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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

HAL JFS 46 2012b Sablayrolles Jean-Franois (Paris 13 SPC et LDI UMR 7187)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAL JFS 46 2012b Sablayrolles Jean-François (Paris 13 SPC et LDI UMR 7187) « Néologie et figement

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

Performance of a NGS-based MCAO demonstrator: the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of a NGS-based MCAO demonstrator: the NGC3366 and NGC2346 simulations Venice 2001% of the energy. These quantities are com- puted using a measured C 2 n pro#12;le and for asterisms of natural

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

3

F i W ldiFusion Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F i W ldiFusion Welding ver. 1 ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

Colton, Jonathan S.

4

F i W ldi PFusion Welding -Processes ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F i W ldi PFusion Welding - Processes ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding · Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. · Heat + filler material = weld· Heat + filler

Colton, Jonathan S.

5

Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

Ahmad, Sajjad

7

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters] [Biomatters

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

Peters, T.; Williams, M.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Gilbert, Tom [National History Museum of Denmark

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-Fast Clustering Algorithms (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

San Diego Supercomputer Center's Weizhong Li on "Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-fast Clustering Algorithms" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

Li, Weizhong [San Diego Supercomputer Center

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

15

NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory] [FBI Laboratory

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

BUI.LDING ENERGY 1987 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Offices, Retail and Wholesale Stores Section Title PaaeDesign Requirements ...·.·.......·... 55Energy Building Energy Efficiency Standards Energy Conservation Standards for New Offices, Retail and Wholesale ...·...··...... - Retail and Wholesale Stores . Ventilation Requirements .... 81 85 106 122 138 154 Energy Conservation

17

Bui & Dinh VVDA.P6.01  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CASL-U-2013-0328-000 Figure 2.1. The pyramid of the subcooled boiling flow phenomenology 3. The subcooled flow boiling model describes the physics schematically...

18

annual publication ngs: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is 28 C and for which Calvanese, Diego 9 Annual report 2008 | 1Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Royal...

19

Through-the-wall Imaging Radar Students: Thang Bui and Joseph Rabig  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radar (SAR) to image objects behind a wall, using a pair of horn antennas and a vector network analyser was used to calibrate out unknown cable and system delays · Objects are resolved at correct locations close to the SAR Focusing delay geometry Theory ­ Image Processing Electromagnetic distance between horn

Ghahramani, Zoubin

20

Improvements on a simple muscle-based 3D face for realistic facial expressions The Duy Bui Dirk Heylen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dynamics of the human face. However, because massive computation is required, these models are not used widely for realtime animation. Pseudo muscle models just ignore the complicated underlying anatomy in this model. The techniques to increase the animation speed are described in Section 5. 2 The face model

Nijholt, Anton

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gnrr HousnEnsrHorEr & WATERFRoNTOrncn BunDrNGs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal HeatPump (GHP)systemin the world. With their GHP system,energy costin theGaltHouseEastis $25.A heatpump package does not require the skill and experiencerequired by a centrifugal system with four pipeHouseEastHotel) . 1994(WaterfrontOfficeBuildings) SvsrEvr: c 7200geothermalor water source heatpumps 1 to 30ton units

22

The Bui Dam impact on Ghana-China relations : transparency, accountability and development outcomes from China's Sino Hydro Dam Project in Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current Afro-Chinese relations on development projects in Sub Saharan Africa has come under a lot of scrutiny, with some experts in the South-to-South relationship discourse claiming the above short-gun-marriage will ...

Habia, James K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Laboratory Results and Status Update for Pathfinder at LBT, The LINC-NIRVANA NGS Ground- Layer AO Subsystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument will be one of the most complex ground-based astronomical systems ever built. It will consist of multiple subsystems, including two multi-conjugate ground layer AO systems (MCAO) that drive the LBT adaptive secondaries, two mid-high layer AO systems with their own Xynetics 349 actuator DM's , a fringe tracker, a beam combiner, and the NIR science camera. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to instrument testing and commissioning by decoupling these subsystems individually. The first subsystem tested on-sky will be one of the ground-layer AO systems, part of a test-bed known as the Pathfinder. The Pathfinder consists of a 12-star pyramid wavefront sensor (PWFS) that drives one of the LBT's adaptive secondaries, a support structure known as "The Foot," and the infrared test camera (IRTC), which is used for acquisition and alignment. The 12 natural guide stars are acquired by moveable arms called "star enlargers," each of which contains its own optical path. The...

Kopon, Derek; Bertram, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Krster, Martin; Berwein, Jrgen; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Viotto, Valentina; Bergomi, Maria; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Baumeister, Harald; De Bonis, Fulvio; Hofferbert, Ralph; Brunelli, Alessandro; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Bizenberger, Peter; Briegel, Florian; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Zhang, Xianyu; Kittmann, Frank

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coupled modes analysis of SRS backscattering, with Langmuir decay and possible cascadings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent experiments aimed at understanding stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF laser-plasma interactions, suggest that SRS is coupled to the Langmuir decay interaction (LDI). The effects of LDI on the saturation of the ...

Salcedo, Ante, 1969-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adaptation method for solving the level set advection equation C. Bui1, C. Dapogny2,3,*, and P. Frey2 1CEA dimensions. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Received 26 May 2011; Revised 18 October 2011; Accepted-75005 Paris, France. E-mail: dapogny@ann.jussieu.fr Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. #12;C. BUI

Frey, Pascal

26

Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

28

n er a I Ap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ca!ICNl (10m I t0Uf)5!1C porn! of vie... itIld weI/- lno...n lor ::5 hlsionc.rl C(NIir6 WJth m~ny medllvll bui

29

A new interpretation of total column BrO during Arctic spring R. J. Salawitch,1,2,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bui,18 G. Chen,19 R. B. Pierce,20 J. H. Crawford,19 and D. J. Jacob21 Received 30 April 2010; revised the convective boundary layer (CBL) during the ARCTAS and ARCPAC field campaigns at times bear little relation

Pan, Laura

30

The Genome Analysis Toolkit: A MapReduce framework for analyzing next-generation DNA sequencing data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) projects, such as the 1000 Genomes Project, are already revolutionizing our understanding of genetic variation among individuals. However, the massive data sets generated by NGSthe ...

McKenna, Aaron

31

SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

32

Tuitioon & Fees Broc Bowling Gree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the outofstate surcharge. Tuition Rates by Campus Bowling Green State University offers programs from three 1001 Ea 132 Admin Bowling G 419 Bursa en State Unive ast Wooster S nistration Bui Green, OH. 4 bursar without advanced notice. Fees/Policies All tuition and fees are approved by Bowling Green State

Moore, Paul A.

33

Tuitioon & Fees Broc Bowling Gree  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are approved by Bowling Green State University's Board of Trustees and are subject to change, without notice the instructional fee plus the outofstate surcharge. Tuition Rates by Campus Bowling Green State University the Bowling Gree 1001 Ea 132 Admin Bowling 419 Bursa en State Unive ast Wooster S nistration Bui Green, OH 4

Moore, Paul A.

34

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids (2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

based on anisotropic mesh adaptation for solving two-fluid flows Thi Thu Cuc Bui1,,, P. Frey1,2 and B of the computational domain in the vicinity of the interface for better accuracy. Copyright 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd@ann.jussieu.fr Contract/grant sponsor: French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Copyright 2010 John Wiley

Frey, Pascal

35

Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to sub-nanometer scale Hao Van Bui #12;ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TiN FILMS GROWTH AND ELECTRICAL BEHAVIOR DOWN TO SUBD. Thesis - University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Title: Atomic layer deposition of TiN films

36

DEAN'S LIST Fall Semester 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Pablo A. Branyan, Callie Ann Braun, Rachel Anne Brown, Michael T. Bui, Julie Byrnes III, Dewayne William, Justin Michael Davis, Matthew Ryan Dawn, Taylor Alexandra DeForest, Evan Lee Decook, William C. Ding.engineering.arizona.edu Aaserud, Matthew Kenneth Acuna Briceno, Andrea Aldossari, Abdulaziz Abdullah Allee, Linda C. Alohali

Wong, Pak Kin

37

20112012 progress report UC Davis is Leading innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mpact 5 educating innovators 11 research powerhouse 13 BuiLding the econoMy 15 acceLerating innovation uc as an economic powerhouse for the state. The university also has raised more than $780 million thanks to our more

California at Davis, University of

38

Computer Optimized Design of Electron Guns John David  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Electron guns are used in many vacuum electron devices to convert electrical powerComputer Optimized Design of Electron Guns John David Lawrence Ives Hien Tran Thuc Bui Michael Read June 28, 2007 Abstract This paper considers the problem of designing electron guns us- ing

39

Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs Stavros Tripakis, Dai Bui, Bert of California, Berkeley stavros, daib, eal@eecs.berkeley.edu October 20, 2009 Abstract Hierarchical SDF models

40

adenine dinucleotide regeneration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and adenosine polyphospho guanosines (Ap nGs) have been detected in human Okan Cinkilic; Brian F. King; Markus Van; Der Giet; Hartmut Schlter; Walter Zidek; Geoffrey Burnstock...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

42

Costing of Joining Methods -Arc Welding Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costing of Joining Methods - Arc Welding Costs ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems.S. Colton © GIT 2009 5 #12;LaborLabor Di t ti f ldi· Direct time of welding ­ time to produce a length of weld ­ labor rate ­ multiplication gives labor cost per length · Set-up time, etc. · Personal time

Colton, Jonathan S.

43

ASPRS 2005 Annual Conference Baltimore, Maryland March 7-11, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further geospatial visualization and analysis, GWSC supports to build, instantiate, execute and registerASPRS 2005 Annual Conference Baltimore, Maryland March 7-11, 2005 GEOSPATIAL WEB SERVICE CLIENT@gmu.edu yxdeng_98@yahoo.com ldi@gmu.edu ABSTRACT This Geospatial Web Service Client (GWSC) provides

44

Joining Part 1g ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technique issues W ldi i i t f i l h Welding using interfacial shear Adhesive bonding Diffusion bonding Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2009 2 #12;Solid state bonding issuesSolid state bonding issues Oxide layers to metal hardness ratio leads High oxide to metal hardness ratio leads to good bonds aluminum tin ME 6222

Colton, Jonathan S.

45

Subscriber access provided by Stanford University Energy & Fuels is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth Street N.W., Washington, DC 20036 Article Asphaltene Molecular #12;Asphaltene Molecular-Mass Distribution Determined by Two-Step Laser Mass Spectrometry Andrew E of asphaltenes. Unlike widely used laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry, in which a single laser

Zare, Richard N.

46

Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be shown and compared with experimental data. The main emission products of gas turbine engines are soot mechanism is dominant for fuel-lean mixtures at low temperatures. Since gas turbine engines operate at high/chemistry/radiation in a realistic configuration. Utilizing the single injector LDI as a model for realistic systems, the combustor

Prinz, Friedrich B.

47

Anal. Chem. 1007, 59, 2747-2749 2747 ACKNOWLEDGMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-14-9;hexanophenone, 942-92-7. LITERATURE CITED (1) Armstrong, D. W.; Henry, S. J.; J . Llq. Chromafogr. 1080,3,657. (2) Armstrong, D. W. Sep. Purif. M e W s 1985, 74, 213. (3)Armstrong, D. W.; Nome. F. Anal. Chem, 107, 1073. (13) Armstrong, D. W.; Hinze, W. L.; Bui, K. H.; Singh, H. N. Anal. Lett. 1081, 74, 1659

Zare, Richard N.

48

Industrial-Load-Shaping: The Practice of and Prospects for Utility/Industry Cooperation to Manage Peak Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL-LOAD-SHAPI1IG: TIlE PRACTICE OF AND PROSPECTS FOR UTILITY/INDUSTRY COOPERATION TO MAUGE PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND Donald J. BuIes and David E. Rubin Consultants, Pacific Gas and Electric Company San Francisco, California Michael F.... Maniates Energy and Resources Group, University of California Berkeley, California ABSTRACT Load-management programs designed to reduce demand for electricity during peak periods are becoming increasingly important to electric utilities. For a gf...

Bules, D. J.; Rubin, D. E.; Maniates, M. F.

49

RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR PARSONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of {approx}150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

50

Engineered Polymerases Enable Novel Sequencing Applications ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Maryke Appel on "Engineered polymerases provide improved NGS library amplification and enable novel sequencing applications" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Appel, Maryke [Kappa Biosystems

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

51

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICP-MS Hg LBNL NAA NASCENT NURE MCL MSW NGS NWIS Pb Sb SDWRAbundance ICP Part. AA NAA NURE ICP See notes See Notes HostNeutron activation analysis NURE: National Uranium Resource

Birkholzer, Jens

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Soiling losses for solar photovoltaic systems in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fall restore the t PV plant t to the effic ciency observrainfall for a 554 kW dc PV plant in Hanford H Kin ngs, CAthe efficiency of solar PV plants. The accumulated soiling

Mejia, Felipe A; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Quantitative Analysis of the Resolved X-ray Emission Line Profiles of O Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are a small fraction of the wind mass Runacres & Owocki 2002, A&A, 381, 1015 #12;Statistics from a long rad-hydro to shock-heating and X-ray emission 1-D rad-hydro simulation of the LDI #12;A snapshot at a single time, 3201 #12;Another rad-hydro simulation, but plotted in Lagrangian coordinates. The shock-heated regions

Cohen, David

54

Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for direct profiling and imaging of small molecules from raw biological materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization(MALDI) mass spectrometry(MS) has been widely used for analysis of biological molecules, especially macromolecules such as proteins. However, MALDI MS has a problem in small molecule (less than 1 kDa) analysis because of the signal saturation by organic matrixes in the low mass region. In imaging MS (IMS), inhomogeneous surface formation due to the co-crystallization process by organic MALDI matrixes limits the spatial resolution of the mass spectral image. Therefore, to make laser desorption/ionization (LDI) MS more suitable for mass spectral profiling and imaging of small molecules directly from raw biological tissues, LDI MS protocols with various alternative assisting materials were developed and applied to many biological systems of interest. Colloidal graphite was used as a matrix for IMS of small molecules for the first time and methodologies for analyses of small metabolites in rat brain tissues, fruits, and plant tissues were developed. With rat brain tissues, the signal enhancement for cerebroside species by colloidal graphite was observed and images of cerebrosides were successfully generated by IMS. In addition, separation of isobaric lipid ions was performed by imaging tandem MS. Directly from Arabidopsis flowers, flavonoids were successfully profiled and heterogeneous distribution of flavonoids in petals was observed for the first time by graphite-assisted LDI(GALDI) IMS.

Cha, Sangwon

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

56

Compliant mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

being condiictcd by this group to bui11 at& entire robotic am&, that is actnatcd by the EAP aloiic, 1&y nsing the EAP as uiuscle fibres are also rcportc&l in lfil l4l !fij l3. Mi&gncto Active Poly&ocr (. '&IAV) Based on thc idea ot dcsigriing scrive... States has been working wrth the people here at Texas A&lvi Uruversity. It is an experience that I will definitely cherish in the years to come. TABLE OF CONTFNTS CHAPTFR Page INTRODUCTION . A. Vciiniform anil Serpentine Robots B. , Joint...

Venkataraghavan, Janarthanan T

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil (flexible graphite), Tefzel, Isolast, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case will not impact decontamination or immobilization operations at Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications have zero tolerance for dimensional changes such as the operation of valves while other applications a finite dimensional change improves the function of the application such as seals and gaskets. Additional considerations are required before using the conclusions from this work to judge outcomes in field applications. Decane, a component of Isopar?L that is most likely to interact with the polymers, mildly interacted with the elastomers and the propylene based polymers but their degree of swelling is at most 10% and the confined geometry that they are typically placed in indicate this is not significant. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid may leach protein into the NGS solvent. Since Vellumoid is used at the mixer in Saltstone where it sees minimum quantities of solvent, this leaching has no effect on the extraction process at MCU or the immobilization process at saltstone. No significant interaction is expected between MaxCalix and the polymers and elastomers used at MCU, DWPF, and Saltstone. Overall, minimal and insignificant interactions are expected on extraction and immobilization operations when MCU switches from CSSX to NGS solvent. It is expected that contacting NGS will not accelerate the aging rate of polymers and elastomers under radiation and heat. This is due to the minimal interaction between NGS and the polymers and the confined geometries for these polymers. SRNL recommends the use of the HSP method (for screening) and some testing to evaluate the impact of other organic such as alcohols, glycolate, and their byproducts on the polymers used throughout the site.

Fondeur, F. F.

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

58

Characterization of commercial fiber optic connectors - Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several types of commercial fiber optic connectors were characterized for potential use in a Sandia designed Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) system. The characterization included optical performance while the connectors were subjected to the more dynamic environmental conditions experienced in weapons applications. The environmental testing included temperature cycling, random vibration, and mechanical shock. This report presents a performance assessment of the fiber optic connectors and fiber included in the characterization. The desirable design features are described for a fiber optic connector that must survive the dynamic environment of weapon systems. The more detailed performance of each connector type will be included as resources permit.

Andrews, Larry A.; Williams, Randy J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Natural Conjugate Gradient on Complex Flag Manifolds for Complex Independent Subspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conjugate gradient method yields better convergence compared to the natural gradient geodesic search method is the natural gradient geodesic search method (NGS), and the other is the natural conjugate gradient method (NCG the natural gradient or the Newton's method on complex manifolds, however, the behavior of the conjugate

Plumbley, Mark

60

www.afm-journal.de 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1163  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the ambient environ- ment. Some types of energy sources, such as solar, thermal, and mechanical be used as a sensor signal for detecting magnitude and rate of the mechanical deformation. Since no power is applied in the signal detection, sensors based on NGs are called active or self-powered sensors

Wang, Zhong L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Joakim ?gren;Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Abstract-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way DNA is sequenced and the whole genome (i.e., all the DNA

62

Discovery and Validation of Barrett's Esophagus MicroRNA Transcriptome by Next Generation Sequencing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a false discovery rate of 5% was considered significant. NGS-identified miRNA were validated using qRT-PCR in an independent group of 40 GERD and 27 BE patients. MicroRNA expression of human BE tissues was also compared with three BE cell lines...

Bansal, Ajay; Lee, In-Hee; Hong, Xiaoman; Mathur, Sharad C.; Tawfik, Ossama; Rastogi, Amit; Buttar, Navtej; Visvanathan, Mahesh; Sharma, Prateek; Christenson, Lane K.

2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

63

2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 www.advmat.de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nanogenerator (NG) is a nanoscale power generator that transforms ambient mechanical energy into a useful form, Geondae Moon, Dohyang Kim, Youn Sang Kim, Jae Min Myoung,* and Zhong Lin Wang* High-Power Density piezoelectric components in the NG. The fun- damental mechanism of NW-based NGs is related to the piezoe

Wang, Zhong L.

64

ght up with f Hamilton-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ddings ght up with f Hamilton- Bachelor of of Arts in C er. e now work ngs magazi ne editor? sibilities Media, a Hamilton-H working as s and the most ex s me to do I am respo from begin nce wants to ds magazines including Hamilton Magazine, Vines Magazine and Hamilton-Halton Weddings, where I would go

Thompson, Michael

65

www.afm-journal.de 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the ambient environ- ment. Some types of energy sources, such as solar, thermal, and mechanical be used as a sensor signal for detecting magnitude and rate of the mechanical deformation. Since no power is applied in the signal detection, sensors based on NGs are called active or self-powered sensors

Wang, Zhong L.

66

ect an Activi T 160.01 -L  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, trip pla y in Yosemit T 160.05 ­ W velop person men, through men. g Mor ke a RP ity or Gener Lake into Y UCATION egment III) S; Segment s in lake and y and trip pla in small boa covery. ngs. Topics

67

E-Print Network 3.0 - age life styles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NGS SCHOOl OF VETERiNARy MEDiCiNE 4 EXCEllENCE AT WORK 5 CONFRONTiNG AGE MyTHS 6-7 lEARNiNG STylES 7-8 12... Chronological Age, Career Age, Life Events Age, and...

68

in: D. E. Dobbs, M. Fontana, S.-E. Kabbaj (eds.), Advances in Commutative Ring Theory (Fes III Conf. 1997)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ . .+.anrn-1 )r, which shows r to be invertible.) This prompts the question how many functions on R in: D. E. Dobbs, M. Fontana, S.-E. Kabbaj (eds.), Advances in Commutative Ring Theory (Fes III-336. POLYNOMIAL FUNCTIONS ON FI NITE COMMUTATIVE RI NGS

Frisch, Sophie

69

Flow induced vibration of a cantilever column jet: a spectral analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

induced instability and changes in the dynamic characteristics of a cantilever d1 schar ge pipe . The original 1 dea was inspired by the design of two new engineering undertak1ngs: the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plants (OTEC), and the new deep...

Shilling, Roy Bryant

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Performance of the SOAR adaptive module with UV Rayleigh guide star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It passed the conceptual review (2003) and two preliminary design reviews (2005, 2007). The integration natural guide stars (NGS), while the laser components were still integrated and progressively deployed, nvdbliek, mmartinez, emondaca, sheathcote@ctio.noao.edu #12;2. THE UV LASER GUIDE STAR The design

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

71

Electrospray and laser desorption ionization studies of C{sub 60}O and isomers of C{sub 60}O{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of C{sub 60} with ozone in toluene results in the formation of C{sub 60} oxides. C{sub 60}O and two isomers of C{sub 60} O{sub 2} were isolated; they both have the 423 nm absorption peak characteristic of an epoxide structure between adjacent 6,6-rings in C{sub 60}. Intact molecular ions are generated by electrospray ionization (ESI) without fragmentation. The enhanced ESI sensitivity of the higher oxides reflects the increase in electron affinity upon oxidation. In contrast to ESI, odd-numbered fragments are observed in laser desorption ionization (LDI) of C{sub 60}O. The two isomers of C{sub 60}O{sub 2} show different intensity distributions of the same fragment ions in LDI, suggesting different distances between the two oxygen atoms in them. Mechanisms are proposed for the formation of the two isomeric forms of C{sub 60}O{sub 2} and for mass spectrometric fragmentation processes. 14 refs., 5 figs.

Deng, J.P.; Mou, C.Y. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China); Han, C.C. [Inst. of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

1995-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of a maintenance program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) A in Tiverton, Ontario, has been operating for 10 yr. One reason for its successful operating record is the development of an effective preventive maintenance program. Evaluation of the existing preventive program included a review of maintenance of selected key equipment over the life of the station. The review emphasized the need to improve the storage and sorting of maintenance information for trend and cost analysis, manpower planning, reliability, and radiation dose calculations.

Walker, I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Survival of selected pine seed sources with different seedling treatments on droughty sites in East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zantle af the mycorrhizal association creates a zmchanical or physical barrier to certain root pathogens (Marx 1971). Moreover mycorrhizal fungi any also help by directly reducing certain soil pathogens causing damping off and root rot (Tinus and Mc... (Thames 1963). This is because the rows of stcmata are f~ apart (van Buijtenen et al. 1975). The ~ of stcmata per needle and per square millimeter of surface area are significantly less on ~ngs fran the Lest pines than on seedlings frcm wetter sites 29...

Echols, Ralph James

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Quelques slides sur les gr n s dans la serie : "hangman game for dummies"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quelques slides sur les gr n s dans la s´erie : "hangman game for dummies" Laurent LIFL, Universit´e Lille 1 - INRIA Journ´ees au vert 20 et 21 mai 2011 Laurent Quelques slides sur les gr n s #12;NGS://www.illumina.com/systems/miseq.ilmn Laurent Quelques slides sur les gr n s #12;Alors, de quoi vais-je bien pouvoir parler ? Laurent Quelques

Noé, Laurent

75

Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs et des gorilles en Afrique Centrale Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

les lacunes en connaissances qu'il faut combler, à travers l'amélioration des méthodes de recensement par les chercheurs suggérant qu'ils avaient eu peu de contacts avec des humains auparavant. ©Nick gorilles de plaine d'Afrique Centrale. ©NickNichols,NGS #12;Plan d'action régional pour la conservation des

76

Desulfurization of Texas lignite using steam and air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USI, IG STEA 1 ANO AIR A Thesis by ROSERT REGINALD STONE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of , 'RASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USING STEAM AND AIR A Thesis by ROBERT REGINALD STONE Approved as to style and content by: Dr. . A . Bulli n ( Chai rman of Committee) R. G. Anthony (Member) J. W. J ni ngs ( ber...

Stone, Robert Reginald

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

80

DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

82

The distribution and systematics of the skinks of the Eumeces Brevilineatus group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the specimen from Cooke county, but it appears to b 9 ~tt t 11 (1' yl, 1933). 0 p (1900) 1 marked on the black coloration of some of the Matamoros specimens, d d h d tg t y, f b . gt k (190gb) ddE. ~tt f gfgt Refugio County, Texas. He also reported...(N=118) was 2. 5%. The overall frequency for brevilineatus (N=232) was 9%, ~ f ~lit h 1 (N=PN), 1 68/. 0 g pht 1 tt grouped samples is demonstrated in Table 1 (p. 3d). For areas A-C ~), h g* f* q y 1 h 10/; f E ? K (b il' t ) 1 ldy f 1-N (~lit h 1...

Lieb, Carl Sears

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

A study of the effect of pantothenic acid deficiency on the reproductive organs of the male albino rat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

var iut ious iii tii sr cr c L ion oi' steroie borreones ol' tbc adrenu 1 cortc c which in ':u'n coi ldi bc caiisccl bir vuri-t joris -=. p iitothriiic acid inta! e. i'hc. role oi' pant otl-;saic ac i? i' i?porta!it bc! ca iso j t is ii n ' i" t, oi... &' ) i'icc '0 ' 0]. . it] 0 li ' oi 'll!c iu' "] I . . ;. G, ]s r&r co(i&inutiou of th sc lesnoi]s. hli o t rill o tii' ]nits s! Owed i& i p r, ';e I I'ai d" p. E. ' 10!] GI I i& a( "I' n" ls . I ] p( ophylucL lc: teats hc n)' iiiteaian( c dose i&r opi...

Lorenzen, Gerald Andrew

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Stimulated scattering in laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In laser driven fusion and high energy density physics experiments, one often encounters a k?{sub D} range of 0.15?LDI) is present. The SRS risk is shown to be highest for k?{sub D} between 0.2 and 0.3. SRS re-scattering processes are found to be unimportant under conditions relevant to ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Large-scale simulations of the hohlraum plasma show that the SRS wavelength spectrum peaks below 600?nm, consistent with most measured NIF spectra, and that nonlinear trapping in the presence of plasma gradients determines the SRS spectral peak. Collisional effects on SRS, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), LDI, and re-scatter, together with three dimensional effects, are examined. Effects of collisions are found to include de-trapping as well as cross-speckle electron temperature variation from collisional heating, the latter of which reduces gain, introduces a positive frequency shift that counters the trapping-induced negative frequency shift, and affects SRS and SBS saturation. Bowing and breakup of ion-acoustic wavefronts saturate SBS and cause a dramatic, sharp decrease in SBS reflectivity. Mitigation of SRS and SBS in the strongly nonlinear trapping regime is discussed.

Yin, L., E-mail: lyin@lanl.gov; Albright, B. J.; Rose, H. A.; Montgomery, D. S.; Kline, J. L.; Finnegan, S. M.; Bergen, B.; Bowers, K. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Extended data analysis strategies for high resolution imaging MS: New methods to deal with extremely large image hyperspectral datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large size of the hyperspectral datasets that are produced with modern mass spectrometric imaging techniques makes it difficult to analyze the results. Unsupervised statistical techniques are needed to extract relevant information from these datasets and reduce the data into a surveyable overview. Multivariate statistics are commonly used for this purpose. Computational power and computer memory limit the resolution at which the datasets can be analyzed with these techniques. We introduce the use of a data format capable of efficiently storing sparse datasets for multivariate analysis. This format is more memory-efficient and therefore it increases the possible resolution together with a decrease of computation time. Three multivariate techniques are compared for both sparse-type data and non-sparse data acquired in two different imaging ToF-SIMS experiments and one LDI-ToF imaging experiment. There is no significant qualitative difference in the use of different data formats for the same multivariate algorithms. All evaluated multivariate techniques could be applied on both SIMS and the LDI imaging datasets. Principal component analysis is shown to be the fastest choice; however a small increase of computation time using a VARIMAX optimization increases the decomposition quality significantly. PARAFAC analysis is shown to be very effective in separating different chemical components but the calculations take a significant amount of time, limiting its use as a routine technique. An effective visualization of the results of the multivariate analysis is as important for the analyst as the computational issues. For this reason, a new technique for visualization is presented, combining both spectral loadings and spatial

Leendert A. Klerk A; Er Broersen B; Ian W. Fletcher C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

International Journal of Mass Spectrometry 260 (2007) 222236 Extended data analysis strategies for high resolution imaging MS: New methods to deal with extremely large image hyperspectral datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large size of the hyperspectral datasets that are produced with modern mass spectrometric imaging techniques makes it difficult to analyze the results. Unsupervised statistical techniques are needed to extract relevant information from these datasets and reduce the data into a surveyable overview. Multivariate statistics are commonly used for this purpose. Computational power and computer memory limit the resolution at which the datasets can be analyzed with these techniques. We introduce the use of a data format capable of efficiently storing sparse datasets for multivariate analysis. This format is more memory-efficient and therefore it increases the possible resolution together with a decrease of computation time. Three multivariate techniques are compared for both sparse-type data and non-sparse data acquired in two different imaging ToF-SIMS experiments and one LDI-ToF imaging experiment. There is no significant qualitative difference in the use of different data formats for the same multivariate algorithms. All evaluated multivariate techniques could be applied on both SIMS and the LDI imaging datasets. Principal component analysis is shown to be the fastest choice; however a small increase of computation time using a VARIMAX optimization increases the decomposition quality significantly. PARAFAC analysis is shown to be very effective in separating different chemical components but the calculations take a significant amount of time, limiting its use as a routine technique. An effective visualization of the results of the multivariate analysis is as important for the analyst as the computational issues. For this reason, a new technique for visualization is presented, combining both spectral loadings and spatial

Leendert A. Klerk A; Er Broersen B; Ian W. Fletcher C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

89

Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15?nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5?nm for Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} and 3?nm for Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36}. The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} yield/flow stress: 2.54?GPa/1.29?GPa and Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} yield/flow stress: 3.57?GPa /1.58?GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

Adibi, Sara [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Branicio, Paulo S., E-mail: branicio@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Joshi, Shailendra P., E-mail: Shailendra@nus.edu.sg [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

The function of interpretation as perceived by park visitors and interpreters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the National Park Service was studied by Clark (1949) and in state park systems by Weaver (1952). These writi ngs identify i nterpretati on and nature study as the same activity. Merriam (1972) used the term educat1on synonymously with interpretat1on 1n... to the resource. Due to the nature of the activity, settings of interpreation are often organizationally based, that is, occurring within an organizational jurisdiction, not alone. In this case, one park system was selected for sampling: Texas...

Silvy, Valeen Adams

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

The effect of added biotin and vitamin E in broiler breeder diets on hatchability and early livability in broilers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of embryonic mortality: the first week of incubation and the last three days of incubation. When breeder hens are fed a low biotin diet their embryos develop congenital per osi s, atoxia, and characteristic. skeletal deformities. The deformities can... and 2 males per pen. Each pen was littered with 8 to 10 cm of fresh wood shav1ngs. Nine nests littered with fresh shavings for nest1ng mater1al were utilized per pen. Water was suppl1ed ad lib1tum by 2 Plasson waterers per pen. Feed was restricted...

Brown, Ronald Blyn

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Participative job design: a review of the literature, theoretical model and empirical test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(or management make decisions about what changes in a worker~ - job would make it moanln u ~ Unfortunately, there is no orovision nade for ensuring tnat, the job changes nil be oorceived by the workers in tho manner that jo'o redosigners desire To the ex... of Results General =valuation of Find'ngs SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIOiuS REFERENCL' iVOTES ~ o ~ ~ ~ REFEREVvCES 61 64 66 69 70 APPENDIX A: Worker Background Information APPENDIX B: Worker Questionnaire AP' ENDIX C: Supervisor Questionnaire APPENDIX D...

Eulberg, Joseph Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Correlation of selected rock and fluid properties with residual oil saturation obtained by laboratory waterfloods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thickness of one-fourth of an inch. End p1eces were mach'ned from lucite and f1+ted w1th rubber "0" r1ngs +o provide low pressure seals. Alum1num plates I ~ Core Holder 2. Vaouum Tube Voltmeter S. l00 Ohm Resistor 4. Calibration Leads S. Powerstat 6... of the end pieces. Three steel rods, thread- ed on both ends, were placed through the alum1num plates and bolted tightly to hold the end pieces 1n place. 12 DESCRIPTION OF EXPERI KNTAL PROCEDURE The experimental procedure consisted of preparing core...

Edgington, Jason Monroe

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effect of passive and active immunization against somatostatin in growing rats and cattle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as in Exp. 1. Rats were infused daily with . 50 ml of either anti-SS or NGS and weighed every fifth day. Antiserum used to infuse treatment rats was the same used in Exp. l. 81ood samples were taken via cannula on d 5, 10, 15 and 20 of the experiment... calculated on 10 determinations of four plasma samples containing 1, 6, 10 and 30 ng GH/ml was 2, 3. 5, 6. 5, and 22. 8% respectively. The interassay coefficient of variation calculated on determination of the same four plasma samples in four different...

Lawrence, Mark Elliott

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

National Geographic Society Kids Network: Report on 1994 teacher participants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, National Geographic Society Kids Network, a computer/telecommunications-based science curriculum, was presented to elementary and middle school teachers through summer programs sponsored by NGS and US DOE. The network program assists teachers in understanding the process of doing science; understanding the role of computers and telecommunications in the study of science, math, and engineering; and utilizing computers and telecommunications appropriately in the classroom. The program enables teacher to integrate science, math, and technology with other subjects with the ultimate goal of encouraging students of all abilities to pursue careers in science/math/engineering. This report assesses the impact of the network program on participating teachers.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

Schieffer, Gregg

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Impact of Pellet Injection on Extension of the Operational Region in LHD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pellet injection has been used as a primary fuelling scheme in the Large Helical Device. With pellet injection, the operational region of NBI plasmas has been extended to higher densities while maintaining a favourable dependence of energy connement on density, and several important values, such as plasma stored energy of 0.88 MJ, energy connement time of 0.3 s, of 2.4% at 1.3 T and density of 1:11020 m 3, have been achieved. These parameters cannot be attained by gas pung. Ablation and the subsequent behaviour of the plasma have been investigated. The measured pellet penetration depth estimated on the basis of the duration of the H emission is shallower than the depth predicted from the simple neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. It can be explained by the NGS model with inclusion of the eect of fast ions on the ablation. Just after ablation, the redistribution of the ablated pellet mass was observed on a short timescale (400 ms). The redistribution causes shallow deposition and low fuelling eciency.

Sakamoto, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tanaka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Narihara, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sakakibara, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Inagaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Fisher, Paul W [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL; Kato, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Komori, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kaneko, O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ashikawa, N. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; DeVries, P. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Emoto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Funaba, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Idei, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ikeda, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kado, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Khlopenkov, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kubo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kumazawa, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Minami, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Miyazawa, J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Morisaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Murakami, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Muto, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nakamura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nakanishi, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Noda, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Notake, T. [Nagoya University, Japan; Kobuchi, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; Liang, Y. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ohyabu, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Oka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ozaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Pavlichenko, R. O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Peterson, B. J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Saito, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Sasao, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sato, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sato, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Seki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shimozuma, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Takechi, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tamura, N. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; et al.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Neutron generator production mission in a national laboratory.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the late 1980's the Department of Energy (DOE) faced a future budget shortfall. By the spring of 1991, the DOE had decided to manage this problem by closing three production plants and moving production capabilities to other existing DOE sites. As part of these closings, the mission assignment for fabrication of War Reserve (WR) neutron generators (NGs) was transferred from the Pinellas Plant (PP) in Florida to Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The DOE directive called for the last WR NG to be fabricated at the PP before the end of September 1994 and the first WR NG to be in bonded stores at SNL/NM by October 1999. Sandia National Laboratories successfully managed three significant changes to project scope and schedule and completed their portion of the Reconfiguration Project on time and within budget. The PP was closed in October 1995. War Reserve NGs produced at SNL/NM were in bonded stores by October 1999. The costs of the move were recovered in just less than five years of NG production at SNL/NM, and the annual savings today (in 1995 dollars) is $47 million.

Pope, Larry E.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bui ldi ngs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

Peters, T. B.

2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

The design of efficient input circuits for class C amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX?? ??X ??o?? hen?in? c?o?ef? tiinf?s?sfg o? g?s rn?eo jis??sf?? linfd?eggsi X ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? X X X X X X X ?? m?cl aj lt?m?c lt?m? ?n?s ?? uni?ofe? tfn??ded o? ?nien? linfd?oi?si XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX ?? ??X ?snd?is? nf? ?n????ngs? a...?geof ???? ??????? l?s ?fdgeg?gs o? rn?eo ?f?efssidX jX ?X lsi?nf? ?rn?eo sf?efssief????? ???in? ue?? ?oo? ?o??nf?? ????X ??X mX ??siegg? ??a?ge??? o?singef? ?of?egeofd ?oi ??ndd ? n???e?esid?? ?io?ss?ef?d o? ?fdgeg?gs o? rn?eo ?f?efssid ??? ??? ??????X ??jX ?X...

Fristoe, Harold T.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

104

Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

105

Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating this. SRNL results support the transition to routine operations.

Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mapping analysis of scaffold/matrix attachment regions (s/MARs) from two different mammalian cell lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are potential element that can be integrated into expression vector to increase expression of recombinant protein. Many studies on S/MAR have been done but none has revealed the distribution of S/MAR in a genome. In this study, we have isolated S/MAR sequences from HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO DG44) using two different methods utilizing 2 M NaCl and lithium-3,5-diiodosalicylate (LIS). The isolated S/MARs were sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Based on reference mapping analysis against human genome database, a total of 8,994,856 and 8,412,672 contigs of S/MAR sequences were retrieved from 2M NaCl and LIS extraction of HEK293 respectively. On the other hand, reference mapping analysis of S/MAR derived from CHO DG44 against our own CHO DG44 database have generated a total of 7,204,348 and 4,672,913 contigs from 2 M NaCl and LIS extraction method respectively.

Pilus, Nur Shazwani Mohd; Ahmad, Azrin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Johari, Norazfa [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

INVESTIGATION INTO THE RATE OF TRIOCTYLAMINE PARTITIONING INTO THE MCU AQUEOUS PHASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has examined the issue of trioctylamine (TOA) losses at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) solvent. For this study, SRNL used partitioning and radiolysis data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as actual MCU operational data. From the radiolysis data, SRNL prepared a model on the rate of TOA degradation. From the combined sets of data, SRNL has calculated the largest possible value of TOA (although this value is not credible) in the Strip Effluent (SE) and also calculated two different conservative, more realistic values for TOA in the SE. Even under conservative assumptions, such as all of the TOA losses partitioning solely into the Strip Effluent (SE), the MCU operational data suggests that the maximum realistic TOA concentration in the SE is < 0.6 mg/L. Furthermore, from understanding the chemical differences between the old and new strip solutions, SRNL does not believe that the TOA will deplete from the blended BOBCalixC6 Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) at a rate higher than previously experienced. Finally, SRNL recommends pursuing analytical development of a method for TOA with a superior precision compared to the current method. However, as the TOA in the blended solvent will continuously decline during MCU operations, further improvements in the development of the understanding of TOA losses may not be cost effective.

Peters, T.; Couture, A.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

RESULTS OF CESIUM MASS TRANSFER TESTING FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT WITH HANFORD WASTE SIMULANT AP-101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRNL has performed an Extraction, Scrub, Strip (ESS) test using the next generation solvent and AP-101 Hanford Waste simulant. The results indicate that the next generation solvent (MG solvent) has adequate extraction behavior even in the face of a massive excess of potassium. The stripping results indicate poorer behavior, but this may be due to inadequate method detection limits. SRNL recommends further testing using hot tank waste or spiked simulant to provide for better detection limits. Furthermore, strong consideration should be given to performing an actual waste, or spiked waste demonstration using the 2cm contactor bank. The Savannah River Site currently utilizes a solvent extraction technology to selectively remove cesium from tank waste at the Multi-Component Solvent Extraction unit (MCU). This solvent consists of four components: the extractant - BoBCalixC6, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - trioctylamine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. This solvent has been used to successfully decontaminate over 2 million gallons of tank waste. However, recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a basis to implement an improved solvent blend. This new solvent blend - referred to as Next Generation Solvent (NGS) - is similar to the current solvent, and also contains four components: the extractant - MAXCalix, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - LIX-79{trademark} guanidine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. Testing to date has shown that this 'Next Generation' solvent promises to provide far superior cesium removal efficiencies, and furthermore, is theorized to perform adequately even in waste with high potassium concentrations such that it could be used for processing Hanford wastes. SRNL has performed a cesium mass transfer test in to confirm this behavior, using a simulant designed to simulate Hanford AP-101 waste.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

113

Premixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 21-month project translated DLN technology to the unique properties of high hydrogen content IGCC fuels, and yielded designs in preparation for a future testing and validation phase. Fundamental flame characterization, mixing, and flame property measurement experiments were conducted to tailor computational design tools and criteria to create a framework for predicting nozzle operability (e.g., flame stabilization, emissions, resistance to flashback/flame-holding and auto-ignition). This framework was then used to establish, rank, and evaluate potential solutions to the operability challenges of IGCC combustion. The leading contenders were studied and developed with the most promising concepts evaluated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and using the design rules generated by the fundamental experiments, as well as using GE's combustion design tools and practices. Finally, the project scoped the necessary steps required to carry the design through mechanical and durability review, testing, and validation, towards full demonstration of this revolutionary technology. This project was carried out in three linked tasks with the following results. (1) Develop conceptual designs of premixer and down-select the promising options. This task defined the ''gap'' between existing design capabilities and the targeted range of IGCC fuel compositions and evaluated the current capability of DLN pre-mixer designs when operated at similar conditions. Two concepts (1) swirl based and (2) multiple point lean direct injection based premixers were selected via a QFD from 13 potential design concepts. (2) Carry out CFD on chosen options (1 or 2) to evaluate operability risks. This task developed the leading options down-selected in Task 1. Both a GE15 swozzle based premixer and a lean direct injection concept were examined by performing a detailed CFD study wherein the aerodynamics of the design, together with the chemical kinetics of the combustion process, were analyzed to evaluate the performance of the different concepts. Detailed 1-D analysis was performed to provide 1-step NOx and 1-step combustion models that could be utilized in CFD to provide more accurate estimates of NOx for more complicated combustion designs. The swozzle results identified potential problems with flame holding, flashback and with adequate mixing. Flame holding issues were further evaluated with laboratory testing to determine under what conditions a jet in cross flow would flame hold. Additional CFD analysis was also performed on fuel injection from a peg to simulate fuel injection off a vane's trailing edge. This task was concluded with a Conceptual Design Review of the two selected design concepts. (3) Optimize design and re-evaluate operability risks. This task extended the analysis of LDI concepts and increased understanding of the optimal design configuration. Designs were selected for subscale combustion laboratory testing and then modeled using CFD to validate CFD methodology. CFD provided a good qualitative match and reasonable quantitative match with the test results. Tests and CFD modeling indicated a path to low NOx combustion with no diluent addition. Different swirler designs were also evaluated and the most promising, a counter rotating swirler, was selected for further evaluation. CFD modeling was performed and the design was optimized to improve mixing. CFD modeling indicated the potential for low NOx combustion without diluent addition. CFD was validated against cold flow testing on a swirler using helium injection in place of hydrogen. Further validation work is still needed to ensure the ability to accurately model the mixing of swirling flows. Entitlement testing was performed on a perfectly premixed H2/N2/air mixture. Results showed that low NOx could be obtained at the temperatures of interest (7FB conditions) with no diluent addition. Results also showed that further NOx reductions might be possible by taking advantage of the very rapid H2 reaction to reduce combustor length and hence residence time. These results also in

Benjamin P. Lacy; Keith R. McManus; Balachandar Varatharajan; Biswadip Shome

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

Rigsby V.P.

2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

115

RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.

Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z