Spectroscopy (TAS) results for this important contributor. The obtained beta feeding from ⁹²Rb shows beta intensity unobserved before in the 4.5 to 5.5 MeV energy region and gives a ground state to ground state branch of 87.5 % ± 3%. These new data induce a dramatic change in recent summation calculations where a 51% GS to GS branch was considered for ⁹²Rb, increasing the summation antineutrino spectrum in the region nearby the observed bias.The new data still have an important impact on other summation calculations in which more recent data were considered« less

  16. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

  17. MBM fuel feeding system design and evaluation for FBG pilot plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, William A.; Fonstad, Terry; Pugsley, Todd; Gerspacher, Regan

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A 1-5 g/s fuel feeding system for pilot scale FBG was designed, built and tested. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Multiple conveying stages improve pressure balancing, flow control and stability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Secondary conveyor stage reduced output irregularity from 47% to 15%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic air sparging effective in dealing with poor flow ability of MBM powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pneumatic injection port plugs with char at gasification temperature of 850 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: A biomass fuel feeding system has been designed, constructed and evaluated for a fluidized bed gasifier (FBG) pilot plant at the University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon, SK, Canada). The system was designed for meat and bone meal (MBM) to be injected into the gasifier at a mass flow-rate range of 1-5 g/s. The designed system consists of two stages of screw conveyors, including a metering stage which controlled the flow-rate of fuel, a rotary airlock and an injection conveyor stage, which delivered that fuel at a consistent rate to the FBG. The rotary airlock which was placed between these conveyors, proved unable to maintain a pressure seal, thus the entire conveying system was sealed and pressurized. A pneumatic injection nozzle was also fabricated, tested and fitted to the end of the injection conveyor for direct injection and dispersal into the fluidized bed. The 150 mm metering screw conveyor was shown to effectively control the mass output rate of the system, across a fuel output range of 1-25 g/s, while the addition of the 50 mm injection screw conveyor reduced the irregularity (error) of the system output rate from 47% to 15%. Although material plugging was found to be an issue in the inlet hopper to the injection conveyor, the addition of air sparging ports and a system to pulse air into those ports was found to successfully eliminate this issue. The addition of the pneumatic injection nozzle reduced the output irregularity further to 13%, with an air supply of 50 slpm as the minimum air supply to drive this injector. After commissioning of this final system to the FBG reactor, the injection nozzle was found to plug with char however, and was subsequently removed from the system. Final operation of the reactor continues satisfactorily with the two screw conveyors operating at matching pressure with the fluidized bed, with the output rate of the system estimated based on system characteristic equations, and confirmed by static weight measurements made before and after testing. The error rate by this method is reported to be approximately 10%, which is slightly better than the estimated error rate of 15% for the conveyor system. The reliability of this measurement prediction method relies upon the relative consistency of the physical properties of MBM with respect to its bulk density and feeding characteristics.

  18. Infinitely many solutions of a quasilinear elliptic problem with an oscillatory potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omari, P.; Zanolin, F.

    1996-12-31

    Let {Omega} be a bounded domain in IR{sup N}, with N {ge} 1, having a smooth boundary {partial_derivative}{Omega}. We denote by A the quasilinear elliptic second order differential operator defined by Au+div(a({vert_bar}{del}{sub u}{vert_bar}{sup 2}){del}{sub u}). We suppose that the function a:[O,+{infinity}{r_arrow}O, +{infinity}] is of class C{sup 1} and satisfies the following ellipticity and growth conditions of Leray-Lions type (cf. e.g. [22]): there are constants {gamma}, {Lambda} > O, K {epsilon} [O,1] and p {epsilon}[1, +{infinity}]such that, for every s > O, {lambda}(K + S){sup p-2} {le} a(s{sup 2}){le}{Lambda} (K+S){sup p-2}({lambda}-1/2) a(s){le}a{prime}(s) s {le}{Gamma} a(s). Hence, we can define, for each s {ge} O, the function A(s) = {integral}{sub O}{sup s} a({xi})d{xi}. Let us consider the Dirichlet problem -Au={mu}(x)g(u) + h(x) in {Omega}, u=O on {partial_derivative}{Omega}, where g: IR {r_arrow} IR is continuous and {mu}, h {epsilon} L{sup {infinity}}({infinity}), with {mu}{sub O} = ess inf{sub {Omega}}{sub {mu}} > O. We also set G(s) = {integral}{sub O}{sup s}g({integral})d{integral}, for all s {epsilon} IR. By a solution of (1.3) we mean a function u {epsilon} W{sub O}{sup 1,p} ({Omega}) {intersection} L{sup {infinity}} ({Omega}) such that {integral}{sub {Omega}} a({vert_bar}{del}{sub u}{vert_bar}{sup 2}){del}{sub u}{del}{sub wdx}= {integral}{sub {Omega}} {mu}g(u)wdx + {integral}{sub {Omega}} hwdx, for every w {epsilon} W{sub O}{sup 1,p}({Omega}), where p is the exponent which appears in (1.1). The aim of this paper is to prove the existence of infinitely many solutions of problem (1.3) when the potential G(s) exhibits an oscillatory behaviour at infinity. 22 refs.

  19. Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy to Monitor Prostate Response to Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, Anna Lia; Gui, Benedetta; D'Agostino, Giuseppe Roberto; Mattiucci, Giancarlo; Clementi, Valeria; Di Molfetta, Ippolita Valentina; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Mantini, Giovanna

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To correlate results of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and time since external beam irradiation (EBRT) in patients treated with long-term hormone therapy (HT) and EBRT for locally advanced disease to verify successful treatment by documenting the achievement of metabolic atrophy (MA). Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2008, 109 patients were consecutively enrolled. MA was assessed by choline and citrate peak area-to-noise-ratio <5:1. Cancerous metabolism (CM) was defined by choline-to-creatine ratio >1.5:1 or choline signal-to-noise-ratio >5:1. To test the strength of association between MRSI results and the time elapsed since EBRT (TEFRT), PSA levels, Gleason score (GS), and stage, logistic regression (LR) was performed. p value <0.05 was statistically significant. The patients' outcomes were verified in 2011. Results: MRSI documented MA in 84 of 109 and CM in 25 of 109 cases. LR showed that age, GS, stage, and initial and recent PSA had no significant impact on MRSI results which were significantly related to PSA values at the time of MRSI and to TEFRT. Patients were divided into three groups according to TEFRT: <1 year, 1-2 years, and >2 years. MA was detected in 54.1% of patients of group 1, 88.9% of group 2, and in 94.5% of group 3 (100% when PSA nadir was reached). CM was detected in 50% of patients with reached PSA nadir in group 1. Local relapse was found in 3 patients previously showing CM at long TEFRT. Conclusion: MA detection, indicative of successful treatment because growth of normal or abnormal cells cannot occur without metabolism, increases with decreasing PSA levels and increasing time on HT after EBRT. This supports long-term HT in advanced prostate cancer. Larger study series are needed to assess whether MRSI could predict local relapse by detecting CM at long TEFRT.

  20. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D.; Payne, W. Vance; Ling, Jiazhen; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  1. Data Qualification Report: Calculated Porosity and Porosity-Derived Values for Lithostratigraphic Units for use on the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sanchez

    2001-05-30

    The qualification is being completed in accordance with the Data Qualification Plan DQP-NBS-GS-000006, Rev. 00 (CRWMS M&O 2001). The purpose of this data qualification activity is to evaluate for qualification the unqualified developed input and porosity output included in Data Tracking Number (DTN) M09910POROCALC.000. The main output of the analyses documented in DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is the calculated total porosity and effective porosity for 40 Yucca Mountain Project boreholes. The porosity data are used as input to Analysis Model Report (AMR) 10040, ''Rock Properties Model'' (MDL-NBS-GS-000004, Rev. 00), Interim Change Notice [ICN] 02 (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The output from the rock properties model is used as input to numerical physical-process modeling within the context of a relationship developed in the AMR between hydraulic conductivity, bound water and zeolitic zones for use in the unsaturated zone model. In accordance with procedure AP-3.15Q, the porosity output is not used in the direct calculation of Principal Factors for post-closure safety or disruptive events. The original source for DTN M09910POROCALC.000 is a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) report, ''Combined Porosity from Geophysical Logs'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a and hereafter referred to as Rael 1999). That report recalculated porosity results for both the historical boreholes covered in Nelson (1996), and the modern boreholes reported in CRWMS M&O (1996a,b). The porosity computations in Rael (1999) are based on density-porosity mathematical relationships requiring various input parameters, including bulk density, matrix density and air and/or fluid density and volumetric water content. The main output is computed total porosity and effective porosity reported on a foot-by-foot basis for each borehole, although volumetric water content is derived from neutron data as an interim output. This qualification report uses technical assessment and corroboration to evaluate the original subject DTN. Rael (1999) provides many technical details of the technical assessment and corroboration methods and partially satisfies the intent of the qualification plan for this analysis. Rael presents a modified method based on Nelson (1996) to recompute porosity and porosity-derived values and uses some of the same inputs. Rael's (1999) intended purpose was to document porosity output relatively free of biases introduced by differing computational methods or parameter selections used for different boreholes. The qualification report necessarily evaluates the soundness of the pre-Process Validation and Re-engineering (PVAR) analyses and methodology, as reported in Rael (1999).

  2. Fine and ultrafine particles generated during fluidized bed combustion of different solid fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urciuolo, M.; Barone, A.; D'Alessio, A.; Chirone, R.

    2008-12-15

    The paper reports an experimental study carried out with a 110-mm ID fluidized bed combustor focused on the characterization of particulates formation/emission during combustion of coal and non-fossil solid fuels. Fuels included: a bituminous coal, a commercial predried and granulated sludge (GS), a refuse-derived fuel (RDF), and a biomass waste (pine seed shells). Stationary combustion experiments were carried out analyzing the fate of fuel ashes. Fly ashes collected at the combustor exhaust were characterized both in terms of particle size distribution and chemical composition, with respect to both trace and major elements. Tapping-Mode Atomic Force Microscopy (TM-AFM) technique and high-efficiency cyclone-type collector devices were used to characterize the size and morphology of the nanometric-and micronic-size fractions of fly ash emitted at the exhaust respectively. Results showed that during the combustion process: I) the size of the nanometric fraction ranges between 2 and 65 nm; ii) depending on the fuel tested, combustion-assisted attrition or the production of the primary ash particles originally present in the fuel particles, are responsible of fine particle generation. The amount in the fly ash of inorganic compounds is larger for the waste-derived fuels, reflecting the large inherent content of these compounds in the parent fuels.

  3. THE CRYOPLANT FOR THE ITER NEUTRAL BEAM TEST FACILITY TO BE BUILT AT RFX IN PADOVA, ITALY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pengo, R.; Fellin, F.; Sonato, P.

    2010-04-09

    The Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF), planned to be constructed in Padua (Italy), will constitute the prototype of the two Neutral Beam Injectors (NBI), which will be installed in the ITER plant (Cadarache-France). The NBTF is composed of a 1 MV accelerator that can produce a 40 A deuteron pulsed neutral beam particles. The necessary vacuum needed in the accelerator is achieved by two large cryopumps, designed by FZK-Karlsruhe, with radiation shields cooled between 65 K and 90 K and with cryopanels cooled by 4 bar supercritical helium (ScHe) between 4.5 K and 6.5 K. A new cryoplant facility will be installed with two large helium refrigerators: a Shield Refrigerator (SR), whose cooling capacity is up to 30 kW between 65 K and 90 K, and a helium Main Refrigerator (MR), whose equivalent cooling capacity is up to 800 W at 4.5 K. The cooling of the cryopanels is obtained with two (ScHe) 30 g/s pumps (one redundant), working in a closed cycle around 4 bar producing a pressure head of 100 mbar. Two heat exchangers are immersed in a buffer dewar connected to the MR. The MR and SR different operation modes are described in the paper, as well as the new cryoplant installation.

  4. Carbon dioxide and global climate change: The birth and arrested development of an idea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mudge, F.B.

    1996-12-31

    G.S. Callendar (1897--1964) is regarded the originator of the modern theory of carbon dioxide and global climate change. However, this paper shows that the theory was developed and became well accepted during the nineteenth century. Carbon dioxide was discovered by Black in 1752. From 1820 to 1890 a steadily growing number of measurements of its atmospheric concentration were made using steadily improving techniques; the average results fell from around 500 ppm in 1820 to about 300 ppm in 1890. By the end of the following decade the greenhouse theory of global climate change seemed widely accepted. However in 1900 and 1901 Aangstroem appeared to demolish the theory when he reported that changes in the carbon dioxide level can have little effect because of the overlap of the water and carbon dioxide spectral bands. At a stroke, all interest in the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels seemed to disappear, although during the 1920s and 1930s a few workers resumed the work but for reasons unconnected to climate change. Over the next thirty years the writers of authoritative textbooks dismissed the theory of carbon dioxide and climate change as an example of misguided speculation. Then in 1938 Callendar`s first paper appeared, reviving the theory which had lain forgotten for nearly forty years.

  5. Low temperature atomic layer deposited ZnO photo thin film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oruc, Feyza B.; Aygun, Levent E.; Donmez, Inci; Biyikli, Necmi; Okyay, Ali K.; Yu, Hyun Yong

    2015-01-01

    ZnO thin film transistors (TFTs) are fabricated on Si substrates using atomic layer deposition technique. The growth temperature of ZnO channel layers are selected as 80, 100, 120, 130, and 250?C. Material characteristics of ZnO films are examined using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction methods. Stoichiometry analyses showed that the amount of both oxygen vacancies and interstitial zinc decrease with decreasing growth temperature. Electrical characteristics improve with decreasing growth temperature. Best results are obtained with ZnO channels deposited at 80?C; I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio is extracted as 7.8 10{sup 9} and subthreshold slope is extracted as 0.116 V/dec. Flexible ZnO TFT devices are also fabricated using films grown at 80?C. I{sub D}V{sub GS} characterization results showed that devices fabricated on different substrates (Si and polyethylene terephthalate) show similar electrical characteristics. Sub-bandgap photo sensing properties of ZnO based TFTs are investigated; it is shown that visible light absorption of ZnO based TFTs can be actively controlled by external gate bias.

  6. 06_01_2002.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2002TI10): Energy levels of 6 He E x J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ cm Decay Reactions (MeV ± keV) g.s. 0 + ; 1 τ 1/2 = 806.7 ± 1.5 ms β - 1, 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 30, 31 1.797 ± 25 2 + ; 1 a Γ = 113 ± 20 keV n, α 5, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 15, 16, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 31 5.6 ± 300 a (2 + , 1 - , 0 + ); 1 a 12.1 ± 1.1 MeV a 15 14.6 ± 0.7 a (1 - , 2 - ); 1 a 7.4 ± 1.0 MeV a 9, 15, 19, 22, 24 (15.5 ± 500) 4 ± 2 MeV 10, 11, 16, 19, 23, 24 23.3

  7. 07_07_2002.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 from (2002TI10): Energy levels of 7 Be E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ or Γ c.m. Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 1 2 τ 1/2 = 53.22 ± 0.06 d d a -capture 1, 2, 4, 5, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 21, 22, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 33, 34 0.42908 ± 0.10 1 2 - ; 1 2 τ m = 192 ± 25 fsec γ 2, 4, 5, 9, 10, 14, 16, 17, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 33, 34 4.57 ± 50 7 2 - ; 1 2 Γ = 175 ± 7 keV 3 He, α 3, 5, 10, 14, 16, 17, 21, 22 6.73 ± 100 5 2 - ; 1 2 1.2 MeV 3 He, α 3, 8, 9, 14, 21 7.21

  8. 08_01_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (2004TI06): Energy Levels of 8 He a E x (MeV) b J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ Decay Reactions g.s. 0 + ; 2 119.0 ± 1.5 msec β - 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 2.7-3.6 c,f 2 + 0.6 ± 0.2 MeV 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12 4.36 ± 0.2 d,f (1 - ) 1.3 ± 0.5 MeV d,e 5, 7, 9, 10, 12 (6.03 ± 0.10) f 0.15 ± 0.15 MeV 9 7.16 ± 0.04 f (3 - ) 0.1 ± 0.1 MeV 6, 9 a Excited states are calculated at E x = 5.83, 7.92 and 8.18 MeV, with J π = 2 + , 1 - and 2 - [(0 + 1) ω model space]. In the (0 + 2) ω model space the

  9. 08_02_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 8 Li a E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ or Γ cm (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 2 + ; 1 τ 1/2 = 839.9 ± 0.9 msec c β - 1, 3, 4, 8, 9, 10, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 21, 22 0.9808 ± 0.1 1 + ; 1 τ m = 12 ± 4 fsec c γ 3, 8, 9, 11, 14, 15, 16, 21, 22, 28 2.255 ± 3 3 + ; 1 Γ = 33 ± 6 keV c γ, n 3, 4, 5, 8, 14, 15, 16, 31 3.21 1 + ; 1 ≈ 1000 n 6, 11 5.4 d 1 + ; 1 ≈ 650 n 6, 11 6.1 ± 100 (3); 1 ≈ 1000 n 5 6.53 ± 20 4 + ; 1 35 ± 15 n 3, 5, 8, 15, 16 7.1 ± 100

  10. 09_13_2004.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 from (2004TI06): Energy levels of 9 B E x a (MeV ± keV) J π ; T Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 3 2 - ; 1 2 0.54 ± 0.21 p 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 ≈ 1.6 b p, (α) 3, 4, 8, 13 2.361 ± 5 5 2 - ; 1 2 81 ± 5 p, α 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 2.75 ± 300 c 1 2 - ; 1 2 3130 ± 200 p 3, 7, 10 2.788 ± 30 5 2 + ; 1 2 550 ± 40 p, α 4, 7, 10, 11, 13, 15, 16 4.3 ± 200 d 1600 ± 200 7 6.97 ± 60 7 2 - ; 1 2 2000 ± 200 p 4, 7, 11, 14, 15, 16

  11. 14_22_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 14 O E x J π ; T τ 1/2 or Γ c.m. Decay Reactions (MeV ± keV) (s) (keV) g.s. 0 + ; 1 τ 1/2 = 70.606 ± 0.018 s β + 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10 5.173 ± 10 1 - ; 1 Γ = 38.1 ± 1.8 keV 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 5.920 ± 10 0 + ; 1 ≤ 50 p 3, 9, 10 6.272 ± 10 3 - ; 1 103 ± 6 p 3, 4, 5, 9, 10 6.590 ± 10 2 + ; 1 ≤ 60 p 3, 4, 5, 9, 10 (6.79 ± 30) π = - 5, 9 7.768 ± 10 2 + ; 1 76 ± 10 p 3, 5, 8, 9, 10 (8.72 ± 40) 9, 10 9.715 ± 20 (2 + ); 1 3, 5, 10 9.915 ±

  12. 15_01_1991.tex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from (1991AJ01): Energy levels of 15 C a E x (MeV ± keV) J π ; T τ or Γ c.m. (keV) Decay Reactions g.s. 1 2 + ; 3 2 τ 1/2 = 2.449 ± 0.005 s β - 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9 |g| = 2.63 ± 0.14 0.7400 ± 1.5 5 2 + τ m = 3.76 ± 0.10 ns γ 2, 3, 4, 7, 8 g = -0.703 ± 0.012 3.103 ± 4 1 2 - Γ c.m. ≤ 40 2, 3, 9 4.220 ± 3 5 2 - < 14 2, 3 4.657 ± 9 3 2 - 2, 3 4.78 ± 100 3 2 + 1740 ± 400 6 5.833 ± 20 ( 3 2 + ) 64 ± 8 2, 6 5.866 ± 8 1 2 - 2, 3 6.358 ± 6 ( 5 2 , 7 2 + , 9 2 + ) < 20 2, 3

  13. Simulation and optimization of a 10 A electron gun with electrostatic compression for the electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikin, A.; Beebe, E. N.; Raparia, D.

    2013-03-15

    Increasing the current density of the electron beam in the ion trap of the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) in BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider facility would confer several essential benefits. They include increasing the ions' charge states, and therefore, the ions' energy out of the Booster for NASA applications, reducing the influx of residual ions in the ion trap, lowering the average power load on the electron collector, and possibly also reducing the emittance of the extracted ion beam. Here, we discuss our findings from a computer simulation of an electron gun with electrostatic compression for electron current up to 10 A that can deliver a high-current-density electron beam for EBIS. The magnetic field in the cathode-anode gap is formed with a magnetic shield surrounding the gun electrodes and the residual magnetic field on the cathode is (5 Division-Sign 6) Gs. It was demonstrated that for optimized gun geometry within the electron beam current range of (0.5 Division-Sign 10) A the amplitude of radial beam oscillations can be maintained close to 4% of the beam radius by adjusting the injection magnetic field generated by a separate magnetic coil. Simulating the performance of the gun by varying geometrical parameters indicated that the original gun model is close to optimum and the requirements to the precision of positioning the gun elements can be easily met with conventional technology.

  14. Achievement of high coercivity in sintered R-Fe-B magnets based on misch-metal by dual alloy method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niu, E Wang, Zhen-Xi; Chen, Zhi-An; Rao, Xiao-Lei; Hu, Bo-Ping; Chen, Guo-An; Zhao, Yu-Gang; Zhang, Jin

    2014-03-21

    The R-Fe-B (R, rare earth) sintered magnets prepared with different ratio of alloys of MM-Fe-B (MM, misch-metal) and Nd-Fe-B by dual alloy method were investigated. As expected, the high ratio of MM-Fe-B alloy degrades the hard magnetic properties heavily with intrinsic coercivity lower than 5 kOe. When the atomic ratio MM/R???21.5% the magnetic properties can reach a practical level of B{sub r}???12.1 kGs, H{sub cj}???10.7 kOe, and (BH){sub max}???34.0 MGOe. And the effect of H{sub cj} enhancement by the grain boundary diffusion process is obvious when MM/R???21.5%. It is revealed that the decrement of intrinsic magnetic properties of R{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B matrix phase is not the main reason of the degradation of the magnets with high MM ratio. The change of deteriorated microstructure together with phase component plays fundamental roles in low H{sub cj}. In high MM ratio magnets, (a) after annealing, Ce atoms inside main phase are inclined to be segregated in the outer layer of the main phase grains; (b) there is no thin layer of Ce-rich phase as an analogue of Nd-rich phase to separate main phase grains; (c) excessive Ce tends to form CeFe{sub 2} grains.

  15. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbatiello, L.A.; Haselkorn, M.

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  16. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 C inlet temperature. We investigated flow perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area.

  17. Performance Characterization of the Production Facility Prototype Helium Flow System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Dalmas, Dale Allen; Romero, Frank Patrick

    2015-12-16

    The roots blower in use at ANL for in-beam experiments and also at LANL for flow tests was sized for 12 mm diameter disks and significantly less beam heating. Currently, the disks are 29 mm in diameter, with a 12 mm FWHM Gaussian beam spot at 42 MeV and 2.86 ?A on each side of the target, 5.72 ?A total. The target design itself is reported elsewhere. With the increased beam heating, the helium flow requirement increased so that a larger blower was need for a mass flow rate of 400 g/s at 2.76 MPa (400 psig). An Aerzen GM 12.4 blower was selected, and is currently being installed at the LANL facility for target and component flow testing. This report describes this blower/motor/pressure vessel package and the status of the facility preparations. Blower performance (mass flow rate as a function of loop pressure drop) was measured at 4 blower speeds. Results are reported below.

  18. Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borns, D.J.; Brady, P.V.; Brady, W.D.; Krupka, K.M.; Spalding, B.P.; Waters, R.D.; Zhang, P.

    1999-03-01

    Site Screening and Technical Guidance for Monitored Natural Attenuation at DOE Sites briefly outlines the biological and geochemical origins of natural attenuation, the tendency for natural processes in soils to mitigate contaminant transport and availability, and the means for relying on monitored natural attenuation (MNA) for remediation of contaminated soils and groundwaters. This report contains a step-by-step guide for (1) screening contaminated soils and groundwaters on the basis of their potential for remediation by natural attenuation and (2) implementing MNA consistent with EPA OSWER Directive 9200.4-17. The screening and implementation procedures are set up as a web-based tool (http://www.sandia.gov/eesector/gs/gc/na/mnahome.html) to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) site environmental managers and their staff and contractors to adhere to EPA guidelines for implementing MNA. This document is intended to support the Decision Maker's Framework Guide and Monitoring Guide both to be issued from DOE EM-40. Further technical advances may cause some of the approach outlined in this document to change over time.

  19. Hypersonic MHD Propulsion System Integration for the Mercury Lightcraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrabo, L.N.; Rosa, R.J.

    2004-03-30

    Introduced herein are the design, systems integration, and performance analysis of an exotic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slipstream accelerator engine for a single-occupant 'Mercury' lightcraft. This ultra-energetic, laser-boosted vehicle is designed to ride a 'tractor beam' into space, transmitted from a future orbital network of satellite solar power stations. The lightcraft's airbreathing combined-cycle engine employs a rotary pulsed detonation thruster mode for lift-off and landing, and an MHD slipstream accelerator mode at hypersonic speeds. The latter engine transforms the transatmospheric acceleration path into a virtual electromagnetic 'mass-driver' channel; the hypersonic momentum exchange process (with the atmosphere) enables engine specific impulses in the range of 6000 to 16,000 seconds, and propellant mass fractions as low as 10%. The single-stage-to-orbit, highly reusable lightcraft can accelerate at 3 Gs into low Earth orbit with its throttle just barely beyond 'idle' power, or virtually 'disappear' at 30 G's and beyond. The objective of this advanced lightcraft design is to lay the technological foundations for a safe, very low cost (e.g., 1000X below chemical rockets) air and space transportation for human life in the mid-21st Century - a system that will be completely 'green' and independent of Earth's limited fossil fuel reserves.

  20. Analysis of Leaf and Root Transcriptome of Soil Grown Avena barbata Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swarbreck, St; phanie; Lindquist, Erika; Ackerly, David; Andersen, Gary

    2011-02-01

    Slender wild oat (Avena barbata) is an annual grass dominant in many grassland ecosystems in Mediterranean climate. This species has been the subject of ecological studies that aim at understanding the effect of global climate change on grassland ecosystems and the genetic basis for adaptation under varying environmental conditions. We present the sequencing and analysis of cDNA libraries constructed from leaf and root samples collected from A. barbata grown on natural soil and under varying rainfall patterns. More than one million expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were generated using both GS 454-FLX pyrosequencing and Sanger sequencing, and these tags were assembled into consensus sequences. We identified numerous candidate polymorphic markers in the dataset, providing possibilities for linking the genomic and the existing genetic information for A. barbata. Using the digital northern method, we showed that genes involved in photosynthesis were down regulated under high rainfall while stress- related genes were up regulated. We also identified a number of genes unique to the root library with unknown function. Real-time RT-PCR was used to confirm the root specificity of some of these transcripts such as two genes encoding O-methyl transferase. Also we showed differential expression under three water levels. Through a combination of Sanger and 454-based sequencing technologies, we were able to generate a large set of transcribed sequences for A. barbata. This dataset provides a platform for further studies of this important wild grass species

  1. Egypt`s first subsea completion: A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co.`s (Gupco) first subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for Well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was used to economically justify development of this one-well marginal field, which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low-cost subsea tree was used to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez, many fields have been discovered but have not been developed because of low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if an economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible because of reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints that will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore, the actual field installation of Egypt`s first subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls and offshore installation operations.

  2. Control of Suspect/Counterfeit and Defective Items

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheriff, Marnelle L.

    2013-09-03

    This procedure implements portions of the requirements of MSC-MP-599, Quality Assurance Program Description. It establishes the Mission Support Alliance (MSA) practices for minimizing the introduction of and identifying, documenting, dispositioning, reporting, controlling, and disposing of suspect/counterfeit and defective items (S/CIs). employees whose work scope relates to Safety Systems (i.e., Safety Class [SC] or Safety Significant [SS] items), non-safety systems and other applications (i.e., General Service [GS]) where engineering has determined that their use could result in a potential safety hazard. MSA implements an effective Quality Assurance (QA) Program providing a comprehensive network of controls and verification providing defense-in-depth by preventing the introduction of S/CIs through the design, procurement, construction, operation, maintenance, and modification of processes. This procedure focuses on those safety systems, and other systems, including critical load paths of lifting equipment, where the introduction of S/CIs would have the greatest potential for creating unsafe conditions.

  3. Cryogenic system for the Energy Recovery Linac and vertical test facility at BNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.; Soria, V.; Lederle, D.; Orfin, P.; Porqueddu, R.; Talty, P.; Zhang, Y.; Tallerico, T.; Masi, L.

    2011-03-28

    A small cryogenic system and warm helium vacuum pumping system provides cooling to either the Energy Recovery Linac's (ERL) cryomodules that consist of a 5-cell cavity and an SRF gun or a large Vertical Test Dewar (VTD) at any given time. The cryogenic system consists of a model 1660S PSI piston plant, a 3800 liter storage dewar, subcooler, a wet expander, a 50 g/s main helium compressor, and a 170 m{sup 3} storage tank. A system description and operating plan of the cryogenic plant and cryomodules is given. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar has a plant that can produce the equivalent of 300W at 4.5K with the addition of a wet expander 350 W at 4.5K. Along with this system, a sub-atmospheric, warm compression system provides pumping to produce 2K at the ERL cryomodules or the Vertical Test Dewar. The cryogenic system for ERL and the Vertical Test Dewar makes use of existing equipment for putting a system together. It can supply either the ERL side or the Vertical Test Dewar side, but not both at the same time. Double valve isolation on the liquid helium supply line allows one side to be warmed to room temperature and worked on while the other side is being held at operating temperature. The cryogenic system maintain the end loads from 4.4K to 2K or colder depending on capacity. Liquid helium storage dewar capacity allows ERL or the VTD to operate above the plant's capacity when required and ERL cryomodules ballast reservoirs and VTD reservoir allows the end loads to operate on full vacuum pump capacity when required.

  4. Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonse, S. R.; Singer, B. C.

    2011-07-01

    As part of a larger study of liquefied natural gas impacts on device performance and pollutant emissions for existing equipment in California, this report describes a cmoputer modeling study of a partially premixed flame issueing from a single cooktop burner port. The model consisted of a reactive computational fluid dynamics three-dimensional spatial grid and a 71-species chemical mechanism with propane combustion capability. Simulations were conducted with a simplified fuel mixture containing methane, ethane, and propane in proportions that yield properties similar to fuels distributed throughout much of California now and in recent years (baseline fuel), as well as with two variations of simulated liquefied natural gas blends. A variety of simulations were conducted with baseline fuel to explore the effect of several key parameters on pollutant formation and other flame characteristics. Simulations started with fuel and air issuing through the burner port, igniting, and continuing until the flame was steady with time. Conditions at this point were analyzed to understand fuel, secondary air and reaction product flows, regions of pollutant formation, and exhaust concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitric oxide and formaldehyde. A sensitivity study was conducted, varying the inflow parameters of this baseline gs about real-world operating conditions. Flame properties responded as expected from reactive flow theory. In the simulation, carbon monoxide levels were influenced more by the mixture's inflow velocity than by the gas-to-air ratio in the mixture issuing from the inflow port. Additional simulations were executed at two inflow conditions - high heat release and medium heat release - to examine the impact of replacing the baseline gas with two mixtures representative of liquefied natural gas. Flame properties and pollutant generation rates were very similar among the three fuel mixtures.

  5. Predicting the performance of system for the co-production of Fischer-Tropsch synthetic liquid and power from coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Xiao, Y.; Xu, S.; Guo, Z.

    2008-01-15

    A co-production system based on Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis reactor and gas turbine was simulated and analyzed. Syngas from entrained bed coal gasification was used as feedstock of the low-temperature slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reactor. Raw synthetic liquid produced was fractioned and upgraded to diesel, gasoline, and liquid petrol gas (LPG). Tail gas composed of unconverted syngas and FT light components was fed to the gas turbine. Supplemental fuel (NG, or refinery mine gas) might be necessary, which was dependent on gas turbine capacity expander through flow capacity, etc. FT yield information was important to the simulation of this co-production system. A correlation model based on Mobil's two step pilot plant was applied. User models that can predict product yields and cooperate with other units were embedded into Aspen plus simulation. Performance prediction of syngas fired gas turbine was the other key of this system. The increase in mass flow through the turbine affects the match between compressor and turbine operating conditions. The calculation was carried out by GS software developed by Politecnico Di Milano and Princeton University. Various cases were investigated to match the FT synthesis island, power island, and gasification island in co-production systems. Effects of CO{sub 2} removal/LPG recovery, co-firing, and CH{sub 4} content variation were studied. Simulation results indicated that more than 50% of input energy was converted to electricity and FT products. Total yield of gasoline, diesel, and LPG was 136-155 g/N m{sup 3} (CO+H{sub 2}). At coal feed of 21.9 kg/s, net electricity exported to the grid was higher than 100 MW. Total production of diesel and gasoline (and LPG) was 118,000 t (134,000 t)/year. Under the economic analysis conditions assumed in this paper the co-production system was economically feasible.

  6. Plutonium contamination in soils in open space and residential areas near Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litaor, M.I.

    1999-02-01

    Spatial analysis of the {sup 240}Pu:{sup 239}Pu isotopic ratio of 42 soil samples collected around Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado, was conducted to assess the effect of Rocky Flats Plant activity on the soil environment. Two probability maps that quantified the uncertainty of the spatial distribution of plutonium isotopic ratios were constructed using the sequential Gaussian simulation technique (sGs). Assuming a plutonium isotopic ratio range of 0.152 {+-} 0.003 to 0.169 {+-} 0.009 is characteristic to global fallout in Colorado, and a mean value of 0.155 is representative for the Rocky Flats Plant area, the main findings of the current work were (1) the areas northwest and southwest of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium ratio {ge}0.155, this were minimally impacted by the plant activity; (2) he study area east of Rocky Flats Plant exhibited a plutonium isotopic ratio {le}0.155, which is a definitive indicator of Rocky Flats Plant-derived plutonium; and (3) inventory calculations across the study area exhibited large standard error of estimates. These errors were originated from the high variability in plutonium activity over a small sampling scale and the uncertainty in the global fallout isotopic ratio. Using the mean simulated estimates of plutonium isotopic ratio, coupled with plutonium activity measured at 11 soil pits and additional plutonium information published elsewhere, the plutonium loading on the open space and residential areas amounted to 111.2 GBq, with a standard error of estimate of 50.8 GBq.

  7. Prolonged experimental drought reduces plant hydraulic conductance and transpiration and increases mortality in a piñon–juniper woodland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pangle, Robert E.; Limousin, Jean -Marc; Plaut, Jennifer A.; Yepez, Enrico A.; Hudson, Patrick J.; Boutz, Amanda L.; Gehres, Nathan; Pockman, William T.; McDowell, Nate G.

    2015-03-23

    Plant hydraulic conductance (ks) is a critical control on whole-plant water use and carbon uptake and, during drought, influences whether plants survive or die. To assess long-term physiological and hydraulic responses of mature trees to water availability, we manipulated ecosystem-scale water availability from 2007 to 2013 in a piñon pine (Pinus edulis) and juniper (Juniperus monosperma) woodland. We examined the relationship between ks and subsequent mortality using more than 5 years of physiological observations, and the subsequent impact of reduced hydraulic function and mortality on total woody canopy transpiration (EC) and conductance (GC). For both species, we observed significant reductionsmore » in plant transpiration (E) and ks under experimentally imposed drought. Conversely, supplemental water additions increased E and ks in both species. Interestingly, both species exhibited similar declines in ks under the imposed drought conditions, despite their differing stomatal responses and mortality patterns during drought. Reduced whole-plant ks also reduced carbon assimilation in both species, as leaf-level stomatal conductance (gs) and net photosynthesis (An) declined strongly with decreasing ks. Finally, we observed that chronically low whole-plant ks was associated with greater canopy dieback and mortality for both piñon and juniper and that subsequent reductions in woody canopy biomass due to mortality had a significant impact on both daily and annual canopy EC and GC. Our data indicate that significant reductions in ks precede drought-related tree mortality events in this system, and the consequence is a significant reduction in canopy gas exchange and carbon fixation. Our results suggest that reductions in productivity and woody plant cover in piñon–juniper woodlands can be expected due to reduced plant hydraulic conductance and increased mortality of both piñon pine and juniper under anticipated future conditions of more frequent and persistent regional drought in the southwestern United States.« less

  8. Wet oxidation of high-concentration reactive dyes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G.; Lei, L.; Yue, P.L.

    1999-05-01

    Advanced oxidation methods were used to degrade reactive dyes at high concentrations in aqueous solutions. Wet peroxide oxidation (WPO) was found to be the best method in terms of the removal of color and total organic carbon (TOC). Reactive blue (Basilen Brilliant Blue P-3R) was chosen as a model dye for determining the suitable reaction conditions. The variables studied include reaction temperature, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage, solution pH, dye concentration, and catalyst usage. The removal of TOC and color by wet oxidation is very sensitive to the reaction temperature. At 150 C, the removal of 77% TOC and 90% color was obtained in less than 30 min. The initial TOC removal rate is proportional to the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dosage. The TOC removal is insignificant even when 50% of the stoichiometric amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is used. No color change is observed until the dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is 100% of the stoichiometric amount. The color removal is closely related to TOC removal. When the pH of the solution is adjusted to 3.5, the dye degradation rate increases significantly. The rates of TOC and color removal are enhanced by using a Cu{sup 2+} catalyst. Another four reactive dyes, Procion Red PX-4B, Cibacron Yellow P-6GS, Cibacron Brown P-6R, and Procion Black PX-2R, were treated at 150 C using WPO. More than 80% TOC was removed from the solution in less than 15 min. The process can remove the colors of al these dyes except Procion Black PX-2R.

  9. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada Rev. No.: 0, April 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IT Coroporation, Las Vegas, NV

    2002-04-17

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) approximately 235 miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 405 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-05-002-SW03, Septic Waste System (aka: Septic Waste System [SWS] 3); 03-05-002-SW04, Septic Waste System (aka: SWS 4); 03-05-002-SW07, Septic Waste System (aka: SWS 7). The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU, and this report provides specific information necessary to support this recommendation. The CAU consists of three leachfields and associated collection systems that were installed in or near Area 3 for wastewater disposal. These systems were used until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990. Historically, operations within various buildin gs in and near Area 3 of the TTR generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters. There is a potential that contaminants of concern (COCs) were present in the wastewaters and were disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. The justification for closure of this CAU without further action is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities. Closure activities were performed at these CASs between January 14 and February 2, 2002, and included the removal and proper disposal of media containing regulated constituents and proper closure of septic tanks. No further action is appropriate because all necessary activities have been completed. No use restrictions are required to be imposed for these sites since the investigation showed no evidence of COCs identified in the soil for CAU 405.

  11. Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea completion -- A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company`s (GUPCO) first remotely controlled subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the Gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was utilized to economically justify development of this one well marginal field which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low cost subsea tree was utilized to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez many fields have been discovered by have not been developed due to low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if any economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible due to reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. Capturing the experience of Amoco in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Dutch North Sea, GUPCO was able to build a low cost subsea system which would allow for the economic development of the marginal fields discovered in the past. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints which will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore the actual field installation of Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls,and offshore installation operations.

  12. R&D ERL: Cryogenic System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Than, R.

    2010-01-01

    The ERL cryogenic system will supply cooling to a super-conducting RF (SCRF) gun and the 5-cell super-conducting RF cavity system that need to be held cold at 2K. The engineering of the cavity cryomodules were carried out by AES in collaboration with BNL. The 2K superfluid bath is produced by pumping on the bath using a sub-atmospheric warm compression system. The cryogenic system makes use of mainly existing equipment relocated from other facilities: a 300W 4.5K coldbox, an 45 g/s screw compressor, a 3800 liter liquid helium storage dewar, a 170 m{sup 3} warm gas storage tank, and a 40,000 liter vertical low pressure liquid nitrogen storage dewar. An existing wet expander obtained from another facility has been added to increase the plant capacity. In order to deliver the required 3 to 4 bar helium to the cryomodules while using up stored liquid capacity at low pressure, a new subcooler will be installed to function as the capacity transfer device. A 2K to 4K recovery heat exchanger is also implemented for each cryomodule to recover refrigeration below 4K, thus maximizing 2K cooling capacity with the given sub-atmospheric pump. No 4K-300K refrigeration recovery is implemented at this time of the returning sub-atmospheric cold vapor, hence the 2K load appears as a liquefaction1 load on the cryogenic plant. A separate LN2 cooling loop supplies liquid nitrogen to the superconducting gun's cathode tip.

  13. Characterization of Nitrogen use efficiency in sweet sorghum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dweikat, Ismail; Clemente, Thomas

    2014-09-09

    Sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) has the potential to augment the increasing demand for alternative fuels and for the production of input efficient, environmentally friendly bioenergy crops. Nitrogen (N) and water availability are considered two of the major limiting factors in crop growth. Nitrogen fertilization accounts for about 40% of the total production cost in sorghum. In cereals, including sorghum, the nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) from fertilizer is approximately 33% of the amount applied. There is therefore extensive concern in relation to the N that is not used by the plant, which is lost by leaching of nitrate, denitrification from the soil, and loss of ammonia to the atmosphere, all of which can have deleterious environmental effects. To improve the potential of sweet sorghum as a leading and cost effective bioenergy crop, the enhancement of NUE must be addressed. To this end, we have identified a sorghum line (SanChi San) that displays about 25% increase in NUE over other sorghum lines. As such, the overarching goal of this project is to employ three complementary strategies to enhance the ability of sweet sorghum to become an efficient nitrogen user. To achieve the project goal, we will pursue the following specific objectives: Objective 1: Phenotypic characterization of SanChi San/Ck60 RILs under low and moderate N-availability including biochemical profiles, vegetative growth and seed yield Objective 2: Conduct quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis and marker identification for nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) in a grain sorghum RIL population. Objective 3: Identify novel candidate genes for NUE using proteomic and gene expression profiling comparisons of high- and low-NUE RILs. Candidate genes will be brought into the pipeline for transgenic manipulation of NUE This project will apply the latest genomics resources to discover genes controlling NUE, one of the most complex and economically important traits in cereal crops. As a result of the completion of the proposed work, we will have: 1) identified novel alleles in wild sorghum germplasm that is useful to improve both cultivated grain and sweet sorghum; 2) been able to select individuals plants that exhibit high NUE within a breeding population on the basis of these markers; 3) acquired essential information necessary to examine the roles of GS and GOGAT, AlaT, along with impact of transcription factor Dof1, on N assimilation in sweet sorghum; and 4) The information learned will provide new opportunities for improving NUE in sorghum and other cereals.

  14. Review of sustainability indices and indicators: Towards a new City Sustainability Index (CSI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mori, Koichiro; Christodoulou, Aris

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss conceptual requirements for a City Sustainability Index (CSI) and to review existing major sustainability indices/indicators in terms of the requirements. The following indices are reviewed: Ecological Footprint (EF), Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI), Dashboard of Sustainability (DS), Welfare Index, Genuine Progress Indicator (GPI), Index of Sustainable Economic Welfare, City Development Index, emergy/exergy, Human Development Index (HDI), Environmental Vulnerability Index (EVI), Environmental Policy Index (EPI), Living Planet Index (LPI), Environmentally-adjusted Domestic Product (EDP), Genuine Saving (GS), and some applications of composite indices or/and multivariate indicators to local or regional context as case studies. The key conceptual requirements for an adequate CSI are: (i) to consider environmental, economic and social aspects (the triple bottom line of sustainability) from the viewpoint of strong sustainability; (ii) to capture external impacts (leakage effects) of city on other areas beyond the city boundaries particularly in terms of environmental aspects; (iii) to create indices/indicators originally for the purpose of assessing city sustainability; and (iv) to be able to assess world cities in both developed and developing countries using common axes of evaluation. Based on the review, we conclude that it is necessary to create a new CSI that enables us to assess and compare cities' sustainability performance in order to understand the global impact of cities on the environment and human life as compared with their economic contribution. In the future, the CSI will be able to provide local authorities with guidance toward sustainable paths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We derive the four key requirements for a new City Sustainability Index (CSI) system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First, the triple bottom line must be considered in terms of strong sustainability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Second, environmental leakage effects beyond city boundaries should be captured. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Third, 'city sustainability' should be originally considered when CSI is created. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fourth, cities in developed and developing countries can be evaluated without bias.

  15. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  16. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We further discover a novel growth condition which enables the characterization of autotrophic (i.e., carbon-fixing) metabolism in Geobacter. Importantly, our systems-level modeling approach helped elucidate the key metabolic pathways and the energetic cost associated with extracellular electron transfer. This model can be applied to characterize and engineer the metabolism and electron transfer capabilities of Geobacter for biotechnological applications.

  17. Flow instabilities in non-uniformly heated helium jet arrays used for divertor PFCs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Youchison, Dennis L.

    2015-07-30

    In this study, due to a lack of prototypical experimental data, little is known about the off-normal behavior of recently proposed divertor jet cooling concepts. This article describes a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study on two jet array designs to investigate their susceptibility to parallel flow instabilities induced by non-uniform heating and large increases in the helium outlet temperature. The study compared a single 25-jet helium-cooled modular divertor (HEMJ) thimble and a micro-jet array with 116 jets. Both have pure tungsten armor and a total mass flow rate of 10 g/s at a 600 °C inlet temperature. We investigated flowmore » perturbations caused by a 30 MW/m2 off-normal heat flux applied over a 25 mm2 area in addition to the nominal 5 MW/m2 applied over a 75 mm2 portion of the face. The micro-jet array exhibited lower temperatures and a more uniform surface temperature distribution than the HEMJ thimble. We also investigated the response of a manifolded nine-finger HEMJ assembly using the nominal heat flux and a 274 mm2 heated area. For the 30 MW/m2 case, the micro-jet array absorbed 750 W in the helium with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1280 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 801 °C. The HEMJ absorbed 750 W with a maximum armor surface temperature of 1411 °C and a fluid/solid interface temperature of 844 °C. For comparison, both the single HEMJ finger and the micro-jet array used 5-mm-thick tungsten armor. The ratio of maximum to average temperature and variations in the local heat transfer coefficient were lower for the micro-jet array compared to the HEMJ device. Although high heat flux testing is required to validate the results obtained in these simulations, the results provide important guidance in jet design and manifolding to increase heat removal while providing more even temperature distribution and minimizing non-uniformity in the gas flow and thermal stresses at the armor joint.« less

  18. Ground-Source Integrated Heat Pump for Near-Zero Energy Houses: Technology Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Richard W; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D; Craddick, William G

    2007-09-01

    The energy service needs of a net-zero-energy house (ZEH) include space heating and cooling, water heating, ventilation, dehumidification, and humidification, depending on the requirements of the specific location. These requirements differ in significant ways from those of current housing. For instance, the most recent DOE buildings energy data (DOE/BED 2007) indicate that on average {approx}43% of residential buildings primary energy use is for space heating and cooling, vs. {approx}12% for water heating (about a 3.6:1 ratio). In contrast, for the particular prototype ZEH structures used in the analyses in this report, that ratio ranges from about 0.3:1 to 1.6:1 depending on location. The high-performance envelope of a ZEH results in much lower space heating and cooling loads relative to current housing and also makes the house sufficiently air-tight to require mechanical ventilation for indoor air quality. These envelope characteristics mean that the space conditioning load will be closer in size to the water heating load, which depends on occupant behavior and thus is not expected to drop by any significant amount because of an improved envelope. In some locations such as the Gulf Coast area, additional dehumidification will almost certainly be required during the shoulder and cooling seasons. In locales with heavy space heating needs, supplemental humidification may be needed because of health concerns or may be desired for improved occupant comfort. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that achieving their ZEH goal will require energy service equipment that can meet these needs while using 50% less energy than current equipment. One promising approach to meeting this requirement is through an integrated heat pump (IHP) - a single system based on heat pumping technology. The energy benefits of an IHP stem from the ability to utilize otherwise wasted energy; for example, heat rejected by the space cooling operation can be used for water heating. With the greater energy savings the cost of the more energy efficient components required for the IHP can be recovered more quickly than if they were applied to individual pieces of equipment to meet each individual energy service need. An IHP can be designed to use either outdoor air or geothermal resources (e.g., ground, ground water, surface water) as the environmental energy source/sink. Based on a scoping study of a wide variety of possible approaches to meeting the energy service needs for a ZEH, DOE selected the IHP concept as the most promising and has supported research directed toward the development of both air- and ground-source versions. This report describes the ground-source IHP (GS-IHP) design and includes the lessons learned and best practices revealed by the research and development (R&D) effort throughout. Salient features of the GS-IHP include a variable-speed rotary compressor incorporating a brushless direct current permanent magnet motor which provides all refrigerant compression, a variable-speed fan for the indoor section, a multiple-speed ground coil circuit pump, and a single-speed pump for water heating operation. Laboratory IHP testing has thus far used R-22 because of the availability of the needed components that use this refrigerant. It is expected that HFC R-410A will be used for any products arising from the IHP concept. Data for a variable-speed compressor that uses R-410A has been incorporated into the DOE/ORNL Mark VI Heat Pump Design Model (HPDM). HPDM was then linked to TRNSYS, a time-series-dependent simulation model capable of determining the energy use of building cooling and heating equipment as applied to a defined house on a sub-hourly basis. This provided a highly flexible design analysis capability for advanced heat pump equipment; however, the program also took a relatively long time to run. This approach was used with the initial prototype design reported in Murphy et al. (2007a) and in the business case analysis of Baxter (2007).

  19. Indium Growth and Island Height Control on Si Submonolayer Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jizhou

    2009-05-09

    Nanotechnology refers any technique that involves about object with nanoscale (10{sup -9} m) or even smaller. It has become more and more important in recently years and has changed our world dramatically. Most of modern electronic devices today should thanks to the miniaturizing driven by development of nanotechnology. Recent years, more and more governments are investing huge amount of money in research related to nanotechnology. There are two major reasons that nanostructure is so fascinate. The first one is the miniaturizing. It is obvious that if we can make products smaller without losing the features, we can save the cost and increase the performance dramatically. For an example, the first computer in the world, ENIAC, which occupied several rooms, is less powerful than the cheapest calculator today. Today's chips with sizes of less than half an inch contain millions of basic units. All these should thank to the development of nanotechnology. The other reason is that when we come to nanoscale, there are many new effects due to the quantum effect which can't be found in large systems. For an example, quantum dots (QDs) are systems which sizes are below 1{micro}m(10{sup -6}m) and restricted in three dimensions. There are many interesting quantum effects in QDs, including discrete energy levels, and interdot coupling. Due to these properties and their small sizes, QDs have varies potential applications such as quantum computing, probe, light emitting device, solar cells, and laser. To meet the requirement of the nanoelectrical applications, the QDs must be grown highly uniformly because their property is highly dependent on their sizes. The major methods to grow uniform QDs include epitaxial, and lithograph. Lithography is a process to make patterns on a thin film by selectively removing certain parts of the film. Using this method, people have good control over size, location and spacing of QDs. For an example, the Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) have a wave length of 13.4nm so it can curve on the surface of an sample to make structure as small as the order of 10nm. however, lithograph usually causes permanent damages to the surface and in many cases the QDs are damaged during the lithograph and therefore result in high percentage of defects. Quantum size effect has attracted more and more interests in surface science due to many of its effects. One of its effects is the height preference in film growing and the resulting possibility of uniformly sized self-assemble nanostructure. The experiment of Pb islands on In 4x1 phase shows that both the height and the width can be controlled by proper growth conditions, which expands the growth dimensions from 1 to 2. This discover leads us to study the In/Pb interface. In Ch.3, we found that the Pb islands growing on In 4x1-Si(111) surface which have uniform height due to QSE and uniform width due to the constriction of In 4x1 lattice have unexpected stability. These islands are stable in even RT, unlike usual nanostructures on Pb/Si surface which are stable only at low temperature. Since similar structures are usually grown at low temperature, this discovery makes the grown structures closer to technological applications. It also shows the unusual of In/Pb interface. Then we studied the In islands grown on Pb-{alpha}-{radical}3x{radical}3-Si(111) phase in Ch.4. These islands have fcc structure in the first few layers, and then convert to bct structure. The In fcc islands have sharp height preference due to QSE like Pb islands. However, the preferred height is different (7 layer for Pb on Si 7x7 and 4 layer for Pb on In 4x1), due to the difference of interface. The In islands structure prefers to be bct than fcc with coverage increase. It is quantitatively supported by first-principle calculation. Unexpectedly, the In islands grown on various of In interfaces didn't show QSE effects and phase transition from fcc and bct structures as on the Pb-{alpha} interface (Ch.6). In g(s) curve there is no clear oscillations in the g(s) curve as the In on Pb-{alpha} phase. This

  20. Pilot Implementation of a Field Study Design to Evaluate the Impact of Source Control Measures on Indoor Air Quality in High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widder, Sarah H.; Chamness, Michele A.; Petersen, Joseph M.; Singer, Brett C.; Maddalena, Randy L.; Destaillats, Hugo

    2014-10-20

    To improve the indoor air quality in new, high performance homes, a variety of standards and rating programs have been introduced to identify building materials that are designed to have lower emission rates of key contaminants of concern and a number of building materials are being introduced that are certified to these standards. For example, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero Energy Ready Home program requires certification under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Indoor airPLUS (IaP) label, which requires the use of PS1 or PS2 certified plywood and OSB; low-formaldehyde emitting wood products; low- or no-VOC paints and coatings as certified by Green Seal Standard GS-11, GreenGuard, SCS Indoor Advantage Gold Standard, MPI Green Performance Standard, or another third party rating program; and Green Label-certified carpet and carpet cushions. However, little is known regarding the efficacy of the IAP requirements in measurably reducing contaminant exposures in homes. The goal of this project is to develop a robust experimental approach and collect preliminary data to support the evaluation of indoor air quality (IAQ) measures linked to IAP-approved low-emitting materials and finishes in new residential homes. To this end, the research team of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a detailed experimental plan to measure IAQ constituents and other parameters, over time, in new homes constructed with materials compliant with IAPs low-emitting material and ventilation requirements (i.e., section 6.1, 6.2, 6.3, and 7.2) and similar homes constructed to the state building code with conventional materials. The IAQ in IAP and conventional homes of similar age, location, and construction style is quantified as the differences in the speciated VOC and aldehyde concentrations, normalized to dilution rates. The experimental plan consists of methods to evaluate the difference between low-emitting and conventional materials as installed in newly constructed residential homes using both (1) highly controlled, short-term active samples to precisely characterize the building-related chemical emissions and building contents and (2) a week-long passive sample designed to capture the impact of occupant behavior and related activities on measured IAQ contaminant levels indoors. The combination of detailed short-term measurements with the home under controlled/consistent conditions during pre- and post-occupancy and the week-long passive sampling data provide the opportunity to begin to separate the different emission sources and help isolate and quantify variability in the monitored homes. Between April and August 2014, the research team performed pre-occupancy and post-occupancy sampling in one conventional home and two homes built with low-emitting materials that were generally consistent with EPAs Indoor airPLUS guidelines. However, for a number of reasons, the full experimental plan was not implemented. The project was intended to continue for up to three years to asses long-term changes in IAQ but the project was limited to one calendar year. As a result, several of the primary research questions related to seasonal impacts and the long-term trends in IAQ could not be addressed. In addition, there were several unexpected issues related to recruiting, availability of home types, and difficulty coordinating with builders/realtors/homeowners. Several field monitoring issues also came up that provide lessons learned that led to improvements to the original monitoring plan. The project produced a good experimental plan that is expected to be be useful for future efforts collecting data to support answering these same or similar research questions.

  1. Peak Ground Velocities for Seismic Events at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Coppersmith; R. Quittmeyer

    2005-02-16

    This report describes a scientific analysis to bound credible horizontal peak ground velocities (PGV) for the repository waste emplacement level at Yucca Mountain. Results are presented as a probability distribution for horizontal PGV to represent uncertainties in the analysis. The analysis also combines the bound to horizontal PGV with results of ground motion site-response modeling (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170027]) to develop a composite hazard curve for horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level. This result provides input to an abstraction of seismic consequences (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169183]). The seismic consequence abstraction, in turn, defines the input data and computational algorithms for the seismic scenario class of the total system performance assessment (TSPA). Planning for the analysis is documented in Technical Work Plan TWP-MGR-GS-000001 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171850]). The bound on horizontal PGV at the repository waste emplacement level developed in this analysis complements ground motions developed on the basis of PSHA results. In the PSHA, ground motion experts characterized the epistemic uncertainty and aleatory variability in their ground motion interpretations. To characterize the aleatory variability they used unbounded lognormal distributions. As a consequence of these characterizations, as seismic hazard calculations are extended to lower and lower annual frequencies of being exceeded, the ground motion level increases without bound, eventually reaching levels that are not credible (Corradini 2003 [DIRS 171191]). To provide credible seismic inputs for TSPA, in accordance with 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 63.102(j) [DIRS 156605], this complementary analysis is carried out to determine reasonable bounding values of horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level for annual frequencies of exceedance as low as 10{sup -8}. For each realization of the TSPA seismic scenario, the results of this analysis provide a constraint on the values sampled from the horizontal PGV hazard curve for the waste emplacement level. The relation of this analysis to other work feeding the seismic consequence abstraction and the TSPA is shown on Figure 1-1. The ground motion hazard results from the PSHA provide the basis for inputs to a site-response model that determines the effect of site materials on the ground motion at a location of interest (e.g., the waste emplacement level). Peak ground velocity values determined from the site-response model for the waste emplacement level are then used to develop time histories (seismograms) that form input to a model of drift degradation under seismic loads potentially producing rockfall. The time histories are also used to carry out dynamic seismic structural response calculations of the drip shield and waste package system. For the drip shield, damage from seismically induced rockfall also is considered. In the seismic consequence abstraction, residual stress results from the structural response calculations are interpreted in terms of the percentage of the component (drip shield, waste package) damaged as a function of horizontal PGV. The composite hazard curve developed in this analysis, which reflects the results of site-response modeling and the bound to credible horizontal PGV at the waste emplacement level, also feeds the seismic consequence abstraction. The composite hazard curve is incorporated into the TSPA sampling process to bound horizontal PGV and related seismic consequences to values that are credible.

  2. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 20092014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional-scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO2 injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial-scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic-data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near-surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

  3. How do rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations behave under seasonal water stress in northeastern Thailand and central Cambodia?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumagai, Tomo'omi; Mudd, Ryan G.; Giambelluca, Thomas W.; Kobayashi, Nakako; Miyazawa, Yoshiyuki; Lim, Tiva Khan; Liu, Wen; Huang, Maoyi; Fox, Jefferson M.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Yin, Song; Mak, Sophea Veasna; Kasemsap, Poonpipope

    2015-11-01

    Plantation rubber (Hevea brasiliensis Mll. Arg.) is a viable economic resource for Southeast Asian countries. Consequently, rubber plantations are rapidly expanding into both climatically optimal and sub-optimal environments throughout mainland Southeast Asia, potentially changing the partitioning of water, energy, and carbon at multiple scales, compared with the traditional land covers they are replacing. Delineating the characteristics of biosphere-atmosphere exchange in rubber plantations is therefore important to understanding the impacts of such land use change on environmental processes. We have conducted eddy flux measurements in two rubber plantation sites: (1) Som Sanuk (SS), located northern Thailand; and (2) Cambodian Rubber Research Institute (CRRI), central Cambodia. Both sites have a distinct dry season. Measurements were made over a 3-year period. We used combination of actual evapotranspiration (ET) flux measurements and an inversed version of a simple 2-layer ET model for estimating the mean canopy stomatal conductances (gs), which is among the most effective measures for describing water and energy exchanges and tree water use characteristics. A main novelty in this analysis is that the rubber canopy conductance can be extracted from total surface conductance (including the canopy and the vegetation floor effects) and hence environmental and biological controls on rubber tree gs are explicitly compared at each site in different seasons and years. It is demonstrated how each studied rubber plantation copes with each strong seasonal drought via tree water use strategies. Potential tree water use deficit (precipitation (P) potential evaporation (ET_POT)) for each season (i.e., December-February: DJF, March-May: MAM, June-August: JJA, and September-November: SON) revealed in which season and how the water use should be controlled. We found that in seasons when actual tree water use deficit (P ET) was negative (i.e., DJF and MAM), the deficit was compensated by soil water from the previous season stored within the soil layer at depths of 0-2 m at the Thailand site, and at depths of 0-3 m at CRRI. Two ecophysiological parameters, the reference value of gs (gsref) and the sensitivity of gs to atmospheric demand (m), as well as their proportionality (m/gsref), were derived from the logarithmic response curve of gs to vapor pressure deficit (D) for each season and each site. At both sites, gsref and m appeared to be smaller in DJF and MAM than those in the other seasons (i.e., JJA and SON). On average in a whole year, m/gsref was less than 0.6 at SS and almost 0.6 at the CRRI site, suggesting that there was less sufficient stomatal regulation at SS, where the risk of water stress-induced hydraulic failure is low because of its high annual rainfall amount. In comparison, at CRRI where annual P ET_POT was negative, there was stricter stomatal regulation that prevents excessive xylem cavitation. These tendencies imply that in the drier season, i.e., DJF and MAM, the rubber trees in SS and CRRI adopt the stomatal control strategy of changing gsref with reluctance and positive to change m, respectively.

  4. Cayuga County Regional Digester - Vision Becomes Reality - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamyar V. Zadeh, Ph.D.; Blue Electron Technology Solutions International LLC

    2013-03-12

    With an average herd size of 113 mature cows, Cayuga County is home to 280 dairy farms and 31,500 dairy milking cows producing approximately 855 million gallons of milk per year. The Cayuga Dairy industry is a major contributor to the countys economy, employing nearly 1200 people, while generating $140,000,000 of revenue from sale of milk alone. At the same time, the Cayuga County dairy industry also produces 5.7 million gallons of manure daily: a) Nearly 34% of this manure is produced on smaller farms. b) Digesters are expensive pieces of equipment and require attention and care. c) The on-farm digester systems have fairly long payback (>10 years) even for larger CAFO farms (>1000 milking cows). In 2005, Cayuga County Soil and Water Conservation District (The District), a Public Agency under Cayuga County, decided to undertake a centralized community digester project. The primary goal of the project was to develop an economically sustainable model, under the auspices of The District to address manure management issues facing the smaller dairies, improve the water quality and improve the quality of life for Cayuga County residents. It is believed that the District has accomplished this goal by completing construction of Cayuga County Regional Digester on a parcel of land behind the Cayuga County Natural Resource Center located at 7413 County House Road in the Town of Sennett in Cayuga County, New York. The digester facility consists of the following major components. 1. Transfer Station: This an indoor truck bay, where 35,000 gallons of manure from three local farms, 8,500 gallons of liquid organic food-processor waste, and 1,200 gallons of brown grease are unloaded from tanker trucks and the digested slurry is loaded onto the tanker trucks for delivery back to the participating farms. 2. Anaerobic Digester: The project utilizes a hydraulic mix anaerobic digester, a unique design that has no internal moving parts for mixing. The digester, which operates at mesophilic temperatures, is designed to process the daily feedstock and produce 220,000 SCF2 of biogas per day. The digester also produces 44,000 gallons of digested slurry per day. 3. Biogas Conditioning System: The plant employs a biological biogas conditioning system to remove the H2S and moisture contents of the biogas and prepare it to be used by the plant generation system. 4. Combined Heat and Power System (CHP): This is a 633kW high efficiency biogas-fired GE-Jenbacher model JMS-312 GS-NL reciprocating engine cogeneration system. The heat recovery system incorporated into the package is designed to capture the waste heat from the engine exhaust, the jacket cooling water and the engine oil circuit. 5. Electrical Substation and Power Distribution Systems: An electrical distribution system has been constructed on-site that aggregates the electrical service of the different county buildings on the District campus into a county owned electric distribution system that is interconnected with the CHP and the local electric grid. The electrical system is designed, in accordance with the utility guidelines, to allow grid-parallel operation of CHP and provide for import and export of electric power. 6. Thermal Energy Distribution System: The heat recovery system has been integrated into a high temperature water distribution system that distributes the heat to the thermal circuits for the anaerobic digester facility. Additional piping has also been installed to transfer the remaining thermal energy to other county buildings on the campus. On a daily basis, the plant will co-process 35,000 gallons of manure from local dairy farms, 8,500 gallons of food-processor waste and 1,200 gallons of brown grease to produce 200,000 ft3/d of biogas and 44,000 gallons of pathogen-free nutrient-rich digested slurry for agricultural use by farms and in the local area. The biogas fueled CHP produces 5,157,000 kWh of electricity and 19,506 dekatherms of thermal energy per year. Electrical power generated by the cogeneration system powers all the buildings on the Cayuga County campus and any surplus power is exported to the grid under a power purchase agreement. Heat recovered from the cogeneration system will be used to maintain the temperature of the process equipment and the excess will be transported to the Cayuga County Public Safety Building to offset purchase of fossil fuel to fuel the boilers. The majority of plant operations are unmanned and automated. However, the plant will have a small staff of well-trained personnel to coordinate the feedstock deliveries and shipments, supervise the day-to-day operation, monitor the systems and perform maintenance, maintain a safe and reliable operation and to respond to emergencies.