National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bucket rain gauge

  1. Optical Rain Gauge and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Introduction Measurement of rainfall and precipitation is a difficult task even in the best of circumstances. Different types of gauges are used depending on the type of...

  2. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-079 Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79 Disdrometer and Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Handbook MJ Bartholomew December 2009 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

  3. Rain Gauge Instrument Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Rain Gauge Instrument Handbook MJ Bartholomew January 2016 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

  4. Rain Gauges Handbook (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rain Gauges Handbook Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rain Gauges Handbook To improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility deployed rain gauges located near disdrometers (DISD and VDIS data streams). This handbook deals specifically with the rain gauges that make the observations for the RAIN data stream. Other precipitation observations are made by the surface meteorology

  5. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  6. Second Stage Turbine Bucket Airfoil.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Liming; Ahmadi, Majid; Humanchuk, David John; Moretto, Nicholas; Delehanty, Richard Edward

    2003-05-06

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  7. Turbine bucket natural frequency tuning rib

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; Norton, Paul Francis; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Jacala, Ariel Caesar-Prepena

    2002-01-01

    A tuning rib is added preferably in the aft cavity of a cored turbine bucket to alter the bucket's natural frequencies. The tuning rib may be a solid rib or a segmented rib and is particularly suited for altering high order frequency modes such as 2T, 4F and 1-3S. As such, detrimental crossings of natural bucket frequencies and gas turbine stimuli can be avoided to thereby improve the reliability of a gas turbine without impacting other features of the bucket that are important to the performance of the gas turbine.

  8. Second-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John Zhiqiang; By, Robert Romany; Sims, Calvin L.; Hyde, Susan Marie

    2002-01-01

    The second-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinate values defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X and Y values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket. The second-stage wheel has sixty buckets.

  9. Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Xu, Liming; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

  10. Liquid cooled counter flow turbine bucket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dakin, James T.

    1982-09-21

    Means and a method are provided whereby liquid coolant flows radially outward through coolant passages in a liquid cooled turbine bucket under the influence of centrifugal force while in contact with countercurrently flowing coolant vapor such that liquid is entrained in the flow of vapor resulting in an increase in the wetted cooling area of the individual passages.

  11. Third-stage turbine bucket airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pirolla, Peter Paul; Siden, Gunnar Leif; Humanchuk, David John; Brassfield, Steven Robert; Wilson, Paul Stuart

    2002-01-01

    The third-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in inches in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  12. Gas turbine bucket with impingement cooled platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raphael Durand

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine bucket having an airfoil portion and a root portion, with a substantially planar platform at an interface between the airfoil portion and root portion, a platform cooling arrangement including at least one bore in the root portion and at least one impingement cooling tube seated in the bore, the tube extending beyond the bore with an outlet in close proximity to a targeted area on an underside of the platform.

  13. Bucket platform cooling scheme and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abuaf, Nesim; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Chopra, Sanjay; Kercher, David Max; Kellock, Iain Robertson; Lenahan, Dean Thomas; Nellian, Sankar; Starkweather, John Howard; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil extending from a platform, having high and low pressure sides; a wheel mounting portion; a hollow shank portion located radially between the platform and the wheel mounting portion, the platform having an under surface. An impingement cooling plate is located in the hollow shank portion, spaced from the under surface, and the impingement plate is formed with a plurality of impingement cooling holes therein.

  14. Internal cooling circuit for gas turbine bucket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Susan Marie; Davis, Richard Mallory

    2005-10-25

    In a gas turbine bucket having a shank portion and an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges and pressure and suction sides, an internal cooling circuit, the internal cooling circuit having a serpentine configuration including plural radial outflow passages and plural radial inflow passages, and wherein a coolant inlet passage communicates with a first of the radial outflow passages along the trailing edge, the first radial outflow passage having a plurality of radially extending and radially spaced elongated rib segments extending between and connecting the pressure and suction sides in a middle region of the first passage to prevent ballooning of the pressure and suction sides at the first radial outflow passage.

  15. Airfoil shape for a turbine bucket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hyde, Susan Marie; By, Robert Romany; Tressler, Judd Dodge; Schaeffer, Jon Conrad; Sims, Calvin Levy

    2005-06-28

    Third stage turbine buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth Table I wherein X and Y values are in inches and the Z values are non-dimensional values from 0 to 0.938 convertible to Z distances in inches by multiplying the Z values by the height of the airfoil in inches. The X and Y values are distances which, when connected by smooth continuing arcs, define airfoil profile sections at each distance Z. The profile sections at each distance Z are joined smoothly to one another to form a complete airfoil shape. The X and Y distances may be scalable as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled up or scaled down airfoil section for the bucket. The nominal airfoil given by the X, Y and Z distances lies within an envelop of .+-.0.150 inches in directions normal to the surface of the airfoil.

  16. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willett, Fred Thomas; Itzel, Gary Michael; Stathopoulos, Dimitrios; Plemmons, Larry Wayne; Plemmons, Helen M.; Lewis, Doyle C.

    2002-01-01

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket wherein the bucket has an airfoil portion, and a tip shroud, the cooling circuit including a plurality of radial cooling holes extending through the airfoil portion and communicating with an enlarged internal area within the tip shroud before exiting the tip shroud such that a cooling medium used to cool the airfoil portion is subsequently used to cool the tip shroud.

  17. Removable inner turbine shell with bucket tip clearance control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sexton, Brendan F.; Knuijt, Hans M.; Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Myers, Albert; Coneybeer, Kyle E.; Johnson, David Martin; Kellock, Iain R.

    2000-01-01

    A turbine includes a plurality of inner shell sections mounting first and second stage nozzle and shroud portions. The inner shell sections are pinned to an outer containment shell formed of sections to preclude circumferential movement of the inner shell relative to the outer shell and enable thermal expansion and contraction of the inner shell relative to the outer shell. Positive bucket tip clearance control is afforded by passing a thermal medium about the inner shell in heat transfer relation with the shrouds about the first and second stage bucket tips, the thermal medium being provided from a source of heating/cooling fluid independent of the turbine. Access is provided to the rotor and turbine buckets by removing the outer and inner shell sections.

  18. Stage 3 bucket shank bypass holes and related method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leone, Sal Albert; Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Lupe, Douglas Arthur

    2002-01-01

    In a multi-stage turbine wherein at least one turbine wheel supports a row of buckets for rotation, and wherein the turbine wheel is located axially between first and second annular fixed arrays of nozzles, a cooling air circuit for purging a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles comprising a flowpath through a shank portion of one or more buckets connecting a wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the first fixed annular array of nozzles with the wheelspace between the turbine wheel and the second fixed annular array of nozzles.

  19. Bucket-type steam traps removed in $82K retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poplett, J.

    1985-08-19

    A retrofit of 481 mostly failed steam traps at Martin Marietta's Aerospace Division should reduce steam costs by $70,000 and require little or no maintenance. Payback should occur within 14 months. The new traps include orifice, bellow-type thermostatic, and float-type traps that have few or no moving parts. Lack of maintenance was responsible for the poor performance of the bucket traps that were replaced, although manufacturers of the bucket traps disagree that replacement of certain parts is necessary every six months. The author describes the design and operation of each type of trap.

  20. Blast-free mining of coal seams by excavators equipped with rotary dynamic buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Labutin, V.N.; Mattis, A.R.; Zaitseva, A.A.

    2005-04-01

    The necessity to equip cable excavators with rotary buckets is substantiated. The results of graphic-analytical analysis of the rotary bucket operation are presented, and its main advantages are determined in comparison with conventional buckets in mining coal seams of complex structure.

  1. First-stage high pressure turbine bucket airfoil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Theresa A.; Ahmadi, Majid; Clemens, Eugene; Perry, II, Jacob C.; Holiday, Allyn K.; Delehanty, Richard A.; Jacala, Ariel Caesar

    2004-05-25

    The first-stage buckets have airfoil profiles substantially in accordance with Cartesian coordinate values of X, Y and Z set forth in Table I wherein Z is a perpendicular distance from a plane normal to a radius of the turbine centerline and containing the X and Y values with the Z value commencing at zero in the X, Y plane at the radially innermost aerodynamic section of the airfoil and X and Y are coordinates defining the airfoil profile at each distance Z. The X, Y and Z values may be scaled as a function of the same constant or number to provide a scaled-up or scaled-down airfoil section for the bucket.

  2. AGING GAUGE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-04-04

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  3. Aging gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Betts, Robert E.; Crawford, John F.

    1989-01-01

    An aging gauge comprising a container having a fixed or a variable sized t opening with a cap which can be opened to control the sublimation rate of a thermally sublimational material contained within the container. In use, the aging gauge is stored with an item to determine total heat the item is subjected to and also the maximum temperature to which the item has been exposed. The aging gauge container contains a thermally sublimational material such as naphthalene or similar material which has a low sublimation rate over the temperature range from about 70.degree. F. to about 160.degree. F. The aging products determined by analyses of a like item aged along with the aging gauge for which the sublimation amount is determined is employed to establish a calibration curve for future aging evaluation. The aging gauge is provided with a means for determining the maximum temperature exposure (i.e., a thermally indicating material which gives an irreversible color change, Thermocolor pigment). Because of the relationship of doubling reaction rates for increases of 10.degree. C., equivalency of item used in accelerated aging evaluation can be obtained by referring to a calibration curve depicting storage temperature on the abscissa scale and multiplier on the ordinate scale.

  4. Singin' in the Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Singin' in the Rain News News Home Featured Articles 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Headlines Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 11.25.13 Singin' in the Rain Ultra water-repellent material developed at Brookhaven Lab may lead to many warming applications. Print Text

  5. Gas turbine bucket cooling circuit and related process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Doyle C.; Barb, Kevin Joseph

    2002-01-01

    A turbine bucket includes an airfoil portion having leading and trailing edges; at least one radially extending cooling passage within the airfoil portion, the airfoil portion joined to a platform at a radially inner end of the airfoil portion; a dovetail mounting portion enclosing a cooling medium supply passage; and, a crossover passage in fluid communication with the cooling medium supply passage and with at least one radially extending cooling passage, the crossover passage having a portion extending along and substantially parallel to an underside surface of the platform.

  6. Modeling the effect of executive device of a bucket-wheel excavator on the coal face

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.A. Zaitseva; V.I. Cheskidov; G.D. Zaitsev

    2005-11-15

    An algorithm is proposed and substantiated to calculate the optimum trajectory of scooping for the dynamic bucket-wheel and stationary bucket excavators. The applicability of the developed program in determining mineral losses and impoverishment during selective and bulk-selective mining in bedded deposits is demonstrated.

  7. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  8. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  9. NNSA Procurement Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate Administrator for Acquisition and Project Management, NNSA NNSA Procurement Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate Administrator ...

  10. DOE SC ARM TR 110 Rain Gauge _RAIN_Handbook Edited_Formatted

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurement experiment RMSE root-mean-square error VAP value-added products VDIS video disdrometer iii MJ Bartholomew, January 2016, DOESC-ARM-TR-110 Contents 1.0 General ...

  11. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conard, Lisa Marie

    1998-01-01

    A tool and a method for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool.

  12. Simulations of RF capture with barrier bucket in booster at injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C.J.

    2012-01-23

    As part of the effort to increase the number of ions per bunch in RHIC, a new scheme for RF capture of EBIS ions in Booster at injection has been developed. The scheme was proposed by M. Blaskiewicz and J.M. Brennan. It employs a barrier bucket to hold a half turn of beam in place during capture into two adjacent harmonic 4 buckets. After acceleration, this allows for 8 transfers of 2 bunches from Booster into 16 buckets on the AGS injection porch. During the Fall of 2011 the necessary hardware was developed and implemented by the RF and Controls groups. The scheme is presently being commissioned by K.L. Zeno with Au32+ ions from EBIS. In this note we carry out simulations of the RF capture. These are meant to serve as benchmarks for what can be achieved in practice. They also allow for an estimate of the longitudinal emittance of the bunches on the AGS injection porch.

  13. Turbine bucket for use in gas turbine engines and methods for fabricating the same

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-06-03

    A turbine bucket for use with a turbine engine. The turbine bucket includes an airfoil that extends between a root end and a tip end. The airfoil includes an outer wall that defines a cavity that extends from the root end to the tip end. The outer wall includes a first ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrate that extends a first distance from the root end to the tip end. An inner wall is positioned within the cavity. The inner wall includes a second CMC substrate that extends a second distance from the root end towards the tip end that is different than the first distance.

  14. Strain gauge installation tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conard, L.M.

    1998-06-16

    A tool and a method are disclosed for attaching a strain gauge to a test specimen by maintaining alignment of, and applying pressure to, the strain gauge during the bonding of the gauge to the specimen. The tool comprises rigid and compliant pads attached to a spring-loaded clamp. The pads are shaped to conform to the specimen surface to which the gauge is to be bonded. The shape of the pads permits the tool to align itself to the specimen and to maintain alignment of the gauge to the specimen during the bond curing process. A simplified method of attaching a strain gauge is provided by use of the tool. 6 figs.

  15. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  16. Cooling circuit for and method of cooling a gas turbine bucket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacala, Ariel C. P.

    2002-01-01

    A closed internal cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket includes axial supply and return passages in the dovetail of the bucket. A first radial outward supply passage provides cooling medium to and along a passageway adjacent the leading edge and then through serpentine arranged passageways within the airfoil to a chamber adjacent the airfoil tip. A second radial passage crosses over the radial return passage for supplying cooling medium to and along a pair of passageways along the trailing edge of the airfoil section. The last passageway of the serpentine passageways and the pair of passageways communicate one with the other in the chamber for returning spent cooling medium radially inwardly along divided return passageways to the return passage. In this manner, both the leading and trailing edges are cooled using the highest pressure, lowest temperature cooling medium.

  17. Scientists Find Surprising Link Between Rain and Airborne Particles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Find Surprising Link Between Rain and Airborne Particles

  18. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  19. Acid rain information book. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    Acid rain is one of the most widely publicized environmental issues of the day. The potential consequences of increasingly widespread acid rain demand that this phenomenon be carefully evaluated. Reveiw of the literature shows a rapidly growing body of knowledge, but also reveals major gaps in understanding that need to be narrowed. This document discusses major aspects of the acid rain phenomenon, points out areas of uncertainty, and summarizes current and projected research by responsible government agencies and other concerned organizations.

  20. Cooling supply system for stage 3 bucket of a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin; Burns, James Lee; Palmer, Gene David; Leone, Sal Albert; Drlik, Gary Joseph; Gibler, Edward Eugene

    2002-01-01

    In a land based gas turbine including a compressor, a combustor and turbine section including at least three stages, an improvement comprising an inlet into a third stage nozzle from the compressor for feeding cooling air from the compressor to the third stage nozzle; at least one passageway running substantially radially through each airfoil of the third stage nozzle and an associated diaphragm, into an annular space between the rotor and the diaphragm; and passageways communicating between the annular space and individual buckets of the third stage.

  1. ARM - Datastreams - rainwb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsrainwb Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAINWB Weighing Bucket Rain Gauge Active Dates 2015.08.05 - 2016.05.12 Measurement Categories Atmospheric State Originating Instrument Rain Gauge (RAIN) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude

  2. Fiber optic gap gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Billy E.; Groves, Scott E.; Larsen, Greg J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.

    2006-11-14

    A lightweight, small size, high sensitivity gauge for indirectly measuring displacement or absolute gap width by measuring axial strain in an orthogonal direction to the displacement/gap width. The gap gauge includes a preferably titanium base having a central tension bar with springs connecting opposite ends of the tension bar to a pair of end connector bars, and an elongated bow spring connected to the end connector bars with a middle section bowed away from the base to define a gap. The bow spring is capable of producing an axial strain in the base proportional to a displacement of the middle section in a direction orthogonal to the base. And a strain sensor, such as a Fabry-Perot interferometer strain sensor, is connected to measure the axial strain in the base, so that the displacement of the middle section may be indirectly determined from the measurement of the axial strain in the base.

  3. Gauge fields out of equilibrium: A gauge invariant formulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The additional degrees of freedom, which arise in gauge theories, influence the behavior of the system dramatically. A comparison with results in the 't Hooft--Feynman background ...

  4. Precision manometer gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Malcolm J. (Lafayette, CA); Bellman, Robert A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  5. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, S.K.

    1993-12-21

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring. 4 figures.

  6. Ballistic impulse gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Stanley K. (Antioch, CA)

    1993-01-01

    A gauge for detecting the impulse generated in sample materials by X-rays or other impulse producing mechanisms utilizes a pair of flat annular springs to support a plunger relative to a housing which may itself be supported by a pair of flat annular springs in a second housing. The plunger has a mounting plate mounted on one end and at the other, a position or velocity transducer is mounted. The annular springs consist of an outer ring and an inner ring with at least three arcuate members connecting the outer ring with the inner ring.

  7. Precision manometer gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, M.J.; Bellman, R.A.

    1982-09-27

    A precision manometer gauge which locates a zero height and a measured height of liquid using an open tube in communication with a reservoir adapted to receive the pressure to be measured. The open tube has a reference section carried on a positioning plate which is moved vertically with machine tool precision. Double scales are provided to read the height of the positioning plate accurately, the reference section being inclined for accurate meniscus adjustment, and means being provided to accurately locate a zero or reference position.

  8. Gauge/Gravity Duality

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Polchinski, Joseph [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics

    2010-09-01

    Gauge theories, which describe the particle interactions, are well understood, while quantum gravity leads to many puzzles. Remarkably, in recent years we have learned that these are actually dual, the same system written in different variables. On the one hand, this provides our most precise description of quantum gravity, resolves some long-standing paradoxes, and points to new principles. On the other, it gives a new perspective on strong interactions, with surprising connections to other areas of physics. I describe these ideas, and discuss current and future directions.

  9. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  10. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  11. Optical Abelian lattice gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagliacozzo, L.; Celi, A.; Zamora, A.; Lewenstein, M.; ICREA-Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats, 08010 Barcelona

    2013-03-15

    We discuss a general framework for the realization of a family of Abelian lattice gauge theories, i.e., link models or gauge magnets, in optical lattices. We analyze the properties of these models that make them suitable for quantum simulations. Within this class, we study in detail the phases of a U(1)-invariant lattice gauge theory in 2+1 dimensions, originally proposed by P. Orland. By using exact diagonalization, we extract the low-energy states for small lattices, up to 4 Multiplication-Sign 4. We confirm that the model has two phases, with the confined entangled one characterized by strings wrapping around the whole lattice. We explain how to study larger lattices by using either tensor network techniques or digital quantum simulations with Rydberg atoms loaded in optical lattices, where we discuss in detail a protocol for the preparation of the ground-state. We propose two key experimental tests that can be used as smoking gun of the proper implementation of a gauge theory in optical lattices. These tests consist in verifying the absence of spontaneous (gauge) symmetry breaking of the ground-state and the presence of charge confinement. We also comment on the relation between standard compact U(1) lattice gauge theory and the model considered in this paper. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the quantum simulation of dynamical gauge theories in optical lattices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We focus on digital simulation of abelian lattice gauge theory. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We rediscover and discuss the puzzling phase diagram of gauge magnets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We detail the protocol for time evolution and ground-state preparation in any phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We provide two experimental tests to validate gauge theory quantum simulators.

  12. MHK ISDB/Sensors/0.01" Rain Gauge (2m cable) Smart Sensor | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1) 0.2 mm Rainfall (2m cable) Smart Sensor ... further results Also made by Onset Computer Corporation HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring SystemHOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring...

  13. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schilke, Peter W.; Muth, Myron C.; Schilling, William F.; Rairden, III, John R.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  14. Subsurface exploration using bucket auger borings and down-hole geologic inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scullin, C.M. )

    1994-03-01

    The down-hole geologic inspection of 24 in. bucket auger borings has been a hands-on technique for collecting valuable geologic structural and lithologic detail in southern California investigations for over 35 yr. Although it has been used for all types of investigations for hillside urban development, it is of particular benefit in landslide investigations and evaluations. The benefits of down-hole geologic inspection during detailed mapping of large landslide complexes with multiple slide planes are discussed in this paper. Many of the geotechnical investigations of these massive landslide complexes have been very limited in their determinations of accurate landslide parameters and very deficient in proper engineering analysis while based upon this limited data. This has resulted in many cases where the geotechnical consultant erroneously concludes that ancient landslides don't move and it is all right to build upon them, even though they have neither justified the landslide parameters, nor the slope stability or safety. Because this author and the many consultants contacted during the preparation of this paper were not aware of other publications regarding this method of collecting detailed geologic data, this author included the safety considerations, safety equipment, the cost and the Cal OSHA requirements for entering exploration shafts.

  15. NNSA Procurement Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate Administrator

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for Acquisition and Project Management, NNSA | Department of Energy Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate Administrator for Acquisition and Project Management, NNSA NNSA Procurement Projects Perspective - Bob Raines, Associate Administrator for Acquisition and Project Management, NNSA PDF icon Workshop 2015 - Raines_NNSA Projects Perspective.pdf More Documents & Publications One Procurement Director's Perspective - Patricia Schuneman, Chicago Procurement Director NNSA Procurement

  16. Arc discharge regulation of a megawatt hot cathode bucket ion source for the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Yahong; Hu Chundong; Liu Sheng; Jiang Caichao; Li Jun; Liang Lizhen; Collaboration: NBI Team

    2012-01-15

    Arc discharge of a hot cathode bucket ion source tends to be unstable what attributes to the filament self-heating and energetic electrons backstreaming from the accelerator. A regulation method, which based on the ion density measurement by a Langmuir probe, is employed for stable arc discharge operation and long pulse ion beam generation. Long pulse arc discharge of 100 s is obtained based on this regulation method of arc power. It establishes a foundation for the long pulse arc discharge of a megawatt ion source, which will be utilized a high power neutral beam injection device.

  17. Heavy rains hamper Louisiana gas line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, C.

    1983-06-01

    Despite heavy rains and flooding a 36-mile gas pipeline loop for Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp. was completed from north of Starks (at the end of Transco's south Louisiana lateral) to the Lake Charles area. Somastic-coated, 42-in. grade X-60 pipe comprises 90% of the route. The contract included multiple 30-42 in. fabrications, installation of six 42-in. gate valves, and expansion of the Gillis compressor station.

  18. Self-modulating pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, D. Jr.; Lanni, C.P.

    1979-08-07

    An ion gauge is disclosed having a reduced x-ray limit and means for measuring that limit. The gauge comprises an ion gauge of the Bayard-Alpert type having a short collector and having means for varying the grid-collector voltage. The x-ray limit (i.e. the collector current resulting from x-rays striking the collector) may then be determined by the formula: I/sub x/ = ..cap alpha..I/sub l/ - I/sub h//..cap alpha.. - l where: I/sub x/ = x-ray limit, I/sub l/ and I/sub h/ = the collector current at the lower and higher grid voltage respectively; and, ..cap alpha.. = the ratio of the collector current due to positive ions at the higher voltage to that at the lower voltage.

  19. Dynamics of gauge field inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marcianò, Antonino

    2015-05-05

    We analyze the existence and stability of dynamical attractor solutions for cosmological inflation driven by the coupling between fermions and a gauge field. Assuming a spatially homogeneous and isotropic gauge field and fermion current, the interacting fermion equation of motion reduces to that of a free fermion up to a phase shift. Consistency of the model is ensured via the Stückelberg mechanism. We prove the existence of exactly one stable solution, and demonstrate the stability numerically. Inflation arises without fine tuning, and does not require postulating any effective potential or non-standard coupling.

  20. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  1. Acid rain legislation and local areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.H.B.

    1992-01-01

    This study explores the local economic impacts of the phase I requirements of the 1990 acid rain legislation. This legislation allows electric utilities to adopt least cost ways of reducing sulfur dioxide pollution. The impact on employment, income and size distribution of income due to a switch to low sulfur coal is examined for a selected number of high sulfur coal producing counties in southern Illinois. In order to achieve the above objectives a generalized non-survey input-output model, IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning), is employed to estimate first- and second-order employment and income effects of a switch to low sulfur coal. Two models, I and II, are constructed to provide these estimates. In Model I, income is generated and adjusted to reflect income retained and spent within the four county region. In Model II, no adjustment is made for flows into and out of the region. In addition to adjustments in income, adjustments in direct employment impacts were made in both models to account for retirements. Scenarios reflecting different degrees of coal switching, low and high switching options, were examined under both models. With regards to size distribution impacts, a newly developed operational model compatible with IMPLAN and developed by Rose et al (1988) was employed. This model is a member of a class of models collectively termed extended input-output models. As in the case of employment and income, allowance was made for income generated, retained and spent within the four counties in the assessment of income distribution impacts. The findings indicate that the adverse effects of a switch to low sulfur coal under the 1990 acid rain legislation will primarily hurt the coal mining industry. Coal mining employment and income will be adversely affected. Employment and income declines in other industries in the region will be fairly slight. Second, income distribution becomes slightly more equal for the local area due to acid rain control.

  2. Gauge Configurations for Lattice QCD from The Gauge Connection

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Gauge Connection is an experimental archive for lattice QCD and a repository of gauge configurations made freely available to the community. Contributors to the archive include the Columbia QCDSP collaboration, the MILC collaboration, and others. Configurations are stored in QCD archive format, consisting of an ASCII header which defines various parameters, followed by binary data. NERSC has also provided some utilities and examples that will aid users in handling the data. Users may browse the archive, but are required to register for a password in order to download data. Contents of the archive are organized under four broad headings: Quenched (more than 1200 configurations); Dynamical, Zero Temperature (more than 300 configurations); MILC Improved Staggered Asqtad Lattices (more than 7000 configurations); and Dynamical, Finite Temperature (more than 1200 configurations)

  3. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  4. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specifications: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Environment (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parm, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 37 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    55Raines Draft Rev 4 Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855Raines Draft Rev 4 PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855Raines Draft Rev 4 More Documents & Publications Enhancing Earned...

  6. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, Albert L. (R.R. #2, Box 264, Pleasant Hill, MO 64080)

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads.

  7. Thread gauge for tapered threads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, A.L.

    1994-01-11

    The thread gauge permits the user to determine the pitch diameter of tapered threads at the intersection of the pitch cone and the end face of the object being measured. A pair of opposed anvils having lines of threads which match the configuration and taper of the threads on the part being measured are brought into meshing engagement with the threads on opposite sides of the part. The anvils are located linearly into their proper positions by stop fingers on the anvils that are brought into abutting engagement with the end face of the part. This places predetermined reference points of the pitch cone of the thread anvils in registration with corresponding points on the end face of the part being measured, resulting in an accurate determination of the pitch diameter at that location. The thread anvils can be arranged for measuring either internal or external threads. 13 figures.

  8. ARM - Field Campaign - Rain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Rain Microphysics Study with Disdrometer and Polarization Radar 2005.04.28 - 2005.06.30 Lead...

  9. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, Kolby; Yanez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J.; Martin, Scot T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  10. Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories Authors: ...

  11. Gauge natural formulation of conformal gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campigotto, M.; Fatibene, L.

    2015-03-15

    We consider conformal gravity as a gauge natural theory. We study its conservation laws and superpotentials. We also consider the Mannheim and Kazanas spherically symmetric vacuum solution and discuss conserved quantities associated to conformal and diffeomorphism symmetries.

  12. Electronic-type vacuum gauges with replaceable elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David (7 Brown's La., Bellport, NY 11713)

    1984-01-01

    In electronic devices for measuring pressures in vacuum systems, the metal elements which undergo thermal deterioration are made readily replaceable by making them parts of a simple plug-in unit. Thus, in ionization gauges, the filament and grid or electron collector are mounted on the novel plug-in unit. In thermocouple pressure gauges, the heater and attached thermocouple are mounted on the plug-in unit. Plug-in units have been designed to function, alternatively, as ionization gauge and as thermocouple gauge, thus providing new gauges capable of measuring broader pressure ranges than is possible with either an ionization gauge or a thermocouple gauge.

  13. Electronic-type vacuum gauges with replaceable elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, D. Jr.

    1984-09-18

    In electronic devices for measuring pressures in vacuum systems, the metal elements which undergo thermal deterioration are made readily replaceable by making them parts of a simple plug-in unit. Thus, in ionization gauges, the filament and grid or electron collector are mounted on the novel plug-in unit. In thermocouple pressure gauges, the heater and attached thermocouple are mounted on the plug-in unit. Plug-in units have been designed to function, alternatively, as ionization gauge and as thermocouple gauge, thus providing new gauges capable of measuring broader pressure ranges than is possible with either an ionization gauge or a thermocouple gauge. 5 figs.

  14. Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science July 2, 2015 - 10:39am Addthis Elizabeth and Rachel visit a YWCA in Waterloo, Iowa. | Photo courtesy of Cycle for Science. Elizabeth and Rachel visit a YWCA in Waterloo, Iowa. | Photo courtesy of Cycle for Science. Rachel Woods-Robinson Guest Blogger, Cycle for Science Elizabeth Case Guest Blogger, Cycle for Science Cycle for Science Read more about Elizabeth and Rachel's journey in their check-in blog posts from April and

  15. Physical meaning of gauge and super-gauge in general-relativistic field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treder, H.

    1985-05-01

    The physical meaning of gauge groups in bimetrical, Riemannian, and Hermitian theories of gravitation is discussed. In Hermitian relativity, Einstein's A-invariance means a super-gauge group which characterizes the Einstein-Schroedinger equations as the only nondegenerate general-relativistic field theory.

  16. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: emami@ipm.ir

    2014-05-01

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent ?N mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations.

  17. Gas turbines and acid rain - Looking at some solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, W.

    1989-01-01

    This article examines the technology available for reducing the sulfur emissions of gas turbines that are implicated in the production of acid rain. The alternatives reviewed are limestone scrubbing, spray dryer absorption and limestone injection into boilers. The last process is not feasible for gas turbines and of the other two the author recommends limestone scrubbing.

  18. Feynman rules for Coulomb gauge QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrasi, A.; Taylor, J.C.

    2012-10-15

    The Coulomb gauge in nonabelian gauge theories is attractive in principle, but beset with technical difficulties in perturbation theory. In addition to ordinary Feynman integrals, there are, at 2-loop order, Christ-Lee (CL) terms, derived either by correctly ordering the operators in the Hamiltonian, or by resolving ambiguous Feynman integrals. Renormalization theory depends on the sub-graph structure of ordinary Feynman graphs. The CL terms do not have a sub-graph structure. We show how to carry out renormalization in the presence of CL terms, by re-expressing these as 'pseudo-Feynman' integrals. We also explain how energy divergences cancel. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In Coulomb gauge QCD, we re-express Christ-Lee terms in the Hamiltonian as pseudo-Feynman integrals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This gives a subgraph structure, and allows the ordinary renormalization process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It also leads to cancellation of energy-divergences.

  19. Diffractive Scattering and Gauge/String Duality

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tan, Chung-I [Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States

    2009-09-01

    High-energy diffractive scattering will be discussed based on Gauge/String duality. As shown by Brower, Polchinski, Strassler and Tan, the ubiquitous Pomeron emerges naturally in gauge theories with string-theoretical descriptions. Its existence is intimately tied to gluons, and also to the energy-momentum tensor. With a confining dual background metric, the Pomeron can be interpreted as a 'massive graviton'. In a single unified step, both its infrared and ultraviolet properties are dealt with, reflecting confinement and conformal symmetry respectively. An effective field theory for high-energy scattering can be constructed. Applications based on this approach will also be described.

  20. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  1. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, Richard C.

    2014-04-15

    SciDAC-2 Project The Secret Life of Quarks: National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, from March 15, 2011 through March 14, 2012. The objective of this project is to construct the software needed to study quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of the strong interactions of sub-atomic physics, and other strongly coupled gauge field theories anticipated to be of importance in the energy regime made accessible by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It builds upon the successful efforts of the SciDAC-1 project National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory, in which a QCD Applications Programming Interface (QCD API) was developed that enables lattice gauge theorists to make effective use of a wide variety of massively parallel computers. This project serves the entire USQCD Collaboration, which consists of nearly all the high energy and nuclear physicists in the United States engaged in the numerical study of QCD and related strongly interacting quantum field theories. All software developed in it is publicly available, and can be downloaded from a link on the USQCD Collaboration web site, or directly from the github repositories with entrance linke http://usqcd-software.github.io

  2. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  3. Gauge-flation confronted with Planck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namba, Ryo; Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Peloso, Marco E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Gauge-flation is a recently proposed model in which inflation is driven solely by a non-Abelian gauge field thanks to a specific higher order derivative operator. The nature of the operator is such that it does not introduce ghosts. We compute the cosmological scalar and tensor perturbations for this model, improving over an existing computation. We then confront these results with the Planck data. The model is characterized by the quantity ??g{sup 2}Q{sup 2}/H{sup 2} (where g is the gauge coupling constant, Q the vector vev, and H the Hubble rate). For ? < 2, the scalar perturbations show a strong tachyonic instability. In the stable region, the scalar power spectrum n{sub s} is too low at small ?, while the tensor-to-scalar ratio r is too high at large ?. No value of ? leads to acceptable values for n{sub s} and r, and so the model is ruled out by the CMB data. The same behavior with ? was obtained in Chromo-natural inflation, a model in which inflation is driven by a pseudo-scalar coupled to a non-Abelian gauge field. When the pseudo-scalar can be integrated out, one recovers the model of Gauge-flation plus corrections. It was shown that this identification is very accurate at the background level, but differences emerged in the literature concerning the perturbations of the two models. On the contrary, our results show that the analogy between the two models continues to be accurate also at the perturbative level.

  4. EECBG Success Story: Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use EECBG Success Story: Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use July 27, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Lexington-Fayette Urban County, ...

  5. Flux-induced Isometry Gauging in Heterotic Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Gao, Peng

    2007-01-05

    We study the effect of flux-induced isometry gauging of the scalar manifold in N = 2 heterotic string compactification with gauge fluxes. We show that a vanishing theorem by Witten provides the protection mechanism. The other ungauged isometries in hyper moduli space could also be protected, depending on the gauge bundle structure. We also discuss the related issue in IIB setting.

  6. Neutron Reference Benchmark Field Specification: ACRR 44 Inch Lead-Boron (LB44) Bucket Environment (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-CL).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vega, Richard Manuel; Parma, Edward J.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Vehar, David W.

    2015-07-01

    This report was put together to support the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) REAL- 2016 activity to validate the dosimetry community’s ability to use a consistent set of activation data and to derive consistent spectral characterizations. The report captures details of integral measurements taken in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity with the 44 inch Lead-Boron (LB44) bucket, reference neutron benchmark field. The field is described and an “a priori” calculated neutron spectrum is reported, based on MCNP6 calculations, and a subject matter expert (SME) based covariance matrix is given for this “a priori” spectrum. The results of 31 integral dosimetry measurements in the neutron field are reported.

  7. Dark matter and gauged flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishara, Fady; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Stamou, Emmanuel; Zupan, Jure

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the phenomenology of flavored dark matter (DM). DM stability is guaranteed by an accidental Z3 symmetry, a subgroup of the standard model (SM) flavor group that is not broken by the SM Yukawa interactions. We consider an explicit realization where the quark part of the SM flavor group is fully gauged. If the dominant interactions between DM and visible sector are through flavor gauge bosons, as we show for Dirac fermion flavored DM, then the DM mass is bounded between roughly 0.5 TeV and 5 TeV if the DM multiplet mass is split only radiatively. In general, however, no such relation exists. We demonstrate this using scalar flavored DM where the main interaction with the SM is through the Higgs portal. For both cases we derive constraints from flavor, cosmology, direct and indirect DM detection, and collider searches.

  8. Supersymmetry Breaking, Gauge Mediation, and the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shih, David

    2015-04-14

    Gauge mediated SUSY breaking (GMSB) is a promising class of supersymmetric models that automatically satisfies the precision constraints. Prior work of Meade, Seiberg and Shih in 2008 established the full, model-independent parameter space of GMSB, which they called "General Gauge Mediation" (GGM). During the first half of 2010-2015, Shih and his collaborators thoroughly explored the parameter space of GGM and established many well-motivated benchmark models for use by the experimentalists at the LHC. Through their work, the current constraints on GGM from LEP, the Tevatron and the LHC were fully elucidated, together with the possible collider signatures of GMSB at the LHC. This ensured that the full discovery potential for GGM could be completely realized at the LHC.

  9. Dark matter and gauged flavor symmetries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bishara, Fady; Greljo, Admir; Kamenik, Jernej F.; Stamou, Emmanuel; Zupan, Jure

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the phenomenology of flavored dark matter (DM). DM stability is guaranteed by an accidental Z3 symmetry, a subgroup of the standard model (SM) flavor group that is not broken by the SM Yukawa interactions. We consider an explicit realization where the quark part of the SM flavor group is fully gauged. If the dominant interactions between DM and visible sector are through flavor gauge bosons, as we show for Dirac fermion flavored DM, then the DM mass is bounded between roughly 0.5 TeV and 5 TeV if the DM multiplet mass is split only radiatively. In general, however,more » no such relation exists. We demonstrate this using scalar flavored DM where the main interaction with the SM is through the Higgs portal. For both cases we derive constraints from flavor, cosmology, direct and indirect DM detection, and collider searches.« less

  10. SHIELDING ANALYSIS FOR PORTABLE GAUGING COMBINATION SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. TOMPKINS; L. LEONARD; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    Radioisotopic decay has been used as a source of photons and neutrons for industrial gauging operations since the late 1950s. Early portable moisture/density gauging equipment used Americium (Am)-241/Beryllium (Be)/Cesium (Cs)-137 combination sources to supply the required nuclear energy for gauging. Combination sources typically contained 0.040 Ci of Am-241 and 0.010 Ci of CS-137 in the same source capsule. Most of these sources were manufactured approximately 30 years ago. Collection, transportation, and storage of these sources once removed from their original device represent a shielding problem with distinct gamma and neutron components. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project is planning to use a multi-function drum (MFD) for the collection, shipping, and storage of AmBe sources, as well as the eventual waste package for disposal. The MFD is an approved TRU waste container design for DOE TRU waste known as the 12 inch Pipe Component Overpack. As the name indicates, this drum is based on a 12 inch ID stainless steel weldment approximately 25 inch in internal length. The existing drum design allows for addition of shielding within the pipe component up to the 110 kg maximum pay load weight. The 12 inch pipe component is packaged inside a 55-gallon drum, with the balance of the interior space filled with fiberboard dunnage. This packaging geometry is similar to the design of a DOT 6M, Type B shipping container.

  11. Light rain events change over North America, Europe and Asia for 1973-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Gong, Daoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2010-10-28

    Long-term daily precipitation data from NCDC are used to investigate the changes of light rain events from 1973-2009 over North America, Europe and Asia. Results reveal that the trend of light rain events presents a remarkably diverse feature in different regions, while an overall decrease trend can be found over the continents in northern hemisphere. In North America, most of stations show a decrease trend for light rain on the annual basis but a decrease trend can also be found for moderate and heavy rain. The opposite trends are observed over the stations in Europe and the trend of light rain is not significant when averaged for all the stations. In Asia, especially East Asia, the light rain days show an overwhelming decrease trend with high spatial coherency. Meanwhile the moderate and heavy rain events (> 10 mm/day) have increased, suggesting a remarkable shift of precipitation from light to heavy rain in East Asia. While both the warming at a global scale and increased atmospheric aerosols due to air pollution at a regional scale (e.g. East Asia) may have affected the light rain changes, it remains a challenging task to quantitatively detect and separate the cause of light rain changes in different regions. ?

  12. DOE/SC-ARM-11-024 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT - 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-024 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT - 2011 Recovery Act HIGHLIGHTS October 2010 * Doppler lidars tested at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. * Final installation completed for the three X-band scanning ARM precipitation radars (X-SAPRs) at SGP. * Weighing bucket rain gauge installed at Tropical Western Pacifc (TWP) site in Darwin, Australia. November 2010 * Aerosol chemistry speciation monitor incorporated into

  13. Data Report: Meteorological and Evapotranspiration Data from Sagebrush and Pinyon Pine/Juniper Communities at Pahute Mesa, Nevada National Security Site, 2011-2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasoni, Richard L; Larsen, Jessica D; Lyles, Brad F.; Healey, John M; Cooper, Clay A; Hershey, Ronald L; Lefebre, Karen J

    2013-04-01

    Pahute Mesa is a groundwater recharge area at the Nevada National Security Site. Because underground nuclear testing was conducted at Pahute Mesa, groundwater recharge may transport radionuclides from underground test sites downward to the water table; the amount of groundwater recharge is also an important component of contaminant transport models. To estimate the amount of groundwater recharge at Pahute Mesa, an INFIL3.0 recharge-runoff model is being developed. Two eddy covariance (EC) stations were installed on Pahute Mesa to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) to support the groundwater recharge modeling project. This data report describes the methods that were used to estimate ET and collect meteorological data. Evapotranspiration was estimated for two predominant plant communities on Pahute Mesa; one site was located in a sagebrush plant community, the other site in a pinyon pine/juniper community. Annual ET was estimated to be 31013.9 mm for the sagebrush site and 34715.9 mm for the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 26, 2011 to March 26, 2012). Annual precipitation measured with unheated tipping bucket rain gauges was 179 mm at the sagebrush site and 159 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site. Annual precipitation measured with bulk precipitation gauges was 222 mm at the sagebrush site and 227 mm at the pinyon pine/juniper site (March 21, 2011 to March 28, 2012). A comparison of tipping bucket versus bulk precipitation data showed that total precipitation measured by the tipping bucket rain gauges was 17 to 20 percent lower than the bulk precipitation gauges. These differences were most likely the result of the unheated tipping bucket precipitation gauges not measuring frozen precipitation as accurately as the bulk precipitation gauges. In this one-year study, ET exceeded precipitation at both study sites because estimates of ET included precipitation that fell during the winter of 2010-2011 prior to EC instrumentation and the precipitation gauges started collecting data in March 2011.

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.0855_Raines Draft Rev 4

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management Update Project Management Update Bob Raines Director, Project Management Systems and Assessments * Everybody's Favorite Subject Cost Estimating * Cost Estimating * EVMS...

  15. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, Albert L.

    1985-01-01

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade.

  16. Thread gauge for measuring thread pitch diameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewster, A.L.

    1985-11-19

    A thread gauge which attaches to a vernier caliper to measure the thread pitch diameter of both externally threaded and internally threaded parts is disclosed. A pair of anvils are externally threaded with threads having the same pitch as those of the threaded part. Each anvil is mounted on a stem having a ball on which the anvil can rotate to properly mate with the parts to which the anvils are applied. The stems are detachably secured to the caliper blades by attachment collars having keyhole openings for receiving the stems and caliper blades. A set screw is used to secure each collar on its caliper blade. 2 figs.

  17. Renormalization of Supersymmetric Gauge Theories on Orbifolds: Brane Gauge Couplings and Higher Derivative Operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groot Nibbelink, S.; Hillenbach, M.

    2005-12-02

    We review an explicit calculation of the renormalization of a vector multiplet due to hyper multiplets on the orbifolds S1/Z2 and T2/ZN. We find that generically the fixed point gauge couplings renormalize except at Z2 fixed points. In the six dimensional case on T2/ZN also a bulk dimension six higher derivative operator is induced.

  18. Holographic Gauge Mediation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gauge Mediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holographic Gauge Mediation We discuss gravitational backgrounds where supersymmetry is broken at the end of a warped throat, and the SUSY-breaking is transmitted to the Standard Model via gauginos which live in (part of) the bulk of the throat geometry. We find that the leading effect arises from splittings of certain 'messenger mesons,' which are adjoint KK-modes of the D-branes supporting the Standard Model gauge group. This picture

  19. Radiation characterization summary : ACRR 44-inch lead-boron bucket located in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline (ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parma, Edward J.,; Quirk, Thomas J.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick Joseph; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer Michael

    2013-04-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the 44-inch-long lead-boron bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-LB44-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray flux profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse and steady-state operations are presented with conversion examples.

  20. Seminatural gauge mediation from product group unification (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    group unification Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2016 Title: Seminatural gauge mediation from product group ...

  1. Divergences of generalized quantum electrodynamics on the Lorenz gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bufalo, R.; Pimentel, B. M.; Zambrano, G. E.

    2013-03-25

    In this paper we study the Generalized Quantum Electrodynamics (GQED4) on the Lorenz gauge condition and show that divergences are still present in the theory.

  2. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search Title: A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material...

  3. Phases of N=1 Supersymmetric Chiral Gauge Theories (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    are characterized by an infinite family of magnetic duals with arbitrarily large gauge groups describing the same fixed point, correlated with arbitrarily large classical global...

  4. The role of gauge symmetry in spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobreiro, R.F.

    2011-12-15

    In this work we employ a field theoretical approach to explain the nature of the non-conserved spin current in spintronics. In particular, we consider the usual U(1) gauge theory for the electromagnetism at classical level in order to obtain the broken continuity equation involving the spin current and spin-transfer torque. Inspired by the recent work of A. Vernes, B. L. Gyorffy and P. Weinberger where they obtain such an equation in terms of relativistic quantum mechanics, we formalize their result in terms of the well known currents of field theory such as the Bargmann-Wigner current and the chiral current. Thus, an interpretation of spintronics is provided in terms of Noether currents (conserved or not) and symmetries of the electromagnetism. In fact, the main result of the present work is that the non-conservation of the spin current is associated with the gauge invariance of physical observables where the breaking term is proportional to the chiral current. Moreover, we generalize their result by including the electromagnetic field as a dynamical field instead of an external one.

  5. Gas safety roof gauging control hatch adapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overstreet, R.J.

    1980-04-15

    A gas safety control hatch is disclosed which is attached to the top of a crude oil storage or stock tank. The hatch has a lid which can be opened to enable the contents of the stock tank to be gauged. A liquid lock apparatus is provided between the interior of the hatch and the interior of the stock tank. The liquid lock comprises a downwardly extending conduit having one end opened into the hatch and the other end opened in proximity of the bottom of the stock tank so that liquid always covers the lower, marginal end of the conduit whenever any appreciable amount of crude is stored in the stock tank. Accordingly, when the lid of the hatch is opened, no obnoxious fumes from the vapor space within the tank can flow into the hatch; and accordingly, the tank can be safely gauged by running a sampling apparatus down through the conduit and into communication with the liquid phase of the tank contents.

  6. Gauge and averaging in gravitational self-force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gralla, Samuel E.

    2011-10-15

    A difficulty with previous treatments of the gravitational self-force is that an explicit formula for the force is available only in a particular gauge (Lorenz gauge), where the force in other gauges must be found through a transformation law once the Lorenz-gauge force is known. For a class of gauges satisfying a 'parity condition' ensuring that the Hamiltonian center of mass of the particle is well-defined, I show that the gravitational self-force is always given by the angle average of the bare gravitational force. To derive this result I replace the computational strategy of previous work with a new approach, wherein the form of the force is first fixed up to a gauge-invariant piece by simple manipulations, and then that piece is determined by working in a gauge designed specifically to simplify the computation. This offers significant computational savings over the Lorenz gauge, since the Hadamard expansion is avoided entirely and the metric perturbation takes a very simple form. I also show that the rest mass of the particle does not evolve due to first-order self-force effects. Finally, I consider the 'mode sum regularization' scheme for computing the self-force in black hole background spacetimes, and use the angle-average form of the force to show that the same mode-by-mode subtraction may be performed in all parity-regular gauges. It appears plausible that suitably modified versions of the Regge-Wheeler and radiation gauges (convenient to Schwarzschild and Kerr, respectively) are in this class.

  7. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. Environmental Externalities in Electric Power Markets: Acid Rain, Urban Ozone, and Climate Change

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the emissions resulting from the generation of electricity by utilities and their role in contributing to the environmental problems of acid rain, urban ozone, and climate change.

  9. S-duality of nonsupersymmetric gauge theories (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    S-duality of nonsupersymmetric gauge theories Citation Details ... Publication Date: 2014-07-11 OSTI Identifier: 1140163 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15726 Journal ID: ISSN ...

  10. Bounding gauged skyrmion masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bounding gauged skyrmion masses Citation Details In-Document ... OSTI Identifier: 1151557 Report Number(s): ANL-HEP-PR-04-89 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal ...

  11. Large-N volume independence in conformal and confining gauge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In particular, this implies that a large N gauge theory which, on Rsup d, flows to an IR fixed point, retains the infinite correlation length and other scale invariant...

  12. Gauge-invariant Green function dynamics: A unified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiecicki, Sylvia D. Sipe, J.E.

    2013-11-15

    We present a gauge-invariant description of Green function dynamics introduced by means of a generalized Peirels phase involving an arbitrary differentiable path in spacetime. Two other approaches to formulating a gauge-invariant description of systems, the Green function treatment of Levanda and Fleurov [M. Levanda, V. Fleurov, J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 6 (1994) 7889] and the usual multipolar expansion for an atom, are shown to arise as special cases of our formalism. We argue that the consideration of paths in the generalized Peirels phase that do not lead to introduction of an effective gauge-invariant Hamiltonian with polarization and magnetization fields may prove useful for the treatment of the response of materials with short electron correlation lengths. -- Highlights: Peirels phase for an arbitrary path in spacetime established. Gauge-invariant Green functions and the PowerZienauWooley transformation connected. Limitations on possible polarization and magnetization fields established.

  13. Holographic Gauge Mediation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gauge Mediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holographic Gauge Mediation × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information

  14. Seminatural gauge mediation from product group unification (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Seminatural gauge mediation from product group unification Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 28, 2016 Title: Seminatural gauge mediation from product group unification Authors: Fukuda, Hajime ; Murayama, Hitoshi ; Yanagida, Tsutomu T. ; Yokozaki, Norimi Publication Date: 2015-09-29 OSTI Identifier: 1222429 Grant/Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical

  15. Load cell having strain gauges of arbitrary location

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry

    2007-03-13

    A load cell utilizes a plurality of strain gauges mounted upon the load cell body such that there are six independent load-strain relations. Load is determined by applying the inverse of a load-strain sensitivity matrix to a measured strain vector. The sensitivity matrix is determined by performing a multivariate regression technique on a set of known loads correlated to the resulting strains. Temperature compensation is achieved by configuring the strain gauges as co-located orthogonal pairs.

  16. Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | DOE PAGES matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories « Prev Next » Title: Effective matrix model for deconfinement in pure gauge theories Authors: Dumitru, Adrian ; Guo, Yun ; Hidaka, Yoshimasa ; Korthals Altes, Chris P. ; Pisarski, Robert D. Publication Date: 2012-11-08 OSTI Identifier: 1101301 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 86; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998

  17. Large field inflation models from higher-dimensional gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki; Koyama, Yoji

    2015-02-23

    Motivated by the recent detection of B-mode polarization of CMB by BICEP2 which is possibly of primordial origin, we study large field inflation models which can be obtained from higher-dimensional gauge theories. The constraints from CMB observations on the gauge theory parameters are given, and their naturalness are discussed. Among the models analyzed, Dante’s Inferno model turns out to be the most preferred model in this framework.

  18. The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Properties in Marine Stratocumulus (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Roles of Cloud Drop Effective Radius and LWP in Determining Rain Properties in Marine Stratocumulus Numerical simulations described in previous studies showed that adding cloud condensation nuclei to marine stratocumulus can prevent their breakup from closed into open

  19. Vortex operators in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polchinski, J.

    1980-07-01

    Several related aspects of the 't Hooft vortex operator are studied. The current picture of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics, the idea of dual field theories, and the idea of the vortex operator are reviewed first. The Abelian vortex operator written in terms of elementary fields and the calculation of its Green's functions are considered. A two-dimensional solvable model of a Dirac string is presented. The expression of the Green's functions more neatly in terms of Wu and Yang's geometrical idea of sections is addressed. The renormalization of the Green's functions of two kinds of Abelian looplike operators, the Wilson loop and the vortex operator, is studied; for both operators only an overall multiplicative renormalization is needed. In the case of the vortex this involves a surprising cancellation. Next, the dependence of the Green's functions of the Wilson and 't Hooft operators on the nature of the vacuum is discussed. The cluster properties of the Green's functions are emphasized. It is seen that the vortex operator in a massive Abelian theory always has surface-like clustering. The form of Green's functions in terms of Feynman graphs is the same in Higgs and symmetric phases; the difference appears in the sum over all tadpole trees. Finally, systems having fields in the fundamental representation are considered. When these fields enter only weakly into the dynamics, a vortex-like operator is anticipated. Any such operator can no longer be local looplike, but must have commutators at long range. A U(1) lattice gauge theory with two matter fields, one singly charged (fundamental) and one doubly charged (adjoint), is examined. When the fundamental field is weakly coupled, the expected phase transitions are found. When it is strongly coupled, the operator still appears to be a good order parameter, a discontinuous change in its behavior leads to a new phase transition. 18 figures.

  20. Unification of gauge, family, and flavor symmetries illustrated in gauged SU(12) models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Albright, Carl H.; Feger, Robert P.; Kephart, Thomas W.

    2016-04-25

    In this study, to explain quark and lepton masses and mixing angles, one has to extend the standard model, and the usual practice is to put the quarks and leptons into irreducible representations of discrete groups. We argue that discrete flavor symmetries (and their concomitant problems) can be avoided if we extend the gauge group. In the framework of SU(12) we give explicit examples of models having varying degrees of predictability obtained by scanning over groups and representations and identifying cases with operators contributing to mass and mixing matrices that need little fine- tuning of prefactors. Fitting with quark andmore » lepton masses run to the GUT scale and known mixing angles allows us to make predictions for the neutrino masses and hierarchy, the octant of the atmospheric mixing angle, leptonic CP violation, Majorana phases, and the effective mass observed in neutrinoless double beta decay.« less

  1. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parma, Edward J.,; Vehar, David W.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2015-06-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the polyethylene-lead-graphite (PLG) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  2. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dnes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixed point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of YangMills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.

  3. Gauge turbulence, topological defect dynamics, and condensation in Higgs models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gasenzer, Thomas; McLerran, Larry; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Sexty, Dénes

    2014-07-28

    The real-time dynamics of topological defects and turbulent configurations of gauge fields for electric and magnetic confinement are studied numerically within a 2+1D Abelian Higgs model. It is shown that confinement is appearing in such systems equilibrating after a strong initial quench such as the overpopulation of the infrared modes. While the final equilibrium state does not support confinement, metastable vortex defect configurations appearing in the gauge field are found to be closely related to the appearance of physically observable confined electric and magnetic charges. These phenomena are seen to be intimately related to the approach of a non-thermal fixedmore » point of the far-from-equilibrium dynamical evolution, signaled by universal scaling in the gauge-invariant correlation function of the Higgs field. Even when the parameters of the Higgs action do not support condensate formation in the vacuum, during this approach, transient Higgs condensation is observed. We discuss implications of these results for the far-from-equilibrium dynamics of Yang–Mills fields and potential mechanisms of how confinement and condensation in non-Abelian gauge fields can be understood in terms of the dynamics of Higgs models. These suggest that there is an interesting new class of dynamics of strong coherent turbulent gauge fields with condensates.« less

  4. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature 'McIntosh', 'Empire', and 'Golden Delicious' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh.) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and in 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and pH 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at ph 2.5 in 'Empire'. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in 'McIntosh'. The incidence of russetting on 'Golden Delicious' fruits was ameliorated by the presence of rain-exclusion chambers but was not affected by acid rain. With season-long sprays at pH 2.75, there was a slight delay in maturity and lower weight of 'McIntosh' apples. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  5. New ways to leptogenesis with gauged B-L symmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Babu, K.S.; Meng, Yanzhi; Tavartkiladze, Zurab

    2009-10-01

    We show that in supersymmetric models with gauged B-L symmetry, there is a new source for cosmological lepton asymmetry. The Higgs bosons responsible for B-L gauge symmetry breaking decay dominantly into right-handed sneutrinos N~ and N~* producing an asymmetry in N~ over N~*. This can be fully converted into ordinary lepton asymmetry in the decays of N~. In simple models with gauged B-L symmetry we show that resonant/soft leptogenesis is naturally realized. Supersymmetry guarantees quasi-degenerate scalar states, while soft breaking of SUSY provides the needed CP violation. Acceptable values of baryon asymmetry are obtained without causing serious problems with gravitinomore » abundance.« less

  6. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

  7. Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.

    1993-12-28

    A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

  8. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  9. Unified spin gauge model and the top quark mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, J.S.R.; Farwell, R.S.

    1995-10-01

    Spin gauge models use a real Clifford algebraic structure R{sub p,q} associated with a real manifold of dimension p + q to describe the fundamental interactions of elementary particles. This review provides a comparison between those models and the standard model, indicating their similarities and differences. By contrast with the standard model, the spin gauge model based on R{sub 3,8} generates intermediate boson mass terms without the need to use the Higgs-Kibble mechanism and produces a precise prediction for the mass of the top quark. The potential of this model to account for exactly three families of fermions is considered.

  10. Gauge theories on hyperbolic spaces and dual wormhole instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchel, Alex

    2004-09-15

    We study supergravity duals of strongly coupled four-dimensional gauge theories formulated on compact quotients of hyperbolic spaces. The resulting background geometries are represented by Euclidean wormholes, which complicate establishing the precise gauge theory/string theory correspondence dictionary. These backgrounds suffer from the nonperturbative instabilities arising from the D3D3-bar pair-production in the background four-form potential. We discuss conditions for suppressing this Schwingerlike instability. We find that Euclidean wormholes arising in this construction develop a naked singularity before they can be stabilized.

  11. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 3: Materials for Non-Welded Rotors, Buckets, and BoltingMaterials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Deepak

    2015-09-15

    The primary objective of the task was to characterize the materials suitable for mechanically coupled rotor, buckets and bolting operating with an inlet temperature of 760°C (1400°F). A previous study DOE-FC26-05NT42442, identified alloys such as Haynes®282®, Nimonic 105, Inconel 740, Waspaloy, Nimonic 263, and Inconel 617 as potential alloys that met the requirements for the necessary operating conditions. Of all the identified materials, Waspaloy has been widely utilized in the aviation industry in the form of disk and other smaller forgings, and sufficient material properties and vendor experience exist, for the design and manufacture of large components. The European program characterizing materials for A-USC conditions are evaluating Nimonic 263 and Inconel 617 for large components. Inconel 740 has been studied extensively as a part of the boiler consortium and is code approved. Therefore, the consortium focused efforts in the development of material properties for Haynes®282® and Nimonic 105 to avoid replicative efforts and provide material choices/trade off during the detailed design of large components. Commercially available Nimonic 105 and Haynes®282® were evaluated for microstructural stability by long term thermal exposure studies. Material properties requisite for design such as tensile, creep / rupture, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, fatigue crack growth rate, hold-time fatigue, fracture toughness, and stress relaxation are documented in this report. A key requisite for the success of the program was a need demonstrate the successful scale up of the down-selected alloys, to large components. All property evaluations in the past were performed on commercially available bar/billet forms. Components in power plant equipment such as rotors and castings are several orders in magnitude larger and there is a real need to resolve the scalability issue. Nimonic 105 contains high volume fraction y’ [>50%], and hence the alloy is best suited for smaller forging and valve internals, bolts, smaller blades. Larger Nimonic 105 forgings, would precipitate y’ during the surface cooling during forging, leading to surface cracks. The associate costs in forging Nimonic 105 to larger sizes [hotter dies, press requirements], were beyond the scope of this task and not investigated further. Haynes®282® has 20 - 25% volume fraction y’ was a choice for large components, albeit untested. A larger ingot diameter is pre-requisite for a larger diameter forging and achieves the “typically” accepted working ratio of 2.5-3:1. However, Haynes®282® is manufactured via a double melt process [VIM-ESR] limited by size [<18-16” diameter], which limited the maximum size of the final forging. The report documents the development of a 24” diameter triple melt ingot, surpassing the current available technology. A second triple melt ingot was manufactured and successfully forged into a 44” diameter disk. The successful developments in triple melting process and the large diameter forging of Haynes®282® resolved the scalability issues and involved the first of its kind attempt in the world for this alloy. The complete characterization of Haynes®282® forging was performed and documented in this report. The dataset from the commercially available Haynes®282® [grain size ASTM 3-4] and the finer grain size disk forging [ASTM 8-9] offer an additional design tradeoff to balance creep and fatigue during the future design process.

  12. ARM - PI Product - Black Carbon aerosol mass concentration in snow and rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    samples over Barrow in the Arctic ProductsBlack Carbon aerosol mass concentration in snow and rain samples over Barrow in the Arctic ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Black Carbon aerosol mass concentration in snow and rain samples over Barrow in the Arctic [ ARM research ] Deposition of black carbon aerosol (BC) on snow (i.e. wet deposition) is considered to lower snow albedo and

  13. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    In this article we describe the relation between the Chern-Simons gauge theory partition function and the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional as the Lagrangian. We show that the partition functions obtained using these two Lagrangians agree, and we identify the semiclassical formula for the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional.

  14. Coulomb gauge approach for charmonium meson and hybrid radiative transitions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gou, Peng; Yepez-Martínez, Tochtli; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-01-22

    We consider the lowest order interaction of the Foldy-Wouthuysen QED and QCD Hamiltonian in the Coulomb gauge approach, to describe radiative transitions between conventional and hybrids charmonium mesons. The results are compared to potential quark models and lattices calculations.

  15. Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and 700 K Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and 700 K ...

  16. Apparatus and method for field calibration of nuclear surface density gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regimand, A.; Gilbert, A.B.

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear gauge density measurements are routinely used for compliance verification with specifications for road and construction projects. The density of construction materials is an important indicator of structural performance and quality. Due to speed of measurement, flexibility and accuracy, nuclear gauge density measurement methods are becoming the preferred standard around the world. Requirements dictate that gauges be verified or calibrated once every 12 to 18 months. Presently, there are no field portable devices available for verification of the gauge calibration. Also, the density references used for calibration of gauges, are large and not designed for field portability. Therefore, to meet the present standards, users are required to ship gauges back to a service facility for calibration. This paper presents results obtained by a newly developed device for field verification and calibration of nuclear density gauges from three different manufacturers. The calibrations obtained by this device are compared to the factory calibration methods and accuracies are reported for each gauge model.

  17. Non-AbelianSU(2)gauge fields through density wave order and strain...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-AbelianSU(2)gauge fields through density wave order and strain in graphene Prev Next Title: Non-AbelianSU(2)gauge fields through density wave order and strain in graphene...

  18. Non-Abelian S U ( 2 ) gauge fields through density wave order...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Non-Abelian S U ( 2 ) gauge fields through density wave order and strain in graphene Title: Non-Abelian S U ( 2 ) gauge fields through density wave order and strain in graphene ...

  19. Comparison between length and velocity gauges in quantum simulations of high-order harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Yong-Chang; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-06-15

    We solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for atomic hydrogen in an intense field using spherical coordinates with a radial grid and a spherical harmonic basis for the angular part. We present the high-order harmonic spectra based on three different forms, the dipole, dipole velocity, and acceleration forms, and two gauges, the length and velocity gauges. The relationships among the harmonic phases obtained from the Fourier transform of the three forms are discussed in detail. Although quantum mechanics is gauge invariant and the length and velocity gauges should give identical results, the two gauges present different computation efficiencies, which reflects the different behavior in terms of characteristics of the physical couplings acting in the two gauges. In order to obtain convergence, more angular momentum states are required in the length gauge, while more grid points are required in the velocity gauge. At lower laser intensity, the calculation in the length gauge is faster than that in the velocity gauge, while at high laser intensity, the calculation in the velocity gauge is more efficient. The velocity gauge is also expected to be more efficient in higher-dimensional calculations.

  20. Cartan gravity, matter fields, and the gauge principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westman, Hans F.; Zlosnik, Tom G.

    2013-07-15

    Gravity is commonly thought of as one of the four force fields in nature. However, in standard formulations its mathematical structure is rather different from the YangMills fields of particle physics that govern the electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions. This paper explores this dissonance with particular focus on how gravity couples to matter from the perspective of the Cartan-geometric formulation of gravity. There the gravitational field is represented by a pair of variables: (1) a contact vector V{sup A} which is geometrically visualized as the contact point between the spacetime manifold and a model spacetime being rolled on top of it, and (2) a gauge connection A{sub ?}{sup AB}, here taken to be valued in the Lie algebra of SO(2,3) or SO(1,4), which mathematically determines how much the model spacetime is rotated when rolled. By insisting on two principles, the gauge principle and polynomial simplicity, we shall show how one can reformulate matter field actions in a way that is harmonious with Cartans geometric construction. This yields a formulation of all matter fields in terms of first order partial differential equations. We show in detail how the standard second order formulation can be recovered. In particular, the Hodge dual, which characterizes the structure of bosonic field equations, pops up automatically. Furthermore, the energymomentum and spin-density three-forms are naturally combined into a single object here denoted the spin-energymomentum three-form. Finally, we highlight a peculiarity in the mathematical structure of our first-order formulation of YangMills fields. This suggests a way to unify a U(1) gauge field with gravity into a SO(1,5)-valued gauge field using a natural generalization of Cartan geometry in which the larger symmetry group is spontaneously broken down to SO(1,3)U(1). The coupling of this unified theory to matter fields and possible extensions to non-Abelian gauge fields are left as open questions. -- Highlights: Develops Cartan gravity to include matter fields. Coupling to gravity is done using the standard gauge prescription. Matter actions are manifestly polynomial in all field variables. Standard equations recovered on-shell for scalar, spinor and YangMills fields. Unification of a U(1) field with gravity based on the orthogonal group SO(1,5)

  1. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-12-15

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  2. (Rain)cloud computing: Researchers work to improve how we predict climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    change | Argonne National Laboratory (Rain)cloud computing: Researchers work to improve how we predict climate change By Louise Lerner * March 3, 2016 Tweet EmailPrint Rao Kotamarthi and Jiali Wang spend their days looking at a future Earth. At the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory, the two scientists work on simulations and techniques to project what the climate will look like 100 years from now. Last year, they completed the highest resolution climate forecast

  3. Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    The Acid Rain Program is divided into two time periods; Phase I, from 1995 through 1999, and Phase II, starting in 2000. Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx . Phase II affects virtually all electric power producers, including utilities and nonutilities. This report is a study of the effects of compliance with Phase I regulations on the costs and operations of electric utilities, but does not address any Phase II impacts.

  4. Effects of acid rain on apple tree productivity and fruit quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsline, P.L.; Musselman, R.C.; Kender, W.J.; Dee, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Mature McIntosh, Empire, and Golden Delicious apple trees (Malus domestica) were sprayed with simulated acid rain solutions in the pH range of 2.5 to 5.5 at full bloom in 1980 and 1981. In 1981, weekly sprays were applied at pH 2.75 and pH 3.25. Necrotic lesions developed on apple petals at pH 2.5 with slight injury appearing at pH 3.0 and 3.5. Apple foliage had no acid rain lesions at any of the pH levels tested. Pollen germination was reduced at pH 2.5 in Empire. Slight fruit set reduction at pH 2.5 was observed in McIntosh. Even at the lowest pH levels no detrimental effects of simulated acid rain were found on apple tree productivity and fruit quality when measured as fruit set, seed number per fruit, and fruit size and appearance.

  5. PDF uncertainties at large x and gauge boson production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto

    2012-10-01

    I discuss how global QCD fits of parton distribution functions can make the somewhat separated fields of high-energy particle physics and lower energy hadronic and nuclear physics interact to the benefit of both. In particular, I will argue that large rapidity gauge boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC has the highest short-term potential to constrain the theoretical nuclear corrections to DIS data on deuteron targets necessary for up/down flavor separation. This in turn can considerably reduce the PDF uncertainty on cross section calculations of heavy mass particles such as W' and Z' bosons.

  6. Lattice Gauge Theory and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronfeld, Andreas S.

    2013-08-01

    Most of the mass of everyday objects resides in atomic nuclei/ the total of the electrons' mass adds up to less than one part in a thousand. The nuclei are composed of nucleons---protons and neutrons---whose nuclear binding energy, though tremendous on a human scale, is small compared to their rest energy. The nucleons are, in turn, composites of massless gluons and nearly massless quarks. It is the energy of these confined objects, via $M=E/c^2$, that is responsible for everyday mass. This article discusses the physics of this mechanism and the role of lattice gauge theory in establishing its connection to quantum chromodynamics.

  7. Lectures on the gauge/string duality with emphasis on spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mateos, David

    2010-11-12

    I review recent progress on the connection between string theory and quantum chromo-dynamics in the context of the gauge/string duality. Emphasis is placed on conciseness and conceptual aspects rather than on technical details. Topics covered include the large-N{sub c} limit of gauge theories, the gravitational description of gauge theory thermodynamics and hydrodynamics, and the physics of quarks and mesons in the quark-gluon plasma.

  8. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackenzie, Paul; Brower, Richard; Karsch, Frithjof; Christ, Norman; Gottlieb, Steven; Negele, John; Richards, David; Toussaint, Doug; Sugar, Robert; DeTar, Carleton; Sharpe, Stephen; DiPierro, Massimo; Sun, Xian-He; Fowler, Rob; Dubey, Abhishek

    2013-07-19

    Under its SciDAC-1 and SciDAC-2 grants, the USQCD Collaboration developed software and algorithmic infrastructure for the numerical study of lattice gauge theories.

  9. Topological fermionic string representation for Chern-Simons non-Abelian gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botelho, L.C.L. )

    1990-05-15

    We show that loop wave equations in non-Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory are exactly solved by a conformally invariant topological fermionic string theory.

  10. Multi-Higgs doublet models with local U(1){sub H} gauge symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and neutrino physics therein Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-Higgs doublet models with local U(1)sub H gauge symmetry and neutrino physics therein ...

  11. Quark masses, the Dashen phase, and gauge field topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creutz, Michael

    2013-12-15

    The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD is predicted by chiral perturbation theory to occur when the updown quark mass difference becomes sufficiently large at fixed down-quark mass. Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes are expected to behave smoothly with the up-quark mass, even as this mass passes through zero. In Euclidean space, the topological susceptibility of the gauge fields is positive at positive quark masses but diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. A zero in this susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. I discuss potential ambiguities with this determination. -- Highlights: The CP violating Dashen phase in QCD occurs when the up quark mass becomes sufficiently negative. Before reaching this phase, all physical hadronic masses and scattering amplitudes behave smoothly with the up-quark mass. The topological susceptibility of the gauge fields diverges to negative infinity as the Dashen phase is approached. A zero in the topological susceptibility provides a tentative signal for the point where the mass of the up quark vanishes. The universality of this definition remains unproven. Potential ambiguities are discussed.

  12. Search for: All records | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ARM: Rain gauge Mary Jane Bartholomew Rain gauge View Dataset March 2006 ARM: Video Disdrometer Drop Size Distribution Mary Jane Bartholomew Video Disdrometer Drop Size ...

  13. The biological diversity conservation district: A rain forest conservation tool for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simons, M.

    1995-12-01

    Over the next twenty years, the Earth`s rain forests may decrease by forty percent! This paper presents a revolutionary corporate entity for the protection of those forests, the biological diversity conservation district (biodistricts). The underlying cause of rain forest destruction is unfettered competition for limited resources. The competitors are many: farmers, business, local and national governments, the biotechnology and ecotourism industries, multinational companies, public utilities, and indigenous groups. To varying degrees, all compete within the marketplace. biodistricts will bring together two forces once thought to be antithetical: conservation an development. They will be set up in corporate form, owned and controlled by groups claiming access to the forest resources. Because the various groups will fight for the same resources habitats, ecosystems, and genetic diversity-each will prevent the others from destroying them. The district members will ensure that all businesses maintain sustainable development practices because the economic success of the district depends upon the area`s natural beauty and biological diversity. This paper analyzes the effects on the culture, politics, economy and conservation there. It will conclude that the comprehensive approach taken by biodistricts is the only method for solving the problem of rain forest destruction; that it is economically feasible, culturally viable, and ethically defensible. By March 1, 1995, the paper will represent not only the culmination of eighteen months of research, writing and interviews regarding biological diversity conservation, but also the impetus to push the thinking of environmentalists and business persons in a new direction, perhaps the only direction that will allow the nations of the world to protect their forests for the next twenty years and beyond.

  14. The role of EPA`s Acid Rain Division in the Ozone Transport Commission`s NOx budget program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schary, C.; Culligan, K.

    1997-12-31

    The Ozone Transport Commission`s (OTC) Nitrogen Oxides (NO{sub x}) Budget Program will implement the emissions reduction goal of the 1994 Memorandum of Understanding between its twelve member states and the District of Columbia. The program will achieve its significant NO{sub x} reductions from electric utilities and industrial boilers using a {open_quotes}cap-and-trade{close_quotes} approach modeled after the US Environmental Protection Agency`s sulfur dioxide emissions trading under the Acid Rain Program. The similarity of the two programs has led to the development of an important partnership between the OTC states and EPA`s Acid Rain Division, Over the past two years, Acid Rain Program staff have shared their technical expertise and assisted extensively in the development of the program`s rules. Leveraging the investment EPA made in the systems used to run the Acid Rain Program, the OTC states have asked the Acid Rain Division to administer the data systems for them, and together are working to expand its existing Emissions Tracking System and to modify a clone of the sulfur dioxide Allowance Tracking System, to fulfill the unique requirements of the NO{sub x} Budget Program. This partnership is an important example of the new type of cooperation and sharing of expertise and resources that should develop between EPA and states as they launch multi-state programs to address regional pollution problems that defy a single-state solution.

  15. A nanocrystal strain gauge for luminescence detection of mechanical forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-07-26

    Local microscale stresses play a crucial role in inhomogeneous mechanical processes from cell motility to material failure. However, it remains difficult to spatially resolve stress at these small length scales. While contact-probe and non-contact based techniques have been used to quantify local mechanical behavior in specific systems with high stiffness or stress and spatial resolution, these methods cannot be used to study a majority of micromechanical systems due to spectroscopic and geometrical constraints. We present here the design and implementation of a luminescent nanocrystal strain gauge, the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod. The tetrapod can be incorporated into many materials, yielding a local stress measurement through optical fluorescence spectroscopy of the electronically confined CdSe core states. The stress response of the tetrapod is calibrated and utilized to study mechanical behavior in single polymer fibers. We expect that tetrapods can be used to investigate local stresses in many other mechanical systems.

  16. Probing new gauge-boson couplings via three-body decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, J.L.; Rizzo, T.G. )

    1993-06-01

    We examine the possibility of using rare, three-body decays of a new neutral gauge boson [ital Z][sub 2] to probe its gauge couplings at hadron colliders. Specifically, we study the decays [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Wl][nu] and [ital Z][sub 2][r arrow][ital Z][nu][bar [nu

  17. The future of emissions trading in light of the acid rain experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLean, B.J.; Rico, R.

    1995-12-31

    The idea of emissions trading was developed more than two decades ago by environmental economists eager to provide new ideas for how to improve the efficiency of environmental protection. However, early emissions trading efforts were built on the historical {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} infrastructure which has dominated U.S. environmental protection until today. The {open_quotes}command and control{close_quotes} model initially had advantages that were of a very pragmatic character: it assured large pollution reductions in a time when large, cheap reductions were available and necessary; and it did not require a sophisticated government infrastructure. Within the last five years, large-scale emission trading programs have been successfully designed and started that are fundamentally different from the earlier efforts, creating a new paradigm for environmental control just when our understanding of environmental problems is changing as well. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the largest national-scale program--the Acid Rain Program--and from that experience, forecast when emission trading programs may be headed based on our understanding of the factors currently influencing environmental management. The first section of this paper will briefly review the history of emissions trading programs, followed by a summary of the features of the Acid Rain Program, highlighting those features that distinguish it from previous efforts. The last section addresses the opportunities for emissions trading (and its probable future directions).

  18. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausladen, Paul; Blessinger, Christopher S; Guzzardo, Tyler; Livesay, Jake

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  19. PRODUCTION PROCESS MONITORING OF MULTILAYERED MATERIALS USING TIME-DOMAIN TERAHERTZ GAUGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimdars, David; Duling, Irl; Fichter, Greg; White, Jeffrey

    2010-02-22

    The results of both a laboratory and factory trial of a time-domain terahertz (TD-THz) multi-layer gauge for on-line process monitoring are presented. The TD-THz gauge is demonstrated on a two layer laminated plastic insulation material. The TD-THz gauge simultaneously measured the total and the individual layer thicknesses. Measurements were made while transversely scanning across a 12 foot wide sheet extruded at high speed in a factory environment. The results were analyzed for precision, accuracy, and repeatability; and demonstrated that the TD-THz gauge performed in an equivalent or superior manner to existing ionizing radiation gauges (which measure only one layer). Many dielectric materials (e.g., plastic, rubber, paper, paint) are transparent to THz pulses, and the measurement of a wide range of samples is possible.

  20. Implications of the Clean Air Act acid rain title on industrial boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maibodi, M. )

    1991-11-01

    This paper discusses the impacts of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments related to acid rain controls, as they apply to industrial boilers. Emphasis is placed on explaining the Title IV provisions of the Amendments that permit nonutility sources to participate in the SO{sub 2} allowance system. The allowance system, as it pertains to industrial boiler operators, is described, and the opportunities for operators to trade and/or sell SO{sub 2} emission credits is discussed. The paper also reviews flue gas desulfurization system technologies available for industrial boiler operators who may choose to participate in the system. Furnace sorbent injection, advanced silicate process, lime spray drying, dry sorbent injection, and limestone scrubbing are described, including statements of their SO{sub 2} removing capability, commercial status, and costs. Capital costs, levelized costs and cost-effectiveness are presented for these technologies.

  1. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings: Evidence from the US Acid Rain Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The US Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate in allowance trading, and whether regulatory activity at the state level would further complicate utilities` decision to trade allowances. This paper finds that public utility commission regulation has encouraged allowance trading activity in states with regulatory rulings, but that allowance trading activity has not been limited to states issuing regulations. Until there is evidence suggesting that significant additional cost savings could have been obtained if additional allowance trading activity had occurred in states without regulations or that utilities in states with regulations are still not taking advantage of all cost saving trading opportunities, this analysis suggests that there is little reason to believe that allowance trading activity is impeded by public utility commission regulations.

  2. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  3. On the gauge features of gravity on a Lie algebroid structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabi, S. Harms, B. Hou, S.

    2014-03-15

    We present the geometric formulation of gravity based on the mathematical structure of a Lie Algebroid. We show that this framework provides the geometrical setting to describe the gauge propriety of gravity.

  4. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.13 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  5. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.14 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  6. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software- EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.11 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated June 2, 2006, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  7. A search for a new gauge boson A'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Eric L.

    2013-08-01

    In the Standard Model, gauge bosons mediate the strong, weak, and electromagnetic forces. New forces could have escaped detection only if their mediators are either heavier than order(TeV) or weakly coupled to charged matter. New vector bosons with small coupling {alpha}' arise naturally from a small kinetic mixing with the photon and have received considerable attention as an explanation of various dark matter related anomalies. Such particles can be produced in electron-nucleus fixed-target scattering and then decay to e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs. New light vector bosons and their associated forces are a common feature of Standard Model extensions, but existing constraints are remarkably sparse. The APEX experiment will search for a new vector boson A' with coupling {alpha}'/{alpha}{sub fs} > 6 × 10{sup -8} to electrons in the mass range 65MeV < mass A' < 550MeV. The experiment will study e{sup +}e{sup -} production off an electron beam incident on a high-Z target in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The e{sup -} and e{sup +} will be detected in the High Resolution Spectrometers (HRSs). The invariant mass spectrum of the e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs will be scanned for a narrow resonance corresponding to the mass of the A'. A test run for the APEX experiment was held in the summer of 2010. Using the test run data, an A' search was performed in the mass range 175-250 MeV. The search found no evidence for an A' --> e{sup +}e{sup -} reaction, and set an upper limit of {alpha}'/{alpha}{sub fs} ~ 10{sup -6}.

  8. H. R. 5904: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief to utilities installing acid rain reduction equipment, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 23, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on October 23, 1990 to control acid rain. This legislation focuses on tax credit for equipment to meet acid rain reduction standards, as well as tax-exempt financing of acid rain control property. In addition, a tax credit is issued for minerals used to reduce the sulfur in coal.

  9. Survival and distribution of Vibrio cholerae in a tropical rain forest stream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez-Rosas, N.; Hazen, T.C.

    1988-12-31

    For 12 months Vibrio cholerae and fecal coliforms were monitored along with 9 other water quality parameters at 12 sites in a rain forest watershed in Puerto Rico. Densities of V. cholerae and fecal coliforms were not significantly correlated even though the highest densities of both bacteria were found at a sewage outfall. High densities of V. cholerae were also found at pristine sites high in the watershed. V. cholerae and Escherichia coli were inoculated into membrane diffusion chambers, placed at two sites and monitored for 5 days on two different occasions. Two different direct count methods indicated that the density of E. coli and V. cholerae did not change significantly during the course of either study. Physiological activity, as measured by INT-reduction and relative nucleic acid composition declined for E. coli during the first 12 h then increased and remained variable during the remainder of the study. V. cholerae activity, as measured by relative nucleic acid concentrations, remained high and unchanged for the entire study. INT-reduction in V. cholerae declined initially but regained nearly all of it`s original activity within 48 h. This study suggests that V. cholerae is an indigenous organism in tropical freshwaters and that assays other than fecal coliforms or E. coli must be used for assessing public health risk in tropical waters.

  10. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (?) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a ? of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing ? to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  11. Hydrogen atom excitation in intense attosecond laser field: Gauge dependence of dipole approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldarmaa, Ch. E-mail: l-xemee@yahoo.com; Khenmedekh, L. E-mail: l-xemee@yahoo.com; Lkhagva, O.

    2014-03-24

    It is assumed that, the atomic excitations probability can be calculated using first order perturbation theory and dipole approximations. The validity of the dipole approximations had been examined by comparing the results with the results obtained by exact calculations within the first order perturbation theory[2]. Figure 1 shows the time dependence of the transition probability in the dipole approximation. From these plots it is obvious that, the probabilities obtained in the length gauge are higher than that in the velocity gauge, in the interaction period (??/2gauges became equal to each other precisely. Moreover those results are equal to the corresponding exact (without the dipole approximation) calculations results. (Figure 2) Though the time evolution of the same transition probabilities are different for these cases, the final results are the same for all three cases, excluding the 6s-6p{sub 0} transition. For the later case, only the length gauge give a false results, but the velocity gauge give the same result as the exact one, for the final value of the transition probability.

  12. Geometrical gauge factor of directional electric potential drop sensors for creep monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madhi, E.; Nagy, P. B.

    2011-06-23

    Directional electric potential drop measurements can be exploited for in-situ monitoring of creep in metals. The sensor monitors the variation in the ratio of the resistances measured simultaneously in the axial and lateral directions using a square-electrode configuration. This technique can efficiently separate the mostly isotropic common part of the resistivity variation caused by reversible temperature variations from the mostly anisotropic differential part caused by direct geometrical and indirect material effects of creep. Initially, this ratio is roughly proportional to the axial creep strain, while at later stages, the resistance ratio increases even faster with creep strain because of the formation of directional discontinuities such as preferentially oriented grain boundary cavities and multiple-site cracks in the material. Similarly to ordinary strain gauges, the relative sensitivity of the sensor is defined as a gauge factor that can be approximated as a sum of geometrical and material parts. This work investigated the geometrical gauge factor by analytical and experimental means. We found that under uniaxial stress square-electrode sensors exhibit geometrical gauge factors of about 4 and 5 in the elastic and plastic regimes, respectively, i.e., more than twice those of conventional strain gauges. Experimental results obtained on 304 stainless steel using a square-electrode electric potential drop creep sensor agree well with our theoretical predictions.

  13. Isomorphism between gauge groups before and after renormalization in the presence of Abel subgroups and Higgs fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-14

    A rigorous proof is given on the isomorphism between gauge groups before and after renormalization, in the presence of Abel subgroups and Higgs fields.

  14. Method of determining the x-ray limit of an ion gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jr., David; Lanni, Christopher P.

    1981-01-01

    An ion gauge having a reduced "x-ray limit" and means for measuring that limit. The gauge comprises an ion gauge of the Bayard-Alpert type having a short collector and having means for varying the grid-collector voltage. The "x-ray limit" (i.e. the collector current resulting from x-rays striking the collector) may then be determined by the formula: ##EQU1## where: I.sub.x ="x-ray limit", I.sub.l and I.sub.h =the collector current at the lower and higher grid voltage respectively; and, .alpha.=the ratio of the collector current due to positive ions at the higher voltage to that at the lower voltage.

  15. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jardine, K.; Yañez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; et al

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within themore » 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63« less

  16. Dimethyl sulfide in the Amazon rain forest: DMS in the Amazon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, K.; Yaez-Serrano, A. M.; Williams, J.; Kunert, N.; Jardine, A.; Taylor, T.; Abrell, L.; Artaxo, P.; Guenther, A.; Hewitt, C. N.; House, E.; Florentino, A. P.; Manzi, A.; Higuchi, N.; Kesselmeier, J.; Behrendt, T.; Veres, P. R.; Derstroff, B.; Fuentes, J. D.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-01-08

    Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate 44 through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate 45 aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally 46 considered the dominant source of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents 47 an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, we quantified 48 ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the 49 central Amazon Basin in real-time (2010-2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013-50 2014). Elevated but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the 51 canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during 52 both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios 53 lasting up to 8 hours (up to 160 ppt) often occurred within the canopy and near the 54 surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up 55 to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain 56 event. The spatial and temporal distribution of DMS suggests that ambient levels and 57 their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil 58 source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as 59 a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light and temperature 60 dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. Our study 61 has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in 62 coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks. 63

  17. Multi-Higgs doublet models with local U(1){sub H} gauge symmetry and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    neutrino physics therein (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Multi-Higgs doublet models with local U(1){sub H} gauge symmetry and neutrino physics therein Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multi-Higgs doublet models with local U(1){sub H} gauge symmetry and neutrino physics therein Multi-Higgs doublet models appear in many interesting extensions of the standard model (SM). But they suffer from Higgs-mediated flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) problem which is very generic. In

  18. Fiber-optic strain gauge with attached ends and unattached microbend section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, J.D.

    1992-07-21

    A strain gauge is made of an optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. The permanent microbends cause a reduction in the fiber's optical transmission, but, when the gauge is attached to a substrate that is subsequently strained, the amplitude of the deformations will diminish and the optical transmission through the fiber will increase. An apparatus and process for manufacturing these microbends into the optical fiber through a heat-set process is employed; this apparatus and process includes a testing and calibration system. 5 figs.

  19. Analytic structure of the self-energy for massive gauge bosons at finite

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    temperature (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analytic structure of the self-energy for massive gauge bosons at finite temperature Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytic structure of the self-energy for massive gauge bosons at finite temperature We show that the one-loop self-energy at finite temperature has a unique limit as the external momentum [ital p][sub [mu]][r arrow]0 [ital if] the loop involves propagators with distinct masses. This naturally arises in theories

  20. Gauged B-xiL origin of R parity and its implications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    Gauged B-L is a popular candidate for the origin of the conservation of R parity, i.e.R=(-)3B+L+2j, in supersymmetry, but it fails to forbid the effective dimension-five terms arising from the superfield combinations QQQL, ucucdcec, and ucdcdcNc, which allow the proton to decay. Changing it to B-xiL, where xe+xμ+xτ=3 (with xi≠1) for the three families, would forbid these terms while still serving as a gauge origin of Rparity. We show how this is achieved in two minimal models with realistic neutrino mass matrices, and discuss their phenomenological implications.

  1. Effective field theory for a heavy Higgs boson: A manifestly gauge-invariant approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyffeler, A.; Schenk, A.

    1996-02-01

    For large values of the Higgs boson mass the low energy structure of the gauged linear {sigma} model in the spontaneously broken phase can adequately be described by an effective field theory. In this work we present a manifestly gauge-invariant technique to explicitly evaluate the corresponding effective Langrangian from the underlying theory. In order to demonstrate the application of this functional method, the effective field theory of the Abelian Higgs model is thoroughly analyzed. We stress that this technique does not rely on any particular property of the Abelian case. The application to the non-Abelian theory is outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Fiber-optic strain gauge with attached ends and unattached microbend section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A strain gauge is made of an optical fiber into which quasi-sinusoidal microbends have been permanently introduced. The permanent microbends cause a reduction in the fiber's optical transmission, but, when the gauge is attached to a substrate that is subsequently strained, the amplitude of the deformations will diminish and the optical transmission through the fiber will increase. An apparatus and process for manufacturing these microbends into the optical fiber through a heat-set process is employed; this apparatus and process includes a testing and calibration system.

  3. S-duality of nonsupersymmetric gauge theories (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect S-duality of nonsupersymmetric gauge theories Citation Details In-Document Search Title: S-duality of nonsupersymmetric gauge theories Authors: Hook, Anson ; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study ; Torroba, Gonzalo ; /Stanford U., ITP /SLAC ; , Publication Date: 2014-07-11 OSTI Identifier: 1140163 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15726 Journal ID: ISSN 1550--7998; arXiv:1309.5948 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Phys. Rev. D89:

  4. Nutrient dynamics and nitrogen trace gas flux during ecosystem development in montane rain forest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.H.; Vitousek, P.M.

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of nitrogen trace gas emissions, soil nitrogen flux, and nutrient availability were evaluated at five sites that form a chronosequence in Hawaiian montane rain forest. The estimated age of basaltic parent material from which soils developed at the Kilauea site was 200 yr, 6000 yr at the Puu Makaala site, 185000 yr at the Kohala site, 1.65 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Molokai site, and 4.5 x 10{sup 6} yr at the Kauai site. Peak net N mineralization and nitrification values were found in soils from the 185000-yr-old Kohala site. Nitrogen content of foliage and leaf litter was highest in the intermediate age sites (Puu Makaala and Kohala) and N and P retranslocation was lowest at the Puu Makaala site. Soil cores fertilized with nitrogen had significantly higher rates of root ingrowth than control cores at the two youngest sites (200 and 6000 yr old) but not in older sites (185000 and 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old sites) and total fine root growth into control cores was greatest at the Kohala site. The highest N{sub 2}O emissions were found at the 185000-yr-old Kohala site, while the highest combined flux of N{sub 2}O + NO was observed at the 4.5 x 10{sup 6}-yr-old Kauai site. While overall N{sub 2}O emission rates were correlated with rates of N transformations, soil water content appeared to influence the magnitude of emissions of N{sub 2}O and the ratios of emissions of NO vs. N{sub 2}O. N{sub 2}O emissions occurred when water-filled pore space (WFPS) values were >40%, with highest emissions in at least two sites observed at WFPS values of 75%. Among sites, high N{sub 2}O emissions were associated with high soil N transformation rates. Large NO fluxes were observed only at the Kauai site when WFPS values were <60%. 50 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Omnidirectional capacitive probe for gauge of having a sensing tip formed as a substantially complete sphere

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jostlein, Hans

    1994-01-01

    A non-contact, omni-directional capacitive probe for use in dimensional gauging includes an electrically conductive spherical sensing tip that forms a capacitor with a workpiece, the capacitance of the capacitor being indicative of the distance between the spherical sensing tip and the workpiece.

  6. 2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

    2012-08-16

    We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

  7. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report Indiana University Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottlieb, Steven Arthur; DeTar, Carleton; Tousaint, Doug

    2014-07-24

    This is the closeout report for the Indiana University portion of the National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory project supported by the United States Department of Energy under the SciDAC program. It includes information about activities at Indian University, the University of Arizona, and the University of Utah, as those three universities coordinated their activities.

  8. Search for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry in the gamma gamma missing ET Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesisoglou, Stilianos Isaak

    2004-12-01

    We present results on a search for Gauge Mediated Supersymmetry in the di-photon final state using Run II data collected by the D0 Experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We discuss event selection, Standard Model backgrounds, and the lower limits on the lightest neutralino and chargino masses resulted from this analysis.

  9. Gauge invariance of phenomenological models of the interaction of quantum dissipative systems with electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokman, M. D. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov Street, 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    We discuss specific features of the electrodynamic characteristics of quantum systems within the framework of models that include a phenomenological description of the relaxation processes. As is shown by W. E. Lamb, Jr., R. R. Schlicher, and M. O. Scully [Phys. Rev. A 36, 2763 (1987)], the use of phenomenological relaxation operators, which adequately describe the attenuation of eigenvibrations of a quantum system, may lead to incorrect solutions in the presence of external electromagnetic fields determined by the vector potential for different resonance processes. This incorrectness can be eliminated by giving a gauge-invariant form to the relaxation operator. Lamb, Jr., et al. proposed the corresponding gauge-invariant modification for the Weisskopf-Wigner relaxation operator, which is introduced directly into the Schroedinger equation within the framework of the two-level approximation. In the present paper, this problem is studied for the von Neumann equation supplemented by a relaxation operator. First, we show that the solution of the equation for the density matrix with the relaxation operator correctly obtained ''from the first principles'' has properties that ensure gauge invariance for the observables. Second, we propose a common recipe for transformation of the phenomenological relaxation operator into the correct (gauge-invariant) form in the density-matrix equations for a multilevel system. Also, we discuss the methods of elimination of other inaccuracies (not related to the gauge-invariance problem) which arise if the electrodynamic response of a dissipative quantum system is calculated within the framework of simplified relaxation models (first of all, the model corresponding to constant relaxation rates of coherences in quantum transitions). Examples illustrating the correctness of the results obtained within the framework of the proposed methods in contrast to inaccuracy of the results of the standard calculation techniques are given.

  10. On the zero modes of the Faddeev-Popov operator in the Landau gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landim, R. R.; Vilar, L. C. Q. Lemes, V. E. R.; Ventura, O. S.

    2014-02-15

    Following Henyey procedure [Phys. Rev. D 20, 1460 (1979)], we construct examples of zero modes of the Faddeev-Popov operator in the Landau gauge in Euclidean space in D dimensions, for both SU(2) and SU(3) groups. We obtain gauge field configurations A{sub ?}{sup a} which give rise to a field strength, F{sub ??}{sup a}=?{sub ?}A{sub ?}{sup a}??{sub ?}A{sub ?}{sup a}+f{sup abc}A{sub ?}{sup b}A{sub ?}{sup c}, whose nonlinear term, f{sup abc}A{sub ?}{sup b}A{sub ?}{sup c}, turns out to be non-vanishing. To our knowledge, this is the first time where such a non-abelian configuration is explicitly obtained in the case of SU(3) in 4D.

  11. The light-front gauge-invariant energy-momentum tensor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lorce, Cedric

    2015-08-11

    In this study, we provide for the first time a complete parametrization for the matrix elements of the generic asymmetric, non-local and gauge-invariant canonical energy-momentum tensor, generalizing therefore former works on the symmetric, local and gauge-invariant kinetic energy-momentum tensor also known as the Belinfante-Rosenfeld energy-momentum tensor. We discuss in detail the various constraints imposed by non-locality, linear and angular momentum conservation. We also derive the relations with two-parton generalized and transverse-momentum dependent distributions, clarifying what can be learned from the latter. In particular, we show explicitly that two-parton transverse-momentum dependent distributions cannot provide any model-independent information about the parton orbitalmore » angular momentum. On the way, we recover the Burkardt sum rule and obtain similar new sum rules for higher-twist distributions.« less

  12. The light-front gauge-invariant energy-momentum tensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorce, Cedric

    2015-08-11

    In this study, we provide for the first time a complete parametrization for the matrix elements of the generic asymmetric, non-local and gauge-invariant canonical energy-momentum tensor, generalizing therefore former works on the symmetric, local and gauge-invariant kinetic energy-momentum tensor also known as the Belinfante-Rosenfeld energy-momentum tensor. We discuss in detail the various constraints imposed by non-locality, linear and angular momentum conservation. We also derive the relations with two-parton generalized and transverse-momentum dependent distributions, clarifying what can be learned from the latter. In particular, we show explicitly that two-parton transverse-momentum dependent distributions cannot provide any model-independent information about the parton orbital angular momentum. On the way, we recover the Burkardt sum rule and obtain similar new sum rules for higher-twist distributions.

  13. Factorization structure of gauge theory amplitudes and application to hard scattering processes at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu Juiyu; Fuhrer, Andreas; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.

    2009-11-01

    Previous work on electroweak radiative corrections to high-energy scattering using soft-collinear effective theory (SCET) has been extended to include external transverse and longitudinal gauge bosons and Higgs bosons. This allows one to compute radiative corrections to all parton-level hard scattering amplitudes in the standard model to next-to-leading-log order, including QCD and electroweak radiative corrections, mass effects, and Higgs exchange corrections, if the high-scale matching, which is suppressed by two orders in the log counting, and contains no large logs, is known. The factorization structure of the effective theory places strong constraints on the form of gauge theory amplitudes at high energy for massless and massive gauge theories, which are discussed in detail in the paper. The radiative corrections can be written as the sum of process-independent one-particle collinear functions, and a universal soft function. We give plots for the radiative corrections to qq{yields}W{sub T}W{sub T}, Z{sub T}Z{sub T}, W{sub L}W{sub L}, and Z{sub L}H, and gg{yields}W{sub T}W{sub T} to illustrate our results. The purely electroweak corrections are large, ranging from 12% at 500 GeV to 37% at 2 TeV for transverse W pair production, and increasing rapidly with energy. The estimated theoretical uncertainty to the partonic (hard) cross section in most cases is below 1%, smaller than uncertainties in the parton distribution functions. We discuss the relation between SCET and other factorization methods, and derive the Magnea-Sterman equations for the Sudakov form factor using SCET, for massless and massive gauge theories, and for light and heavy external particles.

  14. The Excited-state Spectrum of QCD through Lattice Gauge Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Richards

    2012-12-01

    I describe recent progress at understanding the excited state spectrum of QCD through lattice gauge calculations. I begin by outlining the evolution of the lattice effort at JLab. I detail the impact of recent lattice calculations on the present and upcoming experimental programs, and in particular that of the 12 GeV upgrade of Jefferson Laboratory. I conclude with the prospect for future calculations.

  15. ASYMPTOTICALLY FREE GAUGE THEORIES - I* David J. Gross+ National Accelerator Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    national accelerator laboratory NAL-PUB-73/49-THY July, 1973 ASYMPTOTICALLY FREE GAUGE THEORIES - I* David J. Gross+ National Accelerator Laboratory and Joseph Henry Laboratories Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey 08540 and Frank Wilczek Joseph Henry Laboratories Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey 08540 * Research supported in part by the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Contract F-44620-71-6-0180 t Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow 2% Oaerated

  16. Compaction comparison testing using a modified impact soil tester and nuclear density gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erchul, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare test results of a modified Impact Soil Tester (IST) on compacted soil with data obtained from the same soil using a nuclear density gauge at the US Army Corp of Engineer's Buena Vista Flood Wall project in Buena Vista, Virginia. The tests were run during construction of the earth flood wall during the summer of 1996. This comparison testing demonstrated the credibility of the procedure developed for the IST as a compacting testing device. The comparison data was obtained on a variety of soils ranging from silty sands to clays. The Flood Wall comparison compaction data for 90% Standard Proctor shows that the results of the IST as modified are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 89% of the time for all types of soil tested. However, if the soils are more cohesive than the results are consistent with the nuclear density gauge 97% of the time. In addition these comparison tests are in general agreement with comparison compaction testing using the same testing techniques and methods of compacted backfill in utility trenches conducted earlier for the Public Works Department, Chesterfield County, Virginia.

  17. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  18. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    2015-01-01

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  19. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=a; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm ; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  20. Lattice QCD gauge ensemble: USQCD/MILC/asqtad/2064f21b678m010m050b

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Aubin, Christopher Alan [Fordham U.; Bernard, Claude W. [Washington U. St. Louis; Burch, Tommy [U. Regensburg; Datta, Saumen [Tata Institute; DeGrand, Thomas Alan [Colorado U., Boulder; DeTar, Carleton E. [Utah U.; Gottlieb, Steven A. [Indiana U., Bloomington; Gregory, Eric Brittain [Wuppertal U.; Heller, Urs M. [American Physical Society; Hetrick, James Edward [U. Pacific, Stockton; Orginos, Kostas Nikolaou [William-Mary Coll.; Osborn, James C. [Argonne National Laboratory, ALCF; Toussaint, W. Doug [Arizona U.; Sugar, Robert L. [U. C., Santa Barbara

    MILC asqtad QCD SU(3) gauge ensemble; series=b; a=0.11fm minus 0.0022fm; Ls=2.16fm; Nf=2+1; u0.m0=(0.010,0.050)

  1. Building Technologies Program: Tax Deduction Qualified Software-EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides required documentation that EnergyGauge Summit version 3.1 build 2 meets Internal Revenue Code §179D, Notice 2006-52, dated January 31, 2007, for calculating commercial building energy and power cost savings.

  2. Environmental radiological monitoring of air, rain, and snow on and near the Hanford Site, 1945-1957

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanf, R.W.; Thiede, M.E.

    1994-03-01

    This report is a result of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The goal of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received from emissions since 1944 at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Members of the HEDR Project`s Environmental Monitoring Data Task have developed databases of historical environmental measurements of such emissions. Hanford documents were searched for information on the radiological monitoring of air, rain, and snow at and near the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The monitoring information was reviewed and summarized. The end product is a yearly overview of air, rain, and snow samples as well as ambient radiation levels in the air that were measured from 1945 through 1957. The following information is provided in each annual summary: the media sampled, the constituents (radionuclides) measured/reported, the sampling locations, the sampling frequencies, the sampling methods, and the document references. For some years a notes category is included that contains additional useful information. For the years 1948 through 1957, tables summarizing the sampling locations for the various sample media are also included in the appendix. A large number of documents were reviewed to obtain the information in this report. A reference list is attached to the end of each annual summary. All of the information summarized here was obtained from reports originating at Hanford. These reports are all publicly available and can be found in the Richland Operations Office (RL) public reading room. The information in this report has been compiled without analysis and should only be used as a guide to the original documents.

  3. GAUGING APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruggles, C.A.

    1957-08-27

    A swinging arm gage designed to measure radial angles, tapering, sloping, or arcuate concave surfaces is described. The principle of the swinging arm gage is that in any spherical system, radii and radial lines established by them pass through the center of the sphere. Thus if an arm be made to pivot at the sphere center, the path of the swinging end can be guided by a can so set as to establish the proper center angle, and dial indicators on the arm can be zeroed on a master object, angular and dimensional manufacturing errors can be determined on a duplicate object. This device makes possible a considerable saving of time in measuring complex arcuate contours.

  4. Topics in phenomenology of unified gauge theories of weak, electromagnetic, and strong interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Y.S.

    1982-11-01

    Three phenomenological analyses on the current unification theories of elementary particle interactions are presented. In Chapter I, the neutral current phenomenology of a class of supersymmetric SU(2) x U(1) x U tilde(1) models is analyzed. A model with the simplest fermion and Higgs structure allowing a realistic mass spectrum is considered first. Its neutral current sector is parametrized in terms of two mixing angles and the strength of the new U tilde(1) interactions. Expressions for low-energy model-independent parameters are derived and compared with those of the standard model. Bounds on the neutral gauge boson masses are obtained from the data for various neutrino interactions, eD scattering, and the asymmetry in e/sup +/e/sup -/ ..-->.. ..mu../sup +/..mu../sup -/. In Chapter II, the evolution of fermion mass in grand unified theories is reexamined. In particular, the question of gauge invariance of mass ratios in left-right asymmetric theories is considered. A simple expression is derived for the evolution of the Higgs-fermion-fermion coupling which essentially governs the scale dependence of fermion mass. At the one loop level the expression is gauge invariant and involves only the representation content of left- and right-handed fermions but not that of Higgs. The corresponding expression for supersymmetric theories is also given. In Chapter III, the production and the subsequent decays of a heavy lepton pair L/sup + -/ near the Z peak in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are considered as a test of the standard model. The longitudinal polarization is derived from the spin-dependent production cross-section, and the decays L ..-->.. ..pi.. nu and L ..-->.. l nu nu are used as helicity analyzers.

  5. Hidden conformal symmetry of rotating black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M. R.; Kamali, V.

    2010-10-15

    In the present paper we show that for a low frequency limit the wave equation of a massless scalar field in the background of nonextremal charged rotating black holes in five-dimensional minimal gauged and ungauged supergravity can be written as the Casimir of an SL(2,R) symmetry. Our result shows that the entropy of the black hole is reproduced by the Cardy formula. Also the absorption cross section is consistent with the finite temperature absorption cross section for a two-dimensional conformal field theory.

  6. General Nonextremal Rotating Black Holes in Minimal Five-Dimensional Gauged Supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong, Z.-W.; Lue, H.; Pope, C.N.; Cvetic, M.

    2005-10-14

    We construct the general solution for nonextremal charged rotating black holes in five-dimensional minimal gauged supergravity. They are characterized by four nontrivial parameters: namely, the mass, the charge, and the two independent rotation parameters. The metrics in general describe regular rotating black holes, providing the parameters lie in appropriate ranges so that naked singularities and closed timelike curves (CTCs) are avoided. We calculate the conserved energy, angular momenta, and charge for the solutions, and show how supersymmetric solutions arise in a Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield limit. These have naked CTCs in general, but for special choices of the parameters we obtain new regular supersymmetric black holes or smooth topological solitons.

  7. Neutrino masses in SU(4){sub L}⊗U(1){sub X} gauge models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palcu, Adrian

    2013-11-13

    Neutrino masses are obtained within SU(4){sub L}⊗U(1){sub X} electroweak gauge models with spontaneous symmetry breaking by simply exploiting the tree level realization of certain dimension-five effective operators. The scalar sector needs not to be enlarged, since these operators are constructed as direct products among scalar multiplets already existing in the model. There is a unique generic matrix for Yukawa couplings in the neutrino sector, while the charged leptons are already in their diagonal basis. The experimentally observed phenomenology in the neutrino sector is obtained as a natural consequence of this particular approach.

  8. Dirac or inverse seesaw neutrino masses with B L gauge symmetry and S? flavor symmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Ernest; Srivastava, Rahul

    2015-02-01

    Many studies have been made on extensions of the standard model with B L gauge symmetry. The addition of three singlet (right-handed) neutrinos renders it anomaly-free. It has always been assumed that the spontaneous breaking of B L is accomplished by a singlet scalar field carrying two units of B L charge. This results in a very natural implementation of the Majorana seesaw mechanism for neutrinos. However, there exists in fact another simple anomaly-free solution which allows Dirac or inverse seesaw neutrino masses. We show for the first time these new possibilities and discuss an application tomoreneutrino mixing with S? flavor symmetry.less

  9. TeV-scale gauged B-L symmetry with inverse seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban

    2010-10-01

    We propose a modified version of the TeV-scale B-L extension of the standard model, where neutrino masses are generated through the inverse seesaw mechanism. We show that heavy neutrinos in this model can be accessible via clean signals at the LHC. The search for the extra gauge boson Z{sub B-L}{sup '} through the decay into dileptons or two dileptons plus missing energy is studied. We also show that the B-L extra Higgs boson can be directly probed at the LHC via a clean dilepton and missing energy signal.

  10. A first class constraint generates not a gauge transformation, but a bad physical change: The case of electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, J. Brian

    2014-12-15

    In DiracBergmann constrained dynamics, a first-class constraint typically does not alone generate a gauge transformation. By direct calculation it is found that each first-class constraint in Maxwells theory generates a change in the electric field E{sup ?} by an arbitrary gradient, spoiling Gausss law. The secondary first-class constraint p{sup i},{sub i}=0 still holds, but being a function of derivatives of momenta (mere auxiliary fields), it is not directly about the observable electric field (a function of derivatives of A{sub ?}), which couples to charge. Only a special combination of the two first-class constraints, the AndersonBergmannCastellani gauge generator G, leaves E{sup ?} unchanged. Likewise only that combination leaves the canonical action invariantan argument independent of observables. If one uses a first-class constraint to generate instead a canonical transformation, one partly strips the canonical coordinates of physical meaning as electromagnetic potentials, vindicating the AndersonBergmann Lagrangian orientation of interesting canonical transformations. The need to keep gauge-invariant the relation q-dot ?(?H)/(?p) =?E{sub i}?p{sup i}=0 supports using the gauge generator and primary Hamiltonian rather than the separate first-class constraints and the extended Hamiltonian. Partly paralleling Ponss criticism, it is shown that Diracs proof that a first-class primary constraint generates a gauge transformation, by comparing evolutions from identical initial data, cancels out and hence fails to detect the alterations made to the initial state. It also neglects the arbitrary coordinates multiplying the secondary constraints inside the canonical Hamiltonian. Thus the gauge-generating property has been ascribed to the primaries alone, not the primarysecondary team G. Hence the Dirac conjecture about secondary first-class constraints as generating gauge transformations rests upon a false presupposition about primary first-class constraints. Clarity about Hamiltonian electromagnetism will be useful for an analogous treatment of GR. - Highlights: A first-class constraint changes the electric field E, spoiling Gausss law. A first-class constraint does not leave the action invariant or preserve q,0?dH/dp. The gauge generator preserves E,q,0?dH/dp, and the canonical action. The error in proofs that first-class primaries generating gauge is shown. Diracs conjecture about secondary first-class constraints is blocked.

  11. Placement accuracy gauge for electrical components and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biggs, P.M.; Dancer, L.K.; Yerganian, S.S.

    1987-11-12

    Surface mounted electrical components are typically assembled on printed wiring board by automatic machines. It is important that the machines accurately move with respect to both X and Y rotational axes in order to insure that components are positioned precisely on connector pads of the printed wiring board being assembled. In accordance with the instant invention, a gauge is used to facilitate convenient accuracy checks. The gauge is a glass substrate on which grids of 0.005 inch lines are scribed to form location and orientation fields where components are to be placed. The grids are referenced from ether fiducial marks or the edge of the substrate to establish known positions within the grids. The equipment to be evaluated is programmed to place components in known positions and the components are held in place by tacky adhesive that is sprayed on the substrate prior to placing the components. The accuracy of the component position is then compared to the programmed position by placing the substrate on a light table and observing the component location. If a significant inaccuracy with respect to any of the axes exists, the inaccuracy is apparent because the component is not aligned properly with the grid. If a precise measurement of an axis inaccuracy is desired, a measuring microscope may be utilized. 6 figs.

  12. Placement accuracy gauge for electrical components and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biggs, Peter M.; Dancer, Linda K.; Yerganian, Simon S.

    1988-10-11

    Surface mounted electrical components are typically assembled on printed wiring boards by automatic machines. It is important that the machines accurately move with respect to both X and Y rotational axes in order to insure that components are positioned precisely on connector pads of the printed wiring board being assembled. In accordance with the instant invention, a gauge is used to facilitate convenient accuracy checks. The gauge is a glass substrate on which grids of 0.005 inch lines are scribed to form location and orientation fields where components are to be placed. The grids are referenced from either fiducial marks or the edge of the substrate to establish known positions within the grids. The equipment to be evaluated is programmed to place components in known positions and the components are held in place by tacky adhesive that is sprayed on the substrate prior to placing the components. The accuracy of the component position is then compared to the programmed position by placing the substrate on a light table and observing the component location. If a significant inaccuracy with respect to any of the axes exists, the inaccuracy is apparent because the component is not aligned properly with the grid. If a precise measurement of an axis inaccuracy is desired, a measuring microscope may be utilized.

  13. Dismantling of Radium-226 Coal Level Gauges: Encountered Problems and How to Solve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punnachaiya, M.; Nuanjan, P.; Moombansao, K.; Sawangsri, T.; Pruantonsai, P.; Srichom, K.

    2006-07-01

    This paper describes the techniques for dismantling of disused-sealed Radium-226 (Ra-226) coal level gauges which the source specifications and documents were not available, including problems occurred during dismantling stage and the decision making in solving all those obstacles. The 2 mCi (20 pieces), 6 mCi (20 pieces) and 6.6 mCi (30 pieces) of Ra-226 hemi-spherically-shaped with lead-filled coal level gauges were used in industrial applications for electric power generation. All sources needed to be dismantled for further conditioning as requested by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). One of the 2 mCi Ra-226 source was dismantled under the supervision of IAEA expert. Before conditioning period, each of the 6 mCi and 6.6 mCi sources were dismantled and inspected. It was found that coal level gauges had two different source types: the sealed cylindrical source (diameter 2 cm x 2 cm length) locked with spring in lead housing for 2 mCi and 6.6 mCi; while the 6 mCi was an embedded capsule inside source holder stud assembly in lead-filled housing. Dismantling Ra-226 coal level gauges comprised of 6 operational steps: confirmation of the surface dose rate on each source activity, calculation of working time within the effective occupational dose limit, cutting the weld of lead container by electrical blade, confirmation of the Ra-226 embedded capsule size using radiation scanning technique and gamma radiography, automatic sawing of the source holder stud assembly, and transferring the source to store in lead safe box. The embedded length of 6 mCi Ra-226 capsule in its diameter 2 cm x 14.7 cm length stud assembly was identified, the results from scanning technique and radiographic film revealed the embedded source length of about 2 cm, therefore all the 6 mCi sources were safely cut at 3 cm using the automatic saw. Another occurring problem was one of the 6.6 mCi spring type source stuck inside its housing because the spring was deformed and there was previously a leakage on inner source housing. Thus, during manufacturing the filled-lead for shielding passed through this small hole and fixed the deformed spring together with the source. The circular surface of inner hole was measured and slowly drilled at a diameter 2.2 cm behind shielding, till the spring and the fixed lead sheet were cut, therefore the source could be finally hammered out. The surface dose rate of coal level gauges before weld cutting was 10-15 mR/hr and the highest dose rate at the position of the weld cutter was 2.5 mR/hr. The total time for each weld cutting and automatic sawing was 2-3 minutes and 1 minute, respectively. The source was individually and safely transferred to store in lead safe box using a 1-meter length tong and a light container with 1 meter length handle. The total time for Ra-226 (70 pieces) dismantling, including the encountered problems and their troubles shooting took 4 days operation in which the total dose obtained by 18 operators were ranged from 1-38 {mu}Sv. The dismantling team safely completed the activities within the effective dose limit for occupational exposure of 20 mSv/year (80 {mu}Sv/day). (authors)

  14. Precise method of compensating radiation-induced errors in a hot-cathode-ionization gauge with correcting electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeki, Hiroshi Magome, Tamotsu

    2014-10-06

    To compensate pressure-measurement errors caused by a synchrotron radiation environment, a precise method using a hot-cathode-ionization-gauge head with correcting electrode, was developed and tested in a simulation experiment with excess electrons in the SPring-8 storage ring. This precise method to improve the measurement accuracy, can correctly reduce the pressure-measurement errors caused by electrons originating from the external environment, and originating from the primary gauge filament influenced by spatial conditions of the installed vacuum-gauge head. As the result of the simulation experiment to confirm the performance reducing the errors caused by the external environment, the pressure-measurement error using this method was approximately less than several percent in the pressure range from 10{sup ?5} Pa to 10{sup ?8} Pa. After the experiment, to confirm the performance reducing the error caused by spatial conditions, an additional experiment was carried out using a sleeve and showed that the improved function was available.

  15. The role of the U.S. Clean Coal Technology Program in implementing the objectives of the joint Canada-U.S. acid rain mitigation initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, A.L.; Smith, D.N.; Mann, A.W.; McIlvried, H.G.; Russell, D.L. Sr.

    1997-12-31

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in part as a response to the 1986 Joint Report of the US and Canadian Special Envoys on Acid Rain, with a particular focus on coal-burning electric power plants. The fist three solicitations of the CCT Program were aimed primarily at mitigating the potential impacts of acid rain. Subsequently, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 established emission reduction targets for SO{sub 2} and No{sub x}, which influenced the goals of the last two CCT Program. This paper provides an overview of the CCT Program and reports the significant results, with emphasis on emissions reduction as well as their impact on ozone formation.

  16. Remarks on the N = 1 S U ( M + p ) × S U ( p ) quiver gauge theory with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    flavor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Remarks on the N = 1 S U ( M + p ) × S U ( p ) quiver gauge theory with flavor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Remarks on the N = 1 S U ( M + p ) × S U ( p ) quiver gauge theory with flavor Authors: Benini, Francesco ; Dymarsky, Anatoly Publication Date: 2012-02-08 OSTI Identifier: 1099118 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 4; Journal

  17. Sterile neutrino dark matter with gauged U(1){sub B-L} and a low reheating temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban; Seto, Osamu

    2009-04-17

    Sterile right-handed neutrinos can be naturally embedded in a low scale gauged U(1){sub B-L} extension of the standard model. We show that, within a low reheating scenario, such a neutrino can be produced via a novel manner, namely scattering through Z' gauge boson, and becomes an interesting dark matter candidate. In addition, we show that if the neutrino mass is of the order of MeV, then it accounts for the measured dark matter relic density and also accommodates the observed flux of 511 keV photons from the galactic bulge.

  18. A new approach to analytic, non-perturbative and gauge-invariant QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fried, H.M.; Grandou, T.; Sheu, Y.-M.

    2012-11-15

    Following a previous calculation of quark scattering in eikonal approximation, this paper presents a new, analytic and rigorous approach to the calculation of QCD phenomena. In this formulation a basic distinction between the conventional 'idealistic' description of QCD and a more 'realistic' description is brought into focus by a non-perturbative, gauge-invariant evaluation of the Schwinger solution for the QCD generating functional in terms of the exact Fradkin representations of Green's functional G{sub c}(x,y|A) and the vacuum functional L[A]. Because quarks exist asymptotically only in bound states, their transverse coordinates can never be measured with arbitrary precision; the non-perturbative neglect of this statement leads to obstructions that are easily corrected by invoking in the basic Lagrangian a probability amplitude which describes such transverse imprecision. The second result of this non-perturbative analysis is the appearance of a new and simplifying output called 'Effective Locality', in which the interactions between quarks by the exchange of a 'gluon bundle'-which 'bundle' contains an infinite number of gluons, including cubic and quartic gluon interactions-display an exact locality property that reduces the several functional integrals of the formulation down to a set of ordinary integrals. It should be emphasized that 'non-perturbative' here refers to the effective summation of all gluons between a pair of quark lines-which may be the same quark line, as in a self-energy graph-but does not (yet) include a summation over all closed-quark loops which are tied by gluon-bundle exchange to the rest of the 'Bundle Diagram'. As an example of the power of these methods we offer as a first analytic calculation the quark-antiquark binding potential of a pion, and the corresponding three-quark binding potential of a nucleon, obtained in a simple way from relevant eikonal scattering approximations. A second calculation, analytic, non-perturbative and gauge-invariant, of a nucleon-nucleon binding potential to form a model deuteron, will appear separately. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An analytic, non-perturbative and gauge-invariant formulation for QCD processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new property called Effective Locality appears in the QCD fermionic amplitudes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An effective quark-antiquark and 3-quark binding potential is obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A single 'gluon bundle' replaces the sum of an infinite number of Feynman graphs.

  19. S. 1234: A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief to utilities installing acid rain reduction equipment, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 6, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The bill would allow a tax credit of 6 2/3% of a taxpayer's investment in qualified acid rain control equipment for each of the three years beginning the year the equipment is placed in service. Additionally, a tax credit would be allowed during two years of construction progress, the amount being 6 2/3% of construction expenditures. The bill describes qualified acid rain property', tax-exempt financing of acid rain control property, tax credit for minerals used to reduce the sulfur in coal, coal cleaning minerals credit, exclusion from gross income of receipt of qualified Clean Air allowance and proceeds of disposition thereof, qualified Clean Air allowances, and amortization of acid rain control property.

  20. Robustness of fractional quantum Hall states with dipolar atoms in artificial gauge fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grass, T.; Baranov, M. A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2011-10-15

    The robustness of fractional quantum Hall states is measured as the energy gap separating the Laughlin ground state from excitations. Using thermodynamic approximations for the correlation functions of the Laughlin state and the quasihole state, we evaluate the gap in a two-dimensional system of dipolar atoms exposed to an artificial gauge field. For Abelian fields, our results agree well with the results of exact diagonalization for small systems but indicate that the large value of the gap predicted [Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 070404 (2005)] was overestimated. However, we are able to show that the small gap found in the Abelian scenario dramatically increases if we turn to non-Abelian fields squeezing the Landau levels.

  1. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Shaaban; Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-03-01

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  2. Rain Machine (Solar Still)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled with salt water and observe what happens when the stills are placed in the sun. The students then taste the water they have collected and discuss what has happened in their stills.

  3. ARM - Cloud and Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  4. ARM - Instrument - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site TMP M1 Browse Data U. of Helsinki Research Station (SMEAR II), Hyytiala, Finland; AMF2 retired Originating instrument has been retired at this location Contact(s)...

  5. ARM - Datastreams - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0:00 basetime Record with error unitless errorlatch ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 1 Hz frequency1 ( time ) Frequency average, sensor 2 Hz frequency2 ( time ) Frequency...

  6. ARM - Campaign Instrument - rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the Green Ocean Amazon (GOAMAZON 2014) Download Data Manacapuru, Amazonas, Brazil; Mobile Facility, 2014.01.01 - 2014.12.31 Primary Measurements Taken The following...

  7. Gauge bosons and heavy quarks: Proceedings of Summer Institute on Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawthorne, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: Z decays and tests of the standard model; future possibilities for LEP; studies of the interactions of electroweak gauge bosons; top quark topics; the next linear collider; electroweak processes in hadron colliders; theoretical topics in B-physics; experimental aspects of B-physics; B-factory storage ring design; rare kaon decays; CP violation in K{sup 0} decays at CERN; recent K{sup 0} decay results from Fermilab E-731; results from LEP on heavy quark physics; review of recent results on heavy flavor production; weak matrix elements and the determination of the weak mixing angles; recent results from CLEO I and a glance at CLEO II data; recent results from ARGUS; neutrino lepton physics with the CHARM 2 detector; recent results from the three TRISTAN experiments; baryon number violation at high energy in the standard model: fact or fiction New particle searches at LEP; review of QCD at LEP; electroweak interactions at LEP; recent results on W physics from the UA2 experiment at the CERN {rho}{bar {rho}} collider; B physics at CDF; and review of particle astrophysics.

  8. Searching for MeV-scale gauge bosons with IceCube

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    DiFranzo, Anthony; Hooper, Dan

    2015-11-05

    Light gauge bosons can lead to resonant interactions between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and the cosmic neutrino background. We study this possibility in detail, considering the ability of IceCube to probe such scenarios. We also find the most dramatic effects in models with a very light Z' (mZ'≲10 MeV), which can induce a significant absorption feature at Eν~5–10 TeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. In the case of the inverted hierarchy and a small sum of neutrino masses, such a light Z' can result in a broad and deep spectral feature at ~0.1–10 PeV×(mZ'/MeV)2. Current IceCube data already excludes this case for a Z' lighter thanmore » a few MeV and couplings greater than g~10-4. Furthermore, we emphasize that the ratio of neutrino flavors observed by IceCube can be used to further increase their sensitivity to Z' models and to other exotic physics scenarios.« less

  9. Simplifying Multi-loop Integrands of Gauge Theory and Gravity Amplitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Z.; Carrasco, J.J.M.; Dixon, L.J.; Johansson, H.; Roiban, R.

    2012-02-15

    We use the duality between color and kinematics to simplify the construction of the complete four-loop four-point amplitude of N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory, including the nonplanar contributions. The duality completely determines the amplitude's integrand in terms of just two planar graphs. The existence of a manifestly dual gauge-theory amplitude trivializes the construction of the corresponding N = 8 supergravity integrand, whose graph numerators are double copies (squares) of the N = 4 super-Yang-Mills numerators. The success of this procedure provides further nontrivial evidence that the duality and double-copy properties hold at loop level. The new form of the four-loop four-point supergravity amplitude makes manifest the same ultraviolet power counting as the corresponding N = 4 super-Yang-Mills amplitude. We determine the amplitude's ultraviolet pole in the critical dimension of D = 11/2, the same dimension as for N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory. Strikingly, exactly the same combination of vacuum integrals (after simplification) describes the ultraviolet divergence of N = 8 supergravity as the subleading-in-1/N{sub c}{sup 2} single-trace divergence in N = 4 super-Yang-Mills theory.

  10. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of t Hoofts large N expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.

  11. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of ‘t Hooft’s large Nmore » expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.« less

  12. Applications of barrier bucket RF systems at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-03-01

    In recent years, the barrier rf systems have become important tools in a variety of beam manipulation applications at synchrotrons. Four out of six proton synchrotrons at Fermilab are equipped with broad-band barrier rf systems. All of the beam manipulations pertaining to the longitudinal phase space in the Fermilab Recycler (synchrotron used for antiproton storage) are carried out using a barrier system. Recently, a number of new applications of barrier rf systems have been developed- the longitudinal momentum mining, longitudinal phase-space coating, antiproton stacking, fast bunch compression and more. Some of these techniques have been critical for the recent spectacular success of the collider performance at the Fermilab Tevatron. Barrier bunch coalescing to produce bright proton bunches has a high potential to increase proton antiproton luminosity significantly. In this paper, I will describe some of these techniques in detail. Finally, I make a few general remarks on issues related to barrier systems.

  13. Cooling circuit for a gas turbine bucket and tip shroud

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willett, Fred Thomas

    2004-07-13

    An open cooling circuit for a gas turbine airfoil and associated tip shroud includes a first group of cooling holes internal to the airfoil and extending in a radially outward direction generally along a leading edge of the airfoil; a second group of cooling holes internal to the airfoil and extending in a radially outward direction generally along a trailing edge of the airfoil. A common plenum is formed in the tip shroud in direct communication with the first and second group of cooling holes, but a second plenum may be provided for the second group of radial holes. A plurality of exhaust holes extends from the plenum(s), through the tip shroud and opening along a peripheral edge of the tip shroud.

  14. Fleet DNA Project Data Summary Report for Bucket Trucks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fleet Briefings Fleet Briefings PDF icon CITI Briefing.pdf PDF icon DOE - Agency Meeting - FedFleet 2012-2.pdf PDF icon DOE Fed Fleet WEX Program Reviewl.pdf PDF icon DOE Motor Vehicle Accidents and FEOSH-mccabe-final-with HS-20 comments-061912 (2).pdf PDF icon FEMP Briefing.pdf PDF icon INL Coach Bus Brief.pdf PDF icon NREL Brief.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Meeting: Washington Update FEMP Exterior Solid-State Lighting Technology Pilot Federal

  15. Study of the all orders multiplicative renormalizability of a local confining quark action in the Landau gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capri, M.A.L. Fiorentini, D. Sorella, S.P.

    2015-05-15

    The inverse of the Faddeev–Popov operator plays a pivotal role within the Gribov–Zwanziger approach to the quantization of Euclidean Yang–Mills theories in Landau gauge. Following a recent proposal (Capri et al., 2014), we show that the inverse of the Faddeev–Popov operator can be consistently coupled to quark fields. Such a coupling gives rise to a local action while reproducing the behaviour of the quark propagator observed in lattice numerical simulations in the non-perturbative infrared region. By using the algebraic renormalization framework, we prove that the aforementioned local action is multiplicatively renormalizable to all orders.

  16. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 8. 2B. Interferometer gauge pressure-time measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, J.E.; Seacord, D.F.; Newman, R.W.

    1985-04-01

    This project was charged with the responsibility of conducting tests on static aircraft panels mounted on the ground at various ranges from the blast. Pressure-versus-time data were obtained using interferometer gauges. The gauge proved to be reliable and easy to operate. Its high-frequency response enabled it to record data to the pressure rise at the front of the blast wave which had not been noted previously. These results show, from measurements taken by pressure instruments mounted flush with the ground, that the rise times at the front of the blast waves were on gamma-radiation intensity by the smple expedient of stacking a few layers of lead breic around the gauge mounts.

  17. Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson-motivated Lagrangian formulation for the chiral two-form gauge field in D=6 and M5-branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasti, Paolo; Tonin, Mario; Samsonov, Igor; Sorokin, Dmitri

    2009-10-15

    We reveal nonmanifest gauge and SO(1,5) Lorentz symmetries in the Lagrangian description of a six-dimensional free chiral field derived from the Bagger-Lambert-Gustavsson model in [P.-M. Ho and Y. Matsuo, J. High Energy Phys. 06 (2008) 105.] and make this formulation covariant with the use of a triplet of auxiliary scalar fields. We consider the coupling of this self-dual construction to gravity and its supersymmetrization. In the case of the nonlinear model of [P.-M. Ho, Y. Imamura, Y. Matsuo, and S. Shiba, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2008) 014.] we solve the equations of motion of the gauge field, prove that its nonlinear field strength is self-dual and find a gauge-covariant form of the nonlinear action. Issues of the relation of this model to the known formulations of the M5-brane worldvolume theory are discussed.

  18. Galactic center γ-ray excess in hidden sector DM models with dark gauge symmetries: local Z{sub 3} symmetry as an example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, P.; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-16

    We show that hidden sector dark matter (DM) models with local dark gauge symmetries make a natural playground for the possible γ-ray excess from the galactic center (GC). We first discuss in detail the GC γ-ray excess in a scalar dark matter (DM) model with local Z{sub 3} symmetry which was recently proposed by the present authors. Within this model, scalar DM with mass 30–70 GeV is allowed due to the newly-opened (semi-)annihilation channels of a DM pair into dark Higgs ϕ and/or dark photon Z′ pair, and the γ-ray spectrum from the GC can be fit within this model. Then we argue that the GC gamma ray excess can be easily accommodated within hidden sector dark matter models where DM is stabilized by local gauge symmetries, due to the presence of dark Higgs (and also dark photon for Abelian dark gauge symmetry)

  19. Evidence of Wγγ Production in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    Here we report evidence of triple gauge boson production pp→W(ℓν)γγ+X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  20. Evidence of W γ γ Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    This Letter reports evidence of triple gauge boson production pp → W (lν)γγ + X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  1. Bose-Einstein condensate in a light-induced vector gauge potential using 1064-nm optical-dipole-trap lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu Zhengkun; Wang Pengjun; Chai Shijie; Huang Lianghui; Zhang Jing

    2011-10-15

    Using two crossed 1064-nm optical-dipole-trap lasers to be the Raman beams, an effective vector gauge potential for Bose-Einstein condensed {sup 87}Rb in the F=2 hyperfine ground state is experimentally created. The moderate strength of the Raman coupling still can be achieved when the detuning from atomic resonance is larger than the excited-state fine structure, since rubidium has 15 nm energy-level spitting. The atoms at the far detuning of the Raman coupling are loaded adiabatically into the dressed states by ramping the homogeneous bias magnetic field with different paths and the dressed states with different energies are studied experimentally. The experimental scheme can be easily extended to produce the synthetic magnetic or electric field by means of a spatial or time dependence of the effective vector potential.

  2. Scaling and the continuum limit of the finite temperature deconfinement transition in SU(N{sub c}) pure gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datta, Saumen; Gupta, Sourendu

    2009-12-01

    We investigated the finite temperature (T) phase transition for SU(N{sub c}) gauge theory with N{sub c}=4, 6, 8 and 10 at lattice spacing, a, of 1/(6T) or less. We checked that these theories have first-order transitions at such small a. In many cases we were able to find the critical couplings with precision as good as a few parts in 10{sup 4}. We also investigated the use of two-loop renormalization group equations in extrapolating the lattice results to the continuum, thus fixing the temperature scale in units of the phase transition temperature, T{sub c}. We found that when a{<=}1/(8T{sub c}) the two-loop extrapolation was accurate to about 1%-2%. However, we found that trading T{sub c} for the QCD scale, {lambda}{sub MS}, increases uncertainties significantly, to the level of about 5%-10%.

  3. Gauge invariant perturbations of self-similar Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi spacetime: Even parity modes with l{>=}2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, Thomas J.; Nolan, Brien C.

    2009-04-15

    In this paper we consider gauge invariant linear perturbations of the metric and matter tensors describing the self-similar Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi (timelike dust) spacetime containing a naked singularity. We decompose the angular part of the perturbation in terms of spherical harmonics and perform a Mellin transform to reduce the perturbation equations to a set of ordinary differential equations with singular points. We fix initial data so the perturbation is finite on the axis and the past null cone of the singularity, and follow the perturbation modes up to the Cauchy horizon. There we argue that certain scalars formed from the modes of the perturbation remain finite, indicating linear stability of the Cauchy horizon.

  4. Analysis of Precipitation (Rain and Snow) Levels and Straight-line Wind Speeds in Support of the 10-year Natural Phenomena Hazards Review for Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Dewart, Jean Marie; Deola, Regina

    2015-12-10

    This report provides site-specific return level analyses for rain, snow, and straight-line wind extreme events. These analyses are in support of the 10-year review plan for the assessment of meteorological natural phenomena hazards at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). These analyses follow guidance from Department of Energy, DOE Standard, Natural Phenomena Hazards Analysis and Design Criteria for DOE Facilities (DOE-STD-1020-2012), Nuclear Regulatory Commission Standard Review Plan (NUREG-0800, 2007) and ANSI/ ANS-2.3-2011, Estimating Tornado, Hurricane, and Extreme Straight-Line Wind Characteristics at Nuclear Facility Sites. LANL precipitation and snow level data have been collected since 1910, although not all years are complete. In this report the results from the more recent data (1990–2014) are compared to those of past analyses and a 2004 National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration report. Given the many differences in the data sets used in these different analyses, the lack of statistically significant differences in return level estimates increases confidence in the data and in the modeling and analysis approach.

  5. ARM - Instrument - mettwr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Forty Meter Tower: meteorological data, 2, 10, 20, & 40 m, 1-min avg org : Optical Rain Gauge measurements: precipitation rate and accumulation pws : Present weather sensor,...

  6. ARM - Lesson Plans: Acid Rain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox ...

  7. Nonzero {theta}{sub 13} for neutrino mixing in a supersymmetric B-L gauge model with T{sub 7} lepton flavor symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Qinghong; Khalil, Shaaban; Ma, Ernest; Okada, Hiroshi

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how {theta}{sub 13}{ne}0 is accommodated in a recently proposed renormalizable model of neutrino mixing using the non-Abelian discrete symmetry T{sub 7} in the context of a supersymmetric extension of the standard model with gauged U(1){sub B-L}. We predict a correlation between {theta}{sub 13} and {theta}{sub 23}, as well as the effective neutrino mass m{sub ee} in neutrinoless double beta decay.

  8. THERMOCOUPLE VACUUM GAUGE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Price, G.W.

    1954-08-01

    A protector device is described for use in controlling the pressure within a cyclotron. In particular, an electrical circuit functions to actuate a vacuum pump when a predetermined low pressure is reached and disconnect the pump when the pressure increases abcve a certain value. The principal feature of the control circuit lies in the use of a voltage divider network at the input to a relay control tube comprising two parallel, adjustable resistances wherein one resistor is switched into the circuit when the relay connects the pump to a power source. With this arrangement the relay is energized at one input level received from a sensing element within the cyclotron chamber and is de-energized when a second input level, representing the higher pressure limit, is reached.

  9. Mechanical stress measurement by an achromatic optical digital speckle pattern interferometry strain sensor with radial in-plane sensitivity: experimental comparison with electrical strain gauges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viotti, Matias R.; Armando Albertazzi, G. Jr.; Kapp, Walter A.

    2011-03-01

    This paper shows the optical setup of a radial in-plane digital speckle pattern interferometer which uses an axis-symmetrical diffractive optical element (DOE) to obtain double illumination. The application of the DOE gives in-plane sensitivity which only depends on the grating period of the DOE instead of the wavelength of the laser used as illumination source. A compact optical layout was built in order to have a portable optical strain sensor with a circular measurement area of about 5 mm in diameter. In order to compare its performance with electrical strain sensors (strain gauges), mechanical loading was generated by a four-point bending device and simultaneously monitored by the optical strain sensor and by two-element strain gauge rosettes. Several mechanical stress levels were measured showing a good agreement between both sensors. Results showed that the optical sensor could measure applied mechanical strains with a mean uncertainty of about 5% and 4% for the maximum and minimum principal strains, respectively.

  10. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  11. Evaluation of select heat and pressure measurement gauges for potential use in the NRC/OECD High Energy Arc Fault (HEAF) test program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Wente, William Baker; Figueroa, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current state of the art in fire probabilistic risk assessment methodology, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Regulatory Research, contracted Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to conduct a series of scoping tests to identify thermal and mechanical probes that could be used to characterize the zone of influence (ZOI) during high energy arc fault (HEAF) testing. For the thermal evaluation, passive and active probes were exposed to HEAF-like heat fluxes for a period of 2 seconds at the SNLs National Solar Thermal Test Facility to determine their ability to survive and measure such an extreme environment. Thermal probes tested included temperature lacquers (passive), NANMAC thermocouples, directional flame thermometers, modified plate thermometers, infrared temperature sensors, and a Gardon heat flux gauge. Similarly, passive and active pressure probes were evaluated by exposing them to pressures resulting from various high-explosive detonations at the Sandia Terminal Ballistic Facility. Pressure probes included bikini pressure gauges (passive) and pressure transducers. Results from these tests provided good insight to determine which probes should be considered for use during future HEAF testing.

  12. ATLAS search for a heavy gauge boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino in pp collisions at √s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-08

    The ATLAS detector at the LHC is used to search for high-mass states, such as heavy charged gauge bosons (W'), decaying to a charged lepton (electron or muon) and a neutrino. Results are presented based on the analysis of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb-1. No excess beyond Standard Model expectations is observed. A W' with Sequential Standard Model couplings is excluded at the 95% credibility level for masses up to 2.55 TeV. Excited chiral bosons (W*) with equivalent coupling strength are excluded for masses up to 2.42 TeV.

  13. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  14. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  15. Search for Gauge Mediated SUSY Breaking in Diphoton Events in proton anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Minsuk

    2004-12-01

    The authors present the results of a search for anomalous production of diphoton events with large missing transverse energy using the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In 202 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV they observe no candidate events, with an expected standard model background of 0.27 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.10(syst) events. The results exclude a lightest chargino of mass less than 167 GeV/c{sup 2}, and lightest neutralino of 93 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level in a gauge-mediated supersymmetry-breaking model with a light gravitino.

  16. The how-to of stormwater sampling--Not just a drop in the bucket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, C.T. ); Ray, J.A. )

    1993-10-01

    This article examines the stormwater sampling program of Winston-Salem, South Carolina as an example of a winning strategy. The topics of the article include sampling techniques, personnel availability, laboratory flexibility, outline of the program, being prepared, equipment selection and storage on site, sampling activities, demobilization, cleanup, and personnel training and morale.

  17. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  18. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at ? s = 8 TeV is presented. The data we collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 . The W+W- candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured W+W- cross section is 60.1 0.9 (stat) 3.2 (exp) 3.1 (theo) 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. The W+W-cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field theory. Finally, the corresponding 95% confidence level intervals are -5.7 < cWWW/?2 < 5.9 TeV-2 , -11.4 < cW/?2 < 5.4 TeV-2 , -29.2 < cB/?2 < 23.9 TeV-2 , in the HISZ basis.

  19. Robert B. Raines | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    With over 30 years of experience in construction management, design management, utilities ... Bob served for 27 years in the Navy's Civil Engineer Corps retiring as a Captain after two ...

  20. Jack Rains | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Norris Lake at Demre community when they started building TVA. Then my dad had to move. So he moved. As we come into Oak Ridge on the left it's the, what we call old Steward Norris ...

  1. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  2. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  3. RANGE INCREASER FOR PNEUMATIC GAUGES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fowler, A.H.; Seaborn, G.B. Jr.

    1960-09-27

    An improved pneumatic gage is offered in which the linear range has been increased without excessive air consumption. This has been accomplished by providing an expansible antechamber connected to the nozzle of the gage so that the position of the nozzle with respect to the workpiece is varied automatically by variation in pressure within the antechamber. This arrangement ensures that the nozzle-to-workpiece clearance is maintained within certain limits, thus obtaining a linear relation of air flow to nozzle-to-workpiece clearance over a wider range.

  4. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Monica; /Brown U.

    2010-02-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the V{sub tb} element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W{prime}. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30{sub -1.20}{sup +0.98} pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9{sigma} Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 {+-} 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0{sigma}, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |V{sub tb}| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |V{sub tb}| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W{prime} using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W{prime} with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W{prime} {yields} t{bar b}, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W{prime}{sub L} with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W{prime}{sub R}) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is lighter or heavier than W{prime}{sub R}; and M(W{prime}{sub L+R}) > 915 GeV.

  5. ARM - AMF2 Baseline Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 MAOS Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images ... 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, ... rain gauges and present weather detectors are available to ...

  6. MHK ISDB/Sensors/0.2 mm Rainfall (2m cable) Smart Sensor | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (1) 0.01" Rain Gauge (2m cable) Smart Sensor ... further results Also made by Onset Computer Corporation HOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring SystemHOBO RX3000 Remote Monitoring...

  7. Property:SoftwarePage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    scs900-site-controller-software + MHK ISDBSensors0.01" Rain Gauge (2m cable) Smart Sensor + http:www.onsetcomp.comproductssoftwarehoboware + MHK ISDBSensors0.2 mm...

  8. Search for a heavy gauge boson $W$ ' in the final state with an electron and large missing transverse energy in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A search for a heavy gauge boson W' has been conducted by the CMS experiment at the LHC in the decay channel with an electron and large transverse energy imbalance, using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns. No excess above standard model expectations is seen in the transverse mass distribution of the electron-(missing E_T) system. Assuming standard-model-like couplings and decay branching fractions, a W' boson with a mass less than 1.36 TeV/c^2 is excluded at 95% confidence level.

  9. Search for photonic signatures of gauge-mediated supersymmetry in 8 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. 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J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Hellmich, D.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Hengler, C.; Henkelmann, S.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herrberg-Schubert, R.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooft van Huysduynen, L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn’ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. 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S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-01

    A search is presented for photonic signatures motivated by generalized models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking. This search makes use of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC, and explores models dominated by both strong and electroweak production of supersymmetric partner states. Four experimental signatures incorporating an isolated photon and significant missing transverse momentum are explored. These signatures include events with an additional photon, lepton, b-quark jet, or jet activity not associated with any specific underlying quark flavor. No significant excess of events is observed above the Standard Model prediction and model-dependent 95% confidence-level exclusion limits are set.

  10. A Drop in the Bucket or a Pebble in a Pond: Commercial Building Partners Replication of EEMs Across Their Portfolios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonopoulos, Chrissi A.; Baechler, Michael C.; Dillon, Heather E.

    2014-08-18

    This study presents findings from questionnaire and interview data investigating replication efforts of Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) partners that worked directly with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL partnered with 12 organizations on new and retrofit construction projects as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CBP program. PNNL and other national laboratories collaborate with industry leaders that own large portfolios of buildings to develop high performance projects for new construction and renovation. This project accelerates market adoption of commercially available energy saving technologies into the design process for new and upgraded commercial buildings. The labs provide assistance to the partners design teams and make a business case for energy investments. From the owners perspective, a sound investment results in energy savings based on corporate objectives and design. Through a feedback questionnaire, along with personal interviews, PNNL gathered qualitative and quantitative information relating to replication efforts by each organization. Data through this process were analyzed to provide insight into two primary research areas: 1) CBP partners replication efforts of technologies and approaches used in the CBP project to the rest of the organizations building portfolio (including replication verification), and, 2) the market potential for technology diffusion into the total U.S. commercial building stock, as a direct result of the CBP entire program.

  11. Separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general nonextremal rotating charged black hole spacetimes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shuangqing

    2009-10-15

    We continue to investigate the separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general, nonextremal, rotating, charged, Chong-Cvetic-Lue-Pope black holes with two independent angular momenta and a nonzero cosmological constant in minimal D=5 gauged supergravity theory. We show that the complex Klein-Gordon equation and the modified Dirac equation with the inclusion of an extra counterterm can be separated by variables into purely radial and purely angular parts in this general Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons background spacetime. A second-order symmetry operator that commutes with the complex Laplacian operator is constructed from the separated solutions and expressed compactly in terms of a rank-2 Staeckel-Killing tensor which admits a simple diagonal form in the chosen pentad one-forms so that it can be understood as the square of a rank-3 totally antisymmetric tensor. A first-order symmetry operator that commutes with the modified Dirac operator is expressed in terms of a rank-3 generalized Killing-Yano tensor and its covariant derivative. The Hodge dual of this generalized Killing-Yano tensor is a generalized principal conformal Killing-Yano tensor of rank-2, which can generate a 'tower' of generalized (conformal) Killing-Yano and Staeckel-Killing tensors that are responsible for the whole hidden symmetries of this general, rotating, charged, Kerr-anti-de Sitter black hole geometry. In addition, the first laws of black hole thermodynamics have been generalized to the case that the cosmological constant can be viewed as a thermodynamical variable.

  12. Parsivel2 Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartholomew, MJ

    2014-06-13

    In order to improve the quantitative description of precipitation processes in climate models, the ARM program has been collecting observations of the drop size spectra of rain events since early in 2006. ARM purchased Parsivel2 laser disdrometers with America Recovery Act funds and they have proven to be robust in the field. They make observations of the particle size distribution over the range of 0.06mm to 24mm and classify precipitation type. To date they have been deployed on board the Spirit Horizon during the MAGIC Field Campaign and one will be permanently deployed at East North Atlantic (ENA). ARM initially deployed impact disdrometers (TWPC1, TWPC3 and SGPC1). Each of the three units deployed was accompanied by a nearby tipping bucket. In 2010, the tipping buckets were upgraded to weighing buckets. Subsequently five video disdrometers were purchased. The purchase of the 6th video disdrometer is pending. The video disdrometers are permanently deployed at SGPC1, TWPC1, TWPC3 and in the near future at ENA. One video disdrometer is assigned to the ARM2. What follows is a detailed description of the Parsivel2 laser disdrometers and their datastreams.

  13. Gauge fields and ghosts in Rindler space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2010-11-15

    We consider a two-dimensional Maxwell system defined on the Rindler space with metric ds{sup 2}=exp(2a{xi}){center_dot}(d{eta}{sup 2}-d{xi}{sup 2}) with the goal to study the dynamics of the ghosts. We find an extra contribution to the vacuum energy in comparison with Minkowski space-time with metric ds{sup 2}=dt{sup 2}-dx{sup 2}. This extra contribution can be traced to the unphysical degrees of freedom (in Minkowski space). The technical reason for this effect to occur is the property of Bogolubov's coefficients which mix the positive- and negative-frequency modes. The corresponding mixture cannot be avoided because the projections to positive-frequency modes with respect to Minkowski time t and positive-frequency modes with respect to the Rindler observer's proper time {eta} are not equivalent. The exact cancellation of unphysical degrees of freedom which is maintained in Minkowski space cannot hold in the Rindler space. In the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) approach this effect manifests itself as the presence of BRST charge density in L and R parts. An inertial observer in Minkowski vacuum |0> observes a universe with no net BRST charge only as a result of cancellation between the two. However, the Rindler observers who do not ever have access to the entire space-time would see a net BRST charge. In this respect the effect resembles the Unruh effect. The effect is infrared (IR) in nature, and sensitive to the horizon and/or boundaries. We interpret the extra energy as the formation of the ''ghost condensate'' when the ghost degrees of freedom cannot propagate, but nevertheless do contribute to the vacuum energy. Exact computations in this simple two-dimensional model support the claim made in a previous paper [F. R. Urban and A. R. Zhitnitsky, Nucl. Phys. B835, 135 (2010).] that the ghost contribution might be responsible for the observed dark energy in a four-dimensional Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe.

  14. Lattice Gauge Theory for Nuclear Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konstantinos Orginos

    2012-12-01

    Quantum Chromodynamcs (QCD) is now established as the theory of strong interactions. A plethora of hadronic physics phenomena can be explained and described by QCD. From the early days of QCD, it was clear that low energy phenomena require a non-perturbative approach. Lattice QCD is a non-perturbative formulation of QCD that is particularly suited for numerical calculations. Today, supercomputers have achieved performance cabable of performing calculations that allow us to understand complex phenomana that arise from QCD. In this talk I will review the most recent results, relevant to nuclear physics. In particular, I will focus on results relevant to the structure and interactions of hadrons. Finally, I will comment on the opportunities opening up as we approach the era of exaflop computing.

  15. DOE Workshop Gauges Paducah Plant Interest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PADUCAH, KY – The U.S. Department of Energy’s Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (PPPO) is completing a two-day Industry Interest Workshop today at the Julian Carroll Convention Center.

  16. Brazilian rain forest security - environment - development. Study project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arruda, P.A.

    1993-03-25

    The Amazon region has been intensely discussed in the recent years. Most of these discussions have been highly influenced by interests groups. To understand the Amazon area we need to specify what the Amazon is, to describe the forest, to evaluate its mineral and biological resources, and to study the people living in the region. A security analysis reveals that there are no main threats to Brazilian Amazon. Nevertheless, narco guerrillas, acting in neighboring countries, can cross the borders and challenge regional authorities. First World interests may disturb Brazilian policies to the region. To face these threats, Brazilian armed forces maintain a well trained military sharing with other native people the security and the routes towards progress. Brazilian government is also implementing some programs to achieve a well balanced development. The new concepts of sustainable development are applied to keep the region's natural resources available for future generations. Among these programs this paper addresses the ecological economic zoning, Calha Norte Program and Amazon Protection System (SIPAM/SIVAM). In synthesis it demonstrates the Brazilian commitment to integrate, develop and preserve this rich and exotic region.

  17. Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Among the Fastest Growing Job Markets in America Solar Among the Fastest Growing Job Markets in America November 8, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) -- currently the largest solar photovoltaic power plant in the Eastern United States -- generates enough renewable energy to power approximately 4,500 homes. LISF is located at Brookhaven National Laboratory. | Photo courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) -- currently the

  18. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO[sub 2], NO[sub 2]). To control SO[sub 2] emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO[sub 2] emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO[sub 2] emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO[sub 2] emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO[sub 2] emissions.

  19. Incentive mechanisms as a strategic option for acid rain compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1991-12-31

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 (P.L. 101--549) establishes the use of flexible emission compliance strategies for electric utilities to reduce the emissions of add precursors (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}). To control SO{sub 2} emissions, tradeable emission allowances will be used; NO{sub 2} emissions will be controlled by an emission standard, but a utility is permitted to average NO{sub 2} emissions systemwide to meet the standard. Both of these policies promote flexibility and cost savings for the utility while achieving the prescribed emission reduction goals of P.L. 101--549. The use of SO{sub 2} emission allowances has two notable benefits: A utility has the choice of a wide range of compliance methods allowing it to minimize compliance costs and second; the use of transferable emission allowances promote technological innovation with respect to emissions reduction/control. This report discusses the use of regulatory incentives towards the achievement of a Title IV goal of cost reduction of SO{sub 2} emissions.

  20. Parsivel2 Handbook (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In 2010, the tipping buckets were upgraded to weighing buckets. Subsequently five video disdrometers were purchased. The purchase of the 6th video disdrometer is pending. The video ...

  1. QCD and strongly coupled gauge theories: Challenges and perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brambilla, N.; Eidelman, S.; Foka, P.; Gardner, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Alford, M. G.; Alkofer, R.; Butenschoen, M.; Cohen, T. D.; Erdmenger, J.; Fabbietti, L.; Faber, M.; Goity, J. L.; Ketzer, B.; Lin, H. W.; Llanes-Estrada, F. J.; Meyer, H. B.; Pakhlov, P.; Pallante, E.; Polikarpov, M. I.; Sazdjian, H.; Schmitt, A.; Snow, W. M.; Vairo, A.; Vogt, R.; Vuorinen, A.; Wittig, H.; Arnold, P.; Christakoglou, P.; Di Nezza, P.; Fodor, Z.; Garcia i Tormo, X.; Höllwieser, R.; Janik, M. A.; Kalweit, A.; Keane, D.; Kiritsis, E.; Mischke, A.; Mizuk, R.; Odyniec, G.; Papadodimas, K.; Pich, A.; Pittau, R.; Qiu, J. -W.; Ricciardi, G.; Salgado, C. A.; Schwenzer, K.; Stefanis, N. G.; von Hippel, G. M.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2014-10-21

    We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to stongly-coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many research streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments.

  2. New Dualities in Supersymmetric Chiral Gauge Theories (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    When F N + 3 the theory flows to a superconformal fixed point in the infrared, and new dual descriptions of this theory are uncovered. The theory with odd N admits...

  3. Phases of N=1 Supersymmetric Chiral Gauge Theories (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Varying the number of flavors that appear in the superpotential reveals rich infrared chiral dynamics and novel dualities. The dualities are characterized by an infinite...

  4. I REMARKS ON THE TOPOLOGY OF GAUGE FIELDS*

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » ; * * " \ ) I O O l i n O A O U 3 N 3 9 6 6 L I M d v This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Telephone orders may be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Main Order Desk (202)512-1800 FAX: (202) 512-2250 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box

  5. QCD and strongly coupled gauge theories: Challenges and perspectives

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brambilla, N.; Eidelman, S.; Foka, P.; Gardner, S.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Alford, M. G.; Alkofer, R.; Butenschoen, M.; Cohen, T. D.; Erdmenger, J.; et al

    2014-10-21

    We highlight the progress, current status, and open challenges of QCD-driven physics, in theory and in experiment. We discuss how the strong interaction is intimately connected to a broad sweep of physical problems, in settings ranging from astrophysics and cosmology to stongly-coupled, complex systems in particle and condensed-matter physics, as well as to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. We also discuss how success in describing the strong interaction impacts other fields, and, in turn, how such subjects can impact studies of the strong interaction. In the course of the work we offer a perspective on the many researchmore » streams which flow into and out of QCD, as well as a vision for future developments.« less

  6. Bounding gauged skyrmion masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File ...

  7. Weak and strong coupling equilibration in nonabelian gauge theories

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keegan, Liam; Kurkela, Aleksi; Romatschke, Paul; van der Schee, Wilke; Zhu, Yan

    2016-04-06

    In this study, we present a direct comparison studying equilibration through kinetic theory at weak coupling and through holography at strong coupling in the same set-up. The set-up starts with a homogeneous thermal state, which then smoothly transitions through an out-of-equilibrium phase to an expanding system undergoing boost-invariant flow. This first apples-to-apples comparison of equilibration provides a benchmark for similar equilibration processes in heavy-ion collisions, where the equilibration mechanism is still under debate. We find that results at weak and strong coupling can be smoothly connected by simple, empirical power-laws for the viscosity, equilibration time and entropy production of themore » system.« less

  8. Large-N volume independence in conformal and confining gauge...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    one or two compactified dimensions has a rich phase structure with an infinite number of phase transitions coalescing in the zero radius limit. Authors: Unsal, Mithat ; SLAC ;...

  9. New Dualities in Supersymmetric Chiral Gauge Theories (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    claim that all these theories flow to the same superconformal fixed point. A very rich phase structure is found when the number of flavors is reduced below N + 3, including a...

  10. Eddy current gauge for monitoring displacement using printed circuit coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Visioli, Jr., Armando J.

    1977-01-01

    A proximity detection system for non-contact displacement and proximity measurement of static or dynamic metallic or conductive surfaces is provided wherein the measurement is obtained by monitoring the change in impedance of a flat, generally spiral-wound, printed circuit coil which is excited by a constant current, constant frequency source. The change in impedance, which is detected as a corresponding change in voltage across the coil, is related to the eddy current losses in the distant conductive material target. The arrangement provides for considerable linear displacement range with increased accuracies, stability, and sensitivity over the entire range.

  11. Tests gauge LED sensors for fuel-dye measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Lucke, Richard B.; Melville, Angela M.; Wright, Bob W.

    2009-10-19

    The goal of this work was to develop a low cost, robust sensor to allow direct measurement of Solvent Red 164 dye concentration in off-road fuel at refineries and fuel terminals. Optical absorption sensors based on light emitting diodes (LEDs) are rugged, low-cost, have low power consumption, and can be designed to be intrinsically safe.LED-based systems have been used in a variety of chemical detection applications including heavy metals, pH, CO2, and O2. The approach for this work was to develop a sensor that could be mounted on a pipeline sight glass, precluding the need for direct contact of the sensor with the fuel. Below is described the design and testing of three different LED/photodiode sensors utilizing reflectance spectrometry for the measurement of dye concentration.

  12. EECBG Success Story: Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lexington-Fayette Urban County, Kentucky invested $140,000 of a $2.7 million Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) to purchase EnergyCAP software. The energy management software will allow the county to track energy usage and greenhouse gas emission levels in targeted properties as well as process reports and analyze utility bills. Learn more.

  13. Former Auto Worker Gauges Efficiency of American Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Holland, Michigan resident retools skills learned testing car parts to land new job assessing home energy efficiency as a weatherization inspector.

  14. Software Helps Kentucky County Gauge Energy Use | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    purchase EnergyCAP software. The energy management software currently being installed in ... data analysis, the county can take action to spur change in energy usage and behavior. ...

  15. Large N phase transitions in massive N = 2 gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, J. G.

    2014-07-23

    Using exact results obtained from localization on S{sup 4}, we explore the large N limit of N = 2 super Yang-Mills theories with massive matter multiplets. In this talk we discuss two cases: N = 2* theory, describing a massive hypermultiplet in the adjoint representation, and super QCD with massive quarks. When the radius of the four-sphere is sent to infinity these theories are described by solvable matrix models, which exhibit a number of interesting phenomena including quantum phase transitions at finite 't Hooft coupling.

  16. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2007 [Facility News] Improved Instrument Calibration Capabilities Benefit All Sites, Users Bookmark and Share To ensure that ARM precipitation measurements are as accurate as possible, the SGP rain gauges (white cylinder above left) are inspected every two weeks, are statically calibrated in the field every six months, and will now be dynamically calibrated on an annual basis using the system shown above. The ARM fills a unique position in the scientific community by obtaining long-term

  17. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2006 [Facility News] HydroKansas Follows Water Flowing Through Space and Time Bookmark and Share Sets of rain and stream gauges like this one will provide information about water level and flow rates from 14 different sites throughout the Whitewater River watershed during the HydroKansas field campaign. Beginning in May, the Whitewater River watershed in south-central Kansas is the setting for a 3-year field campaign hosted by the ARM's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Called

  18. Rain or Shine, Students Keep Their Race Cars Going - News Feature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    always work," he said. One of his teams, Astler said, wanted to use a hinge so that the solar panel could be adjusted to more directly receive the sun. But the hinge added too...

  19. LPG marketers thank the rain gods for hefty crop-drying market in '89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    One of the pleasant bits of news that sprouted in many places across the country last fall concerned the increased LP-gas gallonage for crop drying. It is difficult to predict the farmers or dryers' consumption of propane in any given season. The demand for this fuel in drying operations is determined almost entirely by weather conditions, and since climate remains a perennial question mark, no one knows until the season is well under way how much moisture content the plants will exhibit. In another area, predictions can be complicated by the variations of individual farm practices as well as the evolving technology of drying equipment, including burners. This article, reports on the crop drying market as seen by various LP-gas dealers and others outside the industry.

  20. Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sarah Gerrity Sarah Gerrity Former Multimedia Editor, Office of Public Affairs Every week, we'll feature our favorite energy-related photo here on Energy.gov, at Facebook.com...

  1. Compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hogberg, Nicholas Alvin

    2015-03-24

    The present application provides a compressive stress system for a gas turbine engine. The compressive stress system may include a first bucket attached to a rotor, a second bucket attached to the rotor, the first and the second buckets defining a shank pocket therebetween, and a compressive stress spring positioned within the shank pocket.

  2. Satellite remote sensing of global rainfall using passive microwave radiometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriday, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    Global rainfall over land and ocean is estimated using measurements of upwelling microwaves by a satellite passive microwave radiometer. Radiative transfer calculations through a cloud model are used to parameterize an inversion technique for retrieving rain rates from brightness temperatures measured by the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I). The rainfall retrieval technique is based on the interaction between multi-spectral microwave radiances and millimeter sized liquid and frozen hydrometeors distributed in the satellite`s field of view. The rain rate algorithm is sensitive to both hydrometeor emission and scattering while being relatively insensitive to extraneous atmospheric and surface effects. Separate formulations are used over ocean and land to account for different background microwave characteristics and the algorithm corrects for inhomogeneous distributions of rain rates within the satellite`s field of view. Estimates of instantaneous and climate scale rainfall are validated through comparisons with modeled clouds, surface radars, rain gauges and alternative satellite estimates. The accuracy of the rainfall estimates is determined from a combination of validation comparisons, theoretical sampling error calculations, and modeled sensitivity to variations in atmospheric and surface radiative properties. An error budget is constructed for both instantaneous rain rates and climate scale global estimates. At a one degree resolution, the root mean square errors in instantaneous rain rate estimates are 13% over ocean and 20% over land. The root mean square errors in global rainfall totals over a four month period are found to be 46% over ocean and 63% over land. Global rainfall totals are computed on a monthly scale for a three year period from 1987 to 1990. The time series is analyzed for climate scale rainfall distribution and variability.

  3. Estimation of Groundwater Recharge at Pahute Mesa using the Chloride Mass-Balance Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Clay A; Hershey, Ronald L; Healey, John M; Lyles, Brad F

    2013-07-01

    Groundwater recharge on Pahute Mesa was estimated using the chloride mass-balance (CMB) method. This method relies on the conservative properties of chloride to trace its movement from the atmosphere as dry- and wet-deposition through the soil zone and ultimately to the saturated zone. Typically, the CMB method assumes no mixing of groundwater with different chloride concentrations; however, because groundwater is thought to flow into Pahute Mesa from valleys north of Pahute Mesa, groundwater flow rates (i.e., underflow) and chloride concentrations from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat were carefully considered. Precipitation was measured with bulk and tipping-bucket precipitation gauges installed for this study at six sites on Pahute Mesa. These data, along with historical precipitation amounts from gauges on Pahute Mesa and estimates from the PRISM model, were evaluated to estimate mean annual precipitation. Chloride deposition from the atmosphere was estimated by analyzing quarterly samples of wet- and dry-deposition for chloride in the bulk gauges and evaluating chloride wet-deposition amounts measured at other locations by the National Atmospheric Deposition Program. Mean chloride concentrations in groundwater were estimated using data from the UGTA Geochemistry Database, data from other reports, and data from samples collected from emplacement boreholes for this study. Calculations were conducted assuming both no underflow and underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. Model results estimate recharge to be 30 mm/yr with a standard deviation of 18 mm/yr on Pahute Mesa, for elevations >1800 m amsl. These estimates assume Pahute Mesa recharge mixes completely with underflow from Kawich Valley and Gold Flat. The model assumes that precipitation, chloride concentration in bulk deposition, underflow and its chloride concentration, have been constant over the length of time of recharge.

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Dynamic Rain Gauge Calibration System A new calibration system recently implemented at the SGP site will verify the operation of the ARM Climate Research

  5. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  6. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  8. Acoustic travel time gauges for in-situ determination of pressure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  9. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. II. Mapping tori of tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    We compute the semiclassical formulas for the partition functions obtained using two different Lagrangians: the Chern-Simons functional and the symplectic action functional.

  10. Conformal window of gauge theories with four-fermion interactions and ideal walking technicolor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukano, Hidenori S.; Sannino, Francesco

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the effects of four-fermion interactions on the phase diagram of strongly interacting theories for any representation as function of the number of colors and flavors. We show that the conformal window, for any representation, shrinks with respect to the case in which the four-fermion interactions are neglected. The anomalous dimension of the mass increases beyond the unity value at the lower boundary of the new conformal window. We plot the new phase diagram which can be used, together with the information about the anomalous dimension, to propose ideal models of walking technicolor. We discover that when the extended technicolor sector, responsible for giving masses to the standard model fermions, is sufficiently strongly coupled the technicolor theory, in isolation, must have an infrared fixed point for the full model to be phenomenologically viable. Using the new phase diagram we show that the simplest one family and minimal walking technicolor models are the archetypes of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking. Our predictions can be verified via first principle lattice simulations.

  11. Analytic structure of the self-energy for massive gauge bosons...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; Pa; HIGGS BOSONS; SELF-ENERGY; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; HIGGS MODEL; PHOTONS; POLARIZATION; PROPAGATOR; SCALAR FIELDS; SYMMETRY ...

  12. National Computational Infrastructure for LatticeGauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bapty, Theodore; Dubey, Abhishek

    2013-07-18

    As part of the reliability project work, researchers from Vanderbilt University, Fermi National Laboratory and Illinois Institute of technology developed a real-time cluster fault-tolerant cluster monitoring framework. The goal for the scientific workflow project is to investigate and develop domain-specific workflow tools for LQCD to help effectively orchestrate, in parallel, computational campaigns consisting of many loosely-coupled batch processing jobs. Major requirements for an LQCD workflow system include: a system to manage input metadata, e.g. physics parameters such as masses, a system to manage and permit the reuse of templates describing workflows, a system to capture data provenance information, a systems to manage produced data, a means of monitoring workflow progress and status, a means of resuming or extending a stopped workflow, fault tolerance features to enhance the reliability of running workflows. In summary, these achievements are reported: • Implemented a software system to manage parameters. This includes a parameter set language based on a superset of the JSON data-interchange format, parsers in multiple languages (C++, Python, Ruby), and a web-based interface tool. It also includes a templating system that can produce input text for LQCD applications like MILC. • Implemented a monitoring sensor framework in software that is in production on the Fermilab USQCD facility. This includes equipment health, process accounting, MPI/QMP process tracking, and batch system (Torque) job monitoring. All sensor data are available from databases, and various query tools can be used to extract common data patterns and perform ad hoc searches. Common batch system queries such as job status are available in command line tools and are used in actual workflow-based production by a subset of Fermilab users. • Developed a formal state machine model for scientific workflow and reliability systems. This includes the use of Vanderbilt’s Generic Modeling Envirnment (GME) tool for code generation for the production of user APIs, code stubs, testing harnesses, and model correctness verification. It is used for creating wrappers around LQCD applications so that they can be integrated into existing workflow systems such as Kepler. • Implemented a database system for tracking the state of nodes and jobs managed by the Torque batch systems used at Fermilab. This robust system and various canned queuries are used for many tasks, including monitoring the health of the clusters, managing allocated projects, producing accounting reports, and troubleshooting nodes and jobs.

  13. National Computational Infrastructure for Lattice Gauge Theory SciDAC-2 Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xian-He

    2013-08-01

    As part of this project work, researchers from Vanderbilt University, Fermi National Laboratory and Illinois Institute of technology developed a real-time cluster fault-tolerant cluster monitoring framework. This framework is open source and is available for download upon request. This work has also been used at Fermi Laboratory, Vanderbilt University and Mississippi State University across projects other than LQCD. The goal for the scientific workflow project is to investigate and develop domain-specific workflow tools for LQCD to help effectively orchestrate, in parallel, computational campaigns consisting of many loosely-coupled batch processing jobs. Major requirements for an LQCD workflow system include: a system to manage input metadata, e.g. physics parameters such as masses, a system to manage and permit the reuse of templates describing workflows, a system to capture data provenance information, a systems to manage produced data, a means of monitoring workflow progress and status, a means of resuming or extending a stopped workflow, fault tolerance features to enhance the reliability of running workflows. Requirements for an LQCD workflow system are available in documentation.

  14. Thermalization of color gauge fields in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Politics Economics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We discuss the quantum mechanical decay of the color magnetic field generated initially during high-energy heavy-ion collisions. The decay is caused by Nielsen-Olesen unstable modes and is accomplished possibly in a period <1 fm/c. We show that the decay products (i.e., incoherent gluons) may be thermalized in a sufficiently short period (<1 fm/c). The precise determination of the period is made by calculating the two-point function of the color magnetic field in a color glass condensate model.

  15. Single field inflation in supergravity with a U(1) gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heurtier, L.; Khalil, S.; Moursy, A.

    2015-10-19

    A single field inflation based on a supergravity model with a shift symmetry and U(1) extension of the MSSM is analyzed. We show that one of the real components of the two U(1) charged scalar fields plays the role of inflaton with an effective scalar potential similar to the “new chaotic inflation” scenario. Both non-anomalous and anomalous (with Fayet-Iliopoulos term) U(1) are studied. We show that the non-anomalous U(1) scenario is consistent with data of the cosmic microwave background and recent astrophysical measurements. A possible kinetic mixing between U(1) and U(1){sub B−L} is considered in order to allow for natural decay channels of the inflaton, leading to a reheating epoch. Upper limits on the reheating temperature thus turn out to favour an intermediate (∼O(10{sup 13}) GeV) scale B−L symmetry breaking.

  16. A model for dark matter, naturalness and a complete gauge unification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kainulainen, Kimmo; Tuominen, Kimmo; Virkajärvi, Jussi

    2015-07-21

    We consider dark matter in a minimal extension of the Standard Model (SM) which breaks electroweak symmetry dynamically and leads to a complete unification of the SM and technicolor coupling constants. The unification scale is determined to be M{sub U}≈2.2×10{sup 15} GeV and the unified coupling α{sub U}≈0.0304. Moreover, unification strongly suggest that the technicolor sector of the model must become strong at the scale of O(TeV). The model also contains a tightly constrained sector of mixing neutral fields stabilized by a discrete symmetry. We find the lightest of these states can be DM with a mass in the range m{sub DM}≈30–800 GeV. We find a large set of parameters that satisfy all available constraints from colliders and from dark matter search experiments. However, most of the available parameter space is within the reach of the next generation of DM search experiments. The model is also sensitive to a modest improvement in the measurement of the precision electroweak parameters.

  17. Search for a new gauge boson in the $A'$ Experiment (APEX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abrahamyan, S; Allada, K; Anez, D; Averett, T; Barbieri, A; Bartlett, K; Beacham, J; Bono, J; Boyce, J R; Brindza, P; Camsonne, A; Cranmer, K; Dalton, M M; de Jager, C W; Donaghy, J; Essig, R; Field, C; Folts, E; Gasparian, A; Goeckner-Wald, N; Gomez, J; Graham, M; Hansen, J -O; Higinbotham, D W; Holmstrom, T; Huang, J; Iqbal, S; Jaros, J; Jensen, E; Kelleher, A; Khandaker, M; LeRose, J J; Lindgren, R; Liyanage, N; Long, E; Mammei, J; Markowitz, P; Maruyama, T; Maxwell, V; Mayilyan, S; McDonald, J; Michaels, R; Moffeit, K; Nelyubin, V; Odian, A; Oriunno, M; Partridge, R; Paolone, M; Piasetzky, E; Pomerantz, I; Qiang, Y; Riordan, S; Roblin, Y; Sawatzky, B; Schuster, P; Segal, J; Selvy, L; Shahinyan, A; Subedi, R; Sulkosky, V; Stepanyan, S; Toro, N; Walz, D; Wojtsekhowski, B

    2011-11-01

    We present a search at Jefferson Laboratory for new forces mediated by sub-GeV vector bosons with weak coupling {alpha}' to electrons. Such a particle A' can be produced in electron-nucleus fixed-target scattering and then decay to an e{sup +}e{sup -} pair, producing a narrow resonance in the QED trident spectrum. Using APEX test run data, we searched in the mass range 175-250 MeV, found no evidence for an A' {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} reaction, and set an upper limit of {alpha}'/{alpha} {approx} 10{sup -6}. Our findings demonstrate that fixed-target searches can explore a new, wide, and important range of masses and couplings for sub-GeV forces.

  18. Diamond as a high pressure gauge up to 2.7 Mbar (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Calibration curve of the Raman shift versus pressure is extended up to 270 GPa and ... GIGA PA; PRESSURE RANGE MEGA PA 10-100; RAMAN SPECTRA; SYNTHESIS CARBON; ELEMENTS; ...

  19. High-speed non-contact measuring apparatus for gauging the thickness of moving sheet material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grann, Eric B. (San Ramon, CA); Holcomb, David E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    An optical measurement apparatus is provided for measuring the thickness of a moving sheet material (18). The apparatus has a pair of optical measurement systems (21, 31) attached to opposing surfaces (14, 16) of a rigid support structure (10). A pair of high-power laser diodes (20,30) and a pair of photodetector arrays (22,32) are attached to the opposing surfaces. Light emitted from the laser diodes is reflected off of the sheet material surfaces (17, 19) and received by the respective photodetector arrays. An associated method for implementing the apparatus is also provided.

  20. Gauging apparatus and method, particularly for controlling mining by a mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Moynihan, D.J.

    1980-04-29

    Apparatus for and method are claimed for controlling the mining by a mining machine of a seam of material (e.g., coal) overlying or underlying a stratum of undesired material (e.g., clay) to reduce the quantity of undesired material mined with the desired material, the machine comprising a cutter movable up and down and adapted to cut down into a seam of coal on being lowered. The control apparatus comprises a first electrical signal constituting a slow-down signal adapted to be automatically operated to signal when the cutter has cut down into a seam of desired material generally to a predetermined depth short of the interface between the seam and the underlying stratum for slowing down the cutting rate as the cutter approaches the interface, and a second electrical signal adapted to be automatically operated subsequent to the first signal for signalling when the cutter has cut down through the seam to the interface for stopping the cutting operation, thereby to avoid mining undesired material with the desired material. Similar signalling may be provided on an upward cut to avoid cutting into the overlying stratum.

  1. H-02 Constructed Wetland Studies: Amphibians and Plants | SREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H-02 Constructed Wetland Studies: Amphibians and Plants Amphibian Studies: Stacey Lance, ... The H-02 treatment wetland array associated with the H-Area facilities Buckets at sampling ...

  2. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hybrid trucks for medium-duty or heavy-duty bucket trucks with ... on their grids, and demonstrate fuel cell-battery electric hybrid truck technologies. ...

  3. Solid feeder and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hathaway, Thomas J.

    1979-01-01

    This invention provides a housing containing a rotatable coal bucket that is sealed at its ends in the housing with a reciprocal plunger that is sealed in the bucket at one end and has an opposite cone-shaped end that wedges up against a closed end of the bucket, and a method for feeding dry, variable size coal from an ambient atmosphere at low pressure into a high temperature, high pressure reactor between the seals for producing fuel gas substantially without losing any high pressure gas from the reactor or excessively wearing the seals. To this end, the piston biases the plunger back and forth for loading and unloading the bucket with coal along an axis that is separated from the seals, the bucket is rotated to unload the coal into the reactor so as to fill the bucket with trapped high pressure gas from the reactor while preventing the gas from escaping therefrom, and then the cone-shaped plunger end is wedged into mating engagement with the closed end of the bucket to displace this high pressure bucket gas by expelling it back into the reactor whereby the bucket can be re-rotated for filling it with coal again substantially without losing any of the high pressure gas or excessively wearing the seals.

  4. Multifrequency, single pass free electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA); Prosnitz, Donald (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A method for simultaneous amplification of laser beams with a sequence of frequencies in a single pass, using a relativistic beam of electrons grouped in a sequence of energies corresponding to the sequence of laser beam frequencies. The method allows electrons to pass from one potential well or "bucket" to another adjacent bucket, thus increasing efficiency of trapping and energy conversion.

  5. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( ؆ · Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phasemore » of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.« less

  6. Remarks on theN=1SU(M+p)SU(p)quiver gauge theory with flavor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Publisher's Accepted Manuscript...

  7. The state of a new art: Monitoring stormwater quality BMPs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.R.; Allen, V.P. II

    1999-07-01

    Virtually all stormwater treatment systems work quite well at the low operating rates that occur during routine rainstorms and virtually all experience some drop-off in efficiency at the higher operating rates that result from heavy rainstorms. Some systems may fail, i.e, operate at negative efficiency meaning that they lose previously captured pollutants, when subjected to high enough loading rates. A premise of this paper is that no system's performance has been thoroughly documented until the highest operating rate at which it can perform acceptably has been documented. The three components of a monitoring program are: sampling (including rain gauging and/or flow measurement), testing, and reporting. None are overly complex, but since every site and every monitoring program is unique, there is wide variability in how best to carry them out. The outline that follows is offered as a practical set of methods to carry out each compound to get the best results from available resources.

  8. Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) for Coal Storage Area Stabilization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Project and Design Engineering

    2011-03-01

    The scope of this project is to stabilize the abandoned coal storage area and redirect the storm water runoff from sanitary sewer system to the storm drain system. Currently, the existing storm water runoff is directed to a perimeter concrete drainage swale and collected in a containment basin. The collected water is then pumped to a treatment facility and after treatment, is discharged to the Y-12 sanitary sewer system. The existing drainage swale and collection basin along with silt fencing will be used during aggregate placement and grading to provide erosion and sediment control. Inlet protection will also be installed around existing structures during the storm water diversion construction. This project scope will include the installation of a non-woven geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base (paving optional) to stabilize the site. The geotextile specifications are provided on the vendor cut sheets in Appendix B. The installation of a storm water collection/retention area will also be installed on the southern side of the site in accordance with EPA Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act. The total area to be disturbed is approximately 2.5 acres. The order of activities for this Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) will be: (1) post notice of coverage (NOC) in a prominent display near entrance of the site; (2) install rain gauge on site or contact Y-12 Plant Shift Superintendent daily for Met tower rain gauge readings; (3) install stabilized construction exit on site; (4) install silt fencing along perimeter as indicated on the attached site plan; (5) regrade site; (6) install geotextile fabric and compacted mineral aggregate base; (7) install catch basin inlet protection where required; (8) excavate and lower existing catch basin tops, re-grade and asphalt to drain; and (9) when all disturbed areas are re-stabilized, remove silt fencing and any other temporary erosion control.

  9. For your calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For your calendar Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit For your calendar From Habitat for Humanity to the Los Alamos Bucket List July 1, 2014 The Los Alamos Bucket List captures 100 things to do in and near Los Alamos. The Los Alamos Bucket List captures 100 things to do in and near Los Alamos. Contact Community Programs Director Kurt Steinhaus Email Editor Ute Haker Email Volunteering

  10. Microsoft Word - 2011sr09.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capsule, about the size of a 5-gallon paint bucket, containing items that depict both the history of SRS, as well as items that show current events in the region and the nation. In...

  11. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for medium duty or heavy duty bucket trucks with drivetrain-integrated ePTO systems. ... on their grids, and demonstrate fuel cell-battery electric hybrid truck technologies. ...

  12. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    medium-duty or heavy-duty bucket trucks with drivetrain-integrated electric power systems. ... a business case and demonstrate fuel cell-battery electric hybrid truck technologies. ...

  13. EERE Success Story-DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    can provide significant benefits to medium and heavy-duty fleets, especially utilities. ... to evaluate the performance of a unique Class 5 plug-in hybrid electric bucket truck. ...

  14. Big wheels keep on turning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteel, K.

    2008-05-15

    Although the structure of the market for bucketwheel and bucket chain based equipment has changed over the years, design advances have enabled the technology to retain a significant place in the production and distribution of coal and minerals. 4 photos.

  15. Pyrometer mount for a closed-circuit thermal medium cooled gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Raymond Joseph; Kirkpatrick, Francis Lawrence; Burns, James Lee; Fulton, John Robert

    2002-01-01

    A steam-cooled second-stage nozzle segment has an outer band and an outer cover defining a plenum therebetween for receiving cooling steam for flow through the nozzles to the inner band and cover therefor and return flow through the nozzles. To measure the temperature of the buckets of the stage forwardly of the nozzle stage, a pyrometer boss is electron beam-welded in an opening through the outer band and TIG-welded to the outer cover plate. By machining a hole through the boss and seating a linearly extending tube in the boss, a line of sight between a pyrometer mounted on the turbine frame and the buckets is provided whereby the temperature of the buckets can be ascertained. The welding of the boss to the outer band and outer cover enables steam flow through the plenum without leakage, while providing a line of sight through the outer cover and outer band to measure bucket temperature.

  16. MHK Technologies/PowerGin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    similar to hydro electric turbine blades which provide a high surface area to catch wave energy As the buckets on the ramp side of the rotor fill with wave water the rotors begin...

  17. HORIZON SENSING (PROPOSAL No.51)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2001-10-01

    Project objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time stress measurement, bit loading, and horizon sensing on a longwall shearer, boring machine, continuous miner, and loading bucket.

  18. HORIZON SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2001-07-31

    Project Objectives are to demonstrate the feasibility of real-time stress measurement, bit loading, and horizon sensing on a longwall shearer, boring machine, continuous miner, and loading bucket.

  19. Sealing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  20. EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range EM Tackles Cleanup at Tonopah Test Range September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup operations. Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup operations. A field technician in protective gear surveys a bucket used during soil cleanup in 1997. A field technician in protective gear surveys a bucket used during soil cleanup in 1997. Field technicians survey a shaker used in past cleanup operations. A

  1. Angel wing seals for blades of a gas turbine and methods for determining angel wing seal profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, John Zhiqiang

    2003-01-01

    A gas turbine has buckets rotatable about an axis, the buckets having angel wing seals. The seals have outer and inner surfaces, at least one of which, and preferably both, extend non-linearly between root radii and the tip of the seal body. The profiles are determined in a manner to minimize the weight of the seal bodies, while maintaining the stresses below predetermined maximum or allowable stresses.

  2. Monticello National Priorities List (NPL) Sites

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of Rain: 1 (>.01 in) 0 (>.1 in) o >1 inl Heat Base: 65. 0 Cool Base: 65. 0 Hethod: ... , RAIN (in) , *IX NO SPBED (mph) LON THIE HEAT DEG DAYS COOL DEG DAYS 1IG I'IIND RAIN ...

  3. Subsea production systems - trends in the nineties: Minitemplate/cluster wells; towed flowline bundles; multiphase flowmeters, improved gauges - a proven track record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.W.

    1996-04-01

    Subsea production systems have successfully demonstrated their overall reliability, and have established a proven track record over the past 30 years of field experience. Current trends in their configuration from large, heavy, multiwell integrated drilling template and production/injection manifold systems to small, light-weight, {open_quotes}mini template{close_quotes} systems or clustered well manifolds with individual satellite wells-essentially a cost reduction trend-are expected to continue throughout the remainder of the decade. System configuration and equipment technology trends in the 1990s are now improving the profitability and capability of subsea production systems.

  4. Measurement of the WZ cross section and triple gauge couplings in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.

    2012-08-01

    This article describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb? of integrated luminosity), 63 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 81 events. The measured total cross section ?(pp??WZ)=3.93+0.600.53(stat)+0.590.46(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.500.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  5. Comment on C. W. Wong, Maxwell equations and the redundant gauge degree of freedom 2009 Eur. J. Phys. 30, 1401-1416

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, John David

    2009-10-22

    In the paper cited in the title, the author makes the claim that in classical electromagnetic theory the longitudinal electric field is instantaneous, corresponding to action at a distance, contrary to popular and correct belief. We point out that the determination of the speed of propagation of electromagnetic fields requires specification of the initial condition of the sources or equivalent. The Coulomb field of a stationary point charge proves nothing. We describe in detail a simple example to illustrate the universal onset of the static 'instantaneous' regime throughout a region of space that expands with the speed of light.

  6. Measurement of the $WZ$ Cross Section and Triple Gauge Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. The WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity), 64 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8 {+-} 1 events. The measured total cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WZ) = 3.93{sub -0.53}{sup +0.60}(stat){sub -0.46}{sup +0.59}(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.50 {+-} 0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  7. Measurement of the WZ cross section and triple gauge couplings in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-08-23

    This article describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions for the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity), 63 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8±1 events. The measured total cross section σ(pp̄→WZ)=3.93+0.60–0.53(stat)+0.59–0.46(syst) pb is in good agreementmore » with the standard model prediction of 3.50±0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.« less

  8. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  9. Relations between rainfall amount, soil moisture and landslides in Hamilton County, Ohio, measured by strain survey and tensiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, B.; Mayer, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The movement of water through fill material and natural colluvium in a cut slope is being monitored at two sites with past landslide activity adjacent to I-275 in Hamilton County, Ohio. Quadrilaterals and an array of wooden stakes were placed immediately adjacent to the slide area to monitor movement of the slope at Site 1. To correlate any movement with soil moisture levels, rain gauges were installed. Changes in line-length measurements over a 3-month period are < 14 mm, and most differences average about 4 mm. Since measurement errors of up to 5--6 mm can be expected using a steel tape, more measurements over time will be needed to determine if significant displacement is occurring. Tensiometers were placed at 12 and 36 inches depth in the soil from mid-September through early November 1992, in order to measure matric suction. The 36 inch tensiometer indicated that the soil remained saturated at that depth. The 12 inch tensiometer measured 8 centibars, which occurred following a week of rain-free weather. Gravimetric measurements of soil samples show that surface soil moisture ranges from 14--39% immediately following a storm to 7--29% following at least 10 days of dry weather. At Site 2, quadrilaterals were set up in mid-August 1992; resurveys of the quadrilaterals shows very little, if any, movement. Movement of 38 mm occurred in one quadrilateral; movement in other quadrilaterals averaged close to 5 mm. The slide is not steadily moving, and may be following a pattern, where slides in Hamilton County were more likely to move in late winter or early spring.

  10. Cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David; Salamah, Samir Armando; Bylina, Noel Jacob

    2003-01-01

    A plurality of arcuate circumferentially spaced supply and return manifold segments are arranged on the rim of a rotor for respectively receiving and distributing cooling steam through exit ports for distribution to first and second-stage buckets and receiving spent cooling steam from the first and second-stage buckets through inlet ports for transmission to axially extending return passages. Each of the supply and return manifold segments has a retention system for precluding substantial axial, radial and circumferential displacement relative to the rotor. The segments also include guide vanes for minimizing pressure losses in the supply and return of the cooling steam. The segments lie substantially equal distances from the centerline of the rotor and crossover tubes extend through each of the segments for communicating steam between the axially adjacent buckets of the first and second stages, respectively.

  11. Debris trap in a turbine cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having a rotor and a plurality of stages, each stage comprising a row of buckets mounted on the rotor for rotation therewith; and wherein the buckets of at least one of the stages are cooled by steam, the improvement comprising at least one axially extending cooling steam supply conduit communicating with an at least partially annular steam supply manifold; one or more axially extending cooling steam feed tubes connected to the manifold at a location radially outwardly of the cooling steam supply conduit, the feed tubes arranged to supply cooling steam to the buckets of at least one of the plurality of stages; the manifold extending radially beyond the feed tubes to thereby create a debris trap region for collecting debris under centrifugal loading caused by rotation of the rotor.

  12. The role of precipitation size distributions in km-scale NWP simulations of intense precipitation: Evaluation of cloud properties and surface precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanWeverberg K.; Vogelmann A.; vanLipzig, N. P. M.; Delobbec, L.

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties and surface precipitation to assumptions regarding the size distributions of the precipitating hydrometeors in a one-moment bulk microphysics scheme. Three sensitivity experiments were applied to two composites of 15 convective and 15 frontal stratiform intense precipitation events observed in a coastal midlatitude region (Belgium), which were evaluated against satellite-retrieved cloud properties and radar-rain-gauge derived surface precipitation. It is found that the cloud optical thickness distribution was well captured by all experiments, although a significant underestimation of cloudiness occurred in the convective composite. The cloud-top-pressure distribution was improved most by more realistic snow size distributions (including a temperature-dependent intercept parameter and non-spherical snow for the calculation of the slope parameter), due to increased snow depositional growth at high altitudes. Surface precipitation was far less sensitive to whether graupel or hail was chosen as the rimed ice species, as compared to previous idealized experiments. This smaller difference in sensitivity could be explained by the stronger updraught velocities and higher freezing levels in the idealized experiments compared to typical coastal midlatitude environmental conditions.

  13. Atmospheric corrosion monitoring at the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge K-25 Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, M.

    1995-12-31

    Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the US Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN has been stored in large steel cylinders which have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize and monitor the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, time-of-wetness sensors and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors and thermocouples. Long-term (16 years) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

  14. Zero interface tensions at the deconfining phase transition for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gauge theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Zero interface tensions at the deconfining phase transition for a matrix model of a SU() gauge theory Authors: ...

  15. Sample Observations from the 2001.Multi-Frequency Radar IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rain and ice particles resulting in Rayleigh scattering without any attenuation of the signal. The 8.6-mm wavelength Ka-band system is short relative to the rain and ice...

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To Rain or Not to Rain...Aerosols May Be the Answer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

  17. Building America Case Study: Hygrothermal Performance of a Double...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    drive, bulk water intrusion from leaks and wind-driven rain, capillary action from concrete to wood connections, and rain splash-back that wets building materials such as siding. ...

  18. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Retrievables: mean rainfall rate (R m ) andor rain water path (RWP), cloud liquid water path (LWP) (D < 50 m or so) (cloud and rain...

  19. Microsoft Word - S09615_oct_dec2012 Quarterly Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 06' 00" N LONG: 109 06' 00" TEMPERATURE (OF)' RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) HEAT COOL AVG vlEAN DEG DEG WIND DOM DAY TEMP HIGH TIME LOW TIME DAYS DAYS RAIN SPEED HIGH TIME ...

  20. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 37" 54' 00" N LONG: 109" 18' 00" w TEMPERATURE (oF)' RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) HEAT COOL AVG MEAN DEG DEG WIND DOM DAY TEMP HIGH TIME LOW TIME DAYS DAYS RAIN SPEED HIGH TIME ...

  1. Microsoft Word - 9_07 rpt w all comments.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 37 54' 00" N LONG: 109 18' 00" w TEMPERATURE (OF)' RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) HEAT COOL AVG MEAN DEG DEG WIND DOM DAY TEMP HIGH TIME LOW TIME DAYS DAYS RAIN SPEED HIGH TIME ...

  2. Steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian David; Barb, Kevin Joseph; Li, Ming Cheng; Hyde, Susan Marie; Mashey, Thomas Charles; Wesorick, Ronald Richard; Glynn, Christopher Charles; Hemsworth, Martin C.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows.

  3. Methods for disassembling, replacing and assembling parts of a steam cooling system for a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ian D.; Wesorick, Ronald R.

    2002-01-01

    The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows. The bore tube assembly, radial tubes, elbows, manifold segments and crossover tubes are removable from the turbine rotor and replaceable.

  4. Method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dembowski, Peter V. (Richmond Heights, OH); Schilke, Peter W. (Scotia, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A method of creating a controlled interior surface configuration of passages within a substrate, particularly cooling passages of nozzles or buckets of a gas turbine, involves the hot isostatic pressing of a leachable passage insert whose surface carries the female image of the desired interior surface configuration inside the substrate followed by leaching of the insert from the substrate.

  5. Sustainability Around the House | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Around the House Sustainability Around the House April 13, 2015 - 7:46am Addthis Rain barrels collect rain water and provide a free source of fresh water for your lawn. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto/schulzie Rain barrels collect rain water and provide a free source of fresh water for your lawn. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto/schulzie Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office How does it work? Choosing the right landscaping for your

  6. Use of Remote Technology in the Surface Water Environmental Monitoring Program at SRS Reducing Measurements in the Field - 13336

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, T.; Terry, B.; Meyer, A.; Hall, J.; Allen, P.; Hughey, D.; Hartley, T.

    2013-07-01

    There are a wide range of sensor and remote technology applications available for use in environmental monitoring programs. Each application has its own set of limitations and can be challenging when attempting to utilize it under diverse environmental field conditions. The Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Program has implemented several remote sensing and surface water flow technologies that have increased the quality of the data while reducing the number of field measurements. Implementation of this technology reduced the field time for personnel that commute across the Savannah River Site (SRS) over a span of 310 square miles. The wireless surface water flow technology allows for immediate notification of changing field conditions or equipment failure thus reducing data-loss or erroneous field data and improving data-quality. This wireless flow technology uses the stage-to-flow methodology coupled with implementation of a robust highly accurate Acoustic Doppler Profiler system for measuring discharge under various field conditions. Savings for implementation of the wireless flow application and Flowlink{sup R} technology equates to approximately 1175 hours annually for the radiological liquid effluent and surveillance programs. The SonTek River Suveyor and Flowtracker technologies are utilized for calibration of the wireless flow monitoring devices in the site streams and validation of effluent flows at the SRS. Implementation of similar wireless devices is also planned in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm-water Monitoring Program. SRS personnel have been developing a unique flow actuator device. This device activates an ISCO{sup TM} automated sampler under flowing conditions at storm-water outfall locations across the site. This technology is unique in that it was designed to be used under field conditions with rapid changes in flow and sedimentation where traditional actuators have been unsuccessful in tripping the automated sampler. In addition, automated rain gauges will be tied into this technology for immediate notification of rain at storm-water locations further enhancing the automation of environmental data collection. These technological improvements at SRS have led to data-quality improvements while reducing the field technician time in the field and costs for maintaining the traditional environmental monitoring applications. (authors)

  7. SPEAR3 Vacuum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zone 1 (01S - 04S) Average: 3.7e-10 Torr Ion gauges Ion gauges Ion pump power supplies ... Zone 2 (05G - 09S) Average: 6.5e-10 Torr Ion gauges Ion gauges Ion pump power supplies ...

  8. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6, blast measurements. Part 3. Pressure near ground level. Section 4. Blast asymmetry from aerial photographs. Section 5. Ball-crusher-gauge measurements of peak pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    Aerial motion pictures from manned aircraft were taken of the Dog, Easy, and George Shots and from a drone aircraft on Dog Shot to determine whether asymmetries in the blast waves could be detected and measured. Only one film, that taken of Dog Shot from a drone, was considered good enough to warrant detailed analysis, but this failed to yield any positive information on asymmetries. The analysis showed that failure to obtain good arrival-time data arose from a number of cases, but primarily from uncertainities in magnification and timing. Results could only be matched with reliable data from blast-velocity switches by use of large corrections. Asymnetries, if present, were judged to have been too small or to have occurred too early to be detected with the slow-frame speed used. Recommendations for better results include locating the aircraft directly overhead at the time of burst and using a camera having greater frame speed and provided with timing marks.

  9. HTO washout model: on the relationship between exchange rate and washout coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubev, A.; Balashov, Y.; Mavrin, S.; Golubeva, V.; Galeriu, D.

    2015-03-15

    Washout coefficient Λ is widely used as a parameter in washout models. These models describes overall HTO washout with rain by a first-order kinetic equation, while washout coefficient Λ depends on the type of rain event and rain intensity and empirical parameters a, b. The washout coefficient is a macroscopic parameter and we have considered in this paper its relationship with a microscopic rate K of HTO isotopic exchange in atmospheric humidity and drops of rainwater. We have shown that the empirical parameters a, b can be represented through the rain event characteristics using the relationships of molecular impact rate, rain intensity and specific rain water content while washout coefficient Λ can be represented through the exchange rate K, rain intensity, raindrop diameter and terminal raindrop velocity.

  10. An analysis of selected atmospheric icing events on test cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Druez, J.; McComber, P.; Laflamme, J.

    1996-12-01

    In cold countries, the design of transmission lines and communication networks requires the knowledge of ice loads on conductors. Atmospheric icing is a stochastic phenomenon and therefore probabilistic design is used more and more for structure icing analysis. For strength and reliability assessments, a data base on atmospheric icing is needed to characterize the distributions of ice load and corresponding meteorological parameters. A test site where icing is frequent is used to obtain field data on atmospheric icing. This test site is located on the Mt. Valin, near Chicoutimi, Quebec, Canada. The experimental installation is mainly composed of various instrumented but non-energized test cables, meteorological instruments, a data acquisition system, and a video recorder. Several types of icing events can produce large ice accretions dangerous for land-based structures. They are rime due to in-cloud icing, glaze caused by freezing rain, wet snow, and mixtures of these types of ice. These icing events have very different characteristics and must be distinguished, before statistical analysis, in a data base on atmospheric icing. This is done by comparison of data from a precipitation gauge, an icing rate meter and a temperature sensor. An analysis of selected icing periods recorded on the cables of two perpendicular test lines during the 1992--1993 winter season is presented. Only significant icing events have been considered. A comparative analysis of the ice load on the four test cables is drawn from the data, and typical accretion and shedding parameters are calculated separately for icing events related to in-cloud icing and precipitation icing.

  11. Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, Brad; McCurdy, Greg; Chapman, Jenny; Miller, Julianne

    2012-01-01

    A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

  12. Daily temperature and precipitation data for 223 USSR Stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Razuvaev, V.N.; Apasova, E.G.; Martuganov, R.A.; Vose, R.S.; Steurer, P.M.

    1993-11-01

    On- May 23, 1972, the United States and the USSR established a bilateral initiative known as the Agreement on Protection of the Environment. Given recent interest in possible greenhouse gas-induced climate change, Working Group VIII (Influence of Environmental Changes on Climate) has become particularly useful to the scientific communities of both nations. Among its many achievements, Working Group VIII has been instrumental in the exchange of climatological information between the principal climate data centers of each country [i.e., the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina, and the Research Institute of Hydrometeorological Information in Obninsk, Russia]. Considering the relative lack of climate records previously available for the USSR, data obtained via this bilateral exchange are particularly valuable to researchers outside the former Soviet Union. To expedite the dissemination of these data, NOAA`s Climate and Global Change Program funded the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and NCDC to distribute one of the more useful archives acquired through this exchange: a 223-station daily data set covering the period 1881-1989. This data set contains: (1) daily mean, minimum, and maximum temperature data; (2) daily precipitation data; (3) station inventory information (WMO No., name, coordinates, and elevation); (4) station history information (station relocation and rain gauge replacement dates); and (5) quality assurance information (i.e., flag codes that were assigned as a result of various data checks). The data set is available, free of charge, as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of 18 data files and a printed document which describes both the data files and the 223-station network in detail.

  13. Retention sleeve for a thermal medium carrying tube in a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas (Ballston Lake, NY); Czachor, Robert Paul (Cincinnati, OH)

    2003-01-01

    Multiple tubes are connected to steam supply and spent cooling steam return manifolds for supplying cooling steam to buckets and returning spent cooling steam from the buckets to the manifolds, respectively. The tubes are prevented from axial movement in one direction by flanges engaging end faces of the spacer between the first and second-stage wheels. Retention sleeves are disposed about cantilevered ends of the tubes. One end of the retention sleeve engages an enlarged flange on the tube, while an opposite end is spaced axially from an end face of the adjoining wheel, forming a gap, enabling thermal expansion of the tubes and limiting axial displacement of the tube in the opposite direction.

  14. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Gandy; R. Viswanathan; S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2006-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  15. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2003-04-01

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 would be aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations. Task 5 would develop a risk-based decision analysis model to make run/repair decisions. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 tasks.

  16. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-08-09

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

  17. COMBUSTION TURBINE (CT) HOT SECTION COATING LIFE MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2002-12-02

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbine is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3, with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. This report is a record of the progress to date on these 3 key tasks. Two supporting tasks relating to field validation (Task 4) and economic analysis (Task 5) have not yet been initiated.

  18. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Cheruvu; K. Krzywosz

    2005-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, four principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 is aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations.

  19. Combustion Turbine (CT) Hot Section Coating Life Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Viswanathan; D. Gandy; K. Krzywosz; S. Cheruvu; E. Wan

    2004-03-31

    The integrity of coatings used in hot section components of combustion turbines is crucial to the reliability of the buckets. This project was initiated in recognition of the need for predicting the life of coatings analytically, and non-destructively; correspondingly, three principal tasks were established. Task 1, with the objective of analytically developing stress, strain and temperature distributions in the bucket and thereby predicting thermal fatigue (TMF) damage for various operating conditions; Task 2 with the objective of developing eddy current techniques to measure both TMF damage and general degradation of coatings and, Task 3 with the objective of developing mechanism based algorithms. Task 4 would be aimed at verifying analytical predictions from Task 1 and the NDE predictions from Task 3 against field observations. Task 5 would develop a risk-based decision analysis model to make run/repair decisions. This report is a record of the progress to date on these four tasks.

  20. Thermochemical Processes | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processes NREL is developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels and biofuel intermediaries. In our Thermochemical User Facility, we work with partners to test and scale processes from bench to those that are industrially relevant. Photo of an engineer in a hardhat working in a facility among a series of metal tubes, pipes, and hoses, pouring a liquid from a large hose into a bucket. Integration, Scale-Up, and Piloting 3-D

  1. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories Budget Atomization of DOE Funding April 22, 2015 Summary of Atomization * Summary of issue: Labs are concerned that the current practice of subdividing funding into small "buckets" complicates implementation, "atomizes" the funding. * The next several slides: - Explain from a high level how funding gets broken out - Provides two account examples - Translates this into numbers - Shows how this affects

  2. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 30, 2006 [Facility News] Disdrometer Joins Tipping Bucket to Improve Precipitation Measurements Bookmark and Share At the SGP site, the disdrometer is installed near the site's main instrument cluster, approximately 50 feet east of the Central Facility. To avoid secondary splash contamination, the disdrometer's sensor cone is surrounded by splash-resistant material. This spring, a pair of new distrometers began collecting data at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site and the ARM Darwin

  3. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect 2: Rain Microphysics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm

  4. Robert Berger > Asst. Professor - Western Washington University > Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert B. Raines Associate Administrator for Acquisition and Project Management Robert B. Raines With over 30 years of experience in construction management, design management, utilities systems operations, employee development, budgeting and contracting, Robert B. Raines serves as the Associate Administrator for Acquisition and Project Management (APM). Bob comes to NNSA from DOE's Office of Engineering and Construction Management where he served as the Director for Project Management Systems

  5. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rain Rates Provided by Radar in New Evaluation Product Bookmark and Share a) Validation of rainfall totals against the Oklahoma Mesonet and b) a single time step showing the ability of the algorithm to capture rain rates from the convective line and trailing stratiform. a) Validation of rainfall totals against the Oklahoma Mesonet and b) a single time step showing the ability of the algorithm to capture rain rates from the convective line and trailing stratiform. Precipitation rates from cloud

  6. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor fall velocity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    velocity Fall velocity of hydrometeors (e.g. rain, snow, graupel, hail). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  7. ARM - Measurement - Hydrometeor types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into such microphysical classes as rain, snow, graupel, and hail. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The composite distributions of KAZR reflectivity and Doppler velocity also show two distinct structures for convective and stratiform rain. These indicate that the method produces ...

  9. Stratiform and Convective Precipitation Observed by Multiple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The composite distributions of KAZR reflectivity and Doppler velocity also show two distinct structures for convective and stratiform rain. These indicate that the method produces ...

  10. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complex physical-socio-technical systems. Examples include: tropical rain forests, agro-eco systems, cities, infrastructure, governments, political systems, education systems,...

  11. NNMCAB Member Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the September 24, 2014 Board meeting Patti Jones LANL, Provided the Members with a Status Update to the TA-21 Demolition and Storm Water Season Rain Events.

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 15 results. Download Rain Machine (Solar Still) Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled with salt...

  13. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 13 results. Download Rain Machine (Solar Still) Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled with salt...

  14. DOE Tour of Zero: The Adaptation Home by Evolutionary Home Builders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Association of Home Builders' National Green Building certification, emerald level, and ... and .75-inch plastic ventilated rain screen strips were installed at the tops and ...

  15. Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Language: English Subject: 58 GEOSCIENCES; AEROSOLS; BOUNDARY LAYERS; CLOUDS; FREEZING; NUCLEATION; RADIATIONS; RAIN; SEASONS; SLOWING-DOWN; SNOW; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; TESTING ...

  16. Africa Data Dissemination Service | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    used to monitor the vegetation condition (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, or NDVI) and rainfall (RainFall Estimate, or RFE) across the entire African continent. The NDVI...

  17. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Feature Stories and Releases Land, Sea, and Air: ACAPEX Targets Atmospheric Rivers Bookmark and Share Researchers collect rare data linked to rain and drought From left...

  18. Mechanisms Contributing to Suppressed Precipitation in Mt. Hua...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Consistent with the increase of air pollution in these regions, it has been argued that the precipitation trend is linked to aerosol microphysical effect on suppressing warm rain. ...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Consistent with the increase of air pollution in these regions, it has been argued that the precipitation trend is linked to aerosol microphysical effect on suppressing warm rain. ...

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    educationdownloadsfun-sun-teachers-activity-guide-elementary-grades-k-2-1 Download Rain Machine (Solar Still) Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    energy.goveereeducationdownloadsphotovoltaics-and-solar-energy-2-activities Download Rain Machine (Solar Still) Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled...

  2. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    experiment as a class. http:energy.goveereeducationdownloadswhats-cooking Download Rain Machine (Solar Still) Working in groups, students build simple solar stills filled...

  3. EPA Webcast- Creating a Green Infrastructure Plan to Transform Your Community

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Green infrastructure approaches, such as incorporating trees and rain gardens into street designs, can help communities better manage stormwater while achieving other environmental, public health,...

  4. DOE-HDBK-1130-2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Radiological Worker (RW) Training Reaffirmed 2013 This program management guide provides guidance for proper implementation of additional standardized raining as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS).

  5. Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parameterization of the warm rain processes and a modified version of the Koenig and Murray (1976) ice parameterization (Wu et al. 1999). The subgrid-scale mixing is...

  6. Streamflow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Help BPA Home > Power > Modified Streamflows Rain drop OUR VISION "BPA is a trusted steward of the Columbia River Power System. We provide maximum power and environmental value...

  7. CASL-U-2015-0234-000 CASL Program Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rod management for normal operating conditions. H concentration Contributors: Rose Montgomery (TVA), Ben Collins (ORNL) Independent review by Dudley Raine (B&W) CASL...

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fog and Rain in the Amazon Download a printable PDF Submitter: Gentine, P., Columbia University Sobel, A., Columbia University Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a stratiform precipitating event and the corresponding estimates of mean rain rate (c) and cloud IWP and LWP (d). A comprehensive characterization of all...

  10. TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    intensity (e.g. May and Ballinger, 2007) Resulting Cloud Properties Examine rain DSD using polarimetric radar Examine ice cloud properties using MMCR and MPL Expect...

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fog and Rain in the Amazon For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research Highlight The diurnal and seasonal...

  12. Microsoft Word - FUSRAP Middlesex NJ.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    However, overlooked during decontamination were traces of radioactive materials that had been carried offsite over the years by wind and rain to yards of neighboring homes. Also, ...

  13. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949,...

  14. Biogenic Aerosols-Effects on Clouds and Climate: Snowfall Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gauge and two-dimensional (2D)-video disdrometer was built on site. Due to the duplication of some instruments, namely the 2D-video disdrometer and the weighing gauge, we ...

  15. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gauge and two-dimensional (2D)-video disdrometer was built on site. Due to the duplication of some instruments, namely the 2D-video disdrometer and the weighing gauge, we ...

  16. Leading order calculation of shear viscosity in hot quantum electrodyn...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACTION INTEGRAL; BOLTZMANN EQUATION; FERMIONS; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; GAUGE INVARIANCE; INTEGRAL EQUATIONS; QUANTUM ...

  17. Spectral function of a fermion coupled with a massive vector boson at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    finite temperature in a gauge invariant formalism (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Spectral function of a fermion coupled with a massive vector boson at finite temperature in a gauge invariant formalism Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Spectral function of a fermion coupled with a massive vector boson at finite temperature in a gauge invariant formalism We investigate spectral properties of a fermion coupled with a massive gauge boson with a mass m at finite temperature (T) in

  18. MONTICELLO PROJECTS FEDERAL FACILITIES AGREEMENT REPORT Report...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... (oF) ' RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) HEAT COOL AVG MEAN DEG DEG lUND DOM DAY TEMP ... of Rain: 4 (>.01 in) 2 (>.1 in) 0 (>1 in) Heat Base: 65.0 Cool Base: 65.0 Method: ...

  19. MONTICELLO NPL SITES

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 18' 00" W TEMPERATURE (F), RAIN (in), WIND SPEED (mph) MEAN DAY TEMP HIGH 1 2 3 4 5 6 ... 7:30a 12:00rn 7:30a HEAT COOL AVG DEG DEG WIND DAYS DAYS RAIN SPEED HIGH 51.0 40.8 34.4 ...

  20. Effects of Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 on Electric Utilities: An Update, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Describes the strategies used to comply with the Acid Rain Program in 1995, the effect of compliance on SO2 emissions levels, the cost of compliance, and the effects of the program on coal supply and demand. It updates and expands the EIA report, Electric Utility Phase I Acid Rain Compliance Strategies for the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990.

  1. A Bivariate Mixed Distribution with a Heavy-tailed Component and its Application to Single-site Daily Rainfall Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chao .; Singh, Vijay P.; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2013-02-06

    This paper presents an improved brivariate mixed distribution, which is capable of modeling the dependence of daily rainfall from two distinct sources (e.g., rainfall from two stations, two consecutive days, or two instruments such as satellite and rain gauge). The distribution couples an existing framework for building a bivariate mixed distribution, the theory of copulae and a hybrid marginal distribution. Contributions of the improved distribution are twofold. One is the appropriate selection of the bivariate dependence structure from a wider admissible choice (10 candidate copula families). The other is the introduction of a marginal distribution capable of better representing low to moderate values as well as extremes of daily rainfall. Among several applications of the improved distribution, particularly presented here is its utility for single-site daily rainfall simulation. Rather than simulating rainfall occurrences and amounts separately, the developed generator unifies the two processes by generalizing daily rainfall as a Markov process with autocorrelation described by the improved bivariate mixed distribution. The generator is first tested on a sample station in Texas. Results reveal that the simulated and observed sequences are in good agreement with respect to essential characteristics. Then, extensive simulation experiments are carried out to compare the developed generator with three other alternative models: the conventional two-state Markov chain generator, the transition probability matrix model and the semi-parametric Markov chain model with kernel density estimation for rainfall amounts. Analyses establish that overall the developed generator is capable of reproducing characteristics of historical extreme rainfall events and is apt at extrapolating rare values beyond the upper range of available observed data. Moreover, it automatically captures the persistence of rainfall amounts on consecutive wet days in a relatively natural and easy way. Another interesting observation is that the recognized overdispersion problem in daily rainfall simulation ascribes more to the loss of rainfall extremes than the under-representation of first-order persistence. The developed generator appears to be a sound option for daily rainfall simulation, especially in particular hydrologic planning situations when rare rainfall events are of great importance.

  2. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluidtransient effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased during set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.

  3. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased during set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.

  4. High vacuum measurements and calibrations, molecular flow fluid transient effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Gavalas, Nickolas A.

    2015-04-29

    High vacuum pressure measurements and calibrations below 1 × 10-8 Torr are problematic. Specifically, measurement accuracies change drastically for vacuum gauges when pressures are suddenly lowered in vacuum systems. How can gauges perform like this? A brief system description is first required to answer this question. Calibrations were performed using a vacuum calibration chamber with attached vacuum gauges. To control chamber pressures, vacuum pumps decreased the chamber pressure while nitrogen tanks increased the chamber pressure. By balancing these opposing pressures, equilibrium in the chamber was maintained at selected set point pressures to perform calibrations. When pressures were suddenly decreased duringmore » set point adjustments, a sudden rush of gas from the chamber also caused a surge of gas from the gauges to decrease the pressures in those gauges. Gauge pressures did not return to equilibrium as fast as chamber pressures due to the sparse distribution of gas molecules in the system. This disparity in the rate of pressure changes caused the pressures in different gauges to be different than expected. This discovery was experimentally proven to show that different gauge designs return to equilibrium at different rates, and that gauge accuracies vary for different gauge designs due to fluid transients in molecular flow.« less

  5. Weekly User Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weekly User Schedule Print Requests for special operations use of the "scrubbing" shift should be sent directly to Warren Byrne (486-7517) by 1:00 p.m. Friday. Any requests for changes in beam energy, bucket fill pattern, scrubbing shifts, or machine setup must be submitted to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by 4:00 pm on Wednesday, the week before the scheduled run, for consideration during Thursday's Physics meeting. These

  6. Weekly User Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weekly User Schedule Print Requests for special operations use of the "scrubbing" shift should be sent directly to Warren Byrne (486-7517) by 1:00 p.m. Friday. Any requests for changes in beam energy, bucket fill pattern, scrubbing shifts, or machine setup must be submitted to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it by 4:00 pm on Wednesday, the week before the scheduled run, for consideration during Thursday's Physics meeting. These

  7. LLNL's Response to 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report Comments B113 Issue #1 and B271 Issue #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, W W

    2009-11-19

    This is LLNL's responses to comments in the 9/9/2009 Annual Inspection Report concerning Underground Storage Tank (UST) 113-D1U2 (Issue No.1) at Building 113 and UST 271-D2U1 (Issue No.2) at Building 271. Also provided is the required Application for Underground Storage Tank Modification for USTs 113-D1U2 and 271-D2U1 and the specification sheet for the Phil-Tite spill bucket that is proposed to be installed in the 271-D2U1 sump.

  8. Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Picosecond to Nanosecond Measurements at High Repetition Rate Since FY2012, SSRL is now scheduling three to four three-day periods each year dedicated to running SPEAR3 in hybrid low-alpha operation. In this mode the SPEAR3 ring has 1-4 camshaft pulses with very low current, and pulse duration of 5-20 picoseconds, for timing measurements. The rest of the buckets are filled to provide 100-200 mA current for other users not involved in timing experiments. The

  9. nprdisplay.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Alaska U.S. Navy By 1910, the U.S. Navy was rapidly converting from coal to oil-burning ships. Concern arose for an assured supply of oil in the event of war or a national emergency. The U.S.S. , , and off the coast of California during the 1920s. The was one of the first oil- burning ships. Colorado Maryland West Virginia West Virginia Sailor tightens oil refueling coupling on board the , circa 1919. U.S.S. New Mexico Clamshell buckets transfer coal from collier to fighting ships. The Pickett

  10. Aggregated Purchasing and Workplace Charging Can Drive EV Market Growth |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Aggregated Purchasing and Workplace Charging Can Drive EV Market Growth Aggregated Purchasing and Workplace Charging Can Drive EV Market Growth November 24, 2014 - 11:06am Addthis Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz with the utility industry's first plug-in electric hybrid drivetrain Class 5 bucket truck at the White House event on November 18, 2014. The truck, which is owned by Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), features up to 40 miles of all-electric range and

  11. Longitudinal emittance measurements in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC gold run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeno, K.

    2014-08-18

    This note describes longitudinal emittance measurements that were made in the Booster and AGS during the 2014 RHIC Gold run. It also contains an overview of the longitudinal aspects of their setup during this run. Each bunch intended for RHIC is composed of beam from 4 Booster cycles, and there are two of them per AGS cycle. For each of the 8 Booster cycles required to produce the 2 bunches in the AGS, a beam pulse from EVIS is injected into the Booster and captured in four h=4 buckets. Then those bunches are accelerated to a porch where they are merged into 2 bunches and then into 1 bunch.

  12. Longitudinal Bunch Pattern Measurements through Single Photon Counting at SPEAR3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongyi; /UC, San Diego

    2012-09-07

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a division of SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, is a synchrotron light source that provides x-rays for experimental use. As electrons are bent in the storage ring, they emit electromagnetic radiation. There are 372 different buckets which electrons can be loaded into. Different filling patterns produce different types of x-rays. What is the bunch pattern at a given time? Which filling pattern is better? Are there any flaws to the current injection system? These questions can be answered with this single photon counting experiment.

  13. Free electron laser designs for laser amplification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prosnitz, Donald; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method for laser beam amplification by means of free electron laser techniques. With wiggler magnetic field strength B.sub.w and wavelength .lambda..sub.w =2.pi./k.sub.w regarded as variable parameters, the method(s) impose conditions such as substantial constancy of B.sub.w /k.sub.w or k.sub.w or B.sub.w and k.sub.w (alternating), coupled with a choice of either constant resonant phase angle or programmed phase space "bucket" area.

  14. The R and D progress of 4 MW EAST-NBI high current ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yahong Hu, Chundong; Liu, Sheng; Xu, Yongjian; Liang, Lizhen; Xie, Yuanlai; Sheng, Peng; Jiang, Caichao; Liu, Zhimin

    2014-02-15

    A high current ion source, which consists of the multi-cusp bucket plasma generator and tetrode accelerator with multi-slot apertures, is developed and tested for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak neutral beam injector. Three ion sources are tested on the test bed with arc power of 80 kW, beam voltage of 80 keV, and beam power of 4 MW. The arc regulation technology with Langmuir probes is employed for the long pulse operation of ion source, and the long pulse beam of 50 keV @ 15.5 A @ 100 s and 80 keV @ 52A @ 1s are extracted, respectively.

  15. Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Salamah, Samir A.; DeStefano, Thomas Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

  16. Cooling system for a gas turbine using a cylindrical insert having V-shaped notch weirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Germain, Malcolm R.

    1981-01-01

    An improved cooling system for a gas turbine is disclosed. A plurality of V-shaped notch weirs are utilized to meter a coolant liquid from a pool of coolant into a plurality of platform and airfoil coolant channels formed in the buckets of the turbine. The V-shaped notch weirs are formed in a separately machined cylindrical insert and serve to desensitize the flow of coolant into the individual platform and airfoil coolant channels to design tolerances and non-uniform flow distribution.

  17. Analysis of acid precipitation samples collected by state agencies sampling period: January-December 1992. Annual project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, L.S.

    1995-03-01

    The report presents analytical data from the 30 acid precipitation collection sites in the State-Operated Network. Samples are collected weekly in plastic bag bucket liners and shipped in 500 mL polyethylene bottles to Global Geochemistry Corporation, the central laboratory for the network. The report contains maps showing the location of each site, plots of analytical data, tables of all field and analytical data, plots comparing field and laboratory pH and conductivity, and information on data quality. Samples are analyzed for pH, strong acid, conductivity, fluoride, chloride, nitrite, phosphate, bromide, nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

  18. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koguchi, H. Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y.

    2014-02-15

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration.

  19. Booster double harmonic setup notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J.

    2015-02-17

    The motivation behind implementing a booster double harmonic include the reduced transverse space charge force from a reduced peak beam current and reduced momentum spread of the beam, both of which can be achieved from flattening the RF bucket. RF capture and acceleration of polarized protons (PP) is first set up in the single harmonic mode with RF harmonic h=1. Once capture and acceleration have been set up in the single harmonic mode, the second harmonic system is brought on and programmed to operate in concert with the single harmonic system.

  20. Potential-well distortion in barrier Rf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King Ng

    2004-04-29

    Head-tail asymmetry has been observed in the longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler Ring where protons or antiprotons are stored in rf barrier buckets. The asymmetry is caused by the distortion of the rf potential well in the presence of resistive impedance. Gaussian energy distribution can fit the observed asymmetric beam profile but not without discrepancy. It can also fit the measured energy distribution. On the other hand, generalized elliptic distribution gives a better fit to the beam profile. However, it fails to reproduce the observed energy distribution.

  1. Trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grondahl, Clayton M.; Germain, Malcolm R.

    1980-01-01

    An improved trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines is disclosed. The trap seal of the present invention includes an annular recess formed in the supply conduit of cooling channels formed in the airfoil of the turbine buckets. A cylindrical insert is located in the annular recesses and has a plurality of axial grooves formed along the outer periphery thereof and a central recess formed in one end thereof. The axial grooves and central recess formed in the cylindrical insert cooperate with the annular recess to define a plurality of S-shaped trap seals which permit the passage of liquid coolant but prohibit passage of gaseous coolant.

  2. T-550: Apache Denial of Service Vulnerability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Apache 'APR-util' is prone to a vulnerability that may allow attackers to cause a denial-of-service condition. Memory leak in the apr_brigade_split_line function in buckets/apr_brigade.c in the Apache Portable Runtime Utility library (aka APR-util) before 1.3.10, as used in the mod_reqtimeout module in the Apache HTTP Server and other software, may allow remote users to cause a Denial of Service (DoS - memory consumption).

  3. DOE-Idaho Operations Summary For Aug. 18 to Aug. 31, 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No incidents to report. Operational Summary Waste shipments: through Aug. 8, 2009, a total of 28,991 cubic meters of stored transuranic waste, 85.35 cubic meters of remote-handled transuranic waste and 1,221 cubic meters of previously buried transuranic waste have been shipped from Idaho to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico for disposal. Idaho Cleanup Project Aug. 13: A front end loader moving soil inside the Advanced Retrieval Project-III facility hit the bucket of an excavator that

  4. BETO-Funded Projects Win at the 2015 R&D 100 Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Projects Win at the 2015 R&D 100 Awards BETO-Funded Projects Win at the 2015 R&D 100 Awards November 19, 2015 - 4:41pm Addthis NREL researcher Dr. Jianping Yu holds a sample of cyanobacteria. Photo courtesy Dennis Schroeder/NREL. NREL researcher Dr. Jianping Yu holds a sample of cyanobacteria. Photo courtesy Dennis Schroeder/NREL. PNNL lab manager Todd Hart pours wet biomass into a bucket as he begins an experiment to convert the substance into biocrude oil. Photo Courtesy of PNNL. PNNL

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automated Rain Rate Estimates Using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Submitter: Chandra, A. S., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra A, C Zhang, P Kollias, S Matrosov, and W Szyrmer. 2015. "Automated rain rate estimates using the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR)." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 8(1-15), doi:10.5194/amt-8-1-2015. ACCEPTED. Scatter plots of rain rates (R) observed from a video

  6. PM Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj Assessment-SC, Jack Surash,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dep Asst Secretary for APM-EM, Bob Raines, Assoc. Administrator for APM-NNSA | Department of Energy Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj Assessment-SC, Jack Surash, Dep Asst Secretary for APM-EM, Bob Raines, Assoc. Administrator for APM-NNSA PM Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj Assessment-SC, Jack Surash, Dep Asst Secretary for APM-EM, Bob Raines, Assoc. Administrator for APM-NNSA 2014 DOE Project Management Workshop PDF icon PM Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj

  7. Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy standard model-like Higgs boson and a light stop from Yukawa-deflected gauge mediation Authors: Kang, Zhaofeng ; Li, Tianjun ; Liu, Tao ; Tong, Chunli ; Yang, Jin Min Publication Date: 2012-11-16 OSTI Identifier: 1101779 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical

  8. Multiscale Monte Carlo equilibration: Pure Yang-Mills theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endres, Michael G.; Brower, Richard C.; Orginos, Kostas; Detmold, William; Pochinsky, Andrew V.

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we present a multiscale thermalization algorithm for lattice gauge theory, which enables efficient parallel generation of uncorrelated gauge field configurations. The algorithm combines standard Monte Carlo techniques with ideas drawn from real space renormalization group and multigrid methods. We demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for pure Yang-Mills gauge theory for both heat bath and hybrid Monte Carlo evolution, and show that it ameliorates the problem of topological freezing up to controllable lattice spacing artifacts.

  9. Multiscale MonteCarlo equilibration: Pure Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endres, Michael G.; Brower, Richard C.; Orginos, Kostas; Detmold, William; Pochinsky, Andrew V.

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we present a multiscale thermalization algorithm for lattice gauge theory, which enables efficient parallel generation of uncorrelated gauge field configurations. The algorithm combines standard Monte Carlo techniques with ideas drawn from real space renormalization group and multigrid methods. We demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for pure Yang-Mills gauge theory for both heat bath and hybrid Monte Carlo evolution, and show that it ameliorates the problem of topological freezing up to controllable lattice spacing artifacts.

  10. Supercomputers Exhibit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as the microprocessor and new concepts such as parallel processing and cluster computing. History of supercomputing at Los Alamos New missions and challenges-from gauging the...

  11. Notices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Carlson, L., et al., 2012, Resilience Theory and Applications, Argonne National ... industry to gauge the interest and usefulness of the proposed decision support tool. ...

  12. DOE SC ARM TR 179 Thermo Scientific Ozone Analyzer Instrument...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... data increment. Ozone - Mixing volume of O3 in ambient air (no water vapor correction). ... However, the supplied pressure regulator only supplies consistent gauge pressure, not ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... gauge and Yukawa coupling Unification. less Full Text Available December 2014 , Springer Berlin The Supersymmetric Fat Higgs Harnik, Roni Supersymmetric models have ...

  14. Leading-order calculation of electric conductivity in hot quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ACTION INTEGRAL; CALCULATION METHODS; ELECTRIC CONDUCTIVITY; FEYNMAN DIAGRAM; GAUGE INVARIANCE; INTEGRAL EQUATIONS; QUANTUM ...

  15. Extension of Chern-Simons forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konitopoulos, Spyros; Savvidy, George

    2014-06-15

    We investigate metric independent, gauge invariant, and closed forms in the generalized Yang-Mills (YM) theory. These forms are polynomial on the corresponding fields strength tensors curvature forms and are analogous to the Pontryagin-Chern densities in the YM gauge theory. The corresponding secondary characteristic classes have been expressed in integral form in analogy with the Chern-Simons form. Because they are not unique, the secondary forms can be dramatically simplified by the addition of properly chosen differentials of one-step-lower-order forms. Their gauge variation can also be found yielding the potential anomalies in the gauge field theory.

  16. Independent Peer Reviews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-16

    Independent Assessments: DOE's Systems Integrator convenes independent technical reviews to gauge progress toward meeting specific technical targets and to provide technical information necessary for key decisions.

  17. Microsoft Word - Ops summary 7_15.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reduction reformer (CRR) airlock inlet valve did not provide adequate isolation of all ... isolation of the incorrect isolation valve for a pressure gauge removalreplacement, ...

  18. Wind Energy Resources for Teachers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    educational materials called "Energy Quest" that includes Energy Story: Wind Energy, Science Project: Building a Wind Gauge, and Science Project: Make an Anemometer (a device to...

  19. Invariants of the electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escobar, C. A.; Urrutia, L. F.; Facultad de Fsica, Pontificia Universidad Catlica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22

    2014-03-15

    We present a constructive proof that, in electrodynamics, all of the gauge-invariant Lorentz scalars and pseudoscalars can be expressed as functions of the quadratic ones.

  20. Dilatometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brewer, Given A. (Marion, MA)

    1981-09-22

    A dilatometer mountable to the exterior surface of pressurized pipe to measure small pressure variations within the pipe. The dilatometer includes two rigid beams tied together by nonextensible tensile members on opposite sides of the pipe. One member includes a strain gauge mounted to a strain gauge plate. Dilation of the pipe distends the beams, stressing the gauge plate. The strain is physically magnified on the gauge plate due to its position at the end of the beams and in direct proportion to overall diametral variation of the pipe due to pressure fluctuations.

  1. Hot spot-derived shock initiation phenomena in heterogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In addition, the use of embedded electromagnetic gauges provides detailed information pertaining to the mechanism of the build-up to detonation and associated reactive flow. Of ...

  2. NREL data set shows clouds' effects on solar power - News Releases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data set shows clouds' effects on solar power Measurement stations in Hawaii gauge ... The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)has ...

  3. Emerging Technologies Applicable to the Safe and Secure Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LLC - Dan Hoglund, Lead * Olin Chemical Chlor-Alkali Division - Don Loftis 3 ... and cargo monitoring - Pressure gauges & chemical detection sensors - Fiber-opticphotonic ...

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Geosciences High Energy Physics Lattice Gauge ... OpenMP * AMD Core Math Library (ACML): BLAS, LAPACK, FFT, ... to trap the shmem portals usage, exit user code. * Second ...

  5. Crooker named Optical Society Fellow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Society (OSA). The Society selected 71 new Fellows based on their overall impact on optics, as gauged through specific scientific, engineering and technological contributions,...

  6. TEPP-Medical Messages | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Messages Medical Messages Index PDF icon Medical Messages More Documents & Publications TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms Transuranic Waste Tabletop Soil DensityMoisture Gauge...

  7. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cass Avenue HEP Argonne IL United States E mail zachos anl gov CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS GENERAL PHYSICS COMPACTIFICATION DUALITY FERMIONS GAUGE INVARIANCE HOLOGRAPHY MANY...

  8. Christopher T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IL 60439-4815 (United States), E-mail: zachos@anl.gov 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; COMPACTIFICATION; DUALITY; FERMIONS; GAUGE INVARIANCE; HOLOGRAPHY;...

  9. A Nanocrystal Sensor for Luminescence Detection of Cellular Forces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    States Language: English Subject: 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION tetrapod stress gauge, luminescent nanocrystals, cellular forces Word Cloud More...

  10. Comparison of the ENERGYGAUGE USA and BEopt Building Energy Simulation Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Danny S.; Cummings, Jamie E.

    2009-08-01

    This report compares two hourly energy simulation softwares, BEopt and Energy Gauge USA, to ensure accuracy and evaluate agreement on the impact of various energy efficiency improvements.

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stability of edge states in strained graphene Ghaemi, Pouyan ; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang ; ... Non-Abelian S U ( 2 ) gauge fields through density wave order and strain in graphene ...

  12. MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment, 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor maintains adequate control of tools, gauges, instruments, devices or systems used to inspect, test, calibrate, measure or...

  13. Chiral symmetry restoration at large chemical potential in strongly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SYMMETRY; CHIRALITY; CLUSTER EXPANSION; CORRELATIONS; GAUGE INVARIANCE; POTENTIALS; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; QUARKS; SPACE-TIME; STRONG-COUPLING MODEL; SU GROUPS Word Cloud More...

  14. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Filter Results Filter by Author Fradkin, Eduardo (11) Cho, Gil Young (3) Kumar, Krishna ... Discretized Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory on arbitrary graphs Sun, Kai ; Kumar, ...

  15. The National Opportunity for Interoperability and its Benefits...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... gauge their response, and creative ratemaking to provide ... 2009. A National Assessment of Demand Response Potential. ... an overall ecosystem of interoperable products and services. ...

  16. Signals of new W's and Z's

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haber, H.E.

    1984-09-01

    If new heavy charged and/or neutral gauge bosons exist with masses below 5 to 10 TeV, they can be observed at the SSC. In this report, we summarize the work of the New W/Z Physics Subgroup. The expected properties of new heavy gauge bosons (such as new W's and Z's or horizontal gauge bosons) are summarized. We then discuss various signatures of these new gauge bosons and their implications for detector designers. Suggestions for future work are indicated. 60 references.

  17. Universal entanglement entropy in two-dimensional conformal quantum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; CONFORMAL INVARIANCE; DIMERS; ENTROPY; GAUGE INVARIANCE; ...

  18. Holographic Systematics of D-brane Inflation (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    branch of the dual gauge theory, in the presence of ... by the most relevant operators that do not destroy the ... Research Org: Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) ...

  19. Dilatometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-02-08

    A dilatometer mountable to the exterior surface of pressurized pipe to measure small pressure variations within the pipe is described. The dilatometer includes two rigid beams tied together by nonextensible tensile members on opposite sides of the pipe. One member includes a strain gauge mounted to a strain gauge plate. Dilation of the pipe distends the beams, stressing the gauge plate. The strain is physically magnified on the gauge plate due to its position at the end of the beams and in direct proportion to overall diametral variation of the pipe due to pressure fluctuations.

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Public Meeting Presentation 5-2-2012.ppt

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... results Historic flooding of the Little Wind River in 2010 caused a spike in ... Gauge Heigh (ft) Uranium in Well 0707 Little Wind River Gage Height National Weather ...

  1. 2011 Annual Report.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transportation shipment accident involving six packages containing radiation therapy sources and a soil moisture density gauge. The scenario required responders to...

  2. BPA Science Lab - How to Build a Motor - June 2014.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Build a Motor Ages 6 and up Supplies you will need: Large rubber band Magnet 2 jumbo-sized paper clips Small gauge magnet wire (enameled wire) Marker ...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    calls for a chance of scattered showers, does that mean it will be raining at the park when youre planning to have a picnic? While it may be interesting to know what the...

  4. The Road Through Paris: Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Tim...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in 2013, just after the catastrophic Black Forest fire and just at the start of the torrential rains that overtopped more than a dozen dams and damaged tens of thousands of homes. ...

  5. A Prehistoric Lahar-Dammed Lake And Eruption Of Mount Pinatubo...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flows; a post-eruption aftermath of rain-triggered lahars in surrounding drainages and dome-building that fills the caldera; and then another long quiescent period. During and...

  6. DOE Tour of Zero: Laurel Gardens #794 by Habitat for Humanity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Deep overhangs, gutters, and site grading help to carry water away from the slab-on-grade foundation. A rain barrel collects some rainwater for irrigation. 4 of 10 ENERGY ...

  7. ARM - Daily Report Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... to the convective area (aerosols and chemistry) Egrett reported water at -37C, but icing at -47C? 23: aged cirrus mission (twin otter and egrett) system had stratiform rain at ...

  8. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Extract- .f?" 6 Strontium 90 Alpha , ,,. (Net) (PC1 > 1 0 i | j"l O ' * Oil * i * ... indicate that the discharge varies widely and is greatest shortly after heavy rains. ...

  9. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keeping vehicles cooler during summer and protecting them from rain, snow, and hail, the innovative PV system is the first in the VA used in conjunction with an ice thermal storage ...

  10. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clouds, rain, thunderstorms… at Solar Decathlon Village? Oh my, you may say. But less-than-ideal weather conditions are no match for this year's teams, thanks to smart grid technology that is helping them monitor their energy consumption.

  11. Woo-Sun Yang! NERSC User Services Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Starting DDT and MAP at NERSC --- 1 --- Allinea D DT a nd M AP T raining May 1 4, 2 015 Overview of today's training * Training o n A llinea's D DT ( parallel d ebugger) a nd MAP (...

  12. Microsoft Word - supplemental comment letter.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... are toxic to fish and can cause chronic stress, lower body weight, smaller size, and ... rain is also detrimental to riparian ecosystems that are vital for the health of the ...

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Words ACROSS 2 When it's outside, it's important to wear a coat and hat 3 Light reflects off of raindrops and puddles, and makes a colorful after it rains 4 When the...

  14. ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to help them understand why the rain in the Great Plains falls mainly in the dark. Their marathon of wakefulness is called PECAN, the Plains Elevated Convection at Night field...

  15. Microsoft Word - li_z.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Cloud Liquid Water Path and Its Potential for Rain Detection Z. Li, R. Chen, and F-L Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland College Park,...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - arm_stm09-poster_matrosov.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    totally attenuated in the liquid layer (liquid cloud + rain). Retrieval results for the case study 10 -1 10 0 10 1 10 2 10 3 10 4 mean rainfall rate, R m (mm h -1 ) IWP (g m -2 )...

  17. Microsoft Word - 7.26_PBacklund - Master _FINAL_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ball screw system lists operating conditions between 0-40 C and 5%-95% relative humidity. These conditions would be exceeded on a hot day or if it rains. Using hydraulic rams...

  18. PM Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj Assessment-SC,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Update - Steve Meador, Acting Dir for Proj Assessment-SC, Jack Surash, Dep Asst Secretary for APM-EM, Bob Raines, Assoc. Administrator for APM-NNSA PM Update - Steve Meador, Acting...

  19. A New Approach for Representing Ice Particles in Weather

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mass mixing ratio, qi, c) cloud water mass mixing ratio, qc, d) rain mass mixing ratio, qr, e) rime mass fraction, Fr, f) mass-weighted mean ice particle density, p, g)...

  20. DOE Tour of Zero: The System Home by Evolutionary Home Builders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    water runoff on the narrow site. Other techniques include underground retention wells, rain barrels, and a water-saving landscaping design. 3 of 15 Even without a solar electric...