Sample records for bui ldi ngs

  1. HAL JFS 46 2012b Sablayrolles Jean-Franois (Paris 13 SPC et LDI UMR 7187)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HAL JFS 46 2012b Sablayrolles Jean-François (Paris 13 SPC et LDI UMR 7187) « Néologie et figement

  2. F i W ldi PFusion Welding -Processes ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldi PFusion Welding - Processes ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. Heat + filler material = weld Heat + filler

  3. F i W ldiFusion Welding ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    F i W ldiFusion Welding ver. 1 ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2009 1 #12;Fusion weldingFusion welding Intimate interfacial contact by using a liquid of substantiallyg q y similar composition to the base materials. Heat + filler material = weld Heat + filler

  4. Optics -Laser Doppler Imaging. As the name suggests,LDI,Laser Doppler Imaging exploits the Doppler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Optics - Laser Doppler Imaging. As the name suggests,LDI,Laser Doppler Imaging exploits the Doppler effect to generate images,in this case of red blood cells moving within the microcirculatory system the Doppler shifted light we obtain information on all the red cells moving in the illuminated tissue,hence we

  5. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  6. http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl/1[7/2/2010 2:26:29 PM] The NGS Data Sheet See Report By GR1938 HISTORY - 1957 MONUMENTED CGS #12;DATASHEETS http://www.ngs.noaa.gov/cgi-bin/ds_pid.prl

  7. New Petri Net Programming Features in PEP ? C'ecile Bui Thanh 1 and Christian Stehno 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    New Petri Net Programming Features in PEP ? C'ecile Bui Thanh 1 and Christian Stehno 2 1 Universit@informatik.uni­oldenburg.de Abstract. We present two new facilities of the high level Petri net editor of the PEP tool. The latest version extends the class of supported Petri nets by a time extension of M­nets. Additionally it features

  8. NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters] [Biomatters

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  9. NGS for the Masses: Empowering Biologists to Improve Bioinformatics Productivity ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Qaadri, Kashef [Biomatters

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Kashef Qaadri on "NGS for the Masses: Empowering biologists to improve bioinformatic productivity" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  10. RESULTS OF ANALYSIS OF NGS CONCENTRATE DRUM SAMPLES [Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Williams, M.

    2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared two drums (50 gallons each in ?Drum#2? and ?Drum#4?) of NGS-MCU (Next Generation Solvent-Modular CSSX Unit) concentrate for future use at MCU in downblending the BOBCalixC6 based solvent to produce NGS-MCU solvent. Samples of each drum were sent for analysis. The results of all the analyses indicate that the blend concentrate is of the correct composition and should produce a blended solvent at MCU of the desired formulation.

  11. Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to Fuel Your NGS Research ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Carter, Jennifer [Agilent

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Jennifer Carter on "Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to fuel your NGS Research" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  12. Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to Fuel Your NGS Research ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Jennifer [Agilent] [Agilent

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jennifer Carter on "Beyond Basic Target Enrichment: New Tools to fuel your NGS Research" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  13. Sample Results From The Extraction, Scrub, And Strip Test For The Blended NGS Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the extraction, scrub, and strip testing for the September 2013 sampling of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Blended solvent from the Modular Caustic Side-Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Solvent Hold Tank. MCU is in the process of transitioning from the BOBCalixC6 solvent to the NGS Blend solvent. As part of that transition, MCU has intentionally created a blended solvent to be processed using the Salt Batch program. This sample represents the first sample received from that blended solvent. There were two ESS tests performed where NGS blended solvent performance was assessed using either the Tank 21 material utilized in the Salt Batch 7 analyses or a simulant waste material used in the V-5/V-10 contactor testing. This report tabulates the temperature corrected cesium distribution, or DCs values, step recovery percentage, and actual temperatures recorded during the experiment. This report also identifies the sample receipt date, preparation method, and analysis performed in the accumulation of the listed values. The calculated extraction DCs values using the Tank 21H material and simulant are 59.4 and 53.8, respectively. The DCs values for two scrub and three strip processes for the Tank 21 material are 4.58, 2.91, 0.00184, 0.0252, and 0.00575, respectively. The D-values for two scrub and three strip processes for the simulant are 3.47, 2.18, 0.00468, 0.00057, and 0.00572, respectively. These values are similar to previous measurements of Salt Batch 7 feed with lab-prepared blended solvent. These numbers are considered compatible to allow simulant testing to be completed in place of actual waste due to the limited availability of feed material.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR DETERMINING SUPPRESSOR CONCENTRATION IN THE MCU NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT (NGS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Diprete, D.; Milliken, C.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with identifying and developing at least one, but preferably two methods for quantifying the suppressor in the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) system. The suppressor is a guanidine derivative, N,N',N"-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG). A list of 10 possible methods was generated, and screening experiments were performed for 8 of the 10 methods. After completion of the screening experiments, the non-aqueous acid-base titration was determined to be the most promising, and was selected for further development as the primary method. {sup 1}H NMR also showed promising results from the screening experiments, and this method was selected for further development as the secondary method. Other methods, including {sup 36}Cl radiocounting and ion chromatography, also showed promise; however, due to the similarity to the primary method (titration) and the inability to differentiate between TiDG and TOA (tri-n-ocytlamine) in the blended solvent, {sup 1}H NMR was selected over these methods. Analysis of radioactive samples obtained from real waste ESS (extraction, scrub, strip) testing using the titration method showed good results. Based on these results, the titration method was selected as the method of choice for TiDG measurement. {sup 1}H NMR has been selected as the secondary (back-up) method, and additional work is planned to further develop this method and to verify the method using radioactive samples. Procedures for analyzing radioactive samples of both pure NGS and blended solvent were developed and issued for the both methods.

  15. Biodiversity Monitoring Using NGS Approaches on Unusual Substrates (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Tom [National History Museum of Denmark

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tom Gilbert of the Natural History Museum of Denmark on "Biodiversity monitoring using NGS approaches on unusual substrates" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  16. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  17. Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-Fast Clustering Algorithms (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Li, Weizhong [San Diego Supercomputer Center

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    San Diego Supercomputer Center's Weizhong Li on "Effective Analysis of NGS Metagenomic Data with Ultra-fast Clustering Algorithms" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  18. NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis, What does the Person of Interest look like? ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, Thomas [FBI Laboratory] [FBI Laboratory

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Callaghan on "NGS: Possible Applications for Forensic DNA Analysis" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  19. Assessment of the Impact of a New Guanidine Suppressor In NGS on F/H Laboratory Analyses For DWPF and Saltstone MCU Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) will now proceed with a new suppressor compound, 1,2,3-tris(3,7-dimethyloctyl)guanidine (TiDG), replacing the originally planned suppressor for NGS, 1,3-dicyclohexyl-2-(11-methyldodecyl) guanidine (DCiTG). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with evaluating the potential impact to F/H Laboratory analyses supporting the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) used to qualify transfers of MCU Strip Effluent (SE) into the facility and the Saltstone WAC used to qualify transfers of Tank 50 containing Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) from MCU into Saltstone. This assigned scope is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Previous impact evaluations were conducted when the DCiTG suppressor was planned for NGS and concluded that there was no impact to either the determination of MCU SE pH nor the analysis of Isopar L carryover in the MCU SE and DSS streams. SRNL reported on this series of cross-check studies between the SRNL and F/H Laboratories. The change in suppressor from DCiTG to TiDG in the NGS should not impact the measurement of Isopar L or pH in SE or DSS necessary to satisfy DWPF and Saltstone WAC (Tank 50) criteria, respectively. A statistical study of the low bias observed in Isopar L measurements in both SRNL and F/H Laboratories may be necessary now that the final NGS composition is fixed in order to quantify the low bias so that a proper correction can be applied to measurements critical to the DWPF and Saltstone WACs. Depending upon the final DWPF WAC requirement put in place for SE pH, it could become necessary to implement an alternative ICP-AES measurement of boron. The current blended solvent system testing in SRNL should address any impacts to Isopar L carryover into either the DSS or the SE. It is recommended that SRNL monitor the current blended solvent work underway with simulants in SRNL as well as any DWPF CPC testing done with the new SE stream to ascertain whether any need develops that could result in modification of any currently planned F/H Laboratory testing protocols.

  20. BUI.LDING ENERGY 1987 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Offices, Retail and Wholesale Stores Section Title PaaeDesign Requirements ...·.·.......·... 55Energy Building Energy Efficiency Standards Energy Conservation Standards for New Offices, Retail and Wholesale ...·...··...... - Retail and Wholesale Stores . Ventilation Requirements .... 81 85 106 122 138 154 Energy Conservation

  1. Johnny Bui | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for(SC) JettingChemistryJohn

  2. annual publication ngs: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is 28 C and for which Calvanese, Diego 9 Annual report 2008 | 1Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management | Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute Royal...

  3. Collaborative Teleoperation via the Internet Ken Goldberg, Billy Chen, Rory Solomon, Steve Bui,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ken

    robot arm via the Internet. A java applet at each client streams mouse motion vectors from up to 30 receive visual feedback from a digital camera mounted above the robot arm. To our knowledge to control a single industrial robot arm. We proposed the term "collaborative teleoperation" to describe

  4. Through-the-wall Imaging Radar Students: Thang Bui and Joseph Rabig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghahramani, Zoubin

    radar (SAR) to image objects behind a wall, using a pair of horn antennas and a vector network analyser was used to calibrate out unknown cable and system delays · Objects are resolved at correct locations close to the SAR Focusing delay geometry Theory ­ Image Processing Electromagnetic distance between horn

  5. Improvements on a simple muscle-based 3D face for realistic facial expressions The Duy Bui Dirk Heylen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijholt, Anton

    and dynamics of the human face. However, because massive computation is required, these models are not used widely for realtime animation. Pseudo muscle models just ignore the complicated underlying anatomy in this model. The techniques to increase the animation speed are described in Section 5. 2 The face model

  6. Gnrr HousnEnsrHorEr & WATERFRoNTOrncn BunDrNGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geothermal HeatPump (GHP)systemin the world. With their GHP system,energy costin theGaltHouseEastis $25.A heatpump package does not require the skill and experiencerequired by a centrifugal system with four pipeHouseEastHotel) . 1994(WaterfrontOfficeBuildings) SvsrEvr: c 7200geothermalor water source heatpumps 1 to 30ton units

  7. Report on the NGS3 Working Group on Safeguards by Design For Aqueous Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael; Schanfein, Mark

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Working Group on SBD for Aqueous Reprocessing Facilities was to provide recommendations, for facility operators and designers, which would aid in the coordination and integration of nuclear material accountancy and the safeguards requirements of all concerned parties - operators, state/regional authorities, and the IAEA. The recommendations, which are to be provided to the IAEA, are intended to assist in optimizing facility design and operating parameters to ensure the safeguardability of the facility while minimizing impact on the operations. The one day Working Group session addressed a wide range of design and operating topics.

  8. Review of Recent NGS Short Reads Alignment Tools BMI-231 final project, Chenxi Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    on discussing the most commonly used aligners in recent 2-3 years. Bowtie and Bowtie2 Indexing reference genome can efficiently speed up finding candidate alignment location(s) for each read. Bowtie[1] uses] To make bowtie a suitable algorithm for mapping short reads, which have mismatches due to genetic variants

  9. The Bui Dam impact on Ghana-China relations : transparency, accountability and development outcomes from China's Sino Hydro Dam Project in Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habia, James K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Afro-Chinese relations on development projects in Sub Saharan Africa has come under a lot of scrutiny, with some experts in the South-to-South relationship discourse claiming the above short-gun-marriage will ...

  10. Coupled modes analysis of SRS backscattering, with Langmuir decay and possible cascadings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salcedo, Ante, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments aimed at understanding stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF laser-plasma interactions, suggest that SRS is coupled to the Langmuir decay interaction (LDI). The effects of LDI on the saturation of the ...

  11. The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. A. GOLDIN, J. A. SMITH, O. M. SUN, A. A. AJA, M. N. BUI, AND T. HUGHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    The Wirewalker: A Vertically Profiling Instrument Carrier Powered by Ocean Waves R. PINKEL, M. Atime record. The elements of the WW system in- clude a surface buoy, a wire suspended from the buoy, a weight at the end of the wire, and the profiler itself. The wire and weight follow the surface motion of the buoy

  12. SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT PROGRAM REAL WASTE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  13. Sample Results From The Next Generation Solvent Program Real Waste Extraction-Scrub-Strip Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed multiple Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) testing using real waste solutions, and three Next Generation Solvent (NGS) variations, which included radiologically clean pure NGS, a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically clean BOBCalixC6 (NGS-MCU), and a blend of radiologically clean NGS and radiologically contaminated BOBCalixC6 from the MCU Solvent system. The results from the tests indicate that both the NGS and the NGS-MCU blend exhibit adequate extraction, scrub and strip behavior.

  14. Department of Ci l i e feri icvi Engineer ng Graduat Course Of ngs -2010-2011 Academ Year as of January 12, 2011 Course No. Course Name Instructor Day Time Location

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    and Repair S. Chidiac Mondays 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon ETB-534 CIV ENG 761 Graduate Seminar Series - Masters and Repair S. Chidiac Mondays 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon ETB-534 CIV ENG 761 Graduate Seminar Series - Masters

  15. Study on the runout of granular columns with SPH methods.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xuzhen; Liang, Dongfang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). "Lagrangian meshfree particles method (SPH) for large deformation and failure flows of geomaterial using elasticplastic soil constitutive model." International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics, (February), 15371570. Bui, HH...

  16. What is the problem? Buildings account for 40 percent of U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these systems to communicate, interact, share information, make decisions, Net-Zero Energy, High for BuiLDinG & fire researcH LaBoratorY #12;MeasureMent science for Net-zero eNergy, high

  17. n er a I Ap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ca!ICNl (10m I t0Uf)5!1C porn! of vie... itIld weI/- lno...n lor ::5 hlsionc.rl C(NIir6 WJth m~ny medllvll bui

  18. HKN Induction Project Title: IR Remote Switch Circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Ca!ICNl (10m I t0Uf)5!1C porn! of vie... itIld weI/- lno...n lor ::5 hlsionc.rl C(NIir6 WJth m~ny medllvll bui

  19. Operation of Energy Efficient Residential Buildings Under Indoor Environmental Quality Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medhat, A. A.; Khalil, E. E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effic iency in residential bui Idings I. INTRODUCTION Com prehensi \\Ie ex perience were gai ned over the past fifty years in Egy pt regarding how therm al comfort and sensations of Egyptians are related to indoor environmental. parameters...

  20. A new interpretation of total column BrO during Arctic spring R. J. Salawitch,1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Laura

    . Bui,18 G. Chen,19 R. B. Pierce,20 J. H. Crawford,19 and D. J. Jacob21 Received 30 April 2010; revised the convective boundary layer (CBL) during the ARCTAS and ARCPAC field campaigns at times bear little relation

  1. Hierarchical Partitioning Techniques for Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (CAREERS), EIA 0103674 (NGS) and EIA-0120934 (ITR), and by DOE ASCI/ASAP (Caltech) via grant number PC

  2. Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    in Arizona. NGS provides 95% of the power for CAP. #12;Coal and Water #12;Climate and Water #12;Why should I Components #12;Water Related NGS Documents EPA Regulation: "BART" alternative TWG Agreement: CA and NV or transform plant into solar plant Commitments from DOI to affected tribes #12;EPA on Water and NGS EPA

  3. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) blend and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  4. Implementation of Iterative Map turbo Decoder on TMS320C40 DSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sunil S

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) = P(u ) p(y lu ) If L'(us) is a priori information then (P(u, = ql) ) (P(u~ = ? I)) Using some mathematical manipulation we can write (1+ ?p( ? L'(us)jJ (2 9) P(ut) = At, exp[ut, L'(ut, )/2] (2. 10) This follows from ( /~ /P+ 3 1/P+/P = P... BITS USING UNIFORM INTERLEAVER LDA eRECD2ADR, ARO LDA @INPUT ADR, AR1 LDI 16, R9 IN LOQP7: LDI O, IRO LDI 15, RC RPTB IN LQQP6 LDI +AR1++, RO STI RO, ++ARO(IRO) IN LQQP6: ADDI 16, IRO ADDI 1, ARO SUBI 1, R9 BNZ IN LQQP7 CMEM ADR, ARi 1...

  5. Development of and Application of Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Mass Spectrometry Based Biosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamez, Roberto

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibited by gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanomaterials have made for versatile platforms in a wide range of applications including surface plasmon biosensing techniques and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). A primary driver for this work...

  6. Development of and Application of Plasmonic Nanomaterials for Mass Spectrometry Based Biosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamez, Roberto

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    exhibited by gold (Au) and silver (Ag) nanomaterials have made for versatile platforms in a wide range of applications including surface plasmon biosensing techniques and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS). A primary driver for this work...

  7. adenine dinucleotide regeneration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and adenosine polyphospho guanosines (Ap nGs) have been detected in human Okan Cinkilic; Brian F. King; Markus Van; Der Giet; Hartmut Schlter; Walter Zidek; Geoffrey Burnstock...

  8. Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Personnel Non-Government Standards Committee Activity and Participating Personnel DOE Technical Standards Ownership APPENDIX B: Non-Government Standards (NGS) Committee...

  9. Implementation of Iterative Map turbo Decoder on TMS320C40 DSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Sunil S

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . ENDM MAIN PROGRAM STORED AT ERAM BANK2 . TEXT MAIN GAM TMP ADR; LOAD PAGE POINTER IOSTACK PTR, SP ; LOAD STACK POINTER OCQNSTi, Rii; STORE CQNSTi IN Rii LDP LDI LDF LDI O, RO BIGGER LOOP: STI RO, OBIG ITER LDI O, RO INITIALIZE MEMORY... OF ENCODER TQ ZERO LDA eMEM ADR, ARO STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +ARO++ STI RO, +AROi+ STI RO, +AROt+ 'W444W48WW8WW4884W84'CWWW4W4'444WW4W8'C4'CWWW444W4W44'C+4444444 GENERATE A BLOCK QF RANDOM BITS USING 32 BIT PN SEQUENCE GENERATOR LDA e...

  10. Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compositionality in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs in Synchronous Data Flow: Modular Code Generation from Hierarchical SDF Graphs Stavros Tripakis, Dai Bui, Bert of California, Berkeley stavros, daib, eal@eecs.berkeley.edu October 20, 2009 Abstract Hierarchical SDF models

  11. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101106 Studies of Signal Waveforms From the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    develop higher and have more muons than showers started by primary protons of the same total energy. Gamma-rays the Water-Cherenkov Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory P.S. Allison, H. Bui-Duc, J. Chye, S. Dagoret The ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water-Cherenkov detectors

  12. DEAN'S LIST Fall Semester 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    , Pablo A. Branyan, Callie Ann Braun, Rachel Anne Brown, Michael T. Bui, Julie Byrnes III, Dewayne William, Justin Michael Davis, Matthew Ryan Dawn, Taylor Alexandra DeForest, Evan Lee Decook, William C. Ding.engineering.arizona.edu Aaserud, Matthew Kenneth Acuna Briceno, Andrea Aldossari, Abdulaziz Abdullah Allee, Linda C. Alohali

  13. Therapeutic targeting of autophagy in neurodegenerative and infectious diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinsztein, David C.; Bento, Carla F.; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . J. Biol. Chem. 290:50285040. http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc .M114.605428 Crdenas, C., R.A. Miller, I. Smith, T. Bui, J. Molg, M. Mller, H. Vais, K.H. Cheung, J. Yang, I. Parker, et al. 2010. Essential regulation of cell bioenergetics...

  14. Uncoveringthe legalrisksposedby

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    in building an Asia-literate and language- capable nation that will be able to effectively take up couldstopasthma initstracks #12;How is the rise of Asia changing the world? Over the past decade, the scale 10 Asian countries with the majority coming from BUiLD as part of our mobility program to build

  15. Tuitioon & Fees Broc Bowling Gree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    the outofstate surcharge. Tuition Rates by Campus Bowling Green State University offers programs from three 1001 Ea 132 Admin Bowling G 419 Bursa en State Unive ast Wooster S nistration Bui Green, OH. 4 bursar without advanced notice. Fees/Policies All tuition and fees are approved by Bowling Green State

  16. Tuitioon & Fees Broc Bowling Gree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    are approved by Bowling Green State University's Board of Trustees and are subject to change, without notice the instructional fee plus the outofstate surcharge. Tuition Rates by Campus Bowling Green State University the Bowling Gree 1001 Ea 132 Admin Bowling 419 Bursa en State Unive ast Wooster S nistration Bui Green, OH 4

  17. Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atomic layer deposition of TiN films Growth and electrical behavior down to sub-nanometer scale Hao Van Bui #12;ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF TiN FILMS GROWTH AND ELECTRICAL BEHAVIOR DOWN TO SUBD. Thesis - University of Twente, Enschede, the Netherlands Title: Atomic layer deposition of TiN films

  18. A detailed analysis of next generation sequencing reads of microRNA expression in Barretts Esophagus: absolute versus relative quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Hee; Hong, Xiaoman; Mathur, Sharad C.; Sharma, Mukut; Rastogi, Amit; Sharma, Prateek; Christenson, Lane K.; Bansal, Ajay

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    compared (>1000 vs. 500 vs. 100 vs. <100). The accuracy, precision and recall of NGS to label a miRNA as differentially expressed were 0.71, 0.88 and 0.74 respectively. Conclusion Absolute NGS reads correlated modestly with q...

  19. Protocol Utilisation de la Plateforme Galaxy pour alignement d'ARN I. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abou Elela, Sherif

    size et step size pour amliorer le trim. Alignement * NGS : Mapping Bowtie2 ou NGS : RNA Analysis plusieurs logiciels pour faire l'alignement. Tophat utilise Bowtie pour faire un alignement primaire ensuite between Mate Pairs du raw data, on peut galement rouler Bowtie sur une partie des lectures pour avoir

  20. Laser desorption ionization and peptide sequencing on laser induced silicon microcolumn arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos (Reston, VA); Chen, Yong (San Diego, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of producing a laser-patterned silicon surface, especially silicon wafers for use in laser desorption ionization (LDI-MS) (including MALDI-MS and SELDI-MS), devices containing the same, and methods of testing samples employing the same. The surface is prepared by subjecting a silicon substrate to multiple laser shots from a high-power picosecond or femtosecond laser while in a processing environment, e.g., underwater, and generates a remarkable homogenous microcolumn array capable of providing an improved substrate for LDI-MS.

  1. Encoding serial data for energy-delay-product and energy minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekambavanan, Sasidharan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , 5, 6, 7]. Although these techniques are easily im- plementable, none of them achieve the lower bound on transition minimization of [8, 9]. There is a clear trade-off between the reduction in the number of transitions achieved by bus encoding... was applied for DVI and OpenLDI, whereas in [2] it was applied for the DVI, OpenLDI and GVIF interface standards. These approaches im- prove the power/energy consumption compared to the work done in [3]. In [15] and [2], the single or no transition restriction...

  2. Sleep Transistor Sizing and Control for Resonant Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chris H.

    larger sleep transistors to improve performance Considers only IR droop Ignores the Ldi/dt noise Suppression of Resonance Decap consumes large leakage and area Adding resistors results in extra IR droop to avoid IR droop Adjustable switching threshold VSW #12;12 Suppression in both undershoot

  3. Size-selected 2, 5, and 10 nm gold nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumpo, Katherine Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical utility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is examined here. An evaluation of the parameters that affect desorption/ionization show that careful treatments of AuNPs is needed...

  4. ASPRS 2005 Annual Conference Baltimore, Maryland March 7-11, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for further geospatial visualization and analysis, GWSC supports to build, instantiate, execute and registerASPRS 2005 Annual Conference Baltimore, Maryland March 7-11, 2005 GEOSPATIAL WEB SERVICE CLIENT@gmu.edu yxdeng_98@yahoo.com ldi@gmu.edu ABSTRACT This Geospatial Web Service Client (GWSC) provides

  5. CSISSLCenter for Spatial Information Science and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    Page 1 CSISSLCenter for Spatial Information Science and Systems 03/19/2008 Survey of ISO Standards for Geospatial Metadata Liping Di ldi@gmu.edu Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems George Mason University #12;Page 2 CSISS Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems 03/19/2008 Introduction ISO

  6. Joining Part 1g ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    technique issues W ldi i i t f i l h Welding using interfacial shear Adhesive bonding Diffusion bonding Prof. J.S. Colton GIT 2009 2 #12;Solid state bonding issuesSolid state bonding issues Oxide layers to metal hardness ratio leads High oxide to metal hardness ratio leads to good bonds aluminum tin ME 6222

  7. Size-selected 2, 5, and 10 nm gold nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumpo, Katherine Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical utility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is examined here. An evaluation of the parameters that affect desorption/ionization show that careful treatments of AuNPs is needed...

  8. journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/nanoenergy Available online at www.sciencedirect.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    ; Flexible; Energy harvesting Abstract Nanogenerators (NGs) have been developed mainly using wurtzite to wurtzite. Laterally packaged single MW generator can generate up to 0.3 V and 40 nA when a strain wurtzite and zinc blende structures

  9. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xudong

    the inclusion of bulky battery components. Recent development of nanogenerators (NGs) has demonstrated, theoretical calculations and experimental characterization methods for predicting or determining, charging batteries, and powering electronic devices [38]. Devices to harvest the vibration-based energy

  10. RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR PARSONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) prepared a nominal 150 gallon batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) for Parsons. This material was then analyzed and tested for cesium mass transfer efficiency. The bulk of the results indicate that the solvent is qualified as acceptable for use in the upcoming pilot-scale testing at Parsons Technology Center. This report describes the analysis and testing of a batch of Next Generation Solvent (NGS) prepared in support of pilot-scale testing in the Parsons Technology Center. A total of {approx}150 gallons of NGS solvent was prepared in late November of 2011. Details for the work are contained in a controlled laboratory notebook. Analysis of the Parsons NGS solvent indicates that the material is acceptable for use. SRNL is continuing to improve the analytical method for the guanidine.

  11. Discovery and characterization of artifactual mutations in deep coverage targeted capture sequencing data due to oxidative DNA damage during sample preparation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    As researchers begin probing deep coverage sequencing data for increasingly rare mutations and subclonal events, the fidelity of next generation sequencing (NGS) laboratory methods will become increasingly critical. Although ...

  12. AnyExpress: Integrated toolkit for analysis of cross-platform gene expression data using a fast interval matching algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jihoon; Patel, Kiltesh; Jung, Hyunchul; Kuo, Winston P; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    external software tools such as Bowtie (indicated by pinkruns via software such as Bowtie or RMAP. The standard inputsoft- ware as inputs (e.g. , Bowtie for NGS), which consist

  13. Engineered Polymerases Enable Novel Sequencing Applications ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Appel, Maryke [Kappa Biosystems

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Maryke Appel on "Engineered polymerases provide improved NGS library amplification and enable novel sequencing applications" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  14. An Application of State-Of-The-Art HVAC and Building Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D. P.

    planning, design, and management of the project is given particular emphasis. Also, the engineering strategies used to integrate energy efficiency, performance optimization, current technology, and cost effectiveness are underscored throughout... as well as the pre-established finish-out allowance and capital budget for the project. The standard code used for building energy efficiency was ASHRAE Standard 90 "Energy Conserva? tion in New Bui lding Design." ASH RAE Standard 90 provides minimum...

  15. Single Stage Contactor Testing Of The Next Generation Solvent Blend

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Peters, T. B.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Poirier, M. R.; Brass, E. A.; Garrison, A. G.; Ketusky, E. T.

    2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent to increase the cesium decontamination factor. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facility the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing utilized a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the new extractant, MaxCalix, as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 liquid-to-liquid centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. The results indicate that hydraulically, the NGS solvent performed hydraulically similar to the current solvent which was expected. For the organic carryover 93% of the solvent is predicted to be recovered from the stripping operation and 96% from the extraction operation. As for the mass transfer, the NGS solvent significantly improved the cesium DF by at least an order of magnitude when extrapolating the One-stage results to actual Seven-stage extraction operation with a stage efficiency of 95%.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of the Resolved X-ray Emission Line Profiles of O Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    are a small fraction of the wind mass Runacres & Owocki 2002, A&A, 381, 1015 #12;Statistics from a long rad-hydro to shock-heating and X-ray emission 1-D rad-hydro simulation of the LDI #12;A snapshot at a single time, 3201 #12;Another rad-hydro simulation, but plotted in Lagrangian coordinates. The shock-heated regions

  17. Development of A Cryogenic Drift Cell Spectrometer and Methods for Improving the Analytical Figures of Merit for Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Jody C.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with Electron Impact) grid a transparent array of thin wires used in charged particle optics IMS Ion Mobility Spectrometry LDI Laser Desorption/Ionization longitudinal/axial the direction parallel to the transit of the ion beam or swarm MALDI Matrix... 1-2.1 Electric Field Considerations for IMS Experiments .......... 13 1-2.2 Measurement of Mobility Constants and the Gas Phase Collision Cross Section ................................................... 15 1-3 Separation Efficiency...

  18. Compliant mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraghavan, Janarthanan T

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    being condiictcd by this group to bui11 at& entire robotic am&, that is actnatcd by the EAP aloiic, 1&y nsing the EAP as uiuscle fibres are also rcportc&l in lfil l4l !fij l3. Mi&gncto Active Poly&ocr (. '&IAV) Based on thc idea ot dcsigriing scrive... States has been working wrth the people here at Texas A&lvi Uruversity. It is an experience that I will definitely cherish in the years to come. TABLE OF CONTFNTS CHAPTFR Page INTRODUCTION . A. Vciiniform anil Serpentine Robots B. , Joint...

  19. Phase-Boundary of several Multicube Superconducting Circuits in a Magnetic-Field of Arbitrary Magnitude and Direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YI, YM; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    );H. J. Fink, O. Buis- son, and B. Pannetier, ibid. 43, 10144 (1991);F. Yu, N. E. Is- raeloff, A. M. Goldman, and R. Bojko, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 2535 (1992). Some additional theoretical references on the subject of super- conducting networks..., 4294 (1985); H. J. Fink and A. Lopez, J. Phys. (Paris) Lett. 46, L961 (1985); Y. Y. Wang, B. Doucot, R. Rammal, and B. Pannetier, Phys. Lett. A 119, 145 (1986);Y. Y. Wang, R. Rammal, and B.Pannetier, J. Low-Temp. Phys. 68, 301 (1987); Y. Park, J...

  20. The use of radar in detecting flood potential precipitation and its application to the field of hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarble, Richard D

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )est ~telo~ gysroiogiscs ia the pest have bees hesper'o4 ceasi4erably by spaces asssorhs of preeipicaties gages ea4 poer eeaaeaisatieas ia obcsiainh asseesary preeipicatiea 4scs for chs prepstaties ef their river sa 4 fleo4 foretaste. Xa a44itisa, ic bu...i- ig ties co the fact that proeipitatiea eaa be 4eteete4 ever s largo area oeap stw4iu have shoes thee tbs veristioa ia cbo iatouity of pre o eipitatiea eaa bo i4eatifio4 by asses of ra4ar. Xhis report poiats oet the caps Sa whish ra4sr esa...

  1. Miscibility Evaluation Of The Next Generation Solvent With Polymers Currently Used At DWPF, MCU, And Saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, funded the development of an enhanced Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. This effort lead to the development of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) with Tris (3,7-dimethyl octyl) guanidine (TiDG). The first deployment target for the NGS solvent is within the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the new chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the affected facility. This report provides the calculated data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers known to be used or present in the MCU, Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), and Saltstone facilities that will be exposed to the NGS showed that TiDG could selectively affect the elastomers and some thermoplastics to varying extents, but the typical use of these polymers in a confined geometry will likely prevent the NGS from impacting component performance. The polymers identified as of primary concern include Grafoil (flexible graphite), Tefzel, Isolast, ethylene-propylene-diene monomer (EPDM) rubber, nitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR), styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR), ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and fluorocarbon rubber (FKM). Certain polymers like NBR and EPDM were found to interact mildly with NGS but their calculated swelling and the confined geometry will impede interaction with NGS. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid (cellulose fibers-reinforced glycerin and protein) may leach protein and Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC) may leach plasticizer (such as Bis-Ethylhexyl-Phthalates) into the NGS solvent. Either case will not impact decontamination or immobilization operations at Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications have zero tolerance for dimensional changes such as the operation of valves while other applications a finite dimensional change improves the function of the application such as seals and gaskets. Additional considerations are required before using the conclusions from this work to judge outcomes in field applications. Decane, a component of Isopar?L that is most likely to interact with the polymers, mildly interacted with the elastomers and the propylene based polymers but their degree of swelling is at most 10% and the confined geometry that they are typically placed in indicate this is not significant. In addition, it was found that Vellumoid may leach protein into the NGS solvent. Since Vellumoid is used at the mixer in Saltstone where it sees minimum quantities of solvent, this leaching has no effect on the extraction process at MCU or the immobilization process at saltstone. No significant interaction is expected between MaxCalix and the polymers and elastomers used at MCU, DWPF, and Saltstone. Overall, minimal and insignificant interactions are expected on extraction and immobilization operations when MCU switches from CSSX to NGS solvent. It is expected that contacting NGS will not accelerate the aging rate of polymers and elastomers under radiation and heat. This is due to the minimal interaction between NGS and the polymers and the confined geometries for these polymers. SRNL recommends the use of the HSP method (for screening) and some testing to evaluate the impact of other organic such as alcohols, glycolate, and their byproducts on the polymers used throughout the site.

  2. Seven Bridges Genomics 625 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge, MA 02138 www.sbgenomics.com www.twitter.com/sbgenomics team@sbgenomics.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    pipeline have been replaced my new versions since the original publication. This webinar will first provide min Abstract Several pipelines have emerged as solutions for SNP and Indel detection in raw next-generation sequencing (NGS) data. In addition to this "standard" variant detection performed by many pipelines, the Huge

  3. nature methods | VOL.7 NO.7 | JULY 2010 | 495 technology feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    nature methods | VOL.7 NO.7 | JULY 2010 | 495 technology feature Next-generation sequencing it would try to load all this infor- mation into memory before visualizing it," Schatz says. The program and shared between researchers. - Pre-NGS (base pairs per dollar) Doubling time, 19 months Hard disk storage

  4. P.M. Vallone 9/9/2014 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/pub_pres/Vallone_CAFDA_Sept_2014.pdf 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · In the process of preparing SRM 2372a · Characterize with dPCR versus UV absorbance Digital PCR (dPCR) Overview the FBI Laboratory and the National Institute of Justice. Outline · NIST forensic SRMs · Digital PCR- based method · Digital PCR provides this capability · Supports adoption of NGS in forensic community

  5. Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Joakim gren;Using genomics to improve Bacillus anthracis diagnostics and outbreak investigations Abstract-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way DNA is sequenced and the whole genome (i.e., all the DNA

  6. Natural Conjugate Gradient on Complex Flag Manifolds for Complex Independent Subspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumbley, Mark

    conjugate gradient method yields better convergence compared to the natural gradient geodesic search method is the natural gradient geodesic search method (NGS), and the other is the natural conjugate gradient method (NCG the natural gradient or the Newton's method on complex manifolds, however, the behavior of the conjugate

  7. Laboratory development of reconsolidation cycle for settlement analysis of precompressed clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Philip Norton

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    & A SPECIAL COhlhll TTEE OF THE '. MERI CAhl . OCI ETY OF ( I VI L ENGINEERS STUD l Et) THE DEVELOPMENT OF IERZAGHI S THEORY ~ THE REPORT OF THIS COLIMI TTEE YIAS PUBLISHED IN THE PRO? DEED I NGS OF Tt! E AtlER I CAN rOC I ETY OF ? I V I L ' NG I...

  8. CONCURRENCY AND COMPUTATION: PRACTICE AND EXPERIENCE Concurrency Computat.: Pract. Exper. 2003; 15:957977 (DOI: 10.1002/cpe.741)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parashar, Manish

    @caip.rutgers.edu Contract/grant sponsor: National Science Foundation; contract/grant numbers: ACI 9984357 (CAREERS); EIA 0103674 (NGS); EIA-0120934 (ITR) Contract/grant sponsor: Department of Energy/California Institute Muralidhar and Manish Parashar, The Applied Software Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical

  9. Pressures on Arizona Water and Energy Policy: Case Study of the Navajo Generating Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    largest user of energy in the state of Arizona. It is powered by a coal plant in Northern Arizona, the Navajo Generating Station (NGS), that is among the dirtiest coal power plants in the country. The future of this power plant is currently being debated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA

  10. A Peer-to-Peer Approach to Web Service Discovery Cristina Schmidt and Manish Parashar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parashar, Manish

    keywords and wildcards. Furthermore, it guarantees that all existing data elements match- ing a query in part by the National Science Foundation via grant numbers ACI 9984357 (CAREERS), EIA 0103674 (NGS) and EIA-0120934 (ITR), and by DOE ASCI/ASAP (Caltech) via grant number PC295251. #12;A P2P Approach to Web

  11. 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim 1 www.advmat.de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    nanogenerator (NG) is a nanoscale power generator that transforms ambient mechanical energy into a useful form, Geondae Moon, Dohyang Kim, Youn Sang Kim, Jae Min Myoung,* and Zhong Lin Wang* High-Power Density piezoelectric components in the NG. The fun- damental mechanism of NW-based NGs is related to the piezoe

  12. Characteristics of output voltage and current of integrated nanogenerators Rusen Yang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    with the measurement system; it is thus easy to observe false signals. To differentiate the electric power of the piezoelectric nanogenerators NGs and the influence of the measurement system and environment, identification of the true signal generated by the NG is critical. We have developed three criteria: Schottky behavior test

  13. Which is faster: Bowtie2GP > Bowtie > Bowtie2 > BWA W. B. Langdon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Which is faster: Bowtie2GP > Bowtie > Bowtie2 > BWA W. B. Langdon Dept. of Computer Science alignment tool Bowtie2 [RN/12/09, Sect. 5.3]. We find it runs more than four times faster than-ended DNA sequence, Solexa nextgen NGS, sequence query, Smith-Waterman, Bowtie2GP, fuzzy string match- ing

  14. in: D. E. Dobbs, M. Fontana, S.-E. Kabbaj (eds.), Advances in Commutative Ring Theory (Fes III Conf. 1997)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisch, Sophie

    + . .+.anrn-1 )r, which shows r to be invertible.) This prompts the question how many functions on R in: D. E. Dobbs, M. Fontana, S.-E. Kabbaj (eds.), Advances in Commutative Ring Theory (Fes III-336. POLYNOMIAL FUNCTIONS ON FI NITE COMMUTATIVE RI NGS

  15. Impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF CPC processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J. D.

    2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic-side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and new strip acid will be deployed. Processing will begin with a blend of the current solvent and the NGS. Compositional changes in the NGS solvent and blending with the current solvent require review of previously performed work to determine if additional experimental work is required to address any impacts to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The composition change involved the substitution of the N,N-dicyclohexyl-N-isotridecylguanidine LIX 79 guanidine suppressor with N,N,N-tris (3,7-dimethyloctyl) guanidine (TiDG) guanidine suppressor. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by DWPF to evaluate any impacts to offgas generation, solvent buildup or carryover, chemical, thermal, and radiolytic stability of the blended and pure TiDG based NGS. Previous work has been performed by SRNL to evaluate impacts to CPC processing using the next generation solvent containing LIX 79 suppressor with boric acid strip effluent. Based on previous experimental work and current literature, the following conclusions are made for processing in the CPC: No mechanism for a change in the catalytic hydrogen evolution in the CPC was identified for the NGS TiDG based solvent; The transition from the LIX 79 based suppressor to the TiDG based suppressor is not expected to have any impact on solvent or Isopar L accumulation; Transitioning from the current solvent to the TiDG based NGS is not expected to have an impact on solvent carryover or partitioning; No changes to the chemical stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; No changes to the thermal stability of the solvent in the CPC process are expected; A worst case scenario was examined in which all of the hydrogen atoms from the TiDG based NGS and blended solvent form hydrogen gas in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) as a result of radiolytic degradation. This represented a ~4% increase in the volume percent hydrogen in the SRAT. Given the chemical similarity and very low concentrations of the suppressor, it is not recommended that additional experimental work be performed to qualify any impacts to the DWPF CPC from the change in suppressor or the revised value for partitioning of the suppressor into the strip effluent.

  16. Characterization of commercial fiber optic connectors - Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, Larry A.; Williams, Randy J.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several types of commercial fiber optic connectors were characterized for potential use in a Sandia designed Laser Diode Ignition (LDI) system. The characterization included optical performance while the connectors were subjected to the more dynamic environmental conditions experienced in weapons applications. The environmental testing included temperature cycling, random vibration, and mechanical shock. This report presents a performance assessment of the fiber optic connectors and fiber included in the characterization. The desirable design features are described for a fiber optic connector that must survive the dynamic environment of weapon systems. The more detailed performance of each connector type will be included as resources permit.

  17. Fundamental properties of solar-like oscillating stars from frequencies of minimum $\\Delta \

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y?ld?z, M; Kayhan, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large separations between the oscillation frequencies of solar-like stars are measures of stellar mean density. The separations have been thought to be mostly constant in the observed range of frequencies. However, detailed investigation shows that they are not constant, and their variations are not random but have very strong diagnostic potential for our understanding of stellar structure and evolution. In this regard, frequencies of the minimum large separation are very useful tools. From these frequencies, in addition to the large separation and frequency of maximum amplitude, Y\\i ld\\i z et al. recently have developed new methods to find almost all the fundamental stellar properties. In the present study, we aim to find metallicity and helium abundances from the frequencies, and generalize the relations given by Y\\i ld\\i z et al. for a wider stellar mass range and arbitrary metallicity ($Z$) and helium abundance ($Y$). We show that the effect of metallicity is { significant} for most of the fundamental...

  18. Toward a Classification of the Ranks and Border Ranks of All (3,3,3) Trilinear Forms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allums, Derek

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    transformations. Ng?s classification is up to this action. The first step is to move the problem of classification into projective space so we consider P(A?B?C). Note that we can also have ? ? Hom(B?,A?C) or ? ? Hom(C?,A?B) so without loss of generality only...)?b1?c1 +a3?b3?c2 +(?a3)?b2?c3. Proposition .43. R(T ) ? 7,R(T ) = 5. Proof. The naive approach yields an upper bound of 7 for the rank. 33 CHAPTER IV SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS Building on Ng?s classification of all ? ? C3?C3?C3 up to the action...

  19. A study of semiconductor laser noise and its effect on fiber optic sensor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wanku

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER NOISE AND ITS EFFECT ON FISER OPTIC SENSOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WANKU LEE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... as to style and content by: F. aylor (Chair o Committee) D, c 0. Eknoyan (Member) Li ngs ( ember G. Cote (Member) A. , Patton (Head o Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ABSTRACT A Study of Semiconductor Laser Noise...

  20. Development of a maintenance program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bruce Nuclear Generating Station (NGS) A in Tiverton, Ontario, has been operating for 10 yr. One reason for its successful operating record is the development of an effective preventive maintenance program. Evaluation of the existing preventive program included a review of maintenance of selected key equipment over the life of the station. The review emphasized the need to improve the storage and sorting of maintenance information for trend and cost analysis, manpower planning, reliability, and radiation dose calculations.

  1. A study of semiconductor laser noise and its effect on fiber optic sensor performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wanku

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF SEMICONDUCTOR LASER NOISE AND ITS EFFECT ON FISER OPTIC SENSOR PERFORMANCE A Thesis by WANKU LEE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved... as to style and content by: F. aylor (Chair o Committee) D, c 0. Eknoyan (Member) Li ngs ( ember G. Cote (Member) A. , Patton (Head o Department) August 1994 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering ABSTRACT A Study of Semiconductor Laser Noise...

  2. Desulfurization of Texas lignite using steam and air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Robert Reginald

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USI, IG STEA 1 ANO AIR A Thesis by ROSERT REGINALD STONE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of , 'RASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981... Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DESULFURIZATION OF TEXAS LIGNITE USING STEAM AND AIR A Thesis by ROBERT REGINALD STONE Approved as to style and content by: Dr. . A . Bulli n ( Chai rman of Committee) R. G. Anthony (Member) J. W. J ni ngs ( ber...

  3. 1) Under the tool bar has a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    . is will let you you open a m r. u bypass the s macro enabled security settin d workbook. ngs in Excel). This func enter some ra t with this da uld have som opers tab and ess macro, bu power of mar ng commands it your macro s environmen gram! Hooma ed in some m e a look at the h line does. ction in excel andom

  4. Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs et des gorilles en Afrique Centrale Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    les lacunes en connaissances qu'il faut combler, à travers l'amélioration des méthodes de recensement par les chercheurs suggérant qu'ils avaient eu peu de contacts avec des humains auparavant. ©Nick gorilles de plaine d'Afrique Centrale. ©NickNichols,NGS #12;Plan d'action régional pour la conservation des

  5. Cutability, bacterial control and packaging effects on the merchandising of lamb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varnadore, William Lee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -life, quality and palata- bility of lamb cuts. Lamb carcasses were fabricated into 384 primal cuts which were used in packaging studies designed to compare chamber, rotating nozzle and stationary nozzle vacuum machines; barrier bags, saran bags, soft film... wraps, cheesecloth and paraffin coat1ngs, and saran pouches; and high vacuum, low vacuum and carbon dioxide atmospheres. Lamb cuts that were stored in barr1er bags under high levels of vacuum created in a chamber machine, satis- factorily maintained...

  6. DWPF FLOWSHEET STUDIES WITH SIMULANT TO DETERMINE THE IMPACT OF NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT ON THE CPC PROCESS AND GLASS FORMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.; Hay, M.; Stone, M.

    2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS), a new strip acid, and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) will be deployed. The NGS is comprised of four components: 0.050 M MaxCalix (extractant), 0.50 M Cs-7SB (modifier), 0.003 M guanidine-LIX-79, with the balance ({approx}74 wt%) being Isopar{reg_sign} L. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST was required to determine the impact of these changes in 512-S and Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) operations, as well as Chemical Process Cell (CPC), glass formulation activities, and melter operations. Because of these changes, experimental testing with the next generation solvent and mMST is required to determine the impact of these changes. A Technical Task Request (TTR) was issued to support the assessments of the impact of the next generation solvent and mMST on the downstream DWPF flowsheet unit. The TTR identified five tasks to be investigated: (1) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for NGS; (2) Solvent Stability for DWPF CPC Conditions; (3) Glass Formulation Studies; (4) Boron Volatility and Melt Rate; and (5) CPC Flowsheet Demonstration for mMST.

  7. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-1403/1404/1405/1406/1407/1408: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-1403, MCU-13-1404, MCU-13-1405, MCU-13-1406, MCU-13-1407, and MCU-13-1408 received on September 17, 2013 are reported. This sample was taken after the addition of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) cocktail to produce a NGS-MCU blended solvent. The results show that the solvent contains a slight excess of Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and TiDG when compared to the target composition. Addition of TiDG trim is recommended. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and that the value has returned to levels observed in 2011. In contrast to what was observed in the heel prior to adding the NGS cocktail, no organic impurities were detected in these solvent samples.

  8. CHEMICAL STABILITY OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIDE IN THE NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT FOR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. For simplicity, this solvent is referred to as the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The initial deployment target envisioned for the technology was within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), the polymer used in the coalescers within MCU. This report provides the data from exposing PPS polymer to NGS. The test was conducted over a three month period. PPS is remarkably stable in the presence of the next generation solvent. Testing showed no indication of swelling or significant leaching. Preferential sorption of the Modifier on PPS was observed but the same behavior occurs with the baseline solvent. Therefore, PPS coalescers exposed to the NGS are expected to perform comparably to those in contact with the baseline solvent.

  9. INVESTIGATION OF PLUTONIUM AND URANIUM UPTAKE INTO MCU SOLVENT AND NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) customer, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) uptake into the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) that will be used at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). SRNL examined archived samples of solvent used in Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests, as well as samples from new tests designed explicitly to examine the Pu and U uptake. Direct radiocounting for Pu and U provided the best results. Using the radiocounting results, we found that in all cases there were <3.41E-12 g Pu/g of NGS and <1.17E-05 g U/g of NGS in multiple samples, even after extended contact times and high aqueous:organic volume phase ratios. These values are conservative as they do not allow for release or removal of the actinides by scrub, strip, or solvent wash processes. The values do not account for extended use or any increase that may occur due to radiolytic damage of the solvent.

  10. Life extension program for the modular caustic side solvent extraction unit at Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadi-Dezfouli, Azadeh

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) is currently used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) for removal of cesium from the high-level salt-wastes stored in underground tanks. At SRS, the CSSX process is deployed in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU). The CSSX technology utilizes a multi-component organic solvent and annular centrifugal contactors to extract cesium from alkaline salt waste. Coalescers and decanters process the Decontaminated Salt Solution (DSS) and Strip Effluent (SE) streams to allow recovery and reuse of the organic solvent and to limit the quantity of solvent transferred to the downstream facilities. MCU is operated in series with the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) which removes strontium and actinides from salt waste utilizing monosodium titanate. ARP and MCU were developed and implemented as interim salt processing until future processing technology, the CSSX-based Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), is operational. SWPF is slated to come on-line in October 2014. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU process, however, was reached in April 2011. Nevertheless, most of the individual process components are capable of operating longer. An evaluation determined ARP/MCU can operate until 2015 before major equipment failure is expected. The three year design life of the ARP/MCU Life Extension (ARP/MCU LE) program will bridge the gap between current ARP/MCU operations and the start of SWPF operation. The ARP/MCU LE program introduces no new technologies. As a portion of this program, a Next Generation Solvent (NGS) and corresponding flowsheet are being developed to provide a major performance enhancement at MCU. This paper discusses all the modifications performed in the facility to support the ARP/MCU Life Extension. It will also discuss the next generation chemistry, including NGS and new stripping chemistry, which will increase cesium removal efficiency in MCU. Possible implementation of the NGS chemistry in MCU accomplishes two objectives. MCU serves as a demonstration facility for improved flowsheet deployment at SWPF; operating with NGS and boric acid validates improved cesium removal performance and increased throughput as well as confirms Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) ability to vitrify waste streams containing boron. NGS implementation at MCU also aids the ARP/MCU LE operation, mitigating the impacts of delays and sustaining operations until other technology is able to come on-line.

  11. A study of the effect of pantothenic acid deficiency on the reproductive organs of the male albino rat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzen, Gerald Andrew

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    var iut ious iii tii sr cr c L ion oi' steroie borreones ol' tbc adrenu 1 cortc c which in ':u'n coi ldi bc caiisccl bir vuri-t joris -=. p iitothriiic acid inta! e. i'hc. role oi' pant otl-;saic ac i? i' i?porta!it bc! ca iso j t is ii n ' i" t, oi... &' ) i'icc '0 ' 0]. . it] 0 li ' oi 'll!c iu' "] I . . ;. G, ]s r&r co(i&inutiou of th sc lesnoi]s. hli o t rill o tii' ]nits s! Owed i& i p r, ';e I I'ai d" p. E. ' 10!] GI I i& a( "I' n" ls . I ] p( ophylucL lc: teats hc n)' iiiteaian( c dose i&r opi...

  12. Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

  13. Pseudo-random construction and reduced complexity decoding for low density parity check codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhakar, Abhiram

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &, randomly constrn(t(&d panty-check inatrix at, thv, d&x o&1&&r can hc prohil&it. ivc in somr. applicatio&is. &Vh(:n a systvn& has a svt. of &liffcr&&nt LDI'(, ' codv&n each of t, hc parity-vhvrk matri?s nc&. 'd t, o hv, storvd in the rcceivcr. Anot h& r...)(Lkc(vtr, k)) L=l, k fr ('2. 1fi) Vr stprr(L, L(Tm )) = g srpn(LL, (l:r&, .)) k=1 kgr ('2. 17) Thc Eq. 2. 17 must hv. vomput&. &1 for a111=1. 2. p ? 1 and an cfficicnt, approach is nscd. First rkc fin&1 two &tuarititi&ls i&)1 arid Sl givvrl )ly Pg k...

  14. Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

  15. Composition and grain size effects on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr nanoglasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adibi, Sara [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Branicio, Paulo S., E-mail: branicio@ihpc.a-star.edu.sg; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 Singapore (Singapore); Joshi, Shailendra P., E-mail: Shailendra@nus.edu.sg [Mechanical Engineering Department, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoglasses (NGs), metallic glasses (MGs) with a nanoscale grain structure, have the potential to considerably increase the ductility of traditional MGs while retaining their outstanding mechanical properties. We investigated the effects of composition on the structural and mechanical properties of CuZr NG films with grain sizes between 3 to 15?nm using molecular dynamics simulations. Results indicate a transition from localized shear banding to homogeneous superplastic flow with decreasing grain size, although the critical average grain size depends on composition: 5?nm for Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} and 3?nm for Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36}. The flow stress of the superplastic NG at different compositions follows the trend of the yield stress of the parent MG, i.e., Cu{sub 36}Zr{sub 64} yield/flow stress: 2.54?GPa/1.29?GPa and Cu{sub 64}Zr{sub 36} yield/flow stress: 3.57?GPa /1.58?GPa. Structural analysis indicates that the differences in mechanical behavior as a function of composition are rooted at the distinct statistics of prominent atomic Voronoi polyhedra. The mechanical behavior of NGs is also affected by the grain boundary thickness and the fraction of atoms at interfaces for a given average grain size. The results suggest that the composition dependence of the mechanical behavior of NGs follows that of their parent MGs, e.g., a stronger MG will generate a stronger NG, while the intrinsic tendency for homogeneous deformation occurring at small grain size is not affected by composition.

  16. The glass lamps from the 11th-century shipwreck at Serc?e Liman, Turkey: a thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morden, Margaret Elizabeth

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    writ1ng during the 4th century, describes a hanging lamp in the following terms: "From the center of panelled ceil1ngs 1n spac1ous rooms . . . openwork bronze lamps were suspended by cable . like a kind of tree w1th pliant vine-like branches... to the three major forms of lamp development discussed earlier. Paul the S1lentiary, in h1s description of Sancta Soph1a in Constantinople, describes the lighting of the entire church (see Appendix III). In the center of the church a lamp was suspended 37...

  17. Correlation of selected rock and fluid properties with residual oil saturation obtained by laboratory waterfloods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgington, Jason Monroe

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thickness of one-fourth of an inch. End p1eces were mach'ned from lucite and f1+ted w1th rubber "0" r1ngs +o provide low pressure seals. Alum1num plates I ~ Core Holder 2. Vaouum Tube Voltmeter S. l00 Ohm Resistor 4. Calibration Leads S. Powerstat 6... of the end pieces. Three steel rods, thread- ed on both ends, were placed through the alum1num plates and bolted tightly to hold the end pieces 1n place. 12 DESCRIPTION OF EXPERI KNTAL PROCEDURE The experimental procedure consisted of preparing core...

  18. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied.

  19. The effect of added biotin and vitamin E in broiler breeder diets on hatchability and early livability in broilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Ronald Blyn

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of embryonic mortality: the first week of incubation and the last three days of incubation. When breeder hens are fed a low biotin diet their embryos develop congenital per osi s, atoxia, and characteristic. skeletal deformities. The deformities can... and 2 males per pen. Each pen was littered with 8 to 10 cm of fresh wood shav1ngs. Nine nests littered with fresh shavings for nest1ng mater1al were utilized per pen. Water was suppl1ed ad lib1tum by 2 Plasson waterers per pen. Feed was restricted...

  20. Impact of Pellet Injection on Extension of the Operational Region in LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tanaka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Narihara, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sakakibara, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Inagaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Fisher, Paul W [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL; Kato, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Komori, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kaneko, O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ashikawa, N. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; DeVries, P. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Emoto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Funaba, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Goto, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ida, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Idei, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ikeda, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kado, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Khlopenkov, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kubo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Kumazawa, R. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Minami, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Miyazawa, J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Morisaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Murakami, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Muto, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nagayama, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nakamura, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nakanishi, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Noda, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Notake, T. [Nagoya University, Japan; Kobuchi, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; Liang, Y. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; Ohdachi, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ohyabu, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Oka, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ozaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Pavlichenko, R. O. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Peterson, B. J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sagara, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Saito, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Sasao, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sato, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sato, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Seki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shimozuma, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Shoji, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Suzuki, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Takechi, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Tamura, N. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan; et al.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellet injection has been used as a primary fuelling scheme in the Large Helical Device. With pellet injection, the operational region of NBI plasmas has been extended to higher densities while maintaining a favourable dependence of energy connement on density, and several important values, such as plasma stored energy of 0.88 MJ, energy connement time of 0.3 s, of 2.4% at 1.3 T and density of 1:11020 m 3, have been achieved. These parameters cannot be attained by gas pung. Ablation and the subsequent behaviour of the plasma have been investigated. The measured pellet penetration depth estimated on the basis of the duration of the H emission is shallower than the depth predicted from the simple neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. It can be explained by the NGS model with inclusion of the eect of fast ions on the ablation. Just after ablation, the redistribution of the ablated pellet mass was observed on a short timescale (400 ms). The redistribution causes shallow deposition and low fuelling eciency.

  1. Neutron generator production mission in a national laboratory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Larry E.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1980's the Department of Energy (DOE) faced a future budget shortfall. By the spring of 1991, the DOE had decided to manage this problem by closing three production plants and moving production capabilities to other existing DOE sites. As part of these closings, the mission assignment for fabrication of War Reserve (WR) neutron generators (NGs) was transferred from the Pinellas Plant (PP) in Florida to Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM). The DOE directive called for the last WR NG to be fabricated at the PP before the end of September 1994 and the first WR NG to be in bonded stores at SNL/NM by October 1999. Sandia National Laboratories successfully managed three significant changes to project scope and schedule and completed their portion of the Reconfiguration Project on time and within budget. The PP was closed in October 1995. War Reserve NGs produced at SNL/NM were in bonded stores by October 1999. The costs of the move were recovered in just less than five years of NG production at SNL/NM, and the annual savings today (in 1995 dollars) is $47 million.

  2. Simulations of plasma behavior during pellet injection in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaywittaphat, P., E-mail: thawatchai@siit.tu.ac.th; Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma behavior during pellet injection in ITER is investigated using a 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the pellet ablation is described using the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model developed by Parks and Turnbull [Phys. Fluids 21, 1735 (1978)]. The NGS pellet ablation model that includes the {nabla}B drift effect is coupled with a plasma core transport model, which is a combination of an MMM95 anomalous transport model and an NCLASS neoclassical transport model. The combination of core transport models, together with pellet model, is used to simulate the time evolution of plasma current, ion and electron temperatures, and density profiles for ITER standard type-I ELMy H-mode discharges during the pellet injection. It is found that the injection of pellet can result in either enhancement or degradation of plasma performance. The {nabla}B drift effect on the pellet deposition is very strong in ITER. The plasma density with high field side pellets, which favorable with the {nabla}B drift effect, is much higher and pellet can penetrate much deeper than that with low field side pellets.

  3. Extending the frontiers of mass spectrometric instrumentation and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schieffer, Gregg

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this dissertation is two-fold: developing novel analysis methods using mass spectrometry and the implementation and characterization of a novel ion mobility mass spectrometry instrumentation. The novel mass spectrometry combines ion trap for ion/ion reactions coupled to an ion mobility cell. The long term goal of this instrumentation is to use ion/ion reactions to probe the structure of gas phase biomolecule ions. The three ion source - ion trap - ion mobility - qTOF mass spectrometer (IT - IM - TOF MS) instrument is described. The analysis of the degradation products in coal (Chapter 2) and the imaging plant metabolites (Appendix III) fall under the methods development category. These projects use existing commercial instrumentation (JEOL AccuTOF MS and Thermo Finnigan LCQ IT, respectively) for the mass analysis of the degraded coal products and the plant metabolites, respectively. The coal degradation paper discusses the use of the DART ion source for fast and easy sample analysis. The sample preparation consisted of a simple 50 fold dilution of the soluble coal products in water and placing the liquid in front of the heated gas stream. This is the first time the DART ion source has been used for analysis of coal. Steven Raders under the guidance of John Verkade came up with the coal degradation projects. Raders performed the coal degradation reactions, worked up the products, and sent them to me. Gregg Schieffer developed the method and wrote the paper demonstrating the use of the DART ion source for the fast and easy sample analysis. The plant metabolite imaging project extends the use of colloidal graphite as a sample coating for atmospheric pressure LDI. DC Perdian and I closely worked together to make this project work. Perdian focused on building the LDI setup whereas Schieffer focused on the MSn analysis of the metabolites. Both Perdian and I took the data featured in the paper. Perdian was the primary writer of the paper and used it as a chapter in his dissertation. Perdian and Schieffer worked together to address the revisions and publish it in Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry Journal.

  4. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  5. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics without Tip-tilt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Davies; S. Rabien; C. Lidman; M. Le Louarn; M. Kasper; N. M. Forster Schreiber; V. Roccatagliata; N. Ageorges; P. Amico; C. Dumas; F. Mannucci

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems allow a telescope to reach its diffraction limit at near infrared wavelengths. But to achieve this, a bright natural guide star (NGS) is needed for the wavefront sensing, severely limiting the fraction of the sky over which AO can be used. To some extent this can be overcome with a laser guide star (LGS). While the laser can be pointed anywhere in the sky, one still needs to have a natural star, albeit fainter, reasonably close to correct the image motion (tip-tilt) to which laser guide stars are insensitive. There are in fact many astronomical targets without suitable tip-tilt stars, but for which the enhanced resolution obtained with the Laser Guide Star Facility (LGSF) would still be very beneficial. This article explores what adaptive optics performance one might expect if one dispenses with the tip-tilt star, and in what situations this mode of observing might be needed.

  6. Identifying Energy Systems that Maximize Cogeneration Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahner, D. J.

    Ies whIch have Inherent constraInts or lImItatIons In meetIng these objectIves should be e11mlnated as opt10ns. Under such var1able condItIons Independent systems have slgnlf1cant advantage due to the1 r Inherent flexlb111ty 1n matchIng wIde var1at10...IDENTIFYING ENERGY SYSTEMS THAT MAXIMIZE COGENERATION SAVINGS DAVID J. AHNER Manager Systems Eng1neer1ng Schenectady. New York ABSTRACT Th1s paper d1scusses the max1m1z1ng of Reg10nal cogenerat10n Energy Sav1ngs ut1l1z1ng var10us...

  7. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and limited uptake of Isopar{reg_sign} L/Modifier by the polymers probably due to the polymers porosity and rough surfaces. Spectroscopic data on the organic liquid and the polymer surfaces showed no preferential adsorption of any component in the NGS to the polymers and with the exception of CPVC, no leachate was observed in the NGS from any of the polymers studied. The testing shows no major concerns for compatibility over the short duration of these tests but does indicate that longer duration exposure studies are warranted, especially for Tefzel. However, the physical changes experienced by Tefzel in the improved solvent were comparable to the physical changes obtained when Tefzel is placed in CSSX baseline solvent. Therefore, there is no effect of the improved solvent beyond those observed in CSSX baseline solvent.

  8. Results Of Routine Strip Effluent Hold Tank, Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank, Caustic Wash Tank And Caustic Storage Tank Samples From Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit During Macrobatch 6 Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2014-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Caustic Storage Tank (CST) samples from the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (Macrobatch) 6 have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The Pu, Sr, and Cs results from the current Macrobatch 6 samples are similar to those from comparable samples in previous Macrobatch 5. In addition the SEHT and DSSHT heel samples (i.e. preliminary) have been analyzed and reported to meet NGS Demonstration Plan requirements. From a bulk chemical point of view, the ICPES results do not vary considerably between this and the previous samples. The titanium results in the DSSHT samples continue to indicate the presence of Ti, when the feed material does not have detectable levels. This most likely indicates that leaching of Ti from MST has increased in ARP at the higher free hydroxide concentrations in the current feed.

  9. Proteogenomic strategies for identification of aberrant cancer peptides using large-scale Next Generation Sequencing data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Sunghee; Cha, Seong Won; Na, Seungjin; Guest, Clark; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Payne, Samuel H.; Bafna, Vineet

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Cancer is driven by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions. Distinguishing the early driver mutations from subsequent passenger mutations is key to molecular sub-typing of cancers, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. The availability of genomics technologies (mainly wholegenome and exome sequencing, and transcript sampling via RNA-seq, collectively referred to as NGS) have fueled recent studies on somatic mutation discovery. However, the vision is challenged by the complexity, redundancy, and errors in genomic data, and the difficulty of investigating the proteome using only genomic approaches. Recently, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies are increasingly employed. However, the complexity and redundancy of NGS data remains a challenge for proteogenomics, and various trade-offs must be made to allow for the searches to take place. This paperprovides a discussion of two such trade-offs, relating to large database search, and FDR calculations, and their implication to cancer proteogenomics. Moreover, it extends and develops the idea of a unified genomic variant database that can be searched by any mass spectrometry sample. A total of 879 BAM files downloaded from TCGA repository were used to create a 4.34 GB unified FASTA database which contained 2,787,062 novel splice junctions, 38,464 deletions, 1105 insertions, and 182,302 substitutions. Proteomic data from a single ovarian carcinoma sample (439,858 spectra) was searched against the database. By applying the most conservative FDR measure, we have identified 524 novel peptides and 65,578 known peptides at 1% FDR threshold. The novel peptides include interesting examples of doubly mutated peptides, frame-shifts, and non-sample-recruited mutations, which emphasize the strength of our approach.

  10. Proceedings of the DOE standards managers workshop, Gaithersburg, Maryland, October 26--28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 19, 1992, the Secretary of Energy signed the revised DOE Order 1300.2A, Department of Energy Technical Standards Program, which set the policy and assigned responsibility for activities within the program. The purpose of the revision to the order was to place greater emphasis on the use of technical standards for design, construction, testing, modification, operation, decommissioning, decontamination, and remediation of DOE`s facilities and activities. Within the context of this order, Standards Managers have been assigned for each DOE Secretarial office, each DOE Field Office, and each management and operating (M&O) contractor or site manager to be responsible for and provide the appropriate amount of emphasis on consistent use of standards at DOE facilities. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-119 also stresses the importance of the use of standards within Government facilities and directs that activities first attempt to locate and adopt non-Government standards (NGSs) for DOE use. If an NGS is not complete enough for the intended application, it should be adopted for the activity and tailored for the need by development of a Government (DOE) standard. When these NGS documents are unavailable, DOE components will develop an appropriate Government standard to satisfy the need. This expanded DOE program will provide all the information necessary to adopt, tailor, or develop these standards and track the activities. A key to the proper implementation of technical standards and governing requirements is establishing a culture of knowledge and commitment. The workshop provided an in-depth orientation on the Technical Standards Program to participating DOE and M&O Standards Managers.

  11. Mass Transfer And Hydraulic Testing Of The V-05 And V-10 Contactors With The Next Generation Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D. T.; Duignan, M. R.; Williams, M. R.; Peters, T. B.; Poirier, M. R.; Fondeur, F. F.

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) facility is actively pursuing the transition from the current BOBCalixC6 based solvent to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS)-MCU solvent. To support this integration of NGS into the MCU facilities, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of a blend of the NGS (MaxCalix based solvent) with the current solvent (BOBCalixC6 based solvent) for the removal of cesium (Cs) from the liquid salt waste stream. This testing differs from prior testing by utilizing a blend of BOBCalixC6 based solvent and the NGS with the full (0.05 M) concentration of the MaxCalix as well as a new suppressor, tris(3,7dimethyloctyl) guanidine. Single stage tests were conducted using the full size V-05 and V-10 centrifugal contactors installed at SRNL. These tests were designed to determine the mass transfer and hydraulic characteristics with the NGS solvent blended with the projected heel of the BOBCalixC6 based solvent that will exist in MCU at time of transition. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the organic carryover phases using several analytical methods. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined by measuring Cs concentration in the aqueous and organic phases during single contactor testing. The nominal cesium distribution ratio, D(Cs) measured for extraction ranged from 37-60. The data showed greater than 96% stage efficiency for extraction. No significant differences were noted for operations at 4, 8 or 12 gpm aqueous salt simulant feed flow rates. The first scrub test (contact with weak caustic solution) yielded average scrub D(Cs) values of 3.3 to 5.2 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 1.8 to 2.3. For stripping behavior, the first stage D Cs) values ranged from 0.04 to 0.08. The efficiency of the low flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) was calculated to be 82.7%. The Spreadsheet Algorithm for Stagewise Solvent Extraction (SASSE) predicted equivalent DF for MCU from this testing is greater than 3,500 assuming 95% efficiency during extraction and 80% efficiency during scrub and strip. Hydraulically, the system performed very well in all tests. Target flows were easily obtained and stable throughout testing. Though some issues were encountered with plugging in the coalescer, they were not related to the solvent. No hydraulic upsets due to the solvent were experienced during any of the tests conducted. The first extraction coalescer element used in testing developed high pressure drop that made it difficult to maintain the target flow rates. Analysis showed an accumulation of sodium aluminosilicate solids. The coalescer was replaced with one from the same manufacturers lot and pressure drop was no longer an issue. Concentrations of Isopar L and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to determine the amount of solvent carryover. For low-flow (0.27 gpm aqueous) conditions in stripping, SVOA measured the Isopar L post-contactor concentration to be 25 mg/L, HPLC measured 39 mg/L of Modifier. For moderate-flow (0.54 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar L postcontactor to be ~69 mg/L, while the HPLC measured 56 mg/L for Modifier. For high-flow (0.8 gpm aqueous) conditions, SVOA measured the Isopar L post-contactor to be 39 mg/L. The post-coalescer (pre-decanter) measurements by SVOA for Isopar L were all less than the analysis detection limit of 10 mg/L. The HPLC measured 18, 22 and 20 mg/L Modifier for the low, medium, and high-low rates respectively. In extraction, the quantity of pre-coalescer Isopar L carryover measured by SVOA was ~280-410 mg/L at low flow (4 gpm aqueous), ~400-450 mg/L at moderate flow (8 gpm aqueous), and ~480 mg/L at high flow (12 gpm aqueous). The amount of post coalescer (pre-decanter) Isopar L carryover measured by SVOA was less than 45 mg/L for all flow rates. HPLC results for Modifier were 182, 217 and 22

  12. Results From The Salt Disposition Project Next Generation Solvent Demonstration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.; Fondeur, F. F.; Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L.

    2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT), Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT), Caustic Wash Tank (CWT) and Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples were taken throughout the Next Generation Solvent (NGS) Demonstration Plan. These samples were analyzed and the results are reported. SHT: The solvent behaved as expected, with no bulk changes in the composition over time, with the exception of the TOA and TiDG. The TiDG depletion is higher than expected, and consideration must be taken on the required rate of replenishment. Monthly sampling of the SHT is warranted. If possible, additional SHT samples for TiDG analysis (only) would help SRNL refine the TiDG degradation model. CWT: The CWT samples show the expected behavior in terms of bulk chemistry. The 137Cs deposited into the CWT varies somewhat, but generally appears to be lower than during operations with the BOBCalix solvent. While a few minor organic components were noted to be present in the Preliminary sample, at this time these are thought to be artifacts of the sample preparation or may be due to the preceding solvent superwash. DSSHT: The DSSHT samples show the predicted bulk chemistry, although they point towards significant dilution at the front end of the Demonstration. The 137Cs levels in the DSSHT are much lower than during the BOBCalix operations, which is the expected observation. SEHT: The SEHT samples represent the most different output of all four of the outputs from MCU. While the bulk chemistry is as expected, something is causing the pH of the SEHT to be higher than what would be predicted from a pure stream of 0.01 M boric acid. There are several possible different reasons for this, and SRNL is in the process of investigating. Other than the pH issue, the SEHT is as predicted. In summary, the NGS Demonstration Plan samples indicate that the MCU system, with the Blend Solvent, is operating as expected. The only issue of concern regards the pH of the SEHT, and SRNL is in the process of investigating this. SRNL results support the transition to routine operations.

  13. Impacts of pellets injected from the low-field side on plasma in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wisitsorasak, A. [Mahidol University, Faculty of Science (Thailand); Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacts of pellets injected from the low-field side (LFS) on plasma in ITER are investigated using the 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the pellet ablation is described using the neutral gas shielding (NGS) model. The pellet ablation model is coupled with the plasma core transport model, which is a combination of the MMM95 anomalous transport model and NCLASS neoclassical transport model. The boundary conditions are assumed to be at the top of the pedestal, in which the pedestal parameters are predicted using a pedestal model based on the theoretical-based pedestal width scaling (either magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling, or flow shear stabilization width scaling, or normalized poloidal pressure width scaling) and the infinite-n ballooning mode pressure gradient limit. These pedestal models depend sensitively on the density at the top of the pedestal, which can be strongly influenced by the injection of pellets. The combination of the MMM95 and NCLASS models, together with the pedestal and NGS models, is used to simulate the time evolution of the plasma current, ion and electron temperatures, and density profiles for ITER standard type-I ELMy H-mode discharges during the injection of LFS pellets. It is found that the injection of pellets results in a complicated plasma scenario, especially in the outer region of the plasma and the plasma conditions at the boundary in which the pellet has an impact on increasing the plasma edge density, but reducing the plasma edge temperature. The LFS pellet has a stronger impact on the edge as compared to the center. For fusion performance, the pellet can result in either enhancement or degradation, depending sensitively on the pellet parameters; such as the pellet size, pellet velocity, and pellet frequency. For example, when a series of deuterium pellets with a size of 0.5 cm, velocity of 1 km/s, and frequency of 2 Hz are injected into the ITER plasma from the LFS, the plasma performance, evaluated in terms of Q{sub fusion}, can increase to 72% of that before the use of pellets. It is also found that the injection of pellets results in an increase in the ion and electron densities, but does not enhance the central plasma density. On the other hand, it results in the formation of another peak of the plasma density in the outer region near the plasma edge. The formation of the density peak results in the reduction of plasma transports near the edge by decreasing the contributions of ion-temperature-gradient and trapped electron modes, as well as kinetic ballooning modes.

  14. SOLVENT HOLD TANK SAMPLE RESULTS FOR MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, AND MCU-13-191: QUARTERLY SAMPLE FROM SEPTEMBER 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Taylor-Pashow, K.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed solvent samples from Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) in support of continuing operations. A quarterly analysis of the solvent is required to maintain solvent composition within specifications. Analytical results of the analyses of Solvent Hold Tank (SHT) samples MCU-13-189, MCU-13-190, and MCU-13-191 received on September 4, 2013 are reported. The results show that the solvent (remaining heel in the SHT tank) at MCU contains excess Isopar? L and a deficit concentration of modifier and trioctylamine when compared to the standard MCU solvent. As with the previous solvent sample results, these analyses indicate that the solvent does not require Isopar? L trimming at this time. Since MCU is switching to NGS, there is no need to add TOA nor modifier. SRNL also analyzed the SHT sample for {{sup 137}Cs content and determined the measured value is within tolerance and the value has returned to levels observed in 2011.

  15. Adaptive Optics Imaging of IRAS 18276-1431: a bipolar pre-planetary nebula with circumstellar "searchlight beams" and "arcs"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contreras, C S; Sahai, R; De Paz, A G; Morris, M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high-angular resolution images of the post-AGB nebula IRAS18276-1431 (also known as OH17.7-2.0) obtained with the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) system in its Natural Guide Star (NGS) mode in the Kp, Lp, and Ms near-infrared bands. We also present supporting optical F606W and F814W HST images as well as interferometric observations of the 12CO(J=1-0), 13CO(J=1-0), and 2.6mm continuum emission with OVRO. The envelope of IRAS18276-1431 displays a clear bipolar morphology in our optical and NIR images with two lobes separated by a dark waist and surrounded by a faint 4.5"x3.4" halo. Our Kp-band image reveals two pairs of radial ``searchlight beams'' emerging from the nebula center and several intersecting, arc-like features. From our CO data we derive a mass of M>0.38[D/3kpc]^2 Msun and an expansion velocity v_exp=17km/s for the molecular envelope. The density in the halo follows a radial power-law proportional to r^-3, which is consistent with a mass-loss rate increasing with time. Analysis of the NIR ...

  16. INVESTIGATION INTO THE RATE OF TRIOCTYLAMINE PARTITIONING INTO THE MCU AQUEOUS PHASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Couture, A.

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has examined the issue of trioctylamine (TOA) losses at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) solvent. For this study, SRNL used partitioning and radiolysis data from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as well as actual MCU operational data. From the radiolysis data, SRNL prepared a model on the rate of TOA degradation. From the combined sets of data, SRNL has calculated the largest possible value of TOA (although this value is not credible) in the Strip Effluent (SE) and also calculated two different conservative, more realistic values for TOA in the SE. Even under conservative assumptions, such as all of the TOA losses partitioning solely into the Strip Effluent (SE), the MCU operational data suggests that the maximum realistic TOA concentration in the SE is < 0.6 mg/L. Furthermore, from understanding the chemical differences between the old and new strip solutions, SRNL does not believe that the TOA will deplete from the blended BOBCalixC6 Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) at a rate higher than previously experienced. Finally, SRNL recommends pursuing analytical development of a method for TOA with a superior precision compared to the current method. However, as the TOA in the blended solvent will continuously decline during MCU operations, further improvements in the development of the understanding of TOA losses may not be cost effective.

  17. Mapping analysis of scaffold/matrix attachment regions (s/MARs) from two different mammalian cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilus, Nur Shazwani Mohd; Ahmad, Azrin; Yusof, Nurul Yuziana Mohd [School of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Johari, Norazfa [Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Scaffold/matrix attachment regions (S/MARs) are potential element that can be integrated into expression vector to increase expression of recombinant protein. Many studies on S/MAR have been done but none has revealed the distribution of S/MAR in a genome. In this study, we have isolated S/MAR sequences from HEK293 and Chinese hamster ovary cell lines (CHO DG44) using two different methods utilizing 2 M NaCl and lithium-3,5-diiodosalicylate (LIS). The isolated S/MARs were sequenced using Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Based on reference mapping analysis against human genome database, a total of 8,994,856 and 8,412,672 contigs of S/MAR sequences were retrieved from 2M NaCl and LIS extraction of HEK293 respectively. On the other hand, reference mapping analysis of S/MAR derived from CHO DG44 against our own CHO DG44 database have generated a total of 7,204,348 and 4,672,913 contigs from 2 M NaCl and LIS extraction method respectively.

  18. V5 AND V10 CONTACTOR TESTING WITH THE NEXT GENERATION (CSSX) SOLVENT FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restivo, M.; Peters, T.; Pierce, R.; Fondeur, F.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Giddings, B.; Hickman, B.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A solvent extraction system for removal of cesium (Cs) from alkaline solutions was developed utilizing a novel solvent invented at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This solvent consists of a calix[4]arene-crown-6 extractant dissolved in an inert hydrocarbon matrix. A Modifier is added to the solvent to enhance the extraction power of the calixarene and to prevent the formation of a third phase. An additional additive, called a suppressor, is used to improve stripping performance. The process that deploys this solvent system is known as Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX). The solvent system has been deployed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) since 2008. Subsequent development efforts by ORNL identified an improved solvent system that can raise the expected decontamination factor (DF) in MCU from {approx}200 to more than 40,000. The improved DF is attributed to an improved distribution ratio for cesium [D(Cs)] in extraction from {approx}15 to {approx}60, an increased solubility of the calixarene in the solvent from 0.007 M to >0.050 M, and use of boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) stripping that also yields improved D(Cs) values. Additionally, the changes incorporated into the Next Generation CSSX Solvent (NGS) are intended to reduce solvent entrainment by virtue of more favorable physical properties. The MCU and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) facilities are actively pursuing the changeover from the current CSSX solvent to the NGS solvent. To support this integration of the NGS into the MCU and SWPF facilities, the Savannah River Remediation (SRR)/ARP/MCU Life Extension Project requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) perform testing of the new solvent for the removal of Cs from the liquid salt waste stream. Additionally, SRNL was tasked with characterizing both strip (20-in long, 10 micron pore size) and extraction (40-in long, 20 micron pore size) coalescers. SRNL designed a pilot-scale experimental program to test the full size strip (V5) and extraction (V10) centrifugal contactors and the associated strip and extraction effluent coalescers to determine the hydraulic and mass transfer characteristics with the NGS. The test program evaluated the amount of organic carryover and the droplet size of the carryover phases using several analytical methods. Provisions were also made to enable an evaluation of coalescer performance. Stage efficiency and mass distribution ratios were determined using Cs mass transfer measurements. Using 20 millimolar (mM) extractant (instead of 50 mM), the nominal D(Cs) measured was 16.0-17.5. The data indicate that equilibrium is achieved rapidly and maintained throughout sampling. The data showed good stage efficiency for extraction (Tests 1A-1D), ranging from 98.2% for Test 1A to 90.5% for Test 1D. No statistically-significant differences were noted for operations at 12 gpm aqueous flow when compared with either 4 gpm or 8 gpm of aqueous flow. The stage efficiencies equal or exceed those previously measured using the baseline CSSX solvent system. The nominal target for scrub Cs distribution values are {approx}1.0-2.5. The first scrub test yielded an average scrub value of 1.21 and the second scrub test produced an average value of 0.78. Both values are considered acceptable. Stage efficiency was not calculated for the scrub tests. For stripping behavior, six tests were completed in a manner to represent the first strip stage. For three tests at the baseline flow ratios (O:A of 3.75:1) but at different total flow rates, the D(Cs) values were all similar at {approx}0.052. Similar behavior was observed for two tests performed at an O:A ratio of 7:1 instead of 3.75:1. The data for the baseline strip tests exhibited acceptable stage efficiency, ranging from 82.0% for low flow to 89-90% for medium and high flow. The difference in efficiency may be attributable to the low volume in the contactor housing at lower flow rates. The concentrations of Isopar L{reg_sign} and Modifier were measured using semi-volatile organic analysis (SVOA

  19. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cte d'Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESAEuropean Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Caada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (2.7 ? [Fe/H] ? 1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5?m post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC10, NGC185, and NGC147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = 1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  20. RESULTS OF CESIUM MASS TRANSFER TESTING FOR NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT WITH HANFORD WASTE SIMULANT AP-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    SRNL has performed an Extraction, Scrub, Strip (ESS) test using the next generation solvent and AP-101 Hanford Waste simulant. The results indicate that the next generation solvent (MG solvent) has adequate extraction behavior even in the face of a massive excess of potassium. The stripping results indicate poorer behavior, but this may be due to inadequate method detection limits. SRNL recommends further testing using hot tank waste or spiked simulant to provide for better detection limits. Furthermore, strong consideration should be given to performing an actual waste, or spiked waste demonstration using the 2cm contactor bank. The Savannah River Site currently utilizes a solvent extraction technology to selectively remove cesium from tank waste at the Multi-Component Solvent Extraction unit (MCU). This solvent consists of four components: the extractant - BoBCalixC6, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - trioctylamine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. This solvent has been used to successfully decontaminate over 2 million gallons of tank waste. However, recent work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a basis to implement an improved solvent blend. This new solvent blend - referred to as Next Generation Solvent (NGS) - is similar to the current solvent, and also contains four components: the extractant - MAXCalix, a modifier - Cs-7B, a suppressor - LIX-79{trademark} guanidine, and a diluent, Isopar L{trademark}. Testing to date has shown that this 'Next Generation' solvent promises to provide far superior cesium removal efficiencies, and furthermore, is theorized to perform adequately even in waste with high potassium concentrations such that it could be used for processing Hanford wastes. SRNL has performed a cesium mass transfer test in to confirm this behavior, using a simulant designed to simulate Hanford AP-101 waste.

  1. Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards:Safeguards-by-Design at Enrichment Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Jon D. [Y-12 National Security Complex] [Y-12 National Security Complex; McGinnis, Brent R [ORNL] [ORNL; Morgan, James B [ORNL] [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL] [ORNL; Lockwood, Mr. Dunbar [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA] [U.S. Department of Energy, NNSA; Shipwash, Jacqueline L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Third International Meeting on Next Generation Safeguards (NGS3) was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NIS) in Washington, D.C. on 14-15 December 2010; this meeting focused on the Safeguards-by-Design (SBD) concept. There were approximately 100 participants from 13 countries, comprised of safeguards policy and technical experts from government and industry. Representatives also were present from the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), the European Atomic Energy Agency (Euratom), and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The primary objective of this meeting was to exchange views and provide recommendations on implementation of the SBD concept for four specific nuclear fuel cycle facility types: gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs), GEN III and GEN IV reactors, aqueous reprocessing plants, and mixed oxide fuel fabrication facilities. The general and facility-specific SBD documents generated from the four working groups, which were circulated for comment among working group participants, are intended to provide a substantive contribution to the IAEA's efforts to publish SBD guidance for these specific types of nuclear facilities in the near future. The IAEA has described the SBD concept as an approach in which 'international safeguards are fully integrated into the design process of a new nuclear facility from the initial planning through design, construction, operation, and decommissioning.' As part of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), the DOE is working to establish SBD as a global norm through DOE laboratory studies, international workshops, engagement with industry and the IAEA, and setting an example through its use in new nuclear facilities in the United States. This paper describes the discussion topics and final recommendations of the Enrichment Facilities Working Group. The working group participants were tasked with providing recommendations for facility operators and designers, while promoting the IAEA's objectives of: (1) avoiding costly and time-consuming redesign work or retrofits of new nuclear facilities and (2) providing for more effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards.

  2. Pellet injection into H-mode ITER plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leekhaphan, P. [Thammasat University, School of Bio-Chemical Engineering and Technology, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand); Onjun, T. [Thammasat University, School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering, Sirindhorn International Institute of Technology (Thailand)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of pellet injection into ITER type-1 ELMy H-mode plasma with the presence of internal transport barriers (ITBs) are investigated using self-consistent core-edge simulations of 1.5D BALDUR integrated predictive modeling code. In these simulations, the plasma core transport is predicted using a combination of a semi-empirical Mixed B/gB anomalous transport model, which can self-consistently predict the formation of ITBs, and the NCLASS neoclassical model. For simplicity, it is assumed that toroidal velocity for {omega}{sub E Multiplication-Sign B} calculation is proportional to local ion temperature. In addition, the boundary conditions are predicted using the pedestal temperature model based on magnetic and flow shear stabilization width scaling; while the density of each plasma species, including both hydrogenic and impurity species, at the boundary are assumed to be a large fraction of its line averaged density. For the pellet's behaviors in the hot plasma, the Neutral Gas Shielding (NGS) model by Milora-Foster is used. It was found that the injection of pellet could result in further improvement of fusion performance from that of the formation of ITB. However, the impact of pellet injection is quite complicated. It is also found that the pellets cannot penetrate into a deep core of the plasma. The injection of the pellet results in a formation of density peak in the region close to the plasma edge. The injection of pellet can result in an improved nuclear fusion performance depending on the properties of pellet (i.e., increase up to 5% with a speed of 1 km/s and radius of 2 mm). A sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the impact of pellet parameters, which are: the pellet radius, the pellet velocity, and the frequency of injection. The increase in the pellet radius and frequency were found to greatly improve the performance and effectiveness of fuelling. However, changing the velocity is observed to exert small impact.

  3. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Proxy Waste Lot Profile 6.999 for Building K-25 West Wing, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rigsby V.P.

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), which includes the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), was placed on the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) National Priorities List. The Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) (DOE 1992), effective January 1, 1992, now governs environmental restoration activities conducted under CERCLA at the ORR. Following signing of the FFA, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the state of Tennessee signed the Oak Ridge Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement on June 18, 2002. The purpose of this agreement is to define a streamlined decision-making process to facilitate the accelerated implementation of cleanup, resolve ORR milestone issues, and establish future actions necessary to complete the accelerated cleanup plan by the end of fiscal year 2008. While the FFA continues to serve as the overall regulatory framework for remediation, the Accelerated Cleanup Plan Agreement supplements existing requirements to streamline the decision-making process. Decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities of Bldg. K-25, the original gaseous diffusion facility, is being conducted by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) on behalf of the DOE. The planned CERCLA action covering disposal of building structure and remaining components from the K-25 building is scheduled as a non-time-critical CERCLA action as part of DOE's continuous risk reduction strategy for ETTP. The K-25 building is proposed for D&D because of its poor physical condition and the expense of surveillance and maintenance activities. The K-25/K-27 D&D Project proposes to dispose of the commingled waste listed below from the K-25 west side building structure and remaining components and process gas equipment and piping at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) under waste disposal proxy lot (WPXL) 6.999: (1) Building structure (e.g. concrete floors [excluding basement slab], roofing, structural steel supports, interior walls, and exterior walls) and support system components including the recirculation cooling water (RCW); electrical; communication; fire protection; ventilation; process coolant; process lube oil; utilities such as steam, water and drain lines; (2) Process Piping; (3) Seal Exhaust Headers; (4) Seal Exhaust Traps; (5) Process Valves; (6) Differential Blind Multipliers (DBM)/Partial Blind Multipliers (PBM); and (7) Aftercoolers (also known as Intercell coolers). Converters and compressors while components of the process gas system, are not included in this commingled waste lot. On January 6, 2009, a meeting was held with EPA, TDEC, DOE and the team for the sole purpose of finalizing the objectives, format, and content of WPXL 6.999. The objective of WPXL 6.999 was to provide a crosswalk to the building structure and the PGE components profiles. This was accomplished by providing tables with references to the specific section of the individual profiles for each of the WLs. There are two building profiles and eight PGE profiles. All of the waste identified in the individual profiles will be commingled, shipped, and disposed exclusively under WPXL 6.999. The individual profiles were provided to the EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) for information purposes only. This summary WPXL 6.999 will be submitted to EPA, TDEC, and DOE for review and approval. The format agreed upon by the regulators and DOE form the basis for WPXL 6.999. The agreed format is found on pages v and vi of the CONTENTS section of this profile. The disposal of this waste will be executed in accordance with the Action Memorandum for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2002), Removal Action Work Plan for the K-25 and K-27 Buildings, Process Equipment Removal and Demolition, K-25/K-27 Project, East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008a); Waste Handling Plan for Demolition of the K-25 and K-27 Bui

  4. RESULTS OF THE EXTRACTION-SCRUB-STRIP TESTING USING AN IMPROVED SOLVENT FORMULATION AND SALT WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY SIMULATED WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.; Washington, A.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent - also known as the next generation solvent (NGS) - for deployment at the Savannah River Site to remove cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). As part of the program, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed a number of Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests. These batch contact tests serve as first indicators of the cesium mass transfer solvent performance with actual or simulated waste. The test detailed in this report used simulated Tank 49H material, with the addition of extra potassium. The potassium was added at 1677 mg/L, the maximum projected (i.e., a worst case feed scenario) value for the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The results of the test gave favorable results given that the potassium concentration was elevated (1677 mg/L compared to the current 513 mg/L). The cesium distribution value, DCs, for extraction was 57.1. As a comparison, a typical D{sub Cs} in an ESS test, using the baseline solvent formulation and the typical waste feed, is {approx}15. The Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) uses the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process to remove cesium (Cs) from alkaline waste. This process involves the use of an organic extractant, BoBCalixC6, in an organic matrix to selectively remove cesium from the caustic waste. The organic solvent mixture flows counter-current to the caustic aqueous waste stream within centrifugal contactors. After extracting the cesium, the loaded solvent is stripped of cesium by contact with dilute nitric acid and the cesium concentrate is transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), while the organic solvent is cleaned and recycled for further use. The Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF), under construction, will use the same process chemistry. The Office of Waste Processing (EM-31) expressed an interest in investigating the further optimization of the organic solvent by replacing the BoBCalixC6 extractant with a more efficient extractant. This replacement should yield dividends in improving cesium removal from the caustic waste stream, and in the rate at which the caustic waste can be processed. To that end, EM-31 provided funding for both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). SRNL wrote a Task Technical Quality and Assurance Plan for this work. As part of the envisioned testing regime, it was decided to perform an ESS test using a simulated waste that simulated a typical envisioned SWPF feed, but with added potassium to make the waste more challenging. Potassium interferes in the cesium removal, and its concentration is limited in the feed to <1950 mg/L. The feed to MCU has typically contained <500 mg/L of potassium.

  5. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.