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1

Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. 2012 AAAR Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. 2012 AAAR Conference Minneapolis, MN://cires.colorado.edu/jimenez/ams.html 1 Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. Outline 1. Building Blocks ­ Inlets (see references) 2 #12;Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. Why Aerosol Mass

Colorado at Boulder, University of

2

Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

Peters, T.; Williams, M.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to Fuel Your NGS Research ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jennifer Carter on "Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to fuel your NGS Research" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Carter, Jennifer [Agilent

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Gilbert, Tom [National History Museum of Denmark

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers  

SciTech Connect

Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar® L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar® L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar® L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar® L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent work underway with simulants in SRNL as well as any DWPF CPC testing done with the new SE stream to ascertain whether any need develops that could result in modification of any currently planned F/H Laboratory testing protocols.

Bannochie, C. J.

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

9

Building America Best Practices Series, Vol. 10 - Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing, A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM R Retrofit Techniques & Technologies: Air Sealing A Guide for Contractors to Share with Homeowners PREPARED BY Pacific Northwest National Laboratory & Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 12, 2010 April 12, 2010 * PNNL-19284 BUILDING AMERICA BEST PRACTICES SERIES VOLUME 10. BuiLDiNG AmERiCA BEST PRACTiCES SERiES Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

10

The Bui Dam impact on Ghana-China relations : transparency, accountability and development outcomes from China's Sino Hydro Dam Project in Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current Afro-Chinese relations on development projects in Sub Saharan Africa has come under a lot of scrutiny, with some experts in the South-to-South relationship discourse claiming the above short-gun-marriage will ...

Habia, James K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Report on the NGS3 Working Group on Safeguards by Design For Aqueous Reprocessing Plants  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Working Group on SBD for Aqueous Reprocessing Facilities was to provide recommendations, for facility operators and designers, which would aid in the coordination and integration of nuclear material accountancy and the safeguards requirements of all concerned parties - operators, state/regional authorities, and the IAEA. The recommendations, which are to be provided to the IAEA, are intended to assist in optimizing facility design and operating parameters to ensure the safeguardability of the facility while minimizing impact on the operations. The one day Working Group session addressed a wide range of design and operating topics.

Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael; Schanfein, Mark

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas-to-Liquids Heat and Power 5/ NGS000:fa_Gas2LiqLiqPrd Natural Gas to Liquids Production 6/ NGS000:ea_ElectricPower Electric Power 7/ NGS000:ea_Transportatio

13

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, Vol. 27, No. 10, pp. 21862195, 2008 Printed in the USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canadian Areas of Concern (AOC) due to a number of Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs), including those: How possible is it to meet the eutrophication delisting goals of the AOC, if the Stage 2 nutrient

Kelly, John J.

14

Physiologia Plantarum 132: 236253. 2008 Copyright Physiologia Plantarum 2007, ISSN 0031-9317 Transcriptome analyses give insights into selenium-stress  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canadian Areas of Concern (AOC) due to a number of Beneficial Use Impairments (BUIs), including those the eutrophication delisting goals of the AOC, if the Stage 2 nutrient loading reduction targets of the Hamilton

15

Modeling and analysis of the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network : an assessment of its properties, plasticity, and role in adaptive evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

188(23): 8259-71 (2006). Herring CD, Raghunathan A, HonischKH, Joyce AR, Applebee MK, Herring CD, Bui OT, Knight EM,BK, Knight EM, Patel T, Herring CD, Landick R, and Palsson

Joyce, Andrew Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Model-driven metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli : a systems biology approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

17. Fong SS, Burgard AP, Herring CD, Knight EM, Blattner FR,KH, Joyce AR, Applebee MK, Herring CD, Bui OT, Knight EM,2005;1:e68. 63. Barrett CL, Herring CD, Reed JL, Palsson BO.

Feist, Adam Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

studentsputtheirtalentstothetestnJitmagazine nJitmagazinestudentsputtheirtalentstothetest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of civil engineering students put their energy into the task of designing a building that could withstandstudentsputtheirtalentstothetestnJitmagazine nJitmagazinestudentsputtheirtalentstothetest 8 buiLdinG efficiency, lightness and con- struction speed. the members of the nJit steel bridge team are hertzler awuy

Bieber, Michael

18

WCI | Site 300 CORS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CORS : CORS Weather Site Access Contained Firing Facility (CFF) Continuosly Operating Reference Station (CORS) CORS logo How to access GPS satellite data The National Geodetic Survey(NGS) Home Page for the S300 CORS base station is: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/CORS/ Type S300 into "enter SiteID" To get user-friendly data: http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/UFCORS/ The GPS data will be in "receiver independent exchange" (RINEX) format, version 2.10. CORS Proxy Data Availability Details: NGS Reference Position Information Site 300 CORS Reference Position RTK Transmission Frequency NGS s300 Site Log NGS s300 Site Map Links to other GPS sites Last modified: July 27, 2011 UCRL-MI-134143 | Privacy & Legal Notice Contact: wci-webteam@llnl.gov NNSA Logo DOE Logo

19

CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Real Waste Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11012012...

20

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Supply Consumption by Sector NGS000: ... 6/ The energy content of biofuels feedstock minus the energy content of liquid ... (billion 2000 chain-weighted ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Design of an Enhanced Handover Algorithm Based on a New Adaptive SR-ARQ for Next-Generation Mobile Communication Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Next-generation mobile communication networks are supposed to provide various high capacity multimedia services to mobile users using various kinds of access networks. Among them, the WiNGS system developed by ETRI as one of 4G mobile system provides ... Keywords: Mobile communication networks, handover performance, SR-ARQ, reordering, WiNGS system

Man Kyu Park; Yun Chul Choi; Jae Yone Lee; Byung Chul Kim; Dae Young Kim; Jae Ho Kim

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Aging Matters What's Inside  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aging Matters What's Inside Letter from the dean PSU winS Carter award artiSan eConomy eLi BUi and Public affairs 2008 fall newsletter www.pdx.edu/cupa aGinG is a modern fact of life. In 2006 the world's population of adults aged 60 or over was 650 million. By 2025 that number will nearly double. By 2050

Bertini, Robert L.

23

Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

24

PROGRESS IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predicted vs. actual energy usage/savings, and present thetools for estimating energy usage. These data bases provideft -yr in resource energy usage. These same office bUild~ngs

Wall, L.W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 4020 of 21,429 results. Download CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Real Waste Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11012012...

26

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Meteorological Processes Affecting the Transport of Emissions from the Navajo Generating Station to Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990 Navajo Generating Station (NGS) Winter Visibility Study, a network of surface and upper-air meteorological measurement systems was operated in and around Grand Canyon National Park to investigate atmospheric processes in complex ...

Charles G. Lindsey; Jun Chen; Timothy S. Dye; L. Willard Richards; Donald L. Blumenthal

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science (1998) 47, 143151 Article No. ec980350  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Intake', Ontario Hydro Research Division Report 91-82-K, 18 pp. Heath, A. G.: 1973, `Ventilatory, 14 pp. Harcus, J. D.: 1991, `Monitoring Fish Behaviour and Entrapment at the Darlington NGS Cooling

Cottenie, Karl

29

RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR PARSONS  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of {approx}150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Engineered Polymerases Enable Novel Sequencing Applications ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maryke Appel on "Engineered polymerases provide improved NGS library amplification and enable novel sequencing applications" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Appel, Maryke [Kappa Biosystems

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Richard Gerber! NERSC User Services NUG Teleconference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PIN: 4 866820 Agenda * Alloca1on Y ear C hangeover i ssues * NUG 2013 annual mee1ng - hSp:www.nersc.govusersNUGannual---mee*ngs2013 - Registra*on O pen - Schedule -...

32

Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Kinetic dispersion of Langmuir waves. I. The Langmuir decay instability  

SciTech Connect

We derive a fully kinetic, three-dimensional dispersion relation for Langmuir waves with a focus on the Langmuir decay instability (LDI). The kinetic dispersion is compared to the standard fluid dispersion found with an equation of state (EOS) closure. The EOS closure fails to capture the intricacies of the nonlinear pressure when high frequency electron plasma waves (EPWs) couple to low frequency ion acoustic waves (IAWs). In particular, we find discrepancies in the k{lambda}{sub d} scaling of the LDI growth rate, where k is the wavenumber of the incident EPW and {lambda}{sub d} is the Debye length. As a result, the kinetic dispersion relation for LDI results in instability thresholds that can be in excess of twice those predicted by the fluid theory. Both the fluid and kinetic dispersion relations predict a nonlinear frequency shift due to the beating of the pump and scattered EPWs, but again the k{lambda}{sub d} scaling of these frequency shifts differ. In addition, the kinetic dispersion predicts a nonlinear reduction in the IAW damping from the three-wave interaction.

Palastro, J. P.; Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Divol, L.; Strozzi, D. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

Cha, Sangwon

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Enabling large-scale next-generation sequence assembly with Blacklight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of extremely challenging biological sequence analyses were conducted on the XSEDE large shared memory resource Blacklight, using current bioinformatics tools and encompassing a wide range of scientific applications. These include genomic sequence ... Keywords: NGS, RNA-Seq, data-intensive computing, de novo assembly, genome, high-performance computing, metagenome, primates, shared memory, transcriptome

M. Brian Couger; Lenore Pipes; Philip D. Blood; Christopher E. Mason

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Thermal And Spectroscopic Analyses Of Next Generation Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Solvent Contacted With 3, 8, And 16 Molar Nitric Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new solvent system referred to as Next Generation Solvent or NGS, has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the removal of cesium from alkaline solutions in the Caustic Side Solvent Extraction process. The NGS is proposed for deployment at MCU{sup a} and at the Salt Waste Processing Facility. This work investigated the chemical compatibility between NGS and 16 M, 8 M, and 3 M nitric acid from contact that may occur in handling of analytical samples from MCU or, for 3 M acid, which may occur during contactor cleaning operations at MCU. This work shows that reactions occurred between NGS components and the high molarity nitric acid. Reaction rates are much faster in 8 M and 16 M nitric acid than in 3 M nitric acid. In the case of 16 M and 8 M nitric acid, the nitric acid reacts with the extractant to produce initially organo-nitrate species. The reaction also releases soluble fluorinated alcohols such as tetrafluoropropanol. With longer contact time, the modifier reacts to produce a tarry substance with evolved gases (NO{sub x} and possibly CO). Calorimetric analysis of the reaction product mixtures revealed that the organo-nitrates reaction products are not explosive and will not deflagrate.

Fondeur, F. F.; Fink, S. D.

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

First order leveling: Pleasant Bayou geothermal test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First order leveling to be conducted as part of an environmental monitoring program for a geopressured test well was reported. 39.43 kilometers of first order levels were run to NGS specifications. Twelve Class B type bench marks were set to NGS specifications. The adjusted elevation of bench mark C-1209 was used as a starting elevation and is based on a supplementary adjustment of April 6, 1979 by NGS. The closure for the loop around the well site is -0.65 millimeters. The distance around the loop is 1.29 kilometers, the allowable error of closure was 4.54 millimeters. The initial leveling of this well was performed in 1977. A thorough search for their monumentation was conducted. No monuments were found due to the lack of adequate monument descriptions. Therefore, an elevation comparison summary for this report is only available along the NGS lines outside the well area. The first order level tie to line No. 101 (BMA-1208) was +3.37 millimeters in 17.21 kilometers. The allowable error of closure was 12.44 millimeters.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

High-Throughput Compression of FASTQ Data with SeqDB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compression has become a critical step in storing next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets because of both the increasing size and decreasing costs of such data. Recent research into efficiently compressing sequence data has focused largely on improving ... Keywords: Throughput,Arrays,Bandwidth,Libraries,Bioinformatics,Instruction sets,Genomics,FASTQ,Compression,data storage,next-generation sequencing

Mark Howison

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Journal of Fusion Energy, Vol. /1, No.2, 1992 Pilot Plant: An Affordable Step Toward Fusion Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first two. Tritium inventory from Ontario Hydro CANDU re- actors is projected to increase to about 20 kg not be less than those used in the CANDU system (600 psi saturated steam at 48SOF).The maximum steam. In Canada, Douglas Point, a 220 Mwe CANDU station at the Bruce NGS site, could possibly be made available

40

Impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF CPC processing  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and new strip acid will be deployed. Processing will begin with a blend of the current solvent and the NGS. Compositional changes in the NGS solvent and blending with the current solvent require review of previously performed work to determine if additional experimental work is required to address any impacts to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The composition change involved the substitution of the N,N’-dicyclohexyl-N”-isotridecylguanidine LIX® 79 guanidine suppressor with N,N’,N”-tris (3,7-dimethyloctyl) guanidine (TiDG) guanidine suppressor. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by DWPF to evaluate any impacts to offgas generation, solvent buildup or carryover, chemical, thermal, and radiolytic stability of the blended and pure TiDG based NGS. Previous work has been performed by SRNL to evaluate impacts to CPC processing using the next generation solvent containing LIX® 79 suppressor with boric acid strip effluent. Based on previous experimental work and current literature, the following conclusions are made for processing in the CPC: No mechanism for a change in the catalytic hydrogen evolution in the CPC was identified for the NGS TiDG based solvent; The transition from the LIX® 79 based suppressor to the TiDG based suppressor is not expected to have any impact on solvent or Isopar® L accumulation; Transitioning from the current solvent to the TiDG based NGS is not expected to have an impact on solvent carryover or partitioning; No changes to the chemical stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; No changes to the thermal stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; A “worst case” scenario was examined in which all of the hydrogen atoms from the TiDG based NGS and blended solvent form hydrogen gas in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) as a result of radiolytic degradation. This represented a ~4% increase in the volume percent hydrogen in the SRAT. Given the chemical similarity and very low concentrations of the suppressor, it is not recommended that additional experimental work be performed to qualify any impacts to the DWPF CPC from the change in suppressor or the revised value for partitioning of the suppressor into the strip effluent.

Newell, J. D.

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Lamp Divisions  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--- --- /A;; i :' r%i;in~house ilEc;' i:Z3:~cra:ion Lamp Divisions , _.. (I +i. 0 :,,,rg. . I . . -= i?e p/q! qe)-' &se pw E.rcale?l iev, Je!sey 07m March 20, 1 gs? ::r . J. A. Jones I ti. 5. Muclear Regulatory Commission .> = ..- haterials Licensing Branch -s - ,.I, - - Division of Fuel Cycle and hateri al Safety LY. , $2 - _ . ' -' . 3 _- - Yeshington, C. C. 2@555 - :_ :--, =-- -- .-?J -.: y...., : :- 7 Dear Mr. Jones : y-- --, ? . *I 2=15 2 r; X -P The following is our final report of the decontamination efZor?s takz in our Bui Iding 7 basement and wi 11 also serve to update our report i& November 12, 1980. As stated in NRC' s report of December 22, 1983, two closeout inspect ions were conducted by your King of Prussia off i ce on November 21 and December 2,

43

I  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01.0J 01.0J I u.s. DEPARIlHENT QFENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETER1vIINATION RECIPIENT:Snohomish County PROJECT TITLE : Solar Array and Charging Stations - Administration Bui lding/Cathcart Page 1 of2 STATE: WA Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FOA-OOOOO13 DE-EEOO00850 EEO Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA). I bave made the following determination : ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase the indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

44

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS 1 Vehicle Features Base Vehicle: 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN: 1G1RD6E48BUI00815 Class: Compact Seatbelt Positions: 4 Type 2 : Multi-Mode PHEV (EV, Series, and Power-split) Motor Type: 12-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 111 kW/370 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 9500 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Generator Type: 16-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. Power/Torque: 55 kW/200 Nm Max. Generator Speed: 6000 rpm Cooling: Active - Liquid cooled Battery Manufacturer: LG Chem Type: Lithium-ion Cathode/Anode Material: LiMn 2 O 4 /Hard Carbon Number of Cells: 288 Cell Config.: 3 parallel, 96 series Nominal Cell Voltage: 3.7 V Nominal System Voltage: 355.2 V Rated Pack Capacity: 45 Ah Rated Pack Energy: 16 kWh Weight of Pack: 435 lb

45

All Other Edi~ims Arc Obolete United States Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9-0s) 9-0s) All Other Edi~ims Arc Obolete United States Department of Energy E n e r g Finance and account in^ Sen'ice Center Travel Authorization and Program Manager Signature Card Name: Date: Position Title: Routing Symbol: BuiIding: Phone: Reporting EntityFund Code: Signature: Typcs of Documents Authorized (please check box) Approved Funding Program Change Request Procurement Authorization (PRs, direct chargebacks. etc.) Claim for Reimbursement for Espenditwre on Official Business (Local Travel) Travel Authorizations and Nodi fications Travel Vouchers Training Authorizations Training Invoice Payments Invoice Payment Approval Travel Authorizations and Modifications (actual expenses) Other (speci fyS - I certifL to the signature and authority of the above individual for the document noted.

46

Microsoft Word - M2FT-13LA0807043.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Scott Painter Carl Gable Nataliia Makedonska Jeffrey Hyman Tsung-Lin Hsieh Quan Bui Los Alamos National Laboratory H.H. Liu Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory December 2012 LA-UR-12-26878 FCRD-UFD-2013-000058 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

47

P  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: s m r \o \o P s CA DISCLAIMER r r M c M LLW Drum Staging BuiMing Environmental Assessment August 3, 1994 DISCLAIMER Portions of t f G s document may be illegible in electronic image products. images are produced from the best avaiIable original document. LLW Drum Staging Building Environmental Assessment EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The proposed action is to place a 3 meter (m) by 4.5 m (10 ft x 15 ft) prefabricated storage building (uansportainer) adjacent to the existing Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (PlrETF) at Technical Area (TA-) 16, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and to use the building as a staging site for sealed 55-gallon drums of noncompactible waste contaminated with low levels of z3ium (LLW). Up to eight drums of waste would be

48

March-April 2009 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March/April 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Technical Standards Program (http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/) The Standards Forum And Standards Actions Technical Standards Program Manager's Note Welcome to the March/April 2009 edition of the Technical Standards Forum and Standards Actions. The Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Standards Program (TSP) continues to provide timely and efficient standards development services to the Department and its contractors. Recently, the TSP acquired the ability to perform title and abstract searches on Non-Government Standards (NGS) available in the private sector. This tool enables the TSP and its customers to identify available NGS that could support implementation of DOE requirements. Office of Management and Budget Circular No.

49

INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

50

INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

51

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM FOR THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

Samadi-Dezfouli, A.

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

55

Enron Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1999 1999 rDEC- 15--B ]S-48 P. 02/21 December 14.1398 Vol. 5. No. SD tandard & Poors' kmRP'M ITILITIESl :- g PERS PECTVES | BH ~I UWhy Is ectric Restrturing Moving So Slowly in States? A the begi6s d 199S. Siamrd & PWfs iwpd between ne rulatory boj,. th Amore Ccaporior. ~3 b f^ rlWdiTr!- atalrtgenbardawmuldadptericemsam- Cmmwiion ACC. and Arizna's two maor OUs. 4 " -" = ' - 1·;n siit ionlt^ ddu teared clstt mrvwy. Leg AinaRt PbliSAniceCo. aod T-Tsn ,Eleaic Pori Co. .::* _.;is __ .. ?... . .ialatbla had aLdy beari dkiil dlatch be a Fuitwraolmatthifmmis n recetltionof 6 ...... - Bhrois. Cai.frf Mass h. Baftrd Fvwrre abr a new ACC crmissinc-, etfectriv Jan 4. 1999. who Otm 6 -B1im ;rwwhkluymregiJacyr n inNewac. Lamw&nmodir may try to urvlJ the senJenttfs

56

DOE Commercial Building Energy Asset Score: Software Development for Phase II Building Types  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

To estim assumpt to unders tables pr These ta but a bui even by s the Asse year, dep in the ap To get an tables. F Operat Schedu School Office Retail Warehou Hotel Apartme Courthou Library 1 Operatio Standard 9 are added be modifie 2 Closing ti purposes. DOE C Softwar Oper ate a buildin ions concern stand how w rovide a simp bles reflect t lding's level season in ca et Scoring To pending on e pendix at the n overall ide or a more gr tional As ules of Op Occu Sche (hrs 41 48 46 use 1 nt 1 use 4 4 nal assumption 90.1 Prototype to the Asset Sc ed to better ref mes reflect tho Commer re Devel rational a ng's energy u ning how the well these as plified list of the full-time of operation ases such as ool applies a each building e end of this a of the ass ranular unde sumption peration upancy

57

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 HINS R&D: a possible Project X Front End Frequency 325 MHz Total length ~ 55 m SSR1 (β=0.22) SSR2 (β=0.4) RT -CHSR MEBT RFQ IS W (MeV) 2.5 0.050 60 30 10 Beam Line Elements: 19 Conventional RT Cavities 29 SC Spoke Cavities and 3 Cryomodules 42 SC Focusing Solenoids RF Power Elements: one 325 MHz Klystron/Modulator one 400 kW RFQ FVM 19 ~20 kW FVM/Fast Tuning for RT Section 29 ~20-120 kW FVM/Fast Tuning for SC Section Power Supplies, quench protection, beam diagnostic,.. Fermilab 2 * HINS R&D Phase: Proof of innovative approach to high intensity beam acceleration ! - 2007-2011/12 R&D period - Prove, Develop & Bui ld Front-End in Meson Bldg. at 325 MHz (0-60 MeV) since much of the technical complexity is in the FE Mechanical/RF Systems * Demonstrate for the first time

58

THE MICROPOROSITY OF BERYLLIUM OXIDE POWDER  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium oxide produced in the thermal decomposition of complex compounds is characterized by the low bulk weight and the inferior pressing properties. An investigation was made of the causes of the deterioration of the pressing properties of beryllium oxide. Beryllium oxide with a bulk weight of 0.107 g/cm/sup 3/ is pressed into briquets ai a pressure of 1 io 1.5 t/cm/sup 2/. It was found thai the amount of pressure applied does not change the properties of the pressed articles. The microporosity of the beryllium oxide sample was investigated as dependent on the sintering temperature. The main cause for the inferior pressing and the low bulk weight of beryllium oxide powder is the high microporosily of ihe sample. An increase of ihe densiiy of beryllium oxide does not only bring about a decrease of the microporosity bui also a change of the grain size. The properties of thue initial beryllium were investigated by means of a small-angle x-ray analysis. (TCO)

Astrakhantsev, S.M.; Umanskii, Ya.S.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

E/EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E/EIA E/EIA -0278 U.S. Depa rtme nt of Energ y Energ y Inform ation Admi nistra tion Assis tant Admi nistra tor for Progr am Deve lopme nt Office of the Cons umpt ion Data Syste m June 1981 01377 9 = 4530 : FED Non res ide ntia l Bui ldin gs u/w & Ene rgy Con sum ptio n Sur vey : Fu el Ch ara cte ris tic s an d Co ns erv ati on Pra cti ces Prepared by: Lynn D. Patinkin, Phillip Windell, Dwight: K. French, Leigh Carleton, Lynda T. Carlson, Kenneth A. Vagts, Leslie Whitaker, Tom Woteki, Wilbert Laird, and Laura Wong. IMPORTANT NOTICE As required by government regulation, EIA will conduct the annual review of our mailing list during the next several weeks. If you are on the mailing list, you will soon receive a post card listing your name and address as they appear on our files. If you wish to continue to receive our publications, you must mail

60

XE6_Tips_022011.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For For m ost u sers a nd a pplica1ons, u sing d efault s e5ngs w ork very well  For users who want to experiment to get the best performance t hey c an, t he f ollowing p resenta1on g ives y ou some informa1on on compilers and se5ngs to try  While i t d oesn't c over a bsolutely e verything, t he p resenta7on tries t o a ddress s ome o f t he t unable p arameters w hich w e h ave found t o p rovide i ncreased p erformance i n t he s itua7ons discussed 2 xtpe---mc12 If n o m odule i s l oaded, a nd n o ' arch' s pecified i n the c ompiler o p;ons, t he c ompilers d efault t o the n ode t ype o n w hich t he c ompiler i s r unning: Which m ay n ot b e t he s ame a s t he c ompute nodes ! 3 The best compiler is not the same for every applica1on 4  PGI - V ery g ood F ortran, o kay C a nd C ++  Good v ectoriza7on 

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61

Simulations of plasma behavior during pellet injection in ITER  

SciTech Connect

Plasma behavior during pellet injection in ITER is investigated using a 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the pellet ablation is described using the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model developed by Parks and Turnbull [Phys. Fluids 21, 1735 (1978)]. The NGS pellet ablation model that includes the {nabla}B drift effect is coupled with a plasma core transport model, which is a combination of an MMM95 anomalous transport model and an NCLASS neoclassical transport model. The combination of core transport models, together with pellet model, is used to simulate the time evolution of plasma current, ion and electron temperatures, and density profiles for ITER standard type-I ELMy H-mode discharges during the pellet injection. It is found that the injection of pellet can result in either enhancement or degradation of plasma performance. The {nabla}B drift effect on the pellet deposition is very strong in ITER. The plasma density with high field side pellets, which favorable with the {nabla}B drift effect, is much higher and pellet can penetrate much deeper than that with low field side pellets.

Klaywittaphat, P., E-mail: thawatchai@siit.tu.ac.th; Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

Schieffer, Gregg

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Data:D81660a4-094e-4639-99b0-fb937b8d193d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

660a4-094e-4639-99b0-fb937b8d193d 660a4-094e-4639-99b0-fb937b8d193d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Jacksonville Electric Authority Effective date: 2006/08/01 End date if known: Rate name: LDI Load Density Improvement Rider Sector: Description: (Closed to new customers) To new and existing customers receiving service in Planning Districts 3 East, 4 West, 5 West, 6 and 7 served by JEA. To new or existing customers who have executed a ten year Load Density Improvement Electric Service Agreement with JEA and whose new or modified account qualifies for electric service under Rate Schedule GSD, GSDT, GSLD, and GSLDT. Application to commence service under this Rider after October 1, 2002, will not be accepted. Resale of energy purchased under this rider is not permitted.

64

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 26700 of 28,560 results. 91 - 26700 of 28,560 results. Download CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Real Waste Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009620-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-009621: Categorical Exclusion Determination Engineering Development Laboratory SO2 Depolarized Electrolyzer Test Facility Operation CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009621-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-009622: Categorical Exclusion Determination Analysis of Solutions by Ion Chromatography CX(s) Applied: B3.6

65

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 1, 2012 November 1, 2012 CX-009620: Categorical Exclusion Determination Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Real Waste Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11/01/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 31, 2012 CX-009624: Categorical Exclusion Determination High Activity Waste Trailer (HAWT) Disposition CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/31/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 31, 2012 CX-009623: Categorical Exclusion Determination Technetium Precipitation Batch Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 10/31/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office October 25, 2012 CX-009625: Categorical Exclusion Determination Preparation and Temperature-Time Settling Treatment of Rheology Samples

66

Microsoft PowerPoint - Proceedings Cover Sheets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generator Output Monitoring for Normalization of Gamma Ray Spectra Generator Output Monitoring for Normalization of Gamma Ray Spectra 1 Sudeep Mitra * and Lucian Wielopolski Environmental Sciences Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (USA) Abstract Neutron generators (NG) being devices where neutron outputs are accomplished electrically, suffer from fluctuations in their outputs. Of particular importance are the short- term variations that may affect individual data acquisition runs. Thus when using NGs for quantitative neutron-induced gamma-ray spectroscopy, the neutron output must be continuously monitored in real time, and normalization procedures subsequently applied to properly evaluate the gamma-ray spectra. Using a plastic scintillator, we developed a scheme for detecting fast neutrons that relies firstly, on recording a neutron

67

Microsoft PowerPoint - 4-03 Geeting_laupa (improved MCU ops).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) Improved Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) Operations Presentation to: EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 11/16/2010 Mark Geeting, SRR Tiina Laupa, SRR SRR-SPT-2010-00223 Print Close 2 Improved MCU Operations Overview * Actinide Removal Process/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU) - Objectives of ARP/MCU - MCU Current Performance - MCU Improvements * Next-Generation Solvent (NGS) at MCU - Parallel R&D / Engineering - Flowsheet Integration Print Close 3 Improved MCU Operations ARP/MCU Print Close 4 Improved MCU Operations ARP / MCU Objectives * Using a "first of a kind" process for salt treatment - Provide lessons learned to SWPF design - Treat Salt Solution (< 200,000 Ci of Cs) prior to the start of SWPF with a ramp-up in process & equipment performance as lessons

68

SLAC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, der längste Linearbeschleuniger SLAC, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, der längste Linearbeschleuniger der Welt, liegt südlich von San Francisco. Er beschleunigt Elektronen und Positronen längs einer zwei Meilen (ca. 3.6 km) messenden Strecke und richtet diese auf verschiedene Targets, Ringe und Detektoren. Der im Bild gezeigte PEP Ring wird gegenwärtig zur B-Fabrik umgebaut. In B - Fabriken , erforschen Physiker mit Hilfe von B - Mesonen die Geheimnisse, die hinter der Antimaterie stecken. Damit verbundene physikalische Forschung findet auch in Cornell mit Hilfe von CESR und in Japan mit KEK statt. Zur Information: ELECTRON GUN: Die Elektronenkanone in Ihrer Fernsehröhre funktioniert in ähnlicher Weise: eine heisse Kathode emittiert Elektronen, welche durch ein elektrisches Feld beschleunigt werden. Wenn diese den

69

CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: Categorical Exclusion Determination 42: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006642: Categorical Exclusion Determination Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/18/2011 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Savannah River National Laboratory and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (Environmental Stress Screening and 2 centimeters) and full-scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests with new solvent being developed for the Extraction and Strip operations in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). The Next Generation Solvent (NGS) is comprised of four components: 0.050

70

Hulin Geopressure-geothermal test well: First order levels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this survey was to level through and establish elevations for existing benchmarks along LA Highway No. 685 from Erath, Louisiana south to the well site. The leveling was performed in April 1991, and was accomplished using procedures and equipment identical to that used by the National Geodetic Survey for First Order Class I Leveling. The leveling began on benchmark NGS T-361 located in Erath, Louisiana and the published elevation of 5.271 feet was used for this survey. On this survey a new benchmark, HU-18 was set on a concrete slab in the well site to observe the subsidence of the ground surface. Also, benchmark No.8 could not be found. A two hour search was made with no results. At this leveling it was noted that an error was made. A metric D.E. was used for the well head elevation instead of feet. This error has been corrected in this report.

None

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The Fast Changing Landscape of Sequencing Technologies and Their Impact on Microbial Genome Assemblies and Annotation  

SciTech Connect

Background: The emergence of next generation sequencing (NGS) has provided the means for rapid and high throughput sequencing and data generation at low cost, while concomitantly creating a new set of challenges. The number of available assembled microbial genomes continues to grow rapidly and their quality reflects the quality of the sequencing technology used, but also of the analysis software employed for assembly and annotation. Methodology/Principal Findings: In this work, we have explored the quality of the microbial draft genomes across various sequencing technologies. We have compared the draft and finished assemblies of 133 microbial genomes sequenced at the Department of Energy-Joint Genome Institute and finished at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a variety of combinations of sequencing technologies, reflecting the transition of the institute from Sanger-based sequencing platforms to NGS platforms. The quality of the public assemblies and of the associated gene annotations was evaluated using various metrics. Results obtained with the different sequencing technologies, as well as their effects on downstream processes, were analyzed. Our results demonstrate that the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system, the primary sequencing technology currently used for de novo genome sequencing and assembly at JGI, has various advantages in terms of total sequence throughput and cost, but it also introduces challenges for the downstream analyses. In all cases assembly results although on average are of high quality, need to be viewed critically and consider sources of errors in them prior to analysis. Conclusion: These data follow the evolution of microbial sequencing and downstream processing at the JGI from draft genome sequences with large gaps corresponding to missing genes of significant biological role to assemblies with multiple small gaps (Illumina) and finally to assemblies that generate almost complete genomes (Illumina+PacBio).

Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Quest, Daniel J [ORNL; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Clum, Alicia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

MASS TRANSFER AND HYDRAULIC TESTING OF THE V-05 AND V-10 CONTACTORS WITH THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT  

SciTech Connect

The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)- MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the “first stage” D(Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) predicted equivalent DF for MCU from this testing is greater than 3,500 assuming 95% efficiency during extraction and 80% efficiency during scrub and strip. Hydraulically, the system performed very well in all tests. Target flows were easily obtained and stable throughout testing. Though some issues were encountered with plugging in the coalescer, they were not related to the solvent. No hydraulic upsets due to the solvent were experienced during any of the tests conducted. The first extraction coalescer element used in testing developed high pressure drop that made it difficult to maintain the target flow rates. Analysis showed an accumulation of sodium aluminosilicate solids. The coalescer was replaced with one from the same manufacturer’s lot and pressure drop was no longer an issue. Concentrations of Isopar™ L and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the amount of solvent carryover. For low-flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) conditions in stripping, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L post-contactor concentration to be 25 mg/L, HPLC measured 39 mg/L of Modifier. For moderate-flow (0.54 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L postcontactor to be ~69 mg/L, while the HPLC measured 56 mg/L for Modifier. For high-flow (0.8 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar™ L post-contactor to be 39 mg/L. The post-coalescer (pre-decanter) measurements by SVOA for Isopar™ L were all less than the analysis detection limit of 10 mg/L. The HPLC measured 18, 22 and 20 mg/L Modifier for the low, medium, and high-flow rates respectively. In extraction, the quantity of pre-coalescer Isopar™ L carryover measured by SVOA was ~280- 410 mg/L at low flow (4 gpm aqueous), ~400-450 mg/L at moderate flow (8 gpm aqueous), and ~480 mg/L at high flow (12 gpm aqueous). The amount of post coalescer (pre-decanter) Isopar™ L carryover measured by SVOA was less than 45 mg/L for all flow rates. HPLC results for Modifier were 182, 217 and

Herman, D.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Peters, T.; Poirier, M.; Fondeur, F.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Parametric instabilities in laser/matter interaction: from noise levels to relativistic regimes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this LDRD was the study of parametric instabilities on a laser-produced plasma, addressing crucial issues affecting the coupling between the laser and the plasma. We have made very good progress during these three years, in advancing our understanding in many different fronts. Progress was made in both theoretical and experimental areas. The coupling of high-power laser light to a plasma through scattering instabilities is still one of the most complex processes in laser-plasma interaction physics. In spite of the relevance of these parametric processes to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and all other situations where a high-power laser beam couples to a plasma, many aspects of the interaction remain unexplained, even after many years of intensive experimental and theoretical efforts. Important instabilities under study are stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and the Langmuir decay instability (LDI). The study of these instabilities is further complicated by the competition and interplay between them, and, in the case of ICF, by the presence of multiple overlapping interaction beams. Stimulated Brillouin scattering consists of the decay of the incident electromagnetic (EM) wave into a scattered EM wave and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). Similarly, SRS consists of the decay of the incident EM wave into a scattered EM wave and an electron plasma wave (EPW). Langmuir decay instability is the further decay of an EPW into a secondary EPW and an IAW. The principal areas of research covered during this three-year period were the following: a) Modeling of Parametric Instabilities in Speckles b) Langmuir Decay Instability c) Non Maxwellian Plasmas d) Multiple Interaction Beams e) SBS from Speckle Distributions.

Baldis, H A; Kruer, W L; Labaune, C L

1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

74

Cepheid distances from infrared long-baseline interferometry - I. VINCI/VLTI observations of seven Galactic Cepheids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the angular diameter measurements of seven classical Cepheids (X Sgr, eta Aql, W Sgr, zeta Gem, beta Dor, Y Oph and L Car) that we have obtained with the VINCI instrument, installed at ESO's VLT Interferometer (VLTI). We also present reprocessed archive data obtained with the FLUOR/IOTA instrument on zeta Gem, in order to improve the phase coverage of our observations. We obtain average limb darkened angular diameter values of LD(X Sgr) = 1.471 +/- 0.033 mas, LD(eta Aql) = 1.839 +/- 0.028 mas, LD(W Sgr) = 1.312 +/- 0.029 mas, LD(beta Dor) = 1.891 +/- 0.024 mas, LD(zeta Gem) =1.747 +/- 0.061 mas, LD(Y Oph) = 1.437 +/- 0.040 mas and LD(L Car) = 2.988 +/- 0.012 mas. For four of these stars (eta Aql, W Sgr, beta Dor, and L Car) we detect the pulsational variation of their angular diameter. This enables us to compute directly their distances, using a modified version of the Baade-Wesselink method: d(eta Aql) = 276 [+55 -38] pc, d(W Sgr) = 379 [+216 -130] pc, d(beta Dor) = 345 [+175 -80] pc, d(L Car) = 603 [+24 -19] pc. The stated error bars are statistical in nature. Applying a hybrid method, that makes use of the Gieren et al. (1998) Period-Radius relation to estimate the linear diameters, we obtain the following distances (statistical and systematic error bars are mentioned): d(X Sgr) = 324 +/- 7 +/- 17 pc, d(eta Aql) = 264 +/- 4 +/- 14 pc, d(W Sgr) = 386 +/- 9 +/- 21 pc, d(beta Dor) = 326 +/- 4 +/- 19 pc, d(zeta Gem) = 360 +/- 13 +/- 22 pc, d(Y Oph) = 648 +/- 17 +/- 47 pc and d(L Car) = 542 +/- 2 +/- 49 pc.

P. Kervella; N. Nardetto; D. Bersier; D. Mourard; V. Coude du Foresto

2003-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Advanced Reverse Osmosis Technology For Application in Nuclear Desalination Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The lack of adequate supplies of clean, safe water is a growing global problem that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of the world. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people do not have access to adequate supplies of safe water, and that as a result nearly 10,000 people die every day and thousands more suffer from a range of debilitating illnesses due to water related diseases. Included in this total is an estimated 2.2 million child deaths annually. As the world's need for additional sources of fresh water continues to grow, seawater and brackish water desalination are providing an increasingly important contribution to the solution of this problem. Because desalination is an energy intensive process, nuclear desalination provides an economically attractive and environmentally sound alternative to the burning of fossil fuels for desalination. Nevertheless, the enormity of the problem dictates that additional steps must be taken to improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the cost of water production in order to reduce the financial and environmental burden to communities in need. An advanced reverse osmosis (RO) desalination technology has been developed that emphasizes a nontraditional approach to system design and operation, and makes use of a sophisticated design optimization process that can lead to highly optimized design configurations and operating regimes. The technology can be coupled with a nuclear generating station (NGS) to provide an integrated facility for the co-generation of both water and electricity. Waste heat from the NGS allows the use of 'preheated' feedwater into the RO system, improving the efficiency of the RO process and reducing the cost of water production. Because waste heat, rather than process heat, is used the desalination system can be readily coupled to any existing or advanced reactor technology with little or no impact on reactor design and operation and without introducing additional reactor safety considerations. Analyses of nuclear desalination systems employing this advanced RO technology under a variety of seawater feed conditions have consistently shown that the cost of potable water production can be reduced by as much as 15-20% relative to systems designed in a more traditional manner. Demonstration testing has been carried out using a trailer mounted system producing up to 150 m{sup 3}/d of potable water. Experimental results from the demonstration testing are behaving as expected based on the analytical performance models, validating the advanced design concept and confirming that the performance improvements indicated by the analyses can be achieved in operating systems. Further demonstration testing is planned using a 1000 m{sup 3}/d containerized system, currently under design, coupled to an existing nuclear power reactor. (authors)

Humphries, J.R.; Davies, K.; Ackert, J.A. [CANDESAL Technologies Limited, Ottawa (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina SRNL, and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular, have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (ESS and 2cm) and full- scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests with new solvent being developed for the Extraction and Strip operations in the the ARP/MCU facilities. The Next Generation Solvent (NGS) is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (Extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (Modifier), 0.003 M guanidine -LIX-79, with the balance Isopar L (~70 wt.%). The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid (0.001 M) to a dilute boric acid stream (0.01M). EDL will also perform coalescer testing using the existing test housing supplied by SRR. EDL will complete

78

SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

PDSF User Meeting 08-06-13.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August August 6 , 2 013 Lisa Gerhardt Utilization --- 2 --- Past / Planned Outages * Past - July 26 th 4 d ays: e liza18 d isk f ailure, d egraded a ccess - July 30 th a ll d ay: U pgrade a nd r ework n etwork, n ew kernal and n ew G PFS, A LICE g rid u pdates, t heory g roup m oved from " other" t o " pdtheory" - July 31 st 6 h ours: p roject u navailable e verywhere * Planned - August 2 0 th A ll d ay: M endel u pgrade ( PDSF w ill b e o nline, just r educed n odes) Other Topics from PDSF Staff * PDSF u ser m ee<ngs n ow m onthly - Will i ncrease a s r equested * Best P rac

80

Legume Information System | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Legume Information System Legume Information System Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Legume Information System Dataset Summary Description LIS stores genetic and genomic data for crops and modal species in the legume family. LIS stores datasets from numerous legumes through species-specific webpages, and uses the reference species Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula as a basis for comparisons between and among diverse legume species. Other genomes are being added as they become available. For other legume species, LIS hosts transcriptome assemblies (both traditional EST and NGS-based) and other datasets. Comparative maps, reference datasets, sequence search tools, etc. make these datasets available for exploration and discovery. New features in 2013 include powerful new sequence-search methods and interfaces; new genome browsers for chickpea, common bean, and pigeonpea; inferred syntenic relationships between all sequenced legume genomes; and a new database of trait and QTL data for bean and peanut. LIS is funded by the USDA-ARS, and is developed and maintained jointly by the National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) and the USDA-ARS at Ames, Iowa.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Support Testing Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina SRNL, and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular, have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (ESS and 2cm) and full- scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests with new solvent being developed for the Extraction and Strip operations in the the ARP/MCU facilities. The Next Generation Solvent (NGS) is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (Extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (Modifier), 0.003 M guanidine -LIX-79, with the balance Isopar L (~70 wt.%). The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid (0.001 M) to a dilute boric acid stream (0.01M). EDL will also perform coalescer testing using the existing test housing supplied by SRR. EDL will complete

82

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRNL and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (ESS and 2cm) and full-scale SRNL and Engineering Developmental Laboratory (EDL) in particular have been tasked to perform a set of small scale (ESS and 2cm) and full-scale V-5 (Strip Bank) and V-10 (Extraction Bank) contactor tests with new solvent being developed for the Extraction and Strip operations in the the ARP/ MCU facilities. The Next Generation Solvent (NGS) is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (Extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (Modifier), 0.003 M guanidine -LIX-79, with the balance Isopar L (~70 wt.%). The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid (0.001 M) to a dilute boric acid stream (0.01M). EDL will also perform coalescer testing using the existing test housing supplied by SRR. EDL will complete cesium mass transfer testing on 5.6M Simulant Salt Solution spiked with cesium nitrate to a Cesium concentration of about 79 mg/L. (Prior to the Cs mass transfer testing, the system

83

V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

PULSE: Palomar Ultraviolet Laser for the Study of Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PULSE is a new concept to augment the currently operating 5.1-m Hale PALM-3000 exoplanet adaptive optics system with an ultraviolet Rayleigh laser and associated wavefront sensor. By using an ultraviolet laser to measure the high spatial and temporal order turbulence near the telescope aperture, where it dominates, one can extend the faintness limit of natural guide stars needed by PALM-3000. Initial simulations indicate that very-high infrared contrast ratios and good visible-light adaptive optics performance will be achieved by such an upgraded system on stars as faint as mV = 16-17 using an optimized low-order NGS sensor. This will enable direct imaging searches for, and subsequent characterization of, companions around cool, low-mass stars for the first time, as well as routine visible-light imaging twice as sharp as HST for fainter targets. PULSE will reuse the laser and wavefront sensor technologies developed for the automated Robo-AO laser system currently operating at the Palomar 60-inch telescope, as...

Baranec, Christoph; van Dam, Marcos; Burruss, Rick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

II-GRR at GRC - Analyses slides.pptx  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview Overview Kate Young Kermit Witherbee NREL October 2, 2012 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Schedule * Progress shown by dark bands after each jurisdiction * Target dates are shown for development of materials and upcoming meetings Roadmap D evelopment S tatus Mee2ngs* 25% 50% 75% 100% Reviewed & P rinted Mee4ng #1 Agency Follow--- up Mee4ng #2 Federal 5/3 6/7 California 6/14 6/27 Nevada 6/29 7/12 7/24 Hawaii 7/13 7/26 8/7 Alaska 7/27 8/9 8/21 Idaho 8/10 8/23 9/4 Utah 8/24 9/6 9/18 Oregon 9/1 9/13 9/25 Montana 9/14 9/20 NA * M ee4ng # 1: M eet w ith a gencies t o i ntroduce p roject a nd r eview d eveloped fl owcharts M ee4ng # 2: M eet w ith i ndustry t o i ntroduce p roject a nd g et f eedback o n p ermiRng c oncerns; m eet w ith a gencies a nd i ndustry t

86

Next Generation Solvent Development for Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction of Cesium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the FY 2010 and 2011 accomplishments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in developing the Next Generation Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (NG-CSSX) process, referred to commonly as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS), under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), Office of Technology Innovation and Development. The primary product of this effort is a process solvent and preliminary flowsheet capable of meeting a target decontamination factor (DF) of 40,000 for worst-case Savannah River Site (SRS) waste with a concentration factor of 15 or higher in the 18-stage equipment configuration of the SRS Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). In addition, the NG-CSSX process may be readily adapted for use in the SRS Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) or in supplemental tank-waste treatment at Hanford upon appropriate solvent or flowsheet modifications. Efforts in FY 2010 focused on developing a solvent composition and process flowsheet for MCU implementation. In FY 2011 accomplishments at ORNL involved a wide array of chemical-development activities and testing up through single-stage hydraulic and mass-transfer tests in 5-cm centrifugal contactors. Under subcontract from ORNL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) designed a preliminary flowsheet using ORNL cesium distribution data, and Tennessee Technological University developed a chemical model for cesium distribution ratios (DCs) as a function of feed composition. Inter Laboratory efforts were coordinated in complementary fashion with engineering tests carried out (and reported separately) by personnel at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Savannah River Remediation (SRR) with helpful advice by Parsons Engineering and General Atomics on aspects of possible SWPF implementation.

Duncan, Nathan C [ORNL; Delmau, Laetitia Helene [ORNL; Ensor, Dale [Tennessee Technological University; Lee, Denise L [ORNL; Birdwell Jr, Joseph F [ORNL; Hill, Talon G [ORNL; Williams, Neil J [ORNL; Stoner, Erica L [ORNL; Roach, Benjamin D [ORNL; Moyer, Bruce A [ORNL; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V [ORNL

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, together with the chemical kinetics of the combustion process, were analyzed to evaluate the performance of the different concepts. Detailed 1-D analysis was performed to provide 1-step NOx and 1-step combustion models that could be utilized in CFD to provide more accurate estimates of NOx for more complicated combustion designs. The swozzle results identified potential problems with flame holding, flashback and with adequate mixing. Flame holding issues were further evaluated with laboratory testing to determine under what conditions a jet in cross flow would flame hold. Additional CFD analysis was also performed on fuel injection from a peg to simulate fuel injection off a vane's trailing edge. This task was concluded with a Conceptual Design Review of the two selected design concepts. (3) Optimize design and re-evaluate operability risks. This task extended the analysis of LDI concepts and increased understanding of the optimal design configuration. Designs were selected for subscale combustion laboratory testing and then modeled using CFD to validate CFD methodology. CFD provided a good qualitative match and reasonable quantitative match with the test results. Tests and CFD modeling indicated a path to low NOx combustion with no diluent addition. Different swirler designs were also evaluated and the most promising, a counter rotating swirler, was selected for further evaluation. CFD modeling was performed and the design was optimized to improve mixing. CFD modeling indicated the potential for low NOx combustion without diluent addition. CFD was validated against cold flow testing on a swirler using helium injection in place of hydrogen. Further validation work is still needed to ensure the ability to accurately model the mixing of swirling flows. Entitlement testing was performed on a perfectly premixed H2/N2/air mixture. Results showed that low NOx could be obtained at the temperatures of interest (7FB conditions) with no diluent addition. Results also showed that further NOx reductions might be possible by taking advantage of the very rapid H2 reaction to reduce combustor length and hence residence time. These results also in

Benjamin P. Lacy; Keith R. McManus; Balachandar Varatharajan; Biswadip Shome

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

88

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

Rigsby V.P.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

89

GPK-2 re-entry and deepening -- a technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Between mid February to end of May 1999 (in 104 days) the well GPK2 at the Soultz HDR site was successfully re-entered and deepened from 3876 m to a final depth of 5084 m and fully completed. Re-entry included the pulling of the existing 321 1 m long internal 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string, fishing of a submersible pump and some 150 m of 2 3/8-inch tubing, sealing of a major loss zone and opening of a 6 1/4-inch well section in granite (3211-3876 m) to 8 1/2-inch hole size. The well was extended to 5048 m in 8 1/2'' hole size and again completed with a floating 9 5/8-inch by 7-inch casing string. The casing shoe is at 4431 m. A bottom hole core was taken in the depth range 5048-5051 m. The core recovery was app. 40%. A pilot hole in 6 1/4-inch was drilled from 5051-5084 m for in situ stress measurements using the hydraulic fracturing technique. The re-entry and deepening of the well GPK2 was accompanied by several technical developments. New casing packer elements based on inflatable metal shells were developed in a close cooperation between SOCOMINE and MeSy GmbH (patent pending). These packer elements were successfully integrated into the completion of the well. The full weight of the casing string is supported by these elements which are filled with and imbedded in cement. High temperature cementing strategies (up to 170-190 C) for the complex saline fluids encountered in Soultz (High Magnesium Resistant Cements) were developed in a cooperation between Schlumberger Dowell (Vechta), SOCOMINE, SII of Houston, Ruhr-University Bochum, BGR Hannover and IFP Paris. The development of several high temperature logging tools (200 C range, 6-arm caliper, PTF probe) was initiated with CSMA (Cornwall) during the preparation of the deepening of GPK2. Initial scientific investigations included borehole logging (NGS, CLIPER, ARI, UBI, TEMPERATURE), geological investigations (cuttings, core) and seismic monitoring while drilling. During the first temperature log performed, 12 hours after circulation, a temperature of 194 C was recorded at 5048 m (bottom hole at that time) when the temperature tool failed. At this time the temperature was still climbing. Geological investigations and borehole logging indicate a strong degree of fracturation in the open hole section between 4431-5084 m. Several zones of hydrothermal alteration were identified.

Baumgartner, J.; Gerard, A.; Barla, R.; Socomine, S.A.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey’s (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards:Safeguards-by-Design at Enrichment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards (NGS3) was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) in Washington, D.C. on 14-15 December 2010; this meeting focused on the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) concept. There were approximately 100 participants from 13 countries, comprised of safeguards policy and technical experts from government and industry. Representatives also were present from the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the European Atomic Energy Agency (Euratom), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The primary objective of this meeting was to exchange views and provide recommendations on implementation of the SBD concept for four specific nuclear fuel cycle facility types: gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), GEN III and GEN IV reactors, aqueous reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities. The general and facility-specific SBD documents generated from the four working groups, which were circulated for comment among working group participants, are intended to provide a substantive contribution to the IAEA's efforts to publish SBD guidance for these specific types of nuclear facilities in the near future. The IAEA has described the SBD concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the DOE is working to establish SBD as a global norm through DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. This paper describes the discussion topics and final recommendations of the Enrichment Facilities Working Group. The working group participants were tasked with providing recommendations for facility operators and designers, while promoting the IAEA's objectives of: (1) avoiding costly and time-consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear facilities and (2) providing for more effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards.

Long, Jon D. [Y-12 National Security Complex; McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL; Lockwood, Mr. Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z