National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bu tt ah

  1. Ah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  2. TtP-3 Tt-4 Tt-2 Tt-3 Tt-1 Tt-5 Tt-6 TtP-5 TtP-1 TtP-2 Tt-7 TtP-9

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TtP-3 Tt-4 Tt-2 Tt-3 Tt-1 Tt-5 Tt-6 TtP-5 TtP-1 TtP-2 Tt-7 TtP-9 TtP-6 TtP-7 TtP-8 TtP-4 OLF-CM20 OLF-CM17 OLF-CM15 OLF-CM15 OLF-CM14 OLF-CM13 OLF-CM12 OLF-CM11 OLF-CM10 OLF-CM9 OLF-CM8 OLF-CM7 OLF-CM6 OLF-CM5 OLF-CM4 OLF-CM1 NORTH March 2014 Figure 1 Plan View of OLF Site Project No. 181750 DITCH/CHANNEL/CREEK L E G E N D : SLUMP OR SUBSIDENCE LINE AND DIRECTION ROAD TEST PIT LOCATION TEST BORING AND INCLINOMETER LOCATION SETTLEMENT MONUMENT (EXISTING) APPROXIMATE LIMITS OF GEOTECHNICAL

  3. NREL: Biomass Research - Lintao Bu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lintao Bu Photo of Lintao Bu Lintao Bu is a staff scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Bioenergy Center. Education Ph.D., Computational Chemistry, Boston University, 1999-2004 M.S., Physical Chemistry, Peking University, 1996-1999 B.S., Chemistry, Peking University, 1991-1996 Professional Experience Research Scientist, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, National Bioenergy Center, Golden, CO, 2008-present Postdoctoral Researcher, National Renewable Energy

  4. Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hai Ah Nam Hai Ah Nam-The power of yes Hai Ah Nam is passionate about saying yes to opportunities, collaborations and new adventures, regardless of which profession one is in. July 28, 2015 Hai Ah Nam Hai Ah Nam. "You never know what great things might be possible." The power of yes In 1999, the Computer, Computational and Statistical Sciences Division's Hai Ah Nam left graduate school for a summer hiatus to take care of her ailing father and save a marriage that was cracking under the

  5. Evidence for tt?? Production and Measurement of (? tt?)?/(?tt?)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, tt??. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (?), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The tt?? sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selection optimized for the tt?? candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt? (?tt?), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 tt?? candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 3.4 events. We measure the tt?? cross section (?tt?) to be 0.18 0.08 pb, and the ratio of ?tt?? to ?tt? to be 0.024 0.009. Assuming no tt?? production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.

  6. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  7. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  8. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  9. Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hai Ah Nam July 28, 2015 The power of yes In 1999, the Computer, Computational and Statistical Sciences Division's Hai Ah Nam left graduate school for a summer hiatus to take care of her ailing father and save a marriage that was cracking under the grad school pressure. The summer hiatus ended up lasting five years. "I had a master's degree in physics at that point," Nam says, "but it wasn't getting me anywhere in southern California. I went to work in the internet industry for a

  10. Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PolicyStatementonTT.pdf PolicyStatementonTT.pdf PolicyStatementonTT.pdf More Documents & Publications PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf Chapter 17 - Special...

  11. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Order authorizing Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf More...

  12. Evidence for tt̄γ Production and Measurement of (σ tt̄)γ/(σtt̄)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, tt̄γ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The tt̄γ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the tt̄γ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt̄ (σtt̄), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 tt̄γ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the tt̄γ cross section (σtt̄) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σtt̄γ to σtt̄ to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tt̄γ production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  13. TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 » TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 PDF icon TT_Coordinator_Ltr_dated_May_13_2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities ADR Revised Policy

  14. TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 PDF icon TT_Coordinator_Ltr_dated_May_13_2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Microsoft Word - ADR Revised Policy82508Reformatted.doc

  15. Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf PDF icon Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Chapter 17 - Special Contracting Methods GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM

  16. Haskel/BuTech/PPI | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Haskel/BuTech/PPI Haskel/BuTech/PPI This presentation was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013. PDF icon csd_workshop_5_walti.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1018/2-93 Improving Compressed Air System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry BNL Compressed Natural Gas Release Investigation

  17. Women @ Energy: Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "I caught the bug to want to know more than what was presented in textbooks. I wanted to be part of the quest to unravel the mysteries of the universe, which meant following the arduous path of physics. It was…and still is such a challenge working in STEM, but, it’s never boring. I get to question our basic understanding of the world where the answers are not in the back of the book." Read more from Hai Ah on her profile here.

  18. The double contact nature of TT Herculis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, Dirk; Nelson, Robert H. E-mail: bob.nelson@shaw.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present new radial velocities and photometry of the short-period Algol TT Herculis. Previous attempts to model the light curves of the system have met with limited success, primarily because of the lack of a reliable mass ratio. Our spectroscopic observations are the first to result in radial velocities for the secondary star, and thus provide a spectroscopic mass ratio. Simultaneous analysis of the radial velocities and new photometry shows that the system is a double contact binary, with a rapidly rotating primary that fills its limiting lobe.

  19. UI,!JTYT) CTaTT:$ A'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .w. q7 -3 UI,!JTYT) CTaTT:$ A' =O:iI c E' XI:' ;' r' CO1 1-1 S?IO" New Ynrl: Operations Office 70 Columbus iivenue xew Yor'k '?5, 3. Y. I;JFOi< ~,4?' 101? F(:i{ Ti!T; DRESS P)R j:g&isZ No. 17, fi?HIL 2, i-31r:j T:?l3i",TlAY r. I.:. Tel. No. Plaza r[-3600, Ext. 2rjj Aridi l!.L, lg.l3 The United States Atomic Energy Commission has oomploted arrangements with the Federal 'urorlrs Agency for tne use of ths Magnesium Keduction Plant (Pluncor 649) at Luckey, Ohio, for the production

  20. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Inc. | Department of Energy 4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-404 Chubu TT Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management

  1. Distinguishing technicolor models via tt production at polarized photon

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    colliders (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Distinguishing technicolor models via tt production at polarized photon colliders Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Distinguishing technicolor models via tt production at polarized photon colliders We study top quark pair productions at a polarized photon collider from an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider (LC) in various improved technicolor models, namely, the one-family walking technicolor model, the top-color-assisted technicolor

  2. HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. m 1956 w I. H.# 7g2 Semplb Nos l2 Date Collected- 512 by RlX -----Route to EA LocetionKN(U[YTr-r-ETyp of Sample ~hd%---Analyzed for F Alphaxx Rema&mre t&n from the furnace and from U= Beta JOC slap ladles. No, Ro Oil PH Be Th Nc0 NO 8506 BcA-j &A- ii \JC cL"w-- Anolyticol Chemistry Secrion: Date Received--!b4-56 by Lab* Date Reported 6-X-66 bu I&b , Method of Analyair

  3. Evidence for spin correlation in tt̄ production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and t̄ spins to the total number of tt̄ events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 tt̄ candidate events with a single lepton ℓ (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed pp̄ collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy \\(\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\) TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement withmore » the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in tt̄ events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.« less

  4. Measurement of the ttW and ttZ production cross sections in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; lvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the ttW and ttZ processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0? (4.2?) over the background-only hypothesis for ttW (ttZ) production. The measured cross sections are ?ttW = 369+10091 fband ?ttZ =176+5852 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither ttW nor ttZ production is excluded at 7.1?. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the ttW and ttZ processes.

  5. Comment on measuring the tt forward-backward asymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; Ligeti, Zoltan; Freytsis, Marat

    2011-10-01

    We suggest a new possibility for ATLAS and CMS to explore the tt forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron, by attempting to reconstruct tt events, with one of the tops decaying semileptonically in the central region (|{eta}|<2.5) and the other decaying hadronically in the forward region (|{eta}|>2.5). For several models which give comparable Tevatron signals, we study the charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of cuts on |{eta}| and on the tt invariant mass, m{sub tt}. We show that there is an interesting complementarity between cuts on |{eta}| and m{sub tt} to suppress the dominant and symmetric gg{yields}tt rate, and different combinations of cuts enhance the distinguishing power between models. This complementarity is likely to hold in other new physics scenarios as well, which affect the tt cross section, so it motivates extending tt reconstruction to higher |{eta}|.

  6. The TT, TB, EB and BB correlations in anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingang [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Emami, Razieh [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wang, Yi, E-mail: Xingang.Chen@utdallas.edu, E-mail: emami@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    The ongoing and future experiments will measure the B-mode from different sky coverage and frequency bands, with the potential to reveal non-trivial features in polarization map. In this work we study the TT, TB, EB and BB correlations associated with the B-mode polarization of CMB map in models of charged anisotropic inflation. The model contains a chaotic-type large field complex inflaton which is charged under the U(1) gauge field. We calculate the statistical anisotropies generated in the power spectra of the curvature perturbation, the tensor perturbation and their cross-correlation. It is shown that the asymmetry in tensor power spectrum is a very sensitive probe of the gauge coupling. While the level of statistical anisotropy in temperature power spectrum can be small and satisfy the observational bounds, the interactions from the gauge coupling can induce large directional dependence in tensor modes. This will leave interesting anisotropic fingerprints in various correlations involving the B-mode polarization such as the TB cross-correlation which may be detected in upcoming Planck polarization data. In addition, the TT correlation receives an anisotropic contribution from the tensor sector which naturally decays after l?>100. We expect that the mechanism of using tensor sector to induce asymmetry at low l to be generic which can also be applied to address other low l CMB anomalies.

  7. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt? lepton+jets and tt? dilepton channels using ?s = 7 TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt? lepton+jets and tt? dilepton (lepton = e,?) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a protonproton centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb1. The tt? lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt? dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the m?b observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 0.54(stat) 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt? lepton+jets and tt? dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 0.48(stat) 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  8. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  9. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  10. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination.

  11. BuD, a helixloophelix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; Lpez-Mndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of BurrH and the BurrHDNA complex are reported. DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific proteinDNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing toolkits for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helixloophelix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin ? (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  12. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Technical Report: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Authors: Chou, Weiren ; Mourou, Gerard ; Solyak, Nikolay ; Tajima, Toshiki ; Velasco, Mayda Publication Date: 2013-05-22 OSTI Identifier: 1128013 Report Number(s): FERMILAB-TM-2558-APC arXiv eprint number arXiv:1305.5202 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Technical Report Resource Relation: Conference: Community Summer Study

  13. Microsoft Word - CR-AH Policy.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After-Hours Policy Original: 11/04 Revised: 2//05 CAMD strives to maintain and improve laboratory and User safety along with User efficiency. After- Hours work inside the cleanroom (CR-AH) is an access privilege that requires deliberate selection of requested Users to maintain a safe, productive environment. * Workdays = 7am - 10pm weekdays * After-Hours = 10pm - 7am workdays + all hours on weekends + all hours of LSU Staff holidays. After-Hours Access Request * Cleanroom-trained Users can apply

  14. B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe > Archived News Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Archived News Stories Latest News The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer › Cornell boasts 22 'highly cited' researchers › Postdoc brings open access issue to the table › In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe April 10th, 2014 › There was a science café at the Lost Dog Cafe in Binghamton last night. A group of Binghamton University students and professors talked about

  15. Measurement of the fraction of tt production via gluon-gluon fusion in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.

    2009-02-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the tt production cross section via gluon-gluon fusion to the total tt production cross section in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. Using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 955 pb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector at Fermilab, we select events based on the tt decay to lepton+jets. Using an artificial neural network technique we discriminate between tt events produced via qq annihilation and gg fusion, and find G{sub f}={sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)<0.33 at the 68% confidence level. This result is combined with a previous measurement to obtain the most stringent measurement of this quantity by CDF to date, G{sub f}=0.07{sub -0.07}{sup +0.15}.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  17. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore »gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  18. Search for resonant tt production in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-10

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 8 TeV. Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb1. The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the tt ? WbWb decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. Furthermore, no significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed.

  19. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Date: 09/05/2013 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) Originators: Pete Devlin, Jim Alkire, Sara Dillich, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Rick Farmer and Sunita Satyapal Date: 09/09/13 Item: Table 1: Number of fuel cells deployments (current and planned) for applications in backup power. The funding of 903 Department of Energy (DOE) fuel cell backup power systems has led to over 3,500 industry installations and on-order backup power units with no DOE funding.

  20. Au133(SPh-tBu)52 Nanomolecules: X-ray Crystallography, Optical, Electrochemical, and Theoretical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dass, Amala; Theivendran, Shevanuja; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Kumara, Chanaka; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Zuo, Xiaobing; Noll, Bruce C.

    2015-04-15

    Crystal structure determination has revolutionized modern science in biology, chemistry, and physics. However, the difficulty in obtaining periodic crystal lattices which are needed for X-ray crystal analysis has hindered the determination of atomic structure in nanomaterials, known as the nanostructure problem. Here, by using rigid and bulky ligands, we have overcome this limitation and successfully solved the X-ray crystallographic structure of the largest reported thiolated gold nanomolecule, Au133S52. The total composition, Au133(SPh-tBu)52, was verified using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The experimental and simulated optical spectra show an emergent surface plasmon resonance that is more pronounced than in the slightly larger Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60. Theoretical analysis indicates that the presence of rigid and bulky ligands is the key to the successful crystal formation.

  1. QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 2 QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ ECTIO NS ENERGY INFORMA TION ADMINIST RATION May 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone,

  2. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  3. Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation and condensation during the associated process of transport have to be considered. This paper discusses limiting amounts of water inside the cask which could lead to unacceptable pressure and takes into account saturated steam as well as overheated steam. However, the difficulties of assessing casks containing wet content will be discussed. From the authority assessment point of view, drying of the content could be an effective way to avoid the above described pressure build-up and the associated difficulties for the safety assessment. (authors)

  4. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  5. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the tt dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-08-06

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb1. A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of tt dilepton signal and background. We measure a value for the top-quark mass of 171.51.9 (stat)2.5 (syst) GeV/c2.

  6. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN I -. . Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H.# 984 Sample Nos. l2 Date Collected- o/2g by&- Route to J" Location SSi4.X CUiTn! CXJitP. Type of Sample&-dust Analyzed for F Alpha x Remarks P~UXC~JGIi.' ON. 14lCI11~ U Beta - IIoll0Wi.n~ slucs - NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. 7573p Hour Sample Description 1355 CZ Orxxator sets slul: into place, closes shield over machine S starts &ill. oil coolant flows through hollow drill ____

  7. A search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp? collision data at ?s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt? candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt? production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt? pairs. A benchmark model of leptophobic Z' ? tt? is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  8. A search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp̄ collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt̄ candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt̄ production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt̄ pairs. A benchmark modelmore » of leptophobic Z' → tt̄ is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  9. Search for resonant production of tt? decaying to jets in pp? collisions at ?{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-11

    This Letter reports a search for non-standard model topquark resonances, Z', decaying to ttMs; ?W+bW-b? , where both W decay to quarks. We examine the top-antitop quark invariant mass spectrum for the presence of narrow resonant states. The search uses a data sample of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. No evidence for top-antitop quark resonant production is found. We place upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for a specific topcolor assisted technicolor model with width of ?Z' = 0.012 MZ'. Within this model, we exclude Z' boson with masses below 805 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  10. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  11. Measurement of the tt production cross-section using e? events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at ?s = 7 and 8TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt) production cross-section ?tt has been measured in protonproton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV ?s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt events with an opposite-charge e? pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine ?tt and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  12. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  13. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  14. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  15. Search for b?u transitions in B?[K????]DK decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schrder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Vavra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.

    2011-07-06

    We present a study of the decays B?DK with D mesons reconstructed in the K????? or K????? final states, where D indicates a D? or a D0 meson. Using a sample of 47410? BB pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R?((?(B?[K????]DK))/((?(B?[K????]DK)). We obtain R?=(5?12?10(stat)?2?4(syst))10? and R?=(12?12?10(stat)?3?5(syst))10?, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R?<2310? and R?<2910?. Using these measurements, we obtain an upper limit for the ratio rB of the magnitudes of the b?u and b?c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

  16. Search for resonant production of tt̄ decaying to jets in pp̄ collisions at √{s}=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-11

    This Letter reports a search for non-standard model topquark resonances, Z', decaying to ttMs; →W+bW-b̄ , where both W decay to quarks. We examine the top-antitop quark invariant mass spectrum for the presence of narrow resonant states. The search uses a data sample of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. No evidence for top-antitop quark resonant production is found. We place upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for a specific topcolor assisted technicolormore » model with width of λZ' = 0.012 MZ'. Within this model, we exclude Z' boson with masses below 805 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level.« less

  17. Observation of Spin Correlation in tt¯ Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-05-24

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is reported using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb⁻¹. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse energy and at least two jets. The difference in azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame is used to extract the correlation between the top and antitop quark spins. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.40+0.09-0.08, in agreement with the next-to-leading-order standard model prediction. The hypothesis of zero spin correlation ismore » excluded at 5.1 standard deviations.« less

  18. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-07-23

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb⁻¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy √s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ →WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to themore » Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with Γ/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.« less

  19. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  20. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; kesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; sman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimares da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 1.5(stat.) 1.4(syst.)+1.00.5(theory) GeV.

  1. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  2. Neutron scattering studies of the H2a-H2b and (H3-H4)/sub 2/ histone complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have shown that both the (H3-H4)/sub 2/ and H2a-H2b histone complexes are quite asymmetric in solution. The (H3-H4)/sub 2/ tetramer is an oblate or flattened structure, with a radius of gyration almost as large as that of the core octamer. If the tetramer is primarily globular, it must have an axial ratio of about 1:5. It is more likely, however, that this asymmetry results in part from N-terminal arms that extend outward approximately within the major plane of the particle. If this is the case, less asymmetric models for the globular part of the tetramer, including a dislocated disk, can be made consistent with the scattering data. The H2a-H2b dimer, on the other hand, is an elongated structure. 48 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  3. Measurement of the tt? production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt? production cross section of 7.99 0.55(stat) 0.76(syst) 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.

  4. A Linear trans -Bis(imido) Neptunium(V) Actinyl Analog: NpV (NDipp)2 ( tBu2 bipy)2Cl (Dipp = 2,6- i Pr2C6H3)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boncella, James M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Tomson, Neil C.

    2015-07-22

    We present the discovery that imido analogs of actinyl dioxo cations can be extended beyond uranium into the transuranic elements. Synthesis of the Np(V) complex, Np(NDipp)2(tBu2bipy)2Cl (1), is achieved through treatment of a Np(IV) precursor with a bipyridine co-ligand and lithium-amide reagent. Complex 1 has been structurally characterized, analyzed by 1H NMR and UV/vis/NIR spectroscopies, and the electronic structure evaluated by DFT calculations.

  5. Measurements of fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b -jets are reported, using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, collected with the ATLAS detector. The cross-section times branching ratio for tt¯ events with at least one additional b-jet is measured to be 950 ± 70 (stat.) +240-190 (syst.) fb in the lepton-plus-jets channel and 50 ± 10 (stat.) +15-10 (syst.) fb in the eμ channel. The cross-section times branching ratio for events with at least two additional b -jets is measured to bemore » 19.3 ± 3.5 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) fb in the dilepton channel ( eμ , μμ , and ee ) using a method based on tight selection criteria, and 13.5 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.) fb using a looser selection that allows the background normalisation to be extracted from data. The latter method also measures a value of 1.30 ± 0.33 (stat.) ± 0.28 (syst.)% for the ratio of tt¯ production with two additional b-jets to tt¯ production with any two additional jets. As a result, all measurements are in good agreement with recent theory predictions.« less

  6. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by ?-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist ?-naphthoflavone (?NF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 ?M ?NF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: Energetic costs of AhR activation by ?NF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. Exposure to ?NF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  7. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore » cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  8. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore »cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  9. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity Area A: Urban and rural ahs analysis. Resource materials. Final report, August 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, H.; Holstein, J.; Ottesen, J.; Hoffman, P.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of technical, operational, and safety issues was accomplished primarily through a comprehensive literature search and a series of expert workshops. The literature search included identification and review of a broad range of previous AHS, IVHS, and related topic research and findings. This work supported a preliminary identification and/or confirmation and detailed description of major technical features, for example, (1) geometric design characteristics such as interchange design, lane width, and median configuration and (2) vehicle characteristics such as braking and acceleration capabilities. Accident type and severity data were also obtained and analyzed for various roadway categories and roadway improvements. Considering improved safety as a primary driver for the implementation of AHSs, current accident statistics were examined carefully to assess their potential utility as an indicator of likely AHS benefits. A summary of freeway design and operating characteristic information was developed not only to guide the ongoing work in this activity area, but to serve as a key point of reference for the team`s other seven activity areas throughout the remainder of the program.

  10. Measurement of the tt̄ production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt̄ productionmore » cross section of 7.99 ± 0.55(stat) ± 0.76(syst) ± 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.« less

  11. Energy and charge transfers between (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (N719) and ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni Manman; Cheng Qiang; Zhang, W. F.

    2010-03-15

    ZnO thin films and (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (called N719) sensitized ZnO thin films are grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrates using laser molecular beam epitaxy. Ultraviolet-visible absorption, photoluminescence (PL), surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and Raman scattering are employed to probe into the transition process of photogenerated charges and the interaction between ZnO and N719. The experimental results indicate that there is a significant electronic interaction between N719 and ZnO through chemiadsorption. The interaction greatly enhances the photogenerated charge separation and thus the photovoltaic response of the ZnO film but remarkedly weakens its radiative recombination, i.e., PL, implying strong energy and charge transfer occurring between N719 and ZnO. In addition, a new PL peak observed at about 720 nm in N719 sensitized ZnO/FTO is attributed to the electron-hole recombination of N719.

  12. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    Tmore » he tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 eV in the single-lepton channel. his data was collected with the ALAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. he results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.« less

  13. Search for New Phenomena in tt¯ Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-01-26

    A search for new phenomena in tt¯ events with large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The measurement is based on 1.04  fb⁻¹ of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Contributions to this final state may arise from a number of standard model extensions. The results are interpreted in terms of a model where new top-quark partners are pair produced and each decay to an on-shell top (or antitop) quark and a long-lived undetected neutral particle. The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations. A limitmore » at 95% confidence level is set excluding a cross section times branching ratio of 1.1 pb for a top-partner mass of 420 GeV and a neutral particle mass less than 10 GeV. In a model of exotic fourth generation quarks, top-partner masses are excluded up to 420 GeV and neutral particle masses up to 140 GeV.« less

  14. TT_Awards_cover_front_FINAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by ... in environments such as reactors and accelerators. ... the identi- fied APCI fast reactor campaign need for ...

  15. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  16. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN)_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  17. AH Bolte A S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Product: Suppliers of flanges to the wind turbine industry. Coordinates: 56.470699, 8.77293 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

  18. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov....

  19. Distinguishing technicolor models via tt production at polarized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It is shown that, considering only the statistical errors, a polarized photon collider from a 500 GeV LC with an integrated luminosity of 500 fbsup -1 is sufficient for ...

  20. Microsoft Word - TT Coordinator Letter dated May 13 2010.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2010 Address Dear (LabFacility Director): I am writing to ask you to support and promote the technology transfer partnership ombudsman that has been appointed in your ...

  1. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napora, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  2. Microsoft Word - CR-AH Request Form.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanroom After-Hours Request Form Personal Contact Information Date ___/___/___ Name ____________________ Email ___________________ Phone _________________ Project Number _________________ Group Code ___________________ Requested duration of After-Hours access: Begin Date: __________________ End Date: __________________ Justification for After-Hours clearance Include details of project requirements, processing routine, and/or other reasons why workday hours are insufficient. * Workday hours =

  3. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  4. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  5. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  6. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  7. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy ...

  8. Searches for new physics in the tt-bar events at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loginov, Andrey; /Yale U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors review the latest results on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model in the top quark sector at CDF Run II in a data sample with integrated luminosity up to 2.8 fb{sup -1}. Since its discovery, the top quark has appeared to be a very special object. It is distinguished by its large mass ({approx} 170 GeV) close to the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB), and a Yukawa coupling surprisingly close to one (0.98). Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the Standard Model (SM) predicts, or does it play a more fundamental role in the EWSB? How would physics beyond the standard model (SM) affect top quark properties? Searches for new physics (NP) should provide answers to the many open questions left by the SM. In these proceedings they present the latest CDF results on the searches for exotic decay modes of the top quark, as well as the production and decay of new particles into final states with a top quark pair. The analyses of the Run II data are performed with approximately 30 times the statistics of the Run I top quark discovery.

  9. Search for New Phenomena in tt Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golling, Tobias

    2014-06-12

    The ATLAS Run I data as provided by CERNs LHC has been systematically searched for the presence of supersymmetric partners of the top quark (stops) using the identification of charm-flavored jets and boosted top tagging. No signs of stop could be established yet.

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2nd Qtr 2010 Presentation _compressed tt mh.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Second Quarter 2010 Surveillance and Maintenance Report for the LM Rocky Flats Site 2 Surface Water Monitoring and Operations Second Quarter 2010 3 Pond Operations - Second Quarter 2010 Terminal Pond Discharges: * Pond A-4: May 1 through May 19, 2010, 32.4 MG * Pond B-5: April 23 through May 16, 2010, 20.8 MG Transfers: * A-3 to A-4: intermittently during the quarter; total of 24.2 MG Pond Levels: * As of June 1, 2010, Ponds A-3, A-4, B-5, and C-2 and the Landfill Pond were holding approximately

  11. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This record from the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program describes the number of current and planned fuel cell deployments for backup power applications.

  12. HUD lead-based-paint abatement demonstration (FHA). Volume 1. Appendices a-h

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The document is Volume 1 of the two-volume appendices accompanying 'The HUD Lead-Based Paint Abatement Demonstration' report. The document contains contract documents; management and work plan narrative in support of HUD 441.1-baseline plan; research design of the lead based paint abatement demonstration; field detection of lead; quality assurance plan of detection of lead; and different forms used in recording data.

  13. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Original Landfill October 2011 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on October 31. The Site received approximately 10 inches of snow on October 25 and 26, however the cover was dry at the time of the inspection except for

  14. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Original Landfill October 2012 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on October 30. The Rocky Flats Site received 1.44 inches of precipitation during the month of October. The cover was dry at the time of the inspection including the majority of the seep locations. The slump in the

  15. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OLF October Monthly Inspection - Attachment 1 Page 1 of 3 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on October 28, 2013. The repairs completed on the surface cracks in the Berm 1 and Berm 4 areas remain in good condition with no new cracking observed. A drain consisting of 4" drainage tile bedded in ¾" gravel was installed in the channel of Berm 4 on October 3 to help remove water from the channel until more permanent repairs can be completed in that location. A geotechnical

  16. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 The monthly inspection of the Original Landfill (OLF) at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site was completed on October 30, 2014. The repairs in the Berm 1 and Berm 4 areas remain in good condition. Although there is a noticeable depression in Berm 4 where the original slump-crack

  17. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Appendix C, Page 12 Appendix C, Page 13 Appendix C, Page 14 Appendix C, Page 15 Appendix C, Page 16 Appendix C, Page 17 Appendix C, Page 18 Appendix C, Page 19 Appendix C, Page 20 Appendix C, Page 21 Appendix C, Page 22 Appendix C, Page 23 Appendix C, Page 24

  18. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Appendix C, Page 12 Appendix C, Page 13 Appendix C, Page 14 Appendix C, Page 15 Appendix C, Page 16 Appendix C, Page 17 Appendix C, Page 18 Appendix C, Page 19 Appendix C, Page 20 Appendix C, Page 21 Appendix C, Page 22 Appendix C, Page 23 Appendix C, Page 24

  19. Search for Z' resonances decaying to tt¯; in dilepton+jets final states in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; et al

    2013-04-03

    A search for resonances decaying to top quark-antiquark pairs is performed using a dilepton+jets data sample recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 b⁻¹. No significant deviations from the standard model background are observed. Upper limits are presented for the production cross section times branching fraction of top quark-antiquark resonances for masses from 750 to 3000 GeV. In particular, the existence of a leptophobic topcolor particle Z' is excluded at the 95% confidence level for resonance masses MZ'Z'=0.012MZ', and MZ'=0.10MZ'.

  20. Measurement of the tt, WW and Z -> tautau Production Cross Sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carron Montero, Sebastian Fernando; /Duke U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis we present a new technique to analyze events containing two highly energetic leptons, as a probe of the Standard Model. The philosophy is to consider the data in a more global way, as opposed to the more traditional process dependent approach of extracting a given signal over the expected backgrounds by using various kinematical requirements. We use our global technique to simultaneously measure the cross sections of the main Standard Model processes; the t{bar t}, WW and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} production from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF detector at Fermilab. We select events by requiring they contain two highly energetic leptons (e{mu}, ee, or {mu}{mu}), and make no other kinematic requirements, except for the ee and {mu}{mu} channels. We then use a likelihood fit of the data in the two-dimensional phase space defined by the missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and the number of jets in the event (N{sub jet}), to the expected Standard Model distributions, to simultaneously extract the production cross-sections of the main process contributing to our dilepton sample.

  1. Search for Z' resonances decaying to tt¯; in dilepton+jets final states in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; et al

    2013-04-03

    A search for resonances decaying to top quark-antiquark pairs is performed using a dilepton+jets data sample recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 b⁻¹. No significant deviations from the standard model background are observed. Upper limits are presented for the production cross section times branching fraction of top quark-antiquark resonances for masses from 750 to 3000 GeV. In particular, the existence of a leptophobic topcolor particle Z' is excluded at the 95% confidence level for resonance masses MZ'<1.3 TeV for ΓZ'=0.012MZ', and M<1.9 TeV for ΓZ'=0.10MZ'.

  2. Assignment of the luminescing states of [Au{sup 1}Rh{sup 1}({sup t}BuNC){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striplin, D.R.; Crosby, G.A.

    1995-07-13

    Fluorescence, phosphorescence, and excitation spectra were measured on the title compound. These results were augmented with polarization ratios obtained at 77 K and detailed studies of the temperature dependence of the phosphorescence in the 77-4 K range. The phosphorescence decay rate at K was also recorded as a function of an applied magnetic field. All the results are consistent with a 4d{sub z}Rh{sup 1} {yields} 6p{sub 2}Au{sup 1} orbital promotion leading to emitting {sup 1}A, {sup 3}A{sub 1} terms in pseudo-C{sub 2v} symmetry. The {sup 3}A{sub 1} term is split by spin-orbit coupling into a forbidden A{sub 2} state lying lowest followed by a quasi-degenerate pair, [B{sub 1}(x), B{sub 2}(y)] lying approximately 16 cm{sup -1} higher that decays >500 times faster than the lowest one. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT Energy to export electric...

  4. Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Transition Team TT General Guidance GG Hazard Characterization HC Turnover ... (TT-4.4) General RequirementsGuidance GG-0 Have an inventory of available documents ...

  5. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  6. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    The tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the single-lepton channel. This data was collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. The results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.

  7. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. | Department of Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. Record of Categorical Exclusion. PDF icon EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf More Documents &

  8. Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "œno-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knyazikhin, Y

    2012-09-10

    Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

  9. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (BuP) DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) This record from the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program describes the ...

  10. Ab initio thermodynamic approach to identify mixed solid sorbents...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Such Tt may be outside the operating temperature range (To) for a practical capture technology. To adjust Tt to fit the practical To, in this study, three scenarios of mixing ...

  11. Measurement of the partial cross sections {sigma}{sub TT}, {sigma}{sub LT}, and ({sigma}{sub T} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub L}) of the {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n reaction in the {Delta}(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Calarco, J.; Holtrop, A.; Sparveris, N. F.; Nakagawa, I.; Bernstein, A. M.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Casagrande, F.; Dow, K.; Farkondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Kowalski, S.; Milner, R.; Sirca, S.; Stave, S.; Tsentalivich, G.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2011-08-15

    We report precision {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n measurements in the {Delta}(1232) resonance at Q{sup 2}=0.127(GeV/c){sup 2} obtained at the MIT-Bates out-of-plane scattering facility. These are the lowest, but nonzero, Q{sup 2} measurements in the {pi}{sup +} channel. The data offer tests of the theoretical calculations, particularly of the background amplitude contributions. The chiral effective field theory and Sato-Lee model calculations are not in agreement with this experiment.

  12. First measurement of the fraction of top-quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first measurement of {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt). We use 0.96 fb{sup -1} of {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV pp collision data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. Using charged particles with low transverse momentum in tt events, we find {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)=0.07{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.07(syst), corresponding to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.33, in agreement with the standard model next-to-leading-order prediction of 0.15{+-}0.05.

  13. Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Order (2015-SE-42001) Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) June 9, 2015 DOE ordered Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) to pay a $12,080 civil penalty after finding Bu Sung had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 64 units of noncompliant commercial refrigerator basic model ESGR3. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Bu Sung. PDF icon Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001) More

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Wang, Hongyu ; Liu, Feng ; Bu, Laju ; Gao, Jun ; Wang, Cheng ; Wei, Wei ; ...

  15. Alternative Energy Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alternative Energy Finance Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: NW11 8BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: String representation...

  16. Envirocapital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Envirocapital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Envirocapital Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC4M 8BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Provides corporate finance advice to the...

  17. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Bu ildi ng 1190...

  18. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics QCD-BU.jpg Key Challenges: Although the QCD theory has been extensively tested at at high energies, at low energies or...

  19. Graphdiyne as a high-capacity lithium ion battery anode material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Byungryul; Koo, Jahyun; Park, Minwoo; Kwon, Yongkyung; Lee, Hoonkyung; Lee, Hosik; Nam, Jaewook

    2013-12-23

    Using the first-principles calculations, we explored the feasibility of using graphdiyne, a 2D layer of sp and sp{sup 2} hybrid carbon networks, as lithium ion battery anodes. We found that the composite of the Li-intercalated multilayer ?-graphdiyne was C{sub 6}Li{sub 7.31} and that the calculated voltage was suitable for the anode. The practical specific/volumetric capacities can reach up to 2719?mAh?g{sup ?1}/2032?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, much greater than the values of ?372?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?818?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, ?1117?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?1589?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, and ?744?mAh?g{sup ?1} for graphite, graphynes, and ?-graphdiyne, respectively. Our calculations suggest that multilayer ?-graphdiyne can serve as a promising high-capacity lithium ion battery anode.

  20. Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-78 Attachment 1 Unsuccessful...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    name and address of the offeror receiving the award: ABC Company. 2222 Anywhere Street Sun City, TT 22222 4. Contract Value: 5. Contract award date:...

  1. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

  2. Microsoft Word - Argonne_WindPowerForecasting_Report_Final_Nov...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    R.A. Anthes and T.T. Warner, "Development of hydrodynamic models suitable for air pollution and other mesometeorological studies," Monthly Weather Review, vol. 106, pp....

  3. Microcab Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microcab Industries Ltd Place: Coventry, United Kingdom Zip: CV1 2TT Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Urban taxi and light freight vehicle powered by a hydrogen fuel cell....

  4. Potential partnerships and funding from a variety of sources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10915 Partnerships for Innovation: Accelerating Innovation Research-Technology Translation (PFI: AIR-TT) Letter of intent due: 9815 Quantum Information Science Closes: 12...

  5. A=18F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978PI1E, 1978SA15,...

  6. A=18O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1979WU06, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982OL01). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978CH26, 1978PI1E,...

  7. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quarkantiquark pairs (tt) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at ?s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and ?) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting ttW events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for ttZ events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the ttW cross section is measured as ?ttW=170+90-80(stat)70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the ttZ cross section, ?ttZ=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive ttV process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.less

  8. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quark–antiquark pairs (tt¯) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and μ) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting tt¯W events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for tt¯Z events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the tt¯W cross section is measured as σtt¯W=170+90-80(stat)±70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore » 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the tt¯Z cross section, σtt¯Z=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive tt¯V process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.« less

  9. Iron Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with Positioned Pendant Amines as Electrocatalysts for the Oxidation of H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Liao, Qian; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Hulley, Elliott; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-06-22

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)Cl, [3-Cl] (where C5F4N is the tetrafluorpyridyl substituent and PtBu2NBn2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-di(benzyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) are reported. Complex 3-Cl and previously reported [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)Cl], 4-Cl, are precursors to intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of H2, including CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)H (3-H), CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)H (4-H), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)]BArF4 ([3](BArF4), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)]BArF4 ([4](BArF4), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)(H2)]BArF4 ([3-H2]BArF4), and [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2H)H]BArF4 ([4-FeH(NH)]BArF4). All of these complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical studies; 3-Cl, 3-H and 4-Cl were also characterized by single crystal diffraction studies. 3-H and 4-H are electrocatalysts for H2 (1.0 atm) oxidation in the presence of a excess of the amine base N-methylpyrrolidine, with turnover frequencies at 22 °C of 2.5 s-1 and 0.5 s-1, and overpotentials at Ecat/2 of 235 mV and 95 mV, respectively. Studies of individual chemical and/or electrochemical reactions of the various intermediates provide important insights into the factors governing the overall catalytic activity for H2 oxidation, and provide important insights into the role of the pendant base of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. This work was supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Cobalt Complexes Containing Pendant Amines in the Second Coordination Sphere as Electrocatalysts for H2 Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Ming; Wiedner, Eric S.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2014-10-27

    A series of heteroleptic 17e- cobalt complexes, [CpCoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [CpC6F5CoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [CpC5F4NCoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [where P2tBuN2Ph = 1,5-diphenyl-3,7-di(tert-butyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane, CpC6F5 = C5H4(C6F5), and CpC5F4N = C5H4(C5F4N)] were synthesized, and structures of all three were determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical studies showed that the CoIII/II couple of [CpC5F4NCoII(PtBu2NPh2)]+ appears 250 mV positive of the CoIII/II couple of [CpCoII(PtBu2NPh2)] as a result of the strongly electron-withdrawing perfluorpyridyl substituent on the Cp ring. Reduction of these paramagnetic CoII complexes by KC8 led to the diamagnetic 18e- complexes CpICo(PtBu2NPh2), CpC6F5CoI(PtBu2NPh2), CpC5F4NCoI(PtBu2NPh2), which were also characterized by crystallography. Protonation of these neutral CoI complexes led to the cobalt hydrides [CpCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4), [CpC6F5CoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4), and [CpC5F4NCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4). The cobalt hydride with the most electron-withdrawing Cp ligand, [CpC5F4NCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H]+ is an electrocatalyst for production of H2 using 4-MeOC6H4NH3BF4 (pKaMeCN = 11.86) with a turnover frequency of 350 s-1 and an overpotential of 0.75 V. Experimental measurement of thermochemical data provided further insights into the thermodynamics of H2 elimination. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal system have been debated for some time. The primary structural model ahs been a single fault with 54 dip. New data including a detailed gravity survey,...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... States) Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute ... oscillation or topology methods as it depends on Dsub AH ... We also find that the viable mechanisms which can account ...

  13. Generation Investment Management LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investment Management LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Generation Investment Management LLP Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 0AH Product: Fund manager of...

  14. Rugged Renewables EMAT Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EMAT Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rugged Renewables EMAT Inc Address: Unit 3 Gear House Saltmeadows Road Place: Gateshead Zip: NE8 3AH Region: United Kingdom...

  15. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology), D.-H. Lee (University of California, Berkeley), F. Guinea (Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain), and A.H. Castro Neto (Boston University). Research...

  16. MHK ISDB/Instruments/HOBO U30 Weather Station Data Logger | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type: Battery Power Specification: 10 Ah rechargeable battery; AC power adapter and solar panel options. ExternalInput: 15 Input Channels Spec Sheet: http:...

  17. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Italy), R. Asgari (Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, Iran), and A.H. MacDonald (University of Texas at Austin). Research funding: German Research Foundation,...

  18. Island Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: W1J 7BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based coal bed methane company, Island Gas was the subject of a reverse takeover by KP Renewables in...

  19. MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mooringanchoring and electrical connection system; (2) a 3.7-statute-mile-long, direct current (DC) submarine transmission cable connecting from one of the AquaBuOY's...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Guo, Shaojun (3) Su, Dong (2) Bu, Lingzheng (1) Chen, Gen (1) Ding, Jiabao (1) Guo, Jun ... F. Fidler ; He, Kai ; Su, Dong ; Chen, Gen ; Lin, Qianglu ; Pietryga, Jeffrey M. ; ...

  1. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bu il ding 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 JUL 0 5 2011 Subject: Notification of a Class 1 Permit...

  2. West Central Soy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soy Jump to: navigation, search Name: West Central Soy Place: Iowa Product: Biodiesel producer based in Iowa, Owned bu a soy farmer coop References: West Central Soy1 This...

  3. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.; Decker, S. .R; Bu, L. T.; Zhao, X. C.; McCabe, C.; Wohlert, J.; Bergenstrahle, M.; Brady, J. W.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F., ":The O-Glycosylated Linker from...

  4. Quantification of Lithium-ion Cell Thermal Runaway Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2016-01-01

    Much of what is known about lithium-ion cell thermal runaway energetics has been measured and extrapolated from data acquired on relatively small cells (< 3 Ah). This work is aimed at understanding the effects of cell size on thermal runaway energetics on cells from 3 to 50 Ah of both LiFePO4 (LFP) and LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) chemistries. Results show that for both LFP and NCA cells, the normalized heating rate (W/Ah) increases roughly linearly for cells from 3-38 Ah while the normalized total heat released (kJ/Ah) is relatively constant over that cell size range. The magnitude of the normalized heating rate is on the order of 2x greater for NCA relative to LFP chemistries for 2-3 Ah cells, while that difference is on the order of 10x for 30-40 Ah cells. The total normalized heat release is ~ 15-20% greater for NCA relative to LFP cells across the entire size range studied 3-38 Ah.

  5. Everest Refrigeration: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-42001) |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-42001) Everest Refrigeration: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-42001) April 24, 2015 DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) finding that commercial refrigeration equipment model number ESGR3 does not comport with the energy conservation standards. DOE determined the product was noncompliant based on DOE testing. Bu Sung must immediately notify each person (or

  6. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  7. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanova, L. N.; Bom, V. R.; Demin, A. M.; Demin, D. L.; Eijk, C. W. E. van; Filchagin, S. V.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. Grishechkin, S. K.; Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D.; Kuryakin, A. V.; Medved', S. V.; Musyaev, R. K.; Rudenko, A. I.; Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G.

    2009-02-15

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  8. 4H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measured (particle)(particle)-coin, missing mass spectrum. 1980SE08: 7Li(-, nt), E at rest; measured tt-coin. 4H deduced possible resonance. 1982AL08: 6Li(6Li, 8B), E 72 MeV....

  9. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... e.g., PUMP Equipment type: a Code indicating the specific type of ... T-810 Boiler Feed Tank VESSEL VERTICAL PRESSURE 110 250 CS 5' 15' T-T ACCE V8.4 T-812 Steam drum VESSEL ...

  10. Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-78 Attachment 4 Successful...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date Mr. John Doe President ABC Company 2222 Anywhere Street Sun City, TT 22222 Dear Mr. Doe: NOTICE OF SELECTION OF insert name of successful offeror FOR THE (insert title...

  11. Phone Log: Spoke to: C.V. Chung I Date/Time: 5/29/14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L (CONTR) - TOT-D1TT-2 Subject: FW: Request for WECC Maps - by non-profit org Hello Kim: One of my staff members received this third-party request from WECC for a "BPA...

  12. Search for new physics in t?+ large ET-> bb?qq?qq? + large ET final state in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The datamoreare consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.less

  13. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Walker, Elizabeth M. NA Weber, Sally A. NA Becker, Melanie NE Morgan, Kelly NE Lyles, Monica D. OE Moore, Sharon M. OR Nance, Deborah L SC Mayes, Lynda A. SR Bectel, Robert W. TT

  14. Computation supporting biodefense

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...t.ga.ta.gg.actgggtttta.a aacctgtgatggc.tc.aagaccct.gaggc.ATCCTCTCCTTTGCACGC CGTGGGACCAT.caggagaagttga..tccgtggcaggactcgc.gtcca ctc.ggacc.ga.ga.taccggcg.ctctttgagcc.tt.ca.gg.ctctt.g...

  15. Microsoft Word - taylor.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... MASA Technical Translation, NASA TT-F-790, 173-181. Clothiaux, EE, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, ... Turner, KP Moran, BE Martner, TP Ackerman, GG Mace, RT Marchand, KB Widener, DJ ...

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Satellite Data Link on the ARM-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F, Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team...

  17. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation for the AMR-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F., Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team...

  18. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ARM-UAV Grand Tour, SGP, NSA, TWP Tooman, T.T., Bolton, W.B.(a), and McCoy, R.F.(a), Sandia National Laboratories (a) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science...

  19. DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  20. Molecular and Electronic Structure of Cyclic Trinuclear Gold(I) Carbeniate Complexes: Insights for Structure/Luminescence/Conductivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDougaldJr, Roy N; Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Jia, Huiping; Perez, Michael R; Rabaa, Hassan; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Cundari, Thomas R.; Gnade, Bruce E; Omary, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study of correlations between solid-state structure and optical/electronic properties of cyclotrimeric gold(I) carbeniates, [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] (R, R' = H, Me, Bu-n, or (c)Pe), is reported. Synthesis and structural and photophysical characterization of novel complexes [Au-3(MeN=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=COMe)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], and [Au-3((c)PeN=COMe)(3)] are presented. Changes in R and R' lead to distinctive variations in solid-state stacking, luminescence spectra, and conductive properties. Solid-state emission and excitation spectra for each complex display a remarkable dependence on the solid-state packing of the cyclotrimers. The electronic structure of [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] was investigated via molecular and solid-state simulations. Calculations on [Au-3(HN=COH)(3)] models indicate that the infinitely extended chain of eclipsed structures with equidistant Au-Au intertrimer aurophilic bonding can have lower band gaps, smaller Stokes shifts, and reduced reorganization energies (lambda). The action of one cyclotrimer as a molecular nanowire is demonstrated via fabrication of an organic field effect transistor and shown to produce a p-type field effect. Hole transport for the same cyclotrimer-doped within a poly(9-vinylcarbazole) host-produced a colossal increase in current density from similar to 1 to similar to 1000 mA/cm(2). Computations and experiments thus delineate the complex relationships between solid-state morphologies, electronic structures, and optoelectronic properties of gold(I) carbeniates.

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Ahmed, Misonara (1) Cruz, Anthony C. (1) Damko, Ermelinda (1) Jang, Se Bok (1) Kabaleeswaran, Venkataraman (1) Lenardo, Michael J. (1) Park, Ah Young (1) Raunser, Stefan (1) Rice, ...

  2. Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and applications development Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant...

  3. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TRN: AH200037%%67","Technical Report",,,"Other Information: PBD: 30 Sep 1999","Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)","USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)","15...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... material for lithium ion batteries due to its high specifi c capacity (3600 mAh g -1 ). ... Perovskite Ba2YRuO6 Nilsen, Goran ; Thompson, Corey M ; Marjerrison, Casey ; Greedan, ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Stefano ; Cascio, Duilio ; Johnson, Reid C. March 2016 Structure of a putative ClpS N-end rule adaptor protein from the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum AhYoung, Andrew ...

  6. Microsoft Word - 3Q15 Web Rev0 11-2-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 0 Post Date: November 30, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of...

  7. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Engineering Structures, Elsevier Science, Vol. 100, pp. 369-384, http:dx.doi.org10.1016j.engstruct.2015.06.023 * Kurt, E., Varma, A.H., Booth, P.N., and Whittaker, A. (2013). ...

  8. A=10O (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0...

  9. A=10Ne (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0...

  10. A=10N (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0...

  11. A=10F (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0...

  12. Nice Car Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Nice Car Company Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W10 5AH Product: UK electric car producer. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading map......

  13. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Qds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel& will be require& In :...

  14. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hyperfine Interactions 21 (1985) 251 1985TH08 J. Thaler, Phys. Rev. C32 (1985) 2189 1985WA02 A.H. Wapstra and G. Audi, Nucl. Phys. A432 (1985) 1 1985WA1C Walter, Bull....

  15. ANALOG QUANTUM NEURON FOR FUNCTIONS APPROXIMATION (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LA-UR-01-2580 TRN: AH200124%%156 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-36 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location...

  16. ALS Capabilities Reveal How Like Can Attract Like

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the ALS is supported by DOE BES. Publication about this research: O. Shih, A.H. England, G.C. Dallinger, J.W. Smith, K.C. Duffey, R.C. Cohen, D. Prendergast, and R.J....

  17. CX-008231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Large Systems Request AH CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 04/11/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  18. Microsoft Word - 2Q12 Web Rev 1 10-22-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00078 Revision 1 November 28, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  19. Microsoft Word - 2Q15 Web Rev1 11-2-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00076 Revision 1 Post Date: November 30, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of ...

  20. Microsoft Word - 2Q13 Web Rev1 10-24-13.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00094 Revision 1 December 2, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  1. Microsoft Word - 1Q12 Web Rev 1, 8-7-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00051 Revision 1 August 28, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  2. Microsoft Word - 2Q11 Web Rev 1, 10-13-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2011-00083 Revision 1 November 11, 2011 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  3. Microsoft Word - 4Q12 Web Rev 1 4-26-13 .docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2013-00010 Revision 1 May 29, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information ...

  4. Microsoft Word - 4Q13 Web Rev1 5-6-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2014-00010 Revision 1 May 30, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section ...

  5. Microsoft Word - 3Q13 Web Rev1 1-31-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00112 Revision 1 February 28, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  6. Microsoft Word - 3Q12 Web Rev 1 1-17-13_DBD .docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00097 Revision 1 February 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  7. Microsoft Word - 1Q11 Web Rev 1, 7-18-11.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2011-00052 Revision 1 August 12, 2011 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  8. Microsoft Word - 4Q11 Web Rev 1, 5-10-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2012-00014 Revision 1 May 30, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information ...

  9. INCOMING DOCUMENT CONTROL FORM DOCUMENT DESCRIPTION ORGANIZATIO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHOOl) RESULTS OF 'I-HE RADIOLOGICAL SURV AT THE FORMER ORE STORAGE SITEi ... by MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, I for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract No. ...

  10. Women's Employee Resource Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Women's Employee Resource Group The Women's Employee Resource Group encourages women's contributions, professional development opportunities, and shared support across the Laboratory. Contact Us Office of Diversity and Strategic Staffing (505) 667-2602 Email Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group, works on the Laboratory's new Trinity supercomputing system.

  11. Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 03 31 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J 306627.00 4.1027 12580.00 2 AH31 1 EG 309 J 61778.00 3.3426 2065.00 4633 Example 3-a

  12. Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 04 05 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J 306627.00 4.1027 12580.00 2 AH31 1 EG 309 J 61778.00 3.3426 2065.00 Example 3-b

  13. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-quark pair production in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collision data at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-19

    This paper reports inclusive and differential measurements of the tt¯ charge asymmetry AC in 20.3 fb–1 of √s = 8 TeV pp collisions recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Three differential measurements are performed as a function of the invariant mass, transverse momentum and longitudinal boost of the tt¯ system. The tt¯ pairs are selected in the single-lepton channels (e or μ) with at least four jets, and a likelihood fit is used to reconstruct the tt¯ event kinematics. A Bayesian unfolding procedure is performed to infer the asymmetry at parton level from themore » observed data distribution. The inclusive tt¯ charge asymmetry is measured to be AC = 0.009 ± 0.005) (stat. + syst.). As a result, the inclusive and differential measurements are compatible with the values predicted by the Standard Model.« less

  14. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 50

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elekes, Zoltan; Timar, Janos; Singh, Balraj

    2011-01-15

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 50 (Cl,Ar,K,Ca,Sc,Ti,V, Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni) have been evaluated and presented together with Adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. This evaluation has been carried out about 15 years after the previous one by Thomas Burrows (1995Bu29). Except for {sup 50}Sc and {sup 50}V, extensive new data have become available for all the other nuclides in the intervening years. The data for {sup 50}Sc and {sup 50}V have also been checked again in detail and several changes made. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 50}Cl, {sup 50}Ar and {sup 50}Ni. This work supersedes earlier evaluations (1995Bu29, 1990Bu18, 1984Al29, 1976Au07) of A=50 nuclides.

  15. Buckling transition in long ?-helices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palen?r, Peter; Bleha, Tom

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of ?-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  16. The interactions of azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzer, Anl; Harvey, Brian H.; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2014-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is reported to possess diverse pharmacological actions and is attracting increasing attention for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Among the pharmacological actions of MB, is the significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). These activities may, at least in part, underlie MB's beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl metabolite, is the predominant species. Azure B has been shown to be pharmacologically active and also possesses a variety of biological actions. Azure B therefore may contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these considerations, the present study investigates the possibility that azure B may, similar to MB, act as an inhibitor of human AChE and BuChE. The results document that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE with IC{sub 50} values of 0.486 ?M and 1.99 ?M, respectively. The results further show that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE reversibly, and that the modes of inhibition are most likely competitive. Although the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activities of azure B are twofold and fivefold, respectively, less potent than those recorded for MB [IC{sub 50}(AChE) = 0.214 ?M; IC{sub 50}(BuChE) = 0.389 ?M] under identical conditions, azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system and beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. - Highlights: Methylene blue (MB) is a known inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, also is an inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. Azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system. Azure B may contribute to MB's potential in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  17. Higher-order gravitational lensing reconstruction using Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S.; Waalewijn, Wouter J. E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu E-mail: ayadav@physics.ucsd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We develop a method for calculating the correlation structure of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using Feynman diagrams, when the CMB has been modified by gravitational lensing, Faraday rotation, patchy reionization, or other distorting effects. This method is used to calculate the bias of the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator in reconstructing the lensing power spectrum up to O(?{sup 4}) in the lensing potential ?. We consider both the diagonal noise TT TT, EB EB, etc. and, for the first time, the off-diagonal noise TT TE, TB EB, etc. The previously noted large O(?{sup 4}) term in the second order noise is identified to come from a particular class of diagrams. It can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the ? expansion. These improved estimators have almost no bias for the off-diagonal case involving only one B component of the CMB, such as EE EB.

  18. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence levelmoreon the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.less

  19. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.

  20. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/? +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e, ?+?, and e??) decay channels. The tt cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic up to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.

  1. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set atmore » a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.« less

  2. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e–, μ+μ–, and e±μ∓) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic upmore » to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.« less

  3. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMtt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - SequoiaFLOPWatt4Salishan2009_v1-Seager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i S t N FLOP/ W tt S i S t N FLOP/ W tt Sequoia Sets New FLOP/s:Watt Sequoia Sets New FLOP/s:Watt Standard Standard S d d S d d Salishan 2009 Mark Seager g Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Version 1 28 April 2009 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-PRES-TBD This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Overview The case for a low power approach Hi h l l S i ti d i High level

  5. SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY Lfcfi0n 31, I?%7 STGTE m rtE!xm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM #% HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE S#W MC&TED W P4DlOKTIVIN kmvi t+mi BkcTmam

  6. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2003-07-25

    NEA completed the CFD simulations for all NBFZ tests. SRI resumed work on HPBO experiments and conducted preliminary tests using the UCONN impactor. UCONN prepared several samples of char for cross-sectional analysis by SEM and characterization is underway. BU completed the NBFZ char characterization program. CBK model had been implemented into Fluent.

  7. A=19C (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (Not illustrated) 19C may have been observed in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of a 197Au target: if so it is particle stable (RA70). Its mass excess must then be < 37.9 MeV (18C + n). See also (ZE60A, BU71E

  8. A=20N (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (Not illustrated) 20N has been observed in the bombardment of 232Th by 122 MeV 18O ions (AR69E, AR70D) and in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of 197Au (RA70): it is particle stable. See also (ZE60A, BA61F, BU71E

  9. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Jones, Matthew B.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Scott, Brian L.; MacBeth, Cora E.; Gordon, John C.

    2015-04-06

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)tBu)3. As a result, in the solid-state, complexes 1–5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  10. A=15N (70AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70AJ04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15N) GENERAL: See Table 15.4 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(HA57B, BR59M, FE59E, TA60L, BA61N, BU63D,...

  11. A=10B (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10B) GENERAL: See (BA59F, BR59M, TA60L, TR61, IN62, BU63D, KU63B, ME63A, MO63C, OL63B, VL63A, WA63C, AM64, BA64V, FR64D, GR64C, MA64HH,...

  12. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    95 Wa ste Sit es Re me dia ted 9 23 ,00 0 To ns of So il Re mo ved Fin al Re me dia tio n of 61 8-1 0 & 618 -11 Bu ria l Gr ou nd s Co mp let e 40 0 A re a Fa st Flu...

  13. A=7Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1983BU1B, 1983KU17, 1983SH1D, 1983VA31, 1984CH24, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06,...

  14. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  15. NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Pliufi aqi ui JHDDO 04 pajoadxa si 661 u pueuiap CDHO u qiMOJ aqj jo juaojad gg uBqi ajopM '(Z 31BU.J uoijduinssB ...

  16. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp̄ = T'T' ̄= tt̄+XX̄=bqq̄b̄q̄q + XX̄. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The datamore » are consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ̄ = tt ̄=+ XX̄, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ≤ 70 GeV/c2.« less

  17. Atterbury,Laura M DK-7 From: Ex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 09, 2010 1234 PM To, FOIA Subject: FO(A Request i:l ( 11% 1) ON RI I % t t 11 I TIUS 1tt4 :- '' to e'a The following is a New FOJA request: Name: Torn Jacobs No...

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into bb¯ in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    In this study, a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair, tt¯H, is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb–1 of pp collision data at √s=8 TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the H→bb¯ decay mode and uses events containing one or two electrons or muons. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and b-tagged jet multiplicities. A neural network is used to discriminate between signal and background events, the latter being dominatedmore » by tt¯+jets production. In the single-lepton channel, variables calculated using a matrix element method are included as inputs to the neural network to improve discrimination of the irreducible tt¯+bb¯ background. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found and an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross section is obtained at 95 % confidence level. The ratio of the measured tt¯H signal cross section to the Standard Model expectation is found to be μ=1.5±1.1 assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV.« less

  19. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into bb¯ in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    In this study, a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair, tt¯H, is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb–1 of pp collision data at √s=8 TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the H→bb¯ decay mode and uses events containing one or two electrons or muons. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and b-tagged jet multiplicities. A neural network is used to discriminate between signal and background events, the latter being dominated by tt¯+jets production. In the single-lepton channel, variables calculated using a matrix element method are included as inputs to the neural network to improve discrimination of the irreducible tt¯+bb¯ background. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found and an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross section is obtained at 95 % confidence level. The ratio of the measured tt¯H signal cross section to the Standard Model expectation is found to be μ=1.5±1.1 assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV.

  20. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t-t AL- 1. + T fi r,y* t ,.- . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Ofll i iy Ci)wp HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET U-G b ;33y jl:tL G c-w &3(y I...

  1. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.

  2. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ".' .-.' .; . " c . ':-, A Publication of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory National Environmental Research Park Program United States Department of Energy , ' , ' : '.- -; , .' : ..:,:...' ~, -~ .' '. "-:; 7A ,', , ' '.'; .~. . ",' " '~ ....;" . ',':' ._-~ ,... : . .... .~ <: ;:~,~.:,: :r. o * i * ~' . ,'." ..... , ~' J;i1'i~ '. J~. , " ', ' "" ,;; ;t! :':;J 'I1I$):i'iR tt ,WJ,S( ' (~,,!~d;;a~ an ,' account of.WQrk ; '*

  3. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-,?+?- and e??). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.

  4. Ab initio thermodynamic approach to identify mixed solid sorbents for CO2 capture technology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duan, Yuhua

    2015-10-15

    Because the current technologies for capturing CO2 are still too energy intensive, new materials must be developed that can capture CO2 reversibly with acceptable energy costs. At a given CO2 pressure, the turnover temperature (Tt) of the reaction of an individual solid that can capture CO2 is fixed. Such Tt may be outside the operating temperature range (ΔTo) for a practical capture technology. To adjust Tt to fit the practical ΔTo, in this study, three scenarios of mixing schemes are explored by combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations. Our calculated resultsmore » demonstrate that by mixing different types of solids, it’s possible to shift Tt to the range of practical operating temperature conditions. According to the requirements imposed by the pre- and post- combustion technologies and based on our calculated thermodynamic properties for the CO2 capture reactions by the mixed solids of interest, we were able to identify the mixing ratios of two or more solids to form new sorbent materials for which lower capture energy costs are expected at the desired pressure and temperature conditions.« less

  5. Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Accountabilities | Department of Energy Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities PDF icon Revised Roles and Responsibilities August 9 2011 FINAL.pdf More Documents & Publications Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 ADR Revised Policy

  6. The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution A report by the General Accounting Office (GAO) on the role of ombudsmen in dispute resolution. PDF icon RoleOmbuds.pdf More Documents & Publications Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution ADR Revised Policy TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010

  7. BPA-2010-02106-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .ddrr*. ph-, 11Ni Central Avenue, Bellingham, WA )8225 www,copp ugercarter.coni 1(Ii.67G.7545 36u.3m.tt369 September 15, 2010 F9 M .A1IIl m. -11PI 1 VI '..aIui Bethany C. Alien...

  8. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  9. Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution PDF icon Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution More Documents & Publications The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution ADR Revised Policy TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010

  10. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  11. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.

  12. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDES FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Au, M.

    2009-12-04

    The aligned nanorods of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and nanoporous hollow spheres (NHS) of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated as the anodes for Li-ion rechargeable batteries. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods demonstrated 1433 mAh/g reversible capacity. The NHS of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered 400 mAh/g and 250 mAh/g capacities respectively in multiple galvonastatic discharge-charge cycles. It was found that high capacity of NHS of metal oxides is sustainable attributed to their unique structure that maintains material integrity during cycling. The nanostructured metal oxides exhibit great potential as the new anode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, low cost and inherent safety.

  13. Daily treatment with {alpha}-naphthoflavone enhances follicular growth and ovulation rate in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreiro, Karina A.; Di Yorio, Maria P.; Artillo-Guida, Romina D.; Paz, Dante A.; Faletti, Alicia G.

    2011-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and the first protein involved in a variety of physiological and toxicological processes, including those of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. AhR has been found in the ovary of many species and seems to mediate the ovarian toxicity of many environmental contaminants, which are AhR ligands. However, the role of AhR in the ovarian function is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the action of {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}NF), known to be an AhR antagonist, on both follicular growth and ovulation. Immature Sprague-Dawley rats were daily injected intraperitoneally with {alpha}NF (0.1-80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 12 days, and primed with gonadotrophins (eCG/hCG) to induce follicular growth and ovulation. Ovaries were obtained 20 h after hCG administration. By means of immunohistochemistry, we found that the numbers of primordial, primary and antral follicles were increased in rats treated with 80 mg/kg {alpha}NF and that there were no differences with other doses. Likewise, the ovarian weight and the ovulation rate, measured by both number of oocytes within oviducts and corpora lutea in ovarian sections, were increased when the rats received either 1 or 10 mg/kg daily. Although further studies are necessary to know the mechanism of action of {alpha}NF, it is possible that the different ovarian processes can be differentially responsive to the presence of different levels of {alpha}NF, and that the same or different endogenous AhR ligands can be involved in these ovarian processes in a cell type-dependent manner.

  14. Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9 PPPL- 4589 Progress Toward Attractive Stellarators January, 2011 G.H. Neilson, L. Bromberg, T.G. Brown, D.A. Gates, L.P. Ku, M.C. Zarnstorff, A.H. Boozer, J.H. Harris, O. Meneghini, H.E. Mynick, N. Pomphrey, A.H. Reiman and P. Xanthopoulos Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

  15. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Yimin Zhu, PD/PI OneD Material, LLC (former Nanosys Energy Storage) Palo Alto, California June 16 ~20, 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies AMR 2014 ES130_zhu_2014_p This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information TM * Barriers addressed - Performance: Low Wh/kg & Wh/L - Life: Poor deep discharge cycles - Cost: High $/kWh * Targets Anode: >700 mAh/g 1,600 mAh/g >800 cycles

  16. A=12O (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 12O) 12O has been observed in the 16O(α, 8He) reaction at Eα = 117.4 MeV (1978KE06) and in the 12C(π+, π-) reaction at Eπ = 164 MeV (1983BL08; see for angular distribution) and 180 MeV (1980BU15). The mass excess of 12O is 32.10 ± 0.12 MeV (1978KE06), 32.059 ± 0.048 MeV (1980BU15): we adopt 32.065 ± 0.045 MeV. 12O is thus unstable to decay into 10C + 2p by 1.79 MeV and into 11N* + p by 0.45 MeV [note that 11N* is probably not the ground state of 11N and

  17. A=7Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983BU1B, 1983FU1D, 1983HO22, 1983PA06, 1984BA53, 1984KA06, 1984WA02, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986KR12, 1986VA13). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983BU1B, 1983HO22, 1984FI20, 1984WA02, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986VA13, 1986XU02, 1988KW02). Electromagnetic transitions, giant resonances: (1984KA06, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986ME13). Astrophysical questions:

  18. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  19. Application of Gold Electrodes for the Study of Nickel Based Homogeneous Catalysts for Hydrogen Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Liu, Fei; Roberts, John A.; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2013-08-12

    Gold and glassy carbon working electrode materials are compared as suitable substrates for the hydrogen oxidation reaction with Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2(BF4)2 used as a catalyst. Voltammetric responses showing electrocatalytic hydrogen oxidation mediated by the homogeneous electrocatalyst Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2(BF4)2 are identical at glassy carbon and gold electrodes, which shows that gold electrode can be used for hydrogen oxidation reaction. This work is supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under FWP 56073.

  20. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacitymore » only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.« less

  1. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps","Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.","1999-01-14T05:00:00Z",3261,,"SAND99-0093C","AC04-94AL85000","TRN: AH200112%%456","Conference",,,"Conference:...

  2. A=6He (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6He) GENERAL: See (PH60A, TA60L, AH61, BA61N, IN62, IN62B, BO63B, MO63C, VL63A, GR64C, WA64F, BO65B, LO65A). See also Table 6.1 Table of...

  3. 08-Wrapup-Wasserman.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a c orner o...

  4. Drivers` activities and information needs in an automated highway system. Working paper, August 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitan, L.; Bloomfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In most visions of the AHS--including that of the National Automated Highway System Consortium--it has been assumed that when a vehicle was under automated control, the driver would be allowed to engage in any of a variety of activities not related to driving (e.g, working, reading, sleeping). The objective of the first study reported here--one of the noncommuter studies--was to determine what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and whether the age of and/gender or the driver and/or the intrastring gap have an influence on those activities. One the objectives of the commuter experiment--of relevance for this report--was to determine whether what drivers do when traveling under automated control changes as a function of experience with the AHS (i.e., across trials). As conceptualization of the AHS proceeds, the details of the interface between the driver and the in-vehicle system will become more important. One part of that interface will be information supplied by the AHS to the driver, perhaps about such things as traffic conditions ahead predicted trip time to the driver`s selected exit, and so on. To maximize the utility of that information, it is important to determine what it is that drivers would like to know when traveling under automated control. The objective of the third study reported here--the second of the five noncommuter experiments--was to provide a first investigation of that issue.

  5. A=18C (72AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72AJ02) (Not illuatrated) 18C is particle stable. Therefore its atomic mass excess, M - A, must be < 29.84 MeV [16C + 2n] (WA70E). 18C has been observed in the bombardment of 232Th by 122 MeV 18O ions (AR69E, AR70D) and in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of Au (RA70). See also (ZE60A, PO68B, BU71E

  6. Intermolecular C?H bond activation of benzene and pyridines by a vanadium(III) alkylidene including a stepwise conversion of benzene to a vanadium-benzyne complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andino, Jos G.; Kilgore, Uriah J.; Pink, Maren; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J.; Telser, Joshua; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2012-01-20

    Breaking of the carbon-hydrogen bond of benzene and pyridine is observed with (PNP)V(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2} (1), and in the case of benzene, the formation of an intermediate benzyne complex (C) is proposed, and indirect proof of its intermediacy is provided by identification of (PNP)VO({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) in combination with DFT calculations.

  7. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1996-04-18

    This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

  8. BandelierDirections2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a r k i n g M E R G E T o T o w n s it e D ia m o n d D ri v e To Sa n ta Fe T o J e m e z M ts . Co mm ut er Bu s Dr op Of f P a r k i n g M E R G E M E R G E T o T o w n s i t e...

  9. Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company This presentation was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013. PDF icon csd_workshop_6_siefert.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Haskel/BuTech/PPI Hydrogen Transmission and Distribution Workshop

  10. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bu il ding 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 JUL 0 5 2011 Subject: Notification of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification 1 0: * Update Emergency Coordinator list We certify under penalty of law that this document and the enclosure were prepared under our direction or supervision in

  11. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Protection Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Bu ildi ng 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5496 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Subject: Fifth Supplement to the Report of Implementation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Contingency Plan on April 11, 2014 Dear Mr. Kieling and Ms. Roberts: On April11 , 2014, the Department of

  12. The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heterojunction Solar Cells (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Role of Additive in Diketopyrrolopyrrole-based Small Molecular Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells Authors: Wang, Hongyu ; Liu, Feng ; Bu, Laju ; Gao, Jun ; Wang, Cheng ; Wei, Wei ; Russell, Thomas P. Publication Date: 2013-08-29 OSTI Identifier: 1160446 DOE Contract

  13. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 68

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental results from the various reaction and radioactive decay studies leading to nuclides in the A = 68 mass chain have been reviewed. Nuclides ranging from Cr (Z = 24) to Br (Z = 35) are included. For these nuclei, level and decay schemes, as well as tables of nuclear properties, are given. This work supersedes the previous evaluation of the data on these nuclides (2002Bu29).

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Lin_2014_CNMS_UserScienceHighlight_NatNano.pptx [Read-Only]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    show the fabrication of flexible metallic nanowires and their Y-junction structures from a semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayer via electron irradiation in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Bu using a combination of in- situ experiments and theoretical calculations, we were able to characterize the electrical properties and mechanical flexibility of the nanowires. TMDC materials have been considered as promising candidates for next

  15. Everest Refrigeration: Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42001) | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42001) Everest Refrigeration: Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42001) June 3, 2015 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) manufactured and distributed noncompliant commercial refrigeration equipment model ESGR3 in the U.S. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do not meet applicable energy conservation

  16. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -.. 37qg: MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE =b-- FROM: ---L- _------__ u . SUBJECT: SITE ACl= ALTERNATE NAME: -_______-~-----------------NA~E:__( CITY:--~---------_-STATE:-~~ (2 OWNE!sI_SL f Past- L&cl= w ------------------- ----- Current- w buL.r - ------------ ownq cm-ltacted 0 yes @ "no; if yes, data cnntacte TYPE OF OPERATION -------------_~-~ q Research & Development 0 Production %.cale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production

  17. S?. LL-UIIS WLLM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. 31 12/!1/87 IEmN wffi WE ST. Lulls m ST. cows awv m S?. LL-UIIS WLLM ftl M NV 9 HIC ltRElWXDwIDloIC6IC~ WVCf ., sm. m buTm1Iv IJm-n Fww. DECMPIISSI~ 1NltEEhU 1"O'S. llE SITEHGSS IKUKDtR6XNWi'. sllErimhtED1omDFMl rnlR!E mrm

  18. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2009-04-28

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  19. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2007-11-06

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  20. Spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, J.-Q.; Zhou, J.-S.; Cheng, J. G.; Goodenough, J. B.; Ren, Y.; Llobet, A.; McQueeney, R. J.

    2011-12-02

    The spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO? (0.30 ? x ? 1.0) has been studied to map out the phase diagram over the whole doping range 0 ? x ? 1. The phase diagram is compared with that for RVO? (R = rare earth or Y) perovskites without A-site variance. For x > 0.20, no long-range orbital ordering was observed above the magnetic ordering temperature TN; the magnetic order is accompanied by a lattice anomaly at a Tt ? TN as in LaVO?. The magnetic ordering below Tt ? TN is G type in the compositional range 0.20 ? xmore? 0.40 and C type in the range 0.738 ? x ? 1.0. Magnetization and neutron powder diffraction measurements point to the coexistence below TN of the two magnetic phases in the compositional range 0.4 N less

  1. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  2. Boltzmann equation solver adapted to emergent chemical non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birrell, Jeremiah; Wilkening, Jon; Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-15

    We present a novel method to solve the spatially homogeneous and isotropic relativistic Boltzmann equation. We employ a basis set of orthogonal polynomials dynamically adapted to allow for emergence of chemical non-equilibrium. Two time dependent parameters characterize the set of orthogonal polynomials, the effective temperature T(t) and phase space occupation factor ?(t). In this first paper we address (effectively) massless fermions and derive dynamical equations for T(t) and ?(t) such that the zeroth order term of the basis alone captures the particle number density and energy density of each particle distribution. We validate our method and illustrate the reduced computational cost and the ability to easily represent final state chemical non-equilibrium by studying a model problem that is motivated by the physics of the neutrino freeze-out processes in the early Universe, where the essential physical characteristics include reheating from another disappearing particle component (e{sup }-annihilation)

  3. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (splitring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gapmoreand gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.less

  4. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (splitring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gap and gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.

  5. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and Spin-0 Resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Jared; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-09-04

    We argue that theories of the strong electroweak symmetry breaking sector necessarily contain new spin 0 states at the TeV scale in the tt and tb/bt channels, even if the third generation quarks are not composite at the TeV scale. These states couple sufficiently strongly to third generation quarks to have significant production at LHC via gg->phi{sup 0} or gb->tphi{sup -}. The existence of narrow resonances in QCD suggests that the strong electroweak breaking sector contains narrow resonances that decay to tt or tb/bt, with potentially significant branching fractions to 3 or more longitudinal W and Z bosons. These may give new 'smoking gun' signals of strong electroweak symmetry breaking.

  6. Color sextet scalars at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.-R.; Klemm, William; Rentala, Vikram; Wang Kai

    2009-03-01

    Taking a phenomenological approach, we study a color sextet scalar at the LHC. We focus on the QCD production of a color sextet pair {phi}{sub 6}{phi}{sub 6} through gg fusion and qq annihilation. Its unique coupling to {psi}{sup c}{psi} allows the color sextet scalar to decay into same-sign diquark states, such as {phi}{sub 6}{yields}tt/tt*. We propose a new reconstruction in the multijet plus same-sign dilepton with missing transverse energy samples (bb+l{sup {+-}}l{sup {+-}}+Ee{sub T}+Nj, N{>=}6) to search for on-shell tttt final states from sextet scalar pair production. Thanks to the large QCD production, the search covers the sextet mass range up to 1 TeV for 100 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity.

  7. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Hour of Day MST. Graph ni-21. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1961-1967), August -a o a) T3 0! 2 a; 54 I I I I I 1 I I I I I f I I I i I I I I I I I I I i i i i i i i i i i *a 0) O "H 01 ao aj SH 0) 9 12 15 Hour of Day MST 18 21 24 Graph 111-22. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1961-1967), September 55 S-J20 TlrTT-tTTTtTT '^m T3 <U (V & 0) cd <u Graph 111-23. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1981-1967), October 56 I i i i i i i 12 15 18 21 24

  8. Title

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D bo a 10 12 15 18 21 24 Hour of Day MST Graph HI-20. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1 961-1967), July 53 Hour of Day MST. Graph ni-21. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1961-1967), August -a o a) T3 0! 2 a; 54 I I I I I 1 I I I I I f I I I i I I I I I I I I I i i i i i i i i i i *a 0) O "H 01 ao aj SH 0) 9 12 15 Hour of Day MST 18 21 24 Graph 111-22. Daily March of Wind Speed, 7-Year Averages (1961-1967), September 55 S-J20 TlrTT-tTTTtTT '^m T3 <U (V & 0) cd

  9. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  10. SAND78-0962 VOL 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dllpartment of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by tt'le United States Government. Neither the United States nor the Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or procass disclosed, or

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  12. PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies & Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST PLAN October 2002 Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Supervisor (Thomas) Date Reviewed: INEEL Bus & Heavy Equipment Foreman (Murdock) Date Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Department Manager (Bullock) Date Approved: INEEL Central/Idaho Falls Facilities Director (Winn) Date Reviewed: INEEL Test Engineer (Zirker) Date Reviewed: INEEL Project Manager (Francfort) Date Approved: INEEL TT&I

  13. Till'"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    zg-..Ttr""2t.T ? f~'***( .)'~=.~ -*pnw**-*:*** .~~., '"?""(".~, .. -.-. **r='''' Till'" a * PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL ATR NSUF Users Week 2009 PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA:

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  15. DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook pn Quarterly Projections August 1984 Published: September 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t- jrt .ort lort .iort .iort iort iort iort ort Tt jm .erm -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  16. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  17. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  18. DOE/EIA-0202(85/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1985 Published: August 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort iort iort '.ort ort Tt .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  19. DOE/EIA-0202(86/3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Washington, DC Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1986 t rt ort .ort lort lort nort iort lort \ort ort Tt "t- . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Enbrgy ^nergy -OJ.VJUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  20. Appendix E Technical Memorandum Regarding Instrumentation and Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    15, 2010 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides an evaluation of data collected from inclinometers at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill (OLF) between the time they were installed in April, 2008, through December 2009. Data from piezometers located on the outside of the inclinometer casings are also reviewed and evaluated for possible correlation with the inclinometer data. Relevant background information

  1. Appendix E Technical Memorandum Regarding Instrumentation and Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    22, 2011 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill (OLF). Previously collected data has been updated with information collected during 2010 and January and February, 2011. Data from piezometers located on the outside of the inclinometer casings were also reviewed and evaluated for possible correlation with the

  2. Fort Collins CO 80525

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Ms. Linda Kaiser From: Thomas A. Chapel, CPG, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 21, 2014 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill (OLF)

  3. Microsoft Word - RFOLF Yearly Report - 2013_TAC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Mr. Rick DiSalvo From: Lance Heyer, EI Thomas A. Chapel, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 29, 2013 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill

  4. CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Valencia, G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the T odd correlations induced by CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at both production and decay level in the process gg{yields}tt{yields}(b{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}})(b{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). We consider several counting asymmetries at the parton level and find the ones with the most sensitivity to each of these anomalous couplings at the LHC.

  5. ACIM-~ NY.49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' h:. ,,, ,_" , ACIM-~ NY.49 .,. i MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE FE: __~-tt_c~7' e_-_~-~------- --------- "%Kf-- ---- ---i------- Current: ~~~~~~--------__---_______ xf yee, date contacted- IVPE OF OPERATION f- ------------- Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process z Theoretical Studies Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage a Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Fat a Other

  6. MEHORANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MEHORANDUM TO: FILE FR0t-t: -~+?!+-- SUBJECT: u - 5..7. am . . ALTERNATE W% : ---\L-&--~~+. ___- ____ S-fA-rE: t-4 ;5- ------ wJ!%RLSL " Past: ------------------------ Current: --~~---~---__~~~-------~-- Owner contacted 0 yes -glnos if yes, date cotitectad TYPE OF OPERATION ---------_----__- 0 Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process *I Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & kialysis 0 Production 0 Disposal /Storage

  7. TO: F FROH: SUBJEC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    F FROH: SUBJEC :T: SITE NAME: CITY:- UWNERI -----_ Past 0Wl-N TYPE C - - - - - - 0 Rez CONTRkCTING PERIOD: /+=I s-3 -----T-- -------- -- -------------------------------------- OWNERSHIP: - - .-- !E ; e; Ip; Pj Br Tt Si IF .-- imr ,CE !ct MEMORANDUM :ILE DATE "1) 241g7 --- ---- _______~ -----_----_ G3d:w i/( ?=v;rt i D.'lr.-s:rM ALTERNATE ~----~----_---____--_________________ NAME: -0-------------_____ B&J ii m0T.e ---- -~--___~~~--~----~~ STATE: fi a ---------_-__ I3 Facility Type

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - SustainAbilitySlideshow18Sept08.pps [Read-Only] [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    What we have seen from these Visiting Speaker Programs is an opportunity for ll b ti Th l tt di HSS Visiting Speaker Program - September 18, 2008. Washington DC collaboration. The people attending are representative of organizations investing their time and they too are struggling to solve the same issues we are ; to keep America sustainable, secure, and to foster responsible leadership. Companies have been successful preparing for and navigating this new shifting global landscape." Index

  9. Production and decays of the light pseudoscalar boson {eta} at the CERN LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung Kingman; Yan Qishu; Song, Jeonghyeon; Tseng Poyan

    2008-09-01

    In many extensions of the standard model, the Higgs sector often contains an additional pseudoscalar boson. A good example is the SU(3) simplest little Higgs model, which accommodates a light pseudoscalar boson {eta} with quite different characteristics from those in other multi-Higgs-doublet models. We study various phenomenological signatures of the {eta} at the CERN LHC. In particular, we calculate in details both production and decays in the Drell-Yan type channel qq{yields}Z/Z{sup '}{yields}h{eta}, and in the associated production with a tt pair, gg(qq){yields}tt{eta}. We emphasize the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay mode of the {eta} boson when its mass is below the bb threshold. We show that tt{eta} production is in fact large enough to give a sizable number of events while suppressing the backgrounds. We also comment on the direct gluon fusion process and the indirect decay from the heavy T quark (T{yields}t{eta})

  10. (Competitive ion kinetics in director mass spectrometric organic speciation). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieck, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    Essentially all of the completed/in progress studies during the last reporting period have involved the NBS pulsed electron beam high pressure mass spectrometer. Three distinct areas of research are recognizable; (1) determinations of binding energies and entropies for association and cluster ions, which is accomplished by measuring the temperature dependence of the equilibrium A/sup +/ or A/sup -/ + B in equilibrium A/sup +/.B or A/sup -/.B, (2) measurement of unimolecular rate constants for the thermal decomposition (pyrolysis of protonated organic molecules, and (3) evaluation of proton affinities and gas phase acidities via measurement of variable-temperature equilibria of the type AH/sup +/ + B in equilibrium BH/sup +/ + A and A/sup -/ + BH in equilibrium AH + B/sup -/. The various systems and classes of molecules chosen for study were those deemed most likely to provide fundamental new information on ion kinetics, ionic stabilities and ionic reaction mechanisms.

  11. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance of SubstitutedLiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2007-11-28

    A complete series of LiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) materials have been synthesized and investigated as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. When cycled between 2.0 and 4.3 V vs. Li/Li+ at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, stable capacities of ~;;160 mAh/g for y=0 to ~;;110 mAh/g for y=0.2 are achieved. Upon increasing the current density, it is found that all materials containing aluminum show reduced polarization and improved rate performance. The optimal performance at all current densities was found for the compound with y=0.05. The effect of aluminumsubstitution on the crystal structure of the host is discussed.

  12. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  13. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail; Hu, Shilin; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical conductivity, but they also serve as a buffer layer to accommodate the large volume change of phosphorus in the charge-discharge process. As a result, the graphene wrapped phosphorus composite anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially extend to other electrode materials with unstable solid electrolyte interphases in sodium-ion batteries.

  14. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  15. Box Canyon Model Watershed Project : Annual Report 1997/1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed Project. This project will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish Project. Primary focus of this project is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.

  16. Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parallel Computing » How to Apply Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creating next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nicole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email Current application deadline is February 5, 2016 with notification by early March 2016. Who can apply? Upper division undergraduate

  17. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrodinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  18. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  19. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectronmore » spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.« less

  20. A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in gastric devices (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A pH-responsive supramolecular polymer gel as an enteric elastomer for use in gastric devices Authors: Zhang, Shiyi ; Bellinger, Andrew M. ; Glettig, Dean L. ; Barman, Ross ; Lee, Young-Ah Lucy ; Zhu, Jiahua ; Cleveland, Cody ; Montgomery, Veronica A. ; Gu, Li ; Nash, Landon D. ;

  1. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacity only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.

  2. California Lithium Battery, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    26 likes California Lithium Battery, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory California Lithium Battery ("CALBattery") is a start-up California company established in 2011 to develop and manufacture a breakthrough high energy density and long cycle life lithium battery for utility energy storage, transportation, and defense industries. The company is a joint venture between California-based Ionex Energy Storage Systems and CALiB Power. US production of this advanced Very Large Format (400Ah+)

  3. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parallel Computing Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email The Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship is an intense 10 week program aimed at providing students with a solid foundation in modern high performance

  4. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  5. 3Q08Web.rtf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPT-2008-00121 October 30, 2008 Page 1 of 4 Saltstone Production and Disposal Facility Website Data - Third Quarter 2008 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 1443 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 0 kgal Outage

  6. 4Q08Web.rtf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESHQA-2009-00015 February 3, 2009 Page 1 of 4 Saltstone Production and Disposal Facility Website Data - Fourth Quarter 2008 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 1443 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 0 kgal Outage

  7. HEALXH AND SAFEIY RFSEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HEALXH AND SAFEIY RFSEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and Development Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHC01) RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFTHE FORMER AEROPROJECTS, FACILITY, WEST cI%mER, PENNSYL.VANIA W. D. Cottrell and R. F. Carrier Date published - October 1990 Investigation Team R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager W. D. Cottrell - NSRAP Project Director Suwey Team Members J. A Roberts* J. L. Quillent l Bechtel National, Inc tNuclear Fuel Services, Inc Work

  8. UNITED STATES GOVERNIMI~NT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .;. ,! r ?- 1; ,: ( ,T UNITED STATES GOVERNIMI~NT 7.;; ,:;$ _ a, -;::I-;. t, ,. :., .~, . ,.,,, : Thomas J. McCarvill, Chief, Physical Exploration Branch, Division of Baw : Reginald W. Bdmonds, Mining Engineer Division of Raw Naterials SUBJECT: MONAZITB DREDGING OPERATIONS AhD PLACER DEPOSITS CONTAINING TBOL~IIJM MINER&S SYXBOL: B&PM3 While at the Bureau of Mines office on June 2, 1955, Mr. Prank Lamb gave me the following information: The contract covering monazite production between

  9. ORNL/RASA-86/65

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    5 (LN01V) HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWC01) RESULTS OF THE INDEPENDENT RADIOLOGICAL VERIFICATION SURVEY AT 58 TRUDY DRIVE, LODI, NEW JERSEY (LN001V) M. G. Yalcintas C. A. Johnson* *Biology Division Date of Issue - December 1986 Investigation Team B. A. Berven - RASA Program Manager W. D. Cottrell - FUSRAP Project Director M. G. Yalcintas - Field Survey Supervisor Work performed as part of the RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY

  10. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered coreshell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolonged 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.

  11. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered core–shell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolongedmore » 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.« less

  12. Controlled Synthesis of Polyenes by Catalytic Methods. Progress Report, December 1, 1989 -- November 30, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Schrock, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    A more direct approach to polyenes by the direct polymerization of acetylenes has been achieved. We were able to show that polymerization of acetylene itself can be controlled with a well- characterized alkylidene catalyst, but only if a base such as quinuclidine is present in order to slow down the rate of propagation relative to initiation. (Quinuclidine may also stabilize vinylalkylidene intermediates formed in the reaction). Unfortunately, living polyenes were no more stable than isolated polyenes, and so this approach had its limitations. Direct polymerization of acetylene by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)(O-t-Bu){sub 2} was more successful, but inherent polyene instability was still a problem. The most important result of the past grant period is the finding that dipropargyl derivatives (HC=CCH{sub 2}XCH{sub 2}C=CH; X = CH{sub 2}, C(CO{sub 2}R){sub 2}, SiR{sub 2}, etc.), which have been reported to be cyclopolymerized by various classical catalysts by as yet unknown mechanisms, are polymerized by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)[OCMe(CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2} in dimethoxyethane. We speculate that intramolecular formation of a five-membered ring in the product of {alpha} addition is fast enough to yield another terminal alkylidene on the time scale of the polymerization reaction, while a six-membered ring is formed in a reaction involving a more reaction terminal alkylidene. Either intermediate alkylidene, but most likely the terminal alkylidene, could react with additional monomer to lead to growth of a chain having dangling triple bonds that eventually could be employed to form crosslinks.

  13. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Guenther, Ph.D.

    2003-01-28

    SRI has completed the NBFZ test program, made modification to the experimental furnace for the HPBO test. The NBFZ datasets provide the information NEA needs to simulate the combustion and fuel-N conversion with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms. BU has determined a linear swell of 1.55 corresponding to a volumetric increase of a factor of 3.7 and a decrease in char density by the same factor. These results are highly significant, and indicate significantly faster burnout at elevated pressure due to the low char density and large diameter.

  14. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1954GO17: 18Ne. 1961BU05: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1961EC02: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FR10: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965FR09: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO05: 18Ne; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Iβ, log ft. 18F deduced levels, branching ratios. 1970AL11: 18Ne; measured T1/2; deduced log ft, β-branching. 1970AS06,

  15. A=9C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: (See also (1979AJ01) for other references in this category and for some reactions on which no new work has been done.) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1981MO20). Reactions involing pions: (1979AS01, 1979NA1E, 1980BU15, 1983HU02). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Mass of 9C: The recent Q0 value for the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (see reaction 3)

  16. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  17. QER- Comment of Mike Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biggest issue with wind energy in ND is the Transmission System. There was a proposal recently by Clean Line Energy This type of forward thinking would allow wind energy to go forward.... The other huge issue is the blockade that the fossil fuel industry has placed on Master Limited Partnerships in 1978!! If the Master Limited Partner Parity Act is passed THAT WOULD BE A GAME CHANGER!! ( this is sponsored bu Senator Coons From DE) Call me directly..... You can also aske Heidi Heitkamp about me.... Mike Gray

  18. Highly efficient greenish-blue platinum-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes on a high triplet energy platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. L. Gong, S. White, R.; Lu, Z. H.; Wang, X.; Wang, S.; Yang, C.

    2014-04-28

    We have demonstrated high-efficiency greenish-blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) based on a dimesitylboryl-functionalized C^N chelate Pt(II) phosphor, Pt(m-Bptrz)(t-Bu-pytrz-Me). Using a high triplet energy platform and optimized double emissive zone device architecture results in greenish-blue PHOLEDs that exhibit an external quantum efficiency of 24.0% and a power efficiency of 55.8?lm/W. This record high performance is comparable with that of the state-of-the-art Ir-based sky-blue organic light-emitting diodes.

  19. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W aste Bu reau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Buitding 1 San ta Fe. New Mexico 87505-6303 FEB 1 3 20j~ Subject: Notification of Cla ss 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF De ar Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is the Class 1 Permit Modification Notification listed below: * Change in th e Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office Manager We certify under penalty of law that this document and th e enclos ure were prepared

  20. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  1. Vacuum Insulation for Window

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3M#Pres(ge#70# 3M#Pres(ge#90# Glass# on Vacuum I nsula4on for W indow 201 Bu uildin Te echnologie Offi ffic Pe ee Rev vie Pictures of NREL's transparent vacuum insulation for windows. The pictures show that the evacuated components are transparent while providing superior insulation in a flexible structure that can be retrofitted to installed windows. Image of vacuum capsules low-e coated films and glass, after multiple sprayed layers. Lin Simpson, lin.simpson@nrel.gov Na4ona Ren newabl En nerg

  2. Venture Capital Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venture Capital Finance DOE Biomass Conference July 2014 Priced Out of Oil ... Into What? Energy Source Commodity Price Sun: $0 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $10/bbl = $1.6 / GJ (late 1990s) Coal: $3 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (N America) $3 - 4 / GJ Biomass (15 GJ/dt) $60-100/dt = $4 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (ex N America) $10 - 15 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $100/bbl = $16 / GJ Corn $4-7/bu= $10 - 20 / GJ 2 * Higher oil prices create a disruptive opportunity for lower cost feedstocks * North American shale gas is a

  3. SUBJIHX:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : SUBJIHX: ?%w P ~.~i~~~~~ I' - 6*:&b d-h tQ @ i -" i" 1 s..?F?ew% ,~~~.~~~~,~ ,l Aesisrtmxt ?Xrarctmr for DATE Jitx;;r 6, I.955 l' lmPmfiQn, mv3.sion of R&w Materials 060. G, Marvin, Qirsctor for PrfXess Developnsnt 4: :.- p, J. Picario, stz.uction and n - f',_' h j::... ; Supply Branch, Division of Raw Materials -T 17 -L, 3c &j 0 DATA BE RESTORATION, ABANJIONMENT OR SELLING BU%3ING AND CERTAIN . " L) CURRIES ON FBCPEB'E OFU. S. PHOSPHO~C PRCDUCTS, EAST TAMPA, --

  4. TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ~~~~;.Offi~~~~~~~~~~~ ,/-; l UNITED STh , :__ .~. :__ .~. , , TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA Health and Safet Division pa& 1 Ps B.- Klevin :mL -y!yG hMBOL: HSH:PBK hMBOL: HSH:PBK : 1. Purpose of Visit >.. a. To study operations planned by~Bu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, i b. ,'To explain to Bureauof Mines' personnel tl in handling any of the aforementioned mate] 2. Scope of Work

  5. L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L _ AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 25 7 See Block 16C 6 . 1SSUED BY CODE 0500 8 NNSA/ Oa kridge Site Office u.s. De pa rtment of Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 S it e Offic e P. O. Box 2 05 0 Bu ilding 97 0 4- 2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 . NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state and ZIP Code) ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL B A t t n: W ILLIE J. W I LSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y- 12 , LLC ,1 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I

  6. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea; Rojas, Paola; Chiappini, Florencia; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Cocca, Claudia; Crocci, Mximo; Colombo, Lucas; Lanari, Claudia; and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 ?M) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 ?M) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ? HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ? HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ? HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ? HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ? HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  7. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  8. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Print Hardware Purchases Subject: First Release:SNL-5-2002, Issue A, 05/16/02 Revised this 18th day'ofNovember, 2004 as F-42(QP-28)04* . Revised By: 11)' I(.~ 't:t' AntOnIO J. ~ora, 14133 14133 Manager ~ c-. m I ~~ <.:-, lL 10252 Manager? \"\\_- - II - 2.3 - 0 'i ~e~7 1 025 8 Manager$::~ R (/.tff7 J Frank A. Villareal Approved By: * The revision of the document in effect at tlte tinre of award of Purchase Order of Subcontract unless otherwise

  10. Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Collider (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider The process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}ttH is considered in the kinematic end point region where the Higgs energy is close to its maximal energy. In perturbative QCD, using the loop expansion, the amplitudes are plagued by

  11. Recent Results in the Top Quark Sector from the D0 Experiment (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Conference: Recent Results in the Top Quark Sector from the D0 Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent Results in the Top Quark Sector from the D0 Experiment In these proceedings, I review recent measurements in the top quark sector in pp-bar collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the D0 detector. I will present the differential measurement of the tt-bar production cross section and the

  12. DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOBEIA-0202(83/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections November 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .lort lort lort lort <.ort ort Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Nrm ,iergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  13. DOE/EIA-0202(85/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook OBIS Quarterly

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook OBIS Quarterly Projections October 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort .iort aort iort iort <.ort ort Tt .-m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(87/2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections April 1987 . m erm Term t-Term rt-Term jrt-Term ort-Term iort-Term ion-Term ion-Term lort-Term lort-Term ort-Term ort-Term Tt-Term ".-Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  15. DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    |83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook Volume 1-Quarterly Projections May 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort lOrt iort '.ort- ort Tt . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  16. Eectronia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eectronia nIetl*c i na lSi*s) 0 ransienlt otrces =.ue to) .)I*sru ted Parsia Currents onl tie leR hit \ ocu es J.D. Kotulski, R.S. Coats, M.F. Pasik Electromalgnetic anHd Plalsmal Physics Anallysis DepalrtmenIt SanYdial Nationacl Lalboraltories Albuquerque, NM87185 USA Abstract- This papelr desclribes the electlromagnuetic anaalysis that has beena completed usinag the OPERA-3d product I;o charact;erize TT. ELECTROMAGNETIC MODELING the folrces ona the ITE1R shield modules as palrt of the

  17. Statistical anisotropies in gravitational waves in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

  18. Final Report for the DOE Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FINAL R EPORT F OR T HE D OE C HEMICAL HYDROGEN S TORAGE C ENTER O F EXCELLENCE Kevin C . O tt, C enter D irector LOS A LAMOS N ATIONAL L ABORATORY PO B ox 1 663 Los A lamos, N M 8 7545 Summarizing C ontributions f rom C enter P artners: Los A lamos N ational L aboratory ( LANL) Pacific N orthwest N ational L aboratory ( PNNL) Millennium C ell, I nc. Northern A rizona U niversity Rohm a nd H aas/Dow C hemical C ompany University o f A labama University o f C alifornia, D avis University o f C

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_OGREN_ARM_AWG_IAP_200703.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) * Objectives - obtain aerosol climatology aloft - determine relevance of surface climatology to vertical column * Measurements Li ht b ti tt i d - Light absorption, scattering, and hemispheric backscattering - RH-dependence of scattering - Temperature and RH Cessna 172XP 3/2000 - 6/2005 Temperature and RH - Flask samples for trace gases (CO 2 ) * Flights - 9 levels 0 5-3 7 km asl (172XP) - 9 levels, 0.5-3.7 km asl (172XP) - 12 levels, 0.5-4.6 km asl (206) -

  20. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  1. Appendix E Technical Memorandum Regarding Instrumentation and Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 3801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Mr. Rick DiSalvo From: Lance Heyer, EI Thomas A. Chapel, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 30, 2012 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill

  2. I PHAEi:'I:. REM E :ACTO N

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PHAEi:'I:. REM E :ACTO N *S0= =F* ltw :::.: .:- :.i.- * :: ..: ** :::::::::::::::::: I. .'Sl4.l . g .... 1/X's~~~ ::i':-:i::11:!:i':' :o::: : :::: ::::::. :. : * , :! ::: If'000;St;:ffULHS 0-;0y~Ar 0 PtS'tltl05 i; t 000; H~~i; 0 t~t < The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake national and international programs in science and engineering education, training and management systems, energy and environment systems, and

  3. REPLY TO AITN Of.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .. Departm&t of ' h mehloraricjum~ iii /II 1 DATE: FEB 6 1991 . ,! '!/ l!I REPLY TO AITN Of. EM-421 (W. A. Williams, FTS 233-5439) -cI: Wrnlum Cleanup Mdellnes for the Elra Gate, Tennessee, FUSRAP.Site Ill III Y0: Lester K. Ptlce, Ofrector former Sites Restoration Dlvlsion ,( III Oak Ridge Dperations Office . t/t 4 This $s in response to your request for uranium cleanup guidelines for the I 1 Elra Gate site. Vour staff recommended a cleanup guIdetIne of 35 Ill picoCurles per grm (pCi/g) of

  4. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    aehsed herewith ia Coaprehenaive Survey of USBEC mtp, Lewebldinge ad G~r~n&-owned Bpipment under SC & COntraCtCW'S COntrOl, as requested in AEC BULLETIN No. 48 dated April 26, 1917. .& Inols. Reports 10 acres NO. 5412 5435 5436 5421 5621 5432 5433 5434 5431 5437 Pipe Shop /j LOCATION Ij ij 88 1 / j Lske 'OntsTis Tohawanda !IS AEC Ordndnce 'Worki, Sllkffiqe ,Model wty, ,New York '8 I' j, i/ DESCRIPTION !! OF TT 'fro1 heti TX-2 fron inec s3n Die ylaed Ialst JS Eng- 1, 3x38 *ict 23, 144

  5. Departtient,of Endrgy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Departtient,of Endrgy ' . :. WaShingtm; DC 20585 ,; .' I .,~. ' . ' . / . . . .; ' ~- FEB Xl995 ., Mr..William P. Dornsife :.'. ..I Bureau'of Radiation Protectibn Pennsjlvania Department of : '~ ., .Environmental Resources, 400 Market Street, 13th Floor ,HatriSburg; ,PennsyJvania 17101' ; 1 .I Dear Hr. Dornsife: ,,'.:' ', I ; )~' ,,: I Secretary of Evergy Hazel O"Leary.has announced a new appr6ac :.the Department of En@rgy (DOE) ahd,its communications'with.tt support of'this initiative, ,we

  6. FROti:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    p.1, , 1' 3 ' - j ttEMORANDUtl TO: FILE - FJ+u? /WI - /3 DATE 2 /I/ / 9 / ----------^--______ FROti: D. s-f&J ---------------- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: --_-__----__-_--- _____ &----w' I+& - f*/crq ALTERNATE A t=l r---i ted ____ NAME: -----------__-________ CITY: ~+ZZL------ _______ STATE: ------ ff+$- OWNER(S) --y;;g-- && - /??#A~ ------------------------ Current: &v CA-J--;cJ Owner contacted ~--yes 0 noi -.-------me-we------- if yes, date contacted _ //t*/4/ -e-----N------

  7. WTIOWu L LBAD COLPANY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . WTIOWu L LBAD COLPANY OP CHDo i0 7 -' Cincinnati 39, Chio September 25, 1961 SUDBJCTr TRIP RBPCRT TO tLELQO tMAClleO TOOL CCOPANY, CICiUTM , (310 ON AUIUS 21, 23. AND 23, AND SYPB3EBR 1, 8. AND 11, 1961 TOt J. A. Quigley, M.D. ORClt B. D. Leininger., A, D. orkun CENTRAL FIL EcjtTr1rr OF TrIP The purpose of this trip was to (1) observe the health and safety aspects during a simulated production ran on the LeDlond Carlstedt Rapid Doring Machine ttUle drilling solid cant uranium billets, aad (2)

  8. CI L C C I LI C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CI L C C - I LI C c C I I I I I I I L rr ORNL/RASA-94/l 0t-t. 27-6 \O [I ,-' :..L, &ml OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY at the former HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE COMPANY (3rd Floor) 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HOOOl) M. E. Murray C. A. Johnson MANA6ED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITE0 STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENEMY This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office

  9. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c. : -* :. : 1 : : ; : s ' ;: ..:, --A,, -... ! : ' Q "3 _, ' ;' ,Z .2 , ., .- -2 ' 1 ' \A ' ., 3 \ * .' >,-' ;;' ;x., -.; t 1 ' .L i ' iq. ) :p 22T*+g~;s~ .r(,, , ~~::---y-~' -' --, ) ,;*; -,:;' L;e.-:.:.: ..,. >,.*L<seT,, :' .5 -1,; JI I,' ' <> ' I. ..; -_ : ,... :,-.;i __. PRODUCTXIN PJZPORT "* *_ ' L T I R(.XJXXG OF TT~C l!ftN D X m X3AZ~IEX INGCt.fS. A T * 2lI,mG~~-LuDL~~~ sTl2zEL coRPoR:!'"I9~~- -_. . _.. ,. .: ii .- _, . :. GN Ofiicial CkuiFcr??bn. d t!+

  10. Assessment of the Electrohol process to manufacture acetaldehyde from ethanol electrogeneratively. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevino, A.A.

    1985-04-10

    Preliminary process economics data for the electrogenerative process to manufacture acetaldehyde from ethanol were generated based on patent information. The technology was assessed in four alternative processing options. The Electrohol process is viable in the US only if integrated to the production of 190 pf ethanol from corn in a large scale unit. To be competitive, the Electrohol process must show yields in excess of 93%. Its attractiveness depends on corn prices remaining under $2.90/bu and DDG selling for more than $132/T. A corn price of $2.00/bu is needed to make a farm-size corn-based processing alternative competitive. A plant based on the fermentation of molasses proved too expensive under the US economic assumptions. The Electrohol technology based on purchased ethanol cannot compete with the existing ethylene-based process under current conditions. To become attractive, the Electrohol process must have access to cheap ethanol ($1.43/gal). The zero electricity generation mode is the most attractive mode of operation for the Electrohol technology in the US. The penalty for low levels of generation (0.130 kwh/kg AcH) is, however, negligible. The optimum operating mode in W. Europe is the generation of 0.312 kwh/kg AcH. In Japan, the low generation level is perferred (0.130 kwh/kg AcH). In general, higher energy prices improve the competitiveness of the Electrohol processing alternatives.

  11. Simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel using the fission-product extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, J.D.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L.; Meikrantz, D.A.; Todd, T.A.

    2008-07-01

    The Fission-Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) for the simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent LWR fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository and, when combined with the separation of Am and Cm, could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyl-dicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and calix[4]arene-bis-(t-octyl-benzo-crown-6 ) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium, and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with simulated and actual spent-nuclear-fuel feed solution in centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, co-extraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance ar e discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel. Recent advances in the evaluation of alternative calixarenes with increased solubility and stability are also detailed. (authors)

  12. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  13. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grgory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-?-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the ?-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  14. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbenebis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in CH bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex. Alternatively, the rhodium carbonyl 5 or iridium isocyanide {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)CNtBu (15) reacts with PhSiH3 in the dark to form the silyl compound {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}RhH(SiH2Ph)CO (14) or {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(SiH2Ph)CNtBu (17). These examples demonstrate the enhanced thermal reactivity of {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}-supported iridium and rhodium carbonyl compounds in comparison to tris(oxazolinyl)borate, tris(pyrazolyl)borate, and cyclopentadienyl-supported compounds.

  15. Top quark physics at the Tevatron results and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Sliwa

    2002-10-16

    The methodology of CDF and D0 top quark analyses and their underlying assumptions are summarized. The CDF and D0 top mass averages, obtained from measurements in several channels and based on about 100 pb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected by each experiment in Run-I, are: M{sub t} = 176.1 {+-} 4.0(stat) {+-} 5.1(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub t} = 172.1 {+-} 5.2(stat) {+-} 4.9(syst) Gev/C{sup 2}, respectively. The combined Tevatron measurement of the top quark mass is M{sub t} = 174.3 {+-} 3.2(stat) {+-} 4.0(syst) GeV/c{sup 2}. The CDF measurement of the t{bar t} cross section (assuming M{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}) is {sigma}{sub tt} = 6.5 {+-} {sub 1.4}{sup 1.6} pb, and the D0 value (assuming M{sub t} = 172.1 GeV/c{sup 2}) is {sigma}{sub tt} = 5.9 {+-} 1.7 pb. In anticipation of much larger statistics, prospects for top physics in Tevatron Run-II are summarized. The fact that top quark analyses are among the best windows to physics beyond the Standard Model is emphasized.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of forward-backward asymmetry and top polarization in dilepton final states from $t\\bar t$ production at the Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-09-22

    We present a simultaneous measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry and the top-quark polarization in tt production in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb1 of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector. To reconstruct the distributions of kinematic observables we employ a matrix element technique that calculates the likelihood of the possible tt kinematic configurations. After accounting for the presence of background events and for calibration effects, we obtain a forward-backward asymmetry of Att=(15.06.4(stat)4.9(syst))% and a top-quark polarization times spin analyzing power in the beam basis of ?P=(7.210.5(stat)4.2(syst))%, with a correlation of 56% between the measurements. If we constrainmorethe forward-backward asymmetry to its expected standard model value, we obtain a measurement of the top polarization of ?P=(11.39.1(stat)1.9(syst))%. If we constrain the top polarization to its expected standard model value, we measure a forward-backward asymmetry of Att=(17.55.6(stat)3.1(syst))%. A combination with the D0 Att measurement in the lepton+jets final state yields an asymmetry of Att=(11.82.5(stat)1.3(syst))%. Within their respective uncertainties, all these results are consistent with the standard model expectations.less

  17. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Anastassov, A; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Annovi, A

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt? events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt? decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 2.4 (stat) 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  18. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton tt¯ events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of topmore » squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  19. Inclusive and differential measurements of the $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ charge asymmetry in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    The tt charge asymmetry is measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . Selected events contain an electron or a muon and four or more jets, where at least one jet is identified as originating from b-quark hadronization. The inclusive charge asymmetry is found to be 0.0010 0.0068 (stat) 0.0037 (syst). In addition, differential charge asymmetries as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum, and invariant mass of the tt system are studied. For the first time at the LHC, our measurements are also performed in a reduced fiducial phase space of top quark pair production, with an integrated result of -0.0035 0.0072 (stat) 0.0031 (syst). Additionally, all measurements are consistent within two standard deviations with zero asymmetry as well as with the predictions of the standard model.

  20. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt̄ events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp̄ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt̄ decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore » the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  1. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  2. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I 1' . _ .t. /' L* x ,! " - p. iI C/-f-j i c, -q iGJbr%pq 22, 19&i 40:m Clli ;xmn r;. Cre?ltz J t E Y"* kL ss&LJl L' fJ i:~-q::~ i;<-t;j.!;z;:, 1 :,'. :; pctl;c-it nt a tsst of the ::3fr iZQviQ@l QT<*rl,l$jiOn t;rCso t!t t!lO 13 "; ?! i'@ t?'lS 2.2' I'"!'\Y ir, colw~bus with plome bill&S SO?' l"c fro?1 i:ol .T. ThO ~3X.~:nri.*,ellti FfB ~tt-?%-:Oti fOF 9 heYi., BQIpdPpJ 21. !?PeBait'k "~..j,;PC~ 1 .r. LOi~lr.tl 0" RU335li, ~iJrj.~~uioll sjl.6

  3. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  4. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  5. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 ?m or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  6. Fabrication of free-standing NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoarrays via a facile modified hydrothermal synthesis method and their applications for lithium ion batteries and high-rate alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Qingyun Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal-synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays exhibit porous structure and high capacity as well as good cycling life for lithium ion batteries and alkaline batteries. - Highlights: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays are prepared by a hydrothermal method. NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show high capacity and good cycling life. Porous nanoflake arrays structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays on nickel foam are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflakes with thicknesses of ?25 nm grow vertically to the nickel foam substrate and form an interconnected porous network with pore diameters of 50500 nm. As anode material of LIBs, the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show a high initial coulombic efficiency of 76%, as well as good cycling stability with a capacity of 880 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.5 A g{sup ?1}, and 523 mAh g{sup ?1} at 1.5 A g{sup ?1} after 50 cycles. As the cathode of alkaline batteries, a high capacity of 95 mAh g{sup ?1} is achieved at 2 A g{sup ?1} and 94% retention is maintained after 10,000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly due to the unique nanoflake arrays structure with large surface area and shorter diffusion length for mass and charge transport.

  7. Net-structured Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array with enhanced electrochemical performance toward lithium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y.X.; Liu, X.Y.; Xia, X.H.; Xiong, Q.Q.; Wang, X.L.; Gu, C.D.; Tu, J.P.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array on nickel foam was synthesized by hydrothermal method, followed by magnetron sputtering of a carbon layer. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array electrode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 1340.4 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C. After 100 cycles, the capacity retention of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C is 88.8% of its initial discharge capacity. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the porous nanosheet array and the thin carbon layer coated on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets. - Abstract: Freestanding Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array growing directly on nickel foam substrate was synthesized using a hydrothermal approach, followed by a direct current magnetron sputtering of a thin carbon layer. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets with thicknesses of 1020 nm are interconnected with each other, forming a highly open net-structure. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array electrode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 1340.4 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C, and maintains a high specific capacity of 912.1 mAh g{sup ?1} at room temperature and can still remain 88.8% of its initial discharge capacity at 55 C at 1 C after 100 cycles. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the porous nanosheet array and the thin carbon layer coated on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets, which cannot only facilitate Li{sup +} and electron transportation in the electrode, but also improve its structure stability during cycling.

  8. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolosz, Ben Grant-Muller, Susan

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years. • ISA and AHS generate a negative result due to vehicle implementation costs. • AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years.

  9. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * SAVANNAH RIVER SITE * AIKEN * SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanostructured Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS), managing contractor of the Savannah River Site (SRS) for the Department of Energy, has developed new anodes for lithium-ion batteries that are reported to increase the energy density four-fold. It is widely known that the energy capacity of lithium-ion batteries is limited by the widely used graphite anode that intercalates lithium ions as LiC6. The theoretical capacity of LiC6 is 372mAh/g. To power an

  10. All-or-none suppression of B cell terminal differentiation by environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qiang; Kline, Douglas E.; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Crawford, Robert B.; Conolly, Rory B.; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-04-01

    Many environmental contaminants can disrupt the adaptive immune response. Exposure to the ubiquitous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other agonists suppresses the antibody response. The underlying pathway mechanism by which TCDD alters B cell function is not well understood. The present study investigated the mechanism of AhR-mediated pathways and mode of suppression by which TCDD perturbs terminal differentiation of B cells to plasma cells and thereby impairs antibody production. An integrated approach combining computational pathway modeling and in vitro assays with primary mouse B cells activated by lipopolysaccharide was employed. We demonstrated that suppression of the IgM response by TCDD occurs in an all-or-none (binary) rather than graded mode: i.e., it reduces the number of IgM-secreting cells in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting the IgM content in individual plasma cells. The mathematical model of the gene regulatory circuit underpinning B cell differentiation revealed that two previously identified AhR-regulated pathways, inhibition of signaling protein AP-1 and activation of transcription factor Bach2, could account for the all-or-none mode of suppression. Both pathways disrupt the operation of a bistable-switch circuit that contains transcription factors Bcl6, Prdm1, Pax5, and Bach2 and regulates B cell fate. The model further predicted that by transcriptionally activating Bach2, TCDD might delay B cell differentiation and increase the likelihood of isotype switching, thereby altering the antibody repertoire. In conclusion, the present study revealed the mode and specific pathway mechanisms by which the environmental immunosuppressant TCDD suppresses B cell differentiation. - Highlights: ? TCDD suppresses B cell differentiation stimulated by LPS in an all-or-none mode. ? TCDD reduces the fraction of IgM-secreting cells, not the IgM level in those cells. ? A mathematical model indicates deregulation of AP-1 and Bach2 by AhR is involved. ? Both pathways interfere with the bistable switch underlying B cell differentiation. ? Disruption of the bistable switch leads to all-or-none mode of suppression.

  11. Electrochemistry of KC{sub 8} in lithium-containing electrolytes and its use in lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossici, R.; Berrettoni, M.; Rosolen, M.; Marassi, R.; Scrosati, B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of KC{sub 8} in a lithium-containing ethylene carbonate-dimethylcarbonate electrolyte has been studied. The results show that upon oxidation KC{sub 8} irreversibly releases potassium ions and that during the following cathodic cycle, the residual graphite intercalates lithium reversibly and with fast rate up to a LiC{sub 6} composition. The results also show that a KC{sub 8} electrode can be used in lithium-ion cells in combination with partially lithiated or even with lithium-free cathodes. The maximum capacities (referred to the anode) that may be achieved are 372 and 279 mAh/g, respectively.

  12. Aeroelastic Modeling of Large Off-shore Vertical-axis Wind Turbines: Development of the Offshore Wind Energy Simulation Toolkit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Downloaded by Daniel Griffith on April 12, 2013 | http://arc.aiaa.org | DOI: 10.2514/6.2013-1552 54th AIAA/ASME/ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics, and Materials Conference April 8-11, 2013, Boston, Massachusetts AIAA 2013-1552 This material is declared a work of the U.S. Government and is not subject to copyright protection in the United States. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2 I. Introduction HE availability of offshore wind resources in coastal regions makes

  13. Overview of the RFX fusion science program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 (2011) 094023 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/51/9/094023 Overview of the RFX fusion science program P. Martin 1 , J. Adamek 2 , P. Agostinetti 1 , M. Agostini 1 , A. Alfier 1 , C. Angioni 3 , V. Antoni 1 , L. Apolloni 1 , F. Auriemma 1 , O. Barana 1 , S. Barison 4 , M. Baruzzo 1 , P. Bettini 1 , M. Boldrin 1 , T. Bolzonella 1 , D. Bonfiglio 1 , F. Bonomo 1 , A.H. Boozer 5,6 , M. Brombin 1 , J. Brotankova 2 , A. Buffa 1 , A. Canton 1 , S. Cappello 1 , L. Carraro 1 , R. Cavazzana 1 , M. Cavinato

  14. X O O

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    I 1 0 3 P 0 d d X O O l i n O A O U 3 N 3 ( O Z / f r G ) 2 0 2 0 - V I 3 / 3 0 Q This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. AH telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238

  15. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2015-10-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  16. SANDIA REPORT SAND96-2031 UC-742 Unlimited Release

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    8 1996 SANDIA REPORT SAND96-2031 UC-742 Unlimited Release Printed August 1996 t i Precision Linear Shaped Charge Analyses for Severance of Metals &j "LbEjIp?C,> L : k > Ah16 3 0 1996 $72 t- i& ,= b - 3 Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Govern- ment nor any

  17. cnc7233.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IZ6SS0 PREPRINT Hard Tmget Penetrator Explosive Development Optimization of Fragrnen& Blast and Survivability Properties of Explosives for Hard Target Applications R.L. Simpson R.W. Swansiger D.M. Hoffman E. James P.C Souers so struck S. CarSwell P.J. Mendicki This paper was preparedfor submittalto 47th AnnualBomb and WarheadTechnicalMeeting Los AhJIIOS, NM May 6-S, 1997 May 1997 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

  18. Microsoft Word - 1Q10Web Update, 7-15-10.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 SRR-ESH-2010-00055 Revision 1 August 13, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,571 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 134 kgals Vault 4, Cell F c)

  19. Microsoft Word - 2Q09Web1, 10-28-09.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 SRR-ESH-2009-00042 Revision 1 November 13, 2009 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 2,619 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 1,365 kgals Vault 4, Cell K c)

  20. Microsoft Word - 2Q10Web Rev 1, 10-25-10.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 SRR-ESH-2010-00093 Revision 1 November 12, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,843 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 386 kgals Vault 4, Cells F,

  1. Microsoft Word - 3Q07Web.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2007 SRS-REG-2007-00033 November 6, 2007 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 100 kilogallons (kgals) For period 3/5/07 - 9/30/07 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 226 kgals, Vault 4, Cell E Vault 4, Cell L For

  2. 1Q08Web.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2008 ESH-WPG-2008-00044 May 6, 2008 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information *This value is corrected to include the contribution of the Y-90/Ba-137m daughter products which were inadvertently omitted from the 3Q and 4Q 2007 reports. The increase in curies as a result of this correction is 3.5 kCi. Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed

  3. 1Q09Web.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Quarter 2009 LWO-DWP-2009-00025 May 14, 2009 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 1,805 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 631 kgals, Vault 4, Cells D, K c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone

  4. Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping January 10, 2012 - 4:31pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ah, January. It's still cold and it's still dark all the time, but now all the cheerful Christmas lights have come down so there's nothing to break up the monotony. What's there to do? Well, while it's a little late now, you might want to go do some post-holiday holiday shopping. Yes, I know. That sounds insane. Everyone is thoroughly

  5. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 1 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 722 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cells 5A and 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  6. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2016-00025 Revision 0 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 744 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  7. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  8. 2Q08Web.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2008 LWO-SPT-2008-00069 August 8, 2008 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 1443 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 220 kgals, Vault 4, Cell D c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone grout

  9. 3Q10Web Rev 1, 1-20-11.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter, Calendar Year 2010 SRR-ESH-2010-00148 Revision 1 February 11, 2011 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,981 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable

  10. 4Q07Web.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2007 SRS-REG-2008-00006 January 30, 2008 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 888 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 1429 kgals, Vault 4, Cell E Vault 4, Cell F c) Cumulative process volume of

  11. ETA-TP014 Appendix A: Day 1 Range and Charge Data Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Day 1 Range and Charge Data Sheet Page 2 of 2 20 Segment Number % of TP4 Range Distance Required (miles) Segment Speed (mph) Initial SOC Time Start Time End Miles Driven Final SOC kWh Used Charge Number Initial Battery Temp Charge Time Start Charge Time End Energy Returned (Ah/kWh) Final Battery Temp 1 80% 60 2 60% 45 3 50% 60 4 40% 45 5 30% 60 6 40% 45 7 30% 60 8 60% 45 9 50% 60 10 40% 45 11 30% 60 12 60% 45 13 50% 60 14 40% 45 TOTALS AVG's Completed By: (Printed Name) (Signature ) (Date)

  12. L.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Au*ority Of .as__w__ *-----a-m*-m-m-ma L.Q /..' ) , ;s ' -.L - This ihzt,rnr~ consis:s 0) T. 0. lhd!?, m mm- - -_._ /[ ..Pairrs No.. ._._ d...ot --._. /o~.cool+s. Ccrto -- '.. ," :I.:' .., i. '. ._ ,' : i I r '. L. ,I . ' I ', .,.i j./ gm@bQ -: ..Y : 1 i " -.. -- --PN1-__..- #l nwuff 1 @ ~Qlw3fng+r4oomlu By A&mfity of m....... . . . . . . . ..-.....-- (?S 1 5 ;' , i, L f ' I. y ' i <Z-a; :' - ' ; .* a I :?:", " ' t ; . . ' . :' * & 4 , y "** i pLA%lAhA

  13. OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 7% d &y / 7 ORNL/TM- 10076 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL ~-T-m -~=- -~ w-~- -"" * ,<.~- ~w&$UREMENTs: TAKEN IN THE NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK, AREA (NF002) J. K. Williams B. A. Berven ~.~~;:;-~~~ ~. -,' - ~~ 7, OPERATED BY MARTIN MARIDTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC, FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY --... ORNL/TM-10076 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOI) RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL

  14. TP14AppABC.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Day 3 Range and Charge Schedule Page 2 of 2 24 Segment Number % of TP4 Range Distance Required (miles) Segment Speed (mph) Initial SOC Time Start Time End Miles Driven Final SOC kWh Used Charge Number Initial Battery Temp Charge Time Start Charge Time End Energy Returned (Ah/kWh) Final Battery Temp 1 80% 60 2 60% 45 3 60% 60 4 80% 45 5 40% 60 6 30% 45 7 50% 60 8 30% 45 9 40% 60 10 60% 45 11 40% 60 12 50% 45 13 30% 60 14 30% 45 TOTALS AVG's Completed By: (Printed Name) (Signature ) (Date)

  15. TP14AppB.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Day 2 Range and Charge Data Sheet Page 2 of 2 22 Charge Data Segment Number % of TP4 Range Distance Required (miles) Segment Speed (mph) Initial SOC Time Start Time End Miles Driven Final SOC kWh Used Charge Number Initial Battery Temp Charge Time Start Charge Time End Energy Returned (Ah/kWh) Final Battery Temp 1 50% 45 2 30% 60 3 60% 60 4 40% 45 5 50% 60 6 30% 45 7 60% 45 8 40% 60 9 50% 45 10 30% 60 11 60% 60 12 40% 45 13 50% 60 14 30% 60 TOTALS AVG's Completed By: (Printed Name) (Signature

  16. CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION PAYMENT TO m MADE BY: CONTRACT NO. AT(30-l)-1247 CONTRACT pl AMERICAN MACHINE Ah'D FOUNDRY COMP'N' Second Avenue and 56th Street Brooklyn, New York MA$HR\?No AND OTHER WORK AND SERVICES August o' 19% to December 31 9 0 'lyj! 512O,ox).OO Division of Disbursement, United States Treasury Department,' New York, New York. Subn-it invoices to: United States Atomic Energy Corrcni&ion, P. 0. %x 30, Ansonia Station New York 23, l!tw

  17. Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

  18. VA-s--- ' At&LYTlCAL DATA SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    VA-s--- ' At&LYTlCAL DATA SHEET - ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. I. H.#1049Sample Nos. 5 Date Collected-7/19bya-Route to-A.. Location NORFOLK NAVAL. STATION Type of Sampleairdus_r_4nalyzed for F Alpha gem.& Samples collected during the demonstration of a uranium u Beta turning fire. Men below took part in extinguishinp the fire. b&,, Ro All wore Comfo type respirators and extinguished the fire from oil PH an upwind position.

  19. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  20. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ,/: .--: I ' > 1-1 __,.. i IN-30-I I ii f ORNL/TM-iii11 L f--$+yq \_; : L,.. ----_ ..-., --.., " ,,,_ ..i RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL' SURVEY AT ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE CORPORATION, INDUSTRIAL AND WILLIAMS AVENUES, TETERBORO, NEW JERSEY (TJ002) R. D. Foley I,. M. Floyd 1 P OFlNL/TM-II111 HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Nuclear and Chemical Waste Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; ONLWCOl) RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT ALLIED BENDIX AEROSPACE CORPORATION, INDUSTRIAL AND

  1. L:LCB:lg

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L:LCB:lg '. ,. ), .; ..:.;; ~ .,. Fhazmon sAmi.now uatsri.als co. 7356 sanca !.tonioa Boulevard Eollymod 46, Calif. Attr Mr. J. 2. Alburger CslItlI%LOIll - Ootober, 9, l&2 ,:;.. ~. Tk have your letter dabed Ootobor~B, 1962 &ah is euffioient to give w a better plotwe of the we wblch you propose to make ofuraniumoorrpovndE inluud.now'paintpignonts. We are attaahing licanse number C-2663 uhi&.permits you to purchase three pounds ofuraniumoompounda for demlop3mt mrk. 1% want ybu to

  2. LCriu OoYCrtR"/

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I\J v. 1 Ah??-2 a/i, / sq _.. ,F-- & ,; ( 1 , i c ;" ,I f ' f- ' (" ." I, ( f c ,F ,td ,,' :, i -+ 1 ,?-' : '" " 4: i' ,-) c ' 3 J' b F ' : ) )j\,J\ :I "vE-', P-)ri 1 I 'r>)r\ L LCriu OoYCrtR"/ i tj~~3iscr,a,..),r\'~'i':riii "1 . _._ .- __ . . .._-.------ PURCHASE ORDER. \ ORDER No. ----zz-7-- - .-.. __~--- ___ -_ - __--. -+?=w. *u*, .. i ' NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO I=--- . BOX 1538, MT. HEALTHY STATION, CINCI' NNATI 31. OHIO iwe-.---- ___-

  3. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    &!!hs!.-&?& SUB3ECT: SITE ALTERNATE NAME: St~tioti\)~ Mdaue Tools z -___---~------~~~~---~~~~~~- I- @ I. &ct*ahlyI +--ca-----NAME: CITY: -&&+L- &------------STATE: -A!$- !EJE~L_s1 Past: 5 ~mPqor.4 --------- ------- Owner contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ~~~_----~~~~----- [III-IO; i Hr. F Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process g Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis ?dAIJ /**,5 ;..c A.$ i-.L Production cl

  4. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE, . . . . . ..-..__. _ --.-.__.. .-..I............ !..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Q~~~ds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel&~ will be require& In : 'ri~ofthehereiabefor6notedeopreodo~ of puriata~tio.aadap :, Iv ve unbntend you vi11 not obj.& to:tha aoe " ai spoh +ant+lea of the mirloua real&es ,, ', ',"" ': ., .,.. i. : /~. ,".. .I,: /, . . ' .* ,; ., ,' ,:.' . .-;. ,-Y .b4 P-0 : ,.

  5. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.#~~Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collected~~by-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description I I I--- R ) T 1 Q I I I 7392 1100 GA Induction furnace area duri-nn ----l----- mDeriod;.02; 151 .3 while furnace was charged with UOT_-

  6. 16C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1961HI01: 16C; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1976AL02: 16C; measured Eγ, Iγ, γ(t), T1/2, delayed neutrons log ft. 16N deduced levels. 1976FI03: 16C; measured T1/2, delayed γ, delayed neutrons. 1983GA03: 16C(β-), (β-n); measured β(t), γ(t), βγ-coin; deduced log ft. 16N levels deduced β-branching ratio. 2000BU33, 2001GR06: 16C(β-n); measured β-delayed neutron spectra. 16N deduced level, J, π. Comparison with shell model

  7. 16Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 16Ne Adopted value: 122 ± 37 keV (1993TI07) Measured Mass Excess for 16Ne Adopted value: 23996 ± 20 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1971MAXQ: 16O(π+, π-); measured particle spectra, σ. 1977HO13: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ; deduced Q. 16Ne deduced mass excess. 1977KEZX: 20Ne(α, 8He), E = 118 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced levels, mass excess. 1978BU09: 16O(π+, π-), E = 145 MeV; measured σ. 16Ne deduced mass

  8. A=10Be (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10Be) GENERAL: See (KU56, FR57, BA59F, KU60A, TA60L, BA61N, TR61, BU63D, VL63A, WA63C, FR64D, GR64C, VO64C, WA64H, WA64K). See also Table 10.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 10Be(β-)10B Qm = 0.555 The weighted mean end-point energy is 0.556 ± 0.003 MeV (LI51A). The mean half life is (2.7 ± 0.4) x 106 y (HU49A): log ft = 13.65 (FE51B). The spectrum is of the D2 type (WU50). 2. (a) 7Li(t, α)6He Qm = 9.834 Eb = 17.250 (b) 7Li(t, 2n)8Be Qm =

  9. A=12B (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 12B) GENERAL: See also (1968AJ02) and Table 12.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1968FU1B, 1968GU11, 1969MO1F, 1969VA1C, 1970TA1J, 1973HA49, 1973SA30). Special levels: (1968CE1A, 1968GU11, 1970FR1C, 1973SA30). Electromagnetic transitions: (1969VA1C, 1973HA49, 1973SA30). Special reactions: (1969AR13, 1969GA18, 1971AR02, 1973KO1D, 1973WI15, 1974FO22). Muon capture (See also reaction 16.): (1969VA37, 1970BU1B, 1970HI09, 1971MO1Q,

  10. A=13B (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 13B) GENERAL: See also (1976AJ04) and Table 13.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Experimental work on complex reactions in which 13B is observed: (1976BU16, 1977AR06, 1978GE1C, 1978KO01, 1979LE1J). Reviews and theoretical papers: (1976AB04, 1976VA29, 1977DO06, 1978AB08, 1978DE15, 1979AL22, 1979BE1H, 1979BO22, 1980MA1F, 1980MU1B). Q = 0.0478 ± 0.0046 b (1973HAVZ, 1978LEZA). μ = +3.17778 ± 0.00051 nm (1978LEZA). 1. 13B(β-)13C Qm = 13.437 The

  11. A=16Ne (1986AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ04) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See also (1982AJ01) and Table 16.26 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. See (1981SE1B, 1983ANZQ, 1985AN28, 1985MA1X). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is 23.989 ± 0.020 MeV which is

  12. A=16Ne (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    93TI07) (See the Isobar Diagram for 16Ne) GENERAL: See Table Prev. Table 16.29 preview 16.29 [General Table] (in PDF or PS) and Table Prev. Table 16.32 preview 16.32 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 16Ne: The Q-values of the 20Ne(α, 8He) and 16O(π+, π-) reactions lead to atomic mass excesses of 23.93 ± 0.08 MeV (1978KE06), 23.978 ± 0.024 MeV (1983WO01) and 24.048 ± 0.045 MeV (1980BU15) [recalculated using the (1985WA02) masses for 8He, 16O and 20Ne]. The weighted mean is

  13. A=19F (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19F) GENERAL: See (1972AJ02) and Table 19.6 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1970FL1A, 1972EN03, 1972GU05, 1972LE13, 1972NE1B, 1973DE13, 1973JU1A, 1973LA1D, 1973MA1K, 1973MC06, 1973MC1E, 1973ME1D, 1973SM1C, 1974CO39, 1975BA81, 1975GA1L, 1975MA1U, 1975SUZR, 1977HA33, 1977SH11). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1972NE1B, 1973DE06, 1973MC1E, 1973NE1C, 1973RO19, 1976LE19, 1977BU05, 1977HO1F). Electromagnetic transitions:

  14. A=7Be (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1978RE1A, 1979WI1B, 1980HA1M, 1981KU13, 1982FI13, 1983WA1M). Astrophysical questions: (1978BU1B, 1979MO04, 1979RA20, 1979RA1C, 1980CA1C, 1980LA1G, 1980WI1M, 1983LI01). Applied work: (1979LA1E, 1982HA1D, 1983HA1W). Complex reactions involving 7Be: (1978DI1A, 1978DU1B, 1978HA40, 1978HE1C, 1979BO22, 1979KA07, 1979LO11, 1979PO10, 1979RA20, 1979SC1D,

  15. A=7He (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7He) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Reactions involving pions: (1978FU09, 1979BA1M, 1979PE1C). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A, 1978SO1A, 1979BU1C, 1981WA1J, 1982KO11). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1981AV02, 1982AW02, 1982NG01). 1. 7Li(π-, γ)7He Qm = 128.36 See (1979AJ01). 2. 7Li(n, p)7He Qm = -10.42 At En = 14.8 MeV a proton group is reported corresponding to 7Heg.s.: Γ < 0.2 MeV: see (1979AJ01). See also

  16. 2011 Chevrolet Volt VIN 0815 Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), including testing the PHEV batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 12,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Chevrolet Volt PHEV (VIN 1G1RD6E48BU100815). The battery testing was performed by the Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation (eTec) dba ECOtality North America. The Idaho National Laboratory and ECOtality North America collaborate on the AVTA for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the DOE.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition of High Silica SiO2-TiO2 Antireflective Thin Films for Glass Based Solar Panels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klobukowski, Erik R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; McCamy, James; Harris, Caroline; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of SiO2-TiO2 thin films employing [[(tBuO)3Si]2O-Ti(OiPr)2], which can be prepared from commercially available materials, results in antireflective thin films on float glass under industrially relevant manufacturing conditions. It was found that while the deposition temperature had an effect on the SiO2:TiO2 ratio, the thickness was dependent on the time of deposition. This study shows that it is possible to use APCVD employing a single source precursor containing titanium and silicon to produce thin films on float glass with high SiO2:TiO2 ratios.

  18. Page

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Updated: January 2013 Page 1 APPENDIX A CRUDE STREAM CODES COUNTRY Stream Code Stream Name Gravity Sulfur Abu Dhabi UA008 Al Bunduq 38.5 1.1 UA009 Mubarraz 38.1 0.9 UA010 Murban 40.5 0.8 UA011 Zakum (Lower Zakum/Abu Dhabi Marine) 40.6 1 UA012 Umm Shaif (Abu Dhabi Marine) 37.4 1.5 UA013 Arzanah 44 0 UA018 Abu Al Bu Khoosh 31.6 2 UA020 Murban Bottoms 21.4 NA UA021 Top Murban 21 NA UA022 Upper Zakum 34.4 1.7 UA299 Abu Dhabi Miscellaneous NA NA Algeria AG020 Arzew 44.3 0.1 AG021 Hassi Messaoud 42.8

  19. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camarero, Julio A. (Livermore, CA); Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); De Yoreo, James J. (Clayton, CA)

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  20. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trellue, Holly Renee; Fugate, Michael Lynn; Tobin, Stephen Joesph

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  1. Efficient One-Step Electrolytic Recycling of Low-Grade and Post-Consumer Magnesium Scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam C. Powell, IV

    2012-07-19

    Metal Oxygen Separation Technologies, Inc. (abbreviated MOxST, pronounced most) and Boston University (BU) have developed a new low-cost process for recycling post-consumer co-mingled and heavily-oxidized magnesium scrap, and discovered a new chemical mechanism for magnesium separations in the process. The new process, designated MagReGenTM, is very effective in laboratory experiments, and on scale-up promises to be the lowest-cost lowest-energy lowest-impact method for separating magnesium metal from aluminum while recovering oxidized magnesium. MagReGenTM uses as little as one-eighth as much energy as today's methods for recycling magnesium metal from comingled scrap. As such, this technology could play a vital role in recycling automotive non-ferrous metals, particularly as motor vehicle magnesium/aluminum ratios increase in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase efficiency.

  2. Synthesis, NMR spectra, and structure of rhodium hydride complexes with Rh-Sn bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krut'ko, B.P.; Permin, A.B.; Petrosyan, V.S.; Reutov, O.A.

    1985-06-20

    The authors study the hydride complexes using Sn 119 and H 1 NMR spectroscopy. The spectra were taken in a pulse mode on a Varian FT-80A spectrometer equipped with a wideband system at 29.66 and 79.54 MHz. The Sn 119 and H 1 NMR spectral parameters for a solution of the complex (Bu/sub 4/N)/sub 3/ (HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/) in CD/sub 3/CN are shown, the spectra show that the (HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sup 3 -/ anion has octahedral structure with four equatorial and one axial Rh-Sn bonds. New rhodium hydride complexes with general formula (R/sub 4/N)/sub 3/(HRh(SnCl/sub 3/)/sub 5/) were synthesized.

  3. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  4. A Singular Differential Equation Stemming from an Optimal Control Problem in Financial Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunovsky, Pavol; Cerny, Ales; Winkler, Michael

    2013-10-15

    We consider the ordinary differential equation x{sup 2} u'' = axu'+bu-c(u'-1){sup 2}, x Element-Of (0,x{sub 0}), with a Element-Of R, b Element-Of R , c>0 and the singular initial condition u(0)=0, which in financial economics describes optimal disposal of an asset in a market with liquidity effects. It is shown in the paper that if a+b<0 then no continuous solutions exist, whereas if a+b>0 then there are infinitely many continuous solutions with indistinguishable asymptotics near 0. Moreover, it is proved that in the latter case there is precisely one solution u corresponding to the choice x{sub 0}={infinity} which is such that 0{<=}u(x){<=}x for all x>0, and that this solution is strictly increasing and concave.

  5. Simonis Sa7; and Steel. Company Occu?atisnal Exposure to Radioactive Eust

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    pff!' ;-g / (. _ ' /' :ze Simonis Sa7; and Steel. Company . Occu?atisnal Exposure to Radioactive Eust STisit 0' Cctober 27, 1948 by LL%AEC, NY-00 -.- .^ -___ .~.~ .___--.__ y ii . 8;' ' j _ ii* .$@!w- mqa yq 1 -9. c--t c! ;i.s -1 .;- 8. ,3' .$ !, ., ,:' S ' -4 - ;,.j j ;j Y 3 :;.% ,y :; -' ,C-, .,.; sL;./, &j ;d J .&; i: 7;: j:c; G Lj _ , ,.A: :' .i TIiBU OP cc>:m;~s A,. P*zyoaa of rbpo*rt 3, iitzm iLt=P 02 St-&J c* zz@fi&. of s+xdy I, op~~",io~b IIzrp~ii~ 3t xo11ing

  6. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  7. Defect-Tolerant Diffusion Channels for Mg2+ Ions in Ribbon-Type Borates: Structural Insights into Potential Battery Cathodes MgVBO4 and Mgx Fe2–xB2O5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bo, Shou-Hang; Grey, Clare P.; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2015-06-10

    The reversible room temperature intercalation of Mg2+ ions is difficult to achieve, but may offer substantial advantages in the design of next-generation batteries if this electrochemical process can be successfully realized. Two types of quadruple ribbon-type transition metal borates (MgxFe2-xB2O5 and MgVBO4) with high theoretical capacities (186 mAh/g and 360 mAh/g) have been synthesized and structurally characterized through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron and time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Neither MgVBO4 nor MgxFe2-xB2O5 can be chemically oxidized at room temperature, though Mg can be dynamically removed from the latter phase at elevated temperatures (approximately 200 - 500 °C). Findingsmore »show that Mg diffusion in the MgxFe2-xB2O5 structure is more facile for the inner two octahedral sites than for the two outer octahedral sites in the ribbons, a result supported by both the refined site occupancies after Mg removal and by bond valence sum difference map calculations of diffusion paths in the pristine material. Mg diffusion in this pyroborate MgxFe2-xB2O5 framework is also found to be tolerant to the presence of Mg/Fe disorder since Mg ions can diffuse through interstitial channels which bypass Fe-containing sites.« less

  8. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of Pure LiFePO 4 and Nanocomposite C- LiFePO 4 Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure limore » thium iron phosphate ( LiFePO 4 ) and carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C- LiFePO 4 ) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating on LiFePO 4 particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C- LiFePO 4 at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms of LiFePO 4 and C- LiFePO 4 showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively for LiFePO 4 where as in case of C- LiFePO 4 that were 163, 144, 118, and 70 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pure LiFePO 4 was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C- LiFePO 4 was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.« less

  9. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-20

    Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

  10. Preparation of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries by a mist CVD process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Sakuda, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro; Duran, Alicia; Aparacio, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were prepared by using the mist CVD process. An aqueous solution of lithium and manganese acetates is used for the precursor solution. The cell with the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g. The cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles. - Abstract: LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries were prepared by using so-called the mist CVD process, employing an aqueous solution of lithium acetate and manganese acetate, as the source of Li and Mn, respectively. The aqueous solution of starting materials was ultrasonically atomized to form mist particles, and mists were transferred by nitrogen gas to silica glass substrate to form thin films. FE-SEM observation revealed that thin films obtained by this process were dense and smooth, and thin films with a thickness of about 750 nm were obtained. The electrochemical cell with the thin films obtained by sintering at 700 C exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g, and the cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles.

  11. Enhanced rate performance of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 fibers synthesized by electrospinning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaofeng; chamoun, rita; Shui, Jianglan; Li, James; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Belharouak, IB

    2015-05-29

    Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) provides a high working potential as a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. Yet there is a phase transition from cubic to tetragonal structure in LNMO during the ~3 V charge/discharge region. To suppress the large volume change and capacity fade inherent with bulk-sized LNMO particles when discharged to below 3.0 V, one-dimensional nano-structured LNMO was prepared by an electrospinning method and a subsequent heat treatment. The well-separated nanofiber precursors combat the growth and aggregation of LNMO particles during the heating procedure and lead to improved capacity, better cycling stability, and improved rate capability of the final LMNO nanofibers. The as-prepared LMNO nanofibers have a diameter as thin as 50100 nm, which is the thinnest of this kind of complex compounds that contain multi-transition metal elements produced through the electrospinning method. In coin cell tests of this material at a current density of 27 mA g-1, the initial discharge capacity was 130 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 3.54.8 V and 300 mAh g-1 over a voltage range of 2.04.8 V.

  12. Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures as cathode materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.H., E-mail: yhding@xtu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Ren, H.M. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Huang, Y.Y. [BTR New Energy Materials Inc., Shenzhen 518000 (China); Chang, F.H.; Zhang, P. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} composites as a high-performance cathode material for flexible lithium-ion batteries have been prepared by using a co-precipitation method to synthesize graphene/LiFePO4 powders as precursors and then followed by a solvent evaporation process. - Highlights: Flexible LiFePO{sub 4}/graphene films were prepared first time by a solvent evaporation process. The flexible electrode exhibited a high discharge capacity without conductive additives. Graphene network offers the electrode adequate strength to withstand repeated flexing. - Abstract: Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures for flexible lithium-ion batteries were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Structural characteristics of flexible electrodes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical performance of graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} was examined by a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures showed high electrochemical properties and significant flexibility. The composites with low graphene content exhibited a high capacity of 163.7 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C and 114 mAh g{sup ?1} at 5 C without further incorporation of conductive agents.

  13. Defect-Tolerant Diffusion Channels for Mg2+ Ions in Ribbon-Type Borates: Structural Insights into Potential Battery Cathodes MgVBO4 and Mgx Fe2–xB2O5

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bo, Shou-Hang; Grey, Clare P.; Khalifah, Peter G.

    2015-06-10

    The reversible room temperature intercalation of Mg2+ ions is difficult to achieve, but may offer substantial advantages in the design of next-generation batteries if this electrochemical process can be successfully realized. Two types of quadruple ribbon-type transition metal borates (MgxFe2-xB2O5 and MgVBO4) with high theoretical capacities (186 mAh/g and 360 mAh/g) have been synthesized and structurally characterized through the combined Rietveld refinement of synchrotron and time-of-flight neutron diffraction data. Neither MgVBO4 nor MgxFe2-xB2O5 can be chemically oxidized at room temperature, though Mg can be dynamically removed from the latter phase at elevated temperatures (approximately 200 - 500 °C). Findingsmore » show that Mg diffusion in the MgxFe2-xB2O5 structure is more facile for the inner two octahedral sites than for the two outer octahedral sites in the ribbons, a result supported by both the refined site occupancies after Mg removal and by bond valence sum difference map calculations of diffusion paths in the pristine material. Mg diffusion in this pyroborate MgxFe2-xB2O5 framework is also found to be tolerant to the presence of Mg/Fe disorder since Mg ions can diffuse through interstitial channels which bypass Fe-containing sites.« less

  14. Evidence of covalent synergy in siliconsulfurgraphene yielding highly efficient and long-life lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Fathy M.; Batmaz, Rasim; Li, Jingde; Wang, Xiaolei; Xiao, Xingcheng; Yu, Aiping; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-10-26

    Silicon has the potential to revolutionize the energy storage capacities of lithium-ion batteries to meet the ever increasing power demands of next generation technologies. To avoid the operational stability problems of silicon-based anodes, we propose synergistic physicochemical alteration of electrode structures during their design. This capitalizes on covalent interaction of Si nanoparticles with sulfur-doped graphene and with cyclized polyacrylonitrile to provide a robust nanoarchitecture. This hierarchical structure stabilized the solid electrolyte interphase leading to superior reversible capacity of over 1,000 mAh g-1 for 2,275 cycles at 2 A g-1. Furthermore, the nanoarchitectured design lowered the contact of the electrolyte to the electrode leading to not only high coulombic efficiency of 99.9% but also maintaining high stability even with high electrode loading associated with 3.4 mAh cm-2. As a result, the excellent performance combined with the simplistic, scalable and non-hazardous approach render the process as a very promising candidate for Li-ion battery technology.

  15. Evidence of covalent synergy in silicon–sulfur–graphene yielding highly efficient and long-life lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hassan, Fathy M.; Batmaz, Rasim; Li, Jingde; Wang, Xiaolei; Xiao, Xingcheng; Yu, Aiping; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-10-26

    Silicon has the potential to revolutionize the energy storage capacities of lithium-ion batteries to meet the ever increasing power demands of next generation technologies. To avoid the operational stability problems of silicon-based anodes, we propose synergistic physicochemical alteration of electrode structures during their design. This capitalizes on covalent interaction of Si nanoparticles with sulfur-doped graphene and with cyclized polyacrylonitrile to provide a robust nanoarchitecture. This hierarchical structure stabilized the solid electrolyte interphase leading to superior reversible capacity of over 1,000 mAh g-1 for 2,275 cycles at 2 A g-1. Furthermore, the nanoarchitectured design lowered the contact of the electrolyte tomore » the electrode leading to not only high coulombic efficiency of 99.9% but also maintaining high stability even with high electrode loading associated with 3.4 mAh cm-2. As a result, the excellent performance combined with the simplistic, scalable and non-hazardous approach render the process as a very promising candidate for Li-ion battery technology.« less

  16. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of PureLiFePO4and Nanocomposite C-LiFePO4Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) and carbon-coatedLiFePO4(C-LiFePO4) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating onLiFePO4particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C-LiFePO4at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms ofLiFePO4and C-LiFePO4showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively forLiFePO4where as in case of C-LiFePO4that were 163, 144,more118, and 70?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pureLiFePO4was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C-LiFePO4was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.less

  17. Highly Reversible Mg Insertion in Nanostructured Bi for Mg Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Gu, Meng; Li, Xiaolin; Nie, Zimin; Zuo, Pengjian; Li, Guosheng; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Xiao, Jie; Cheng, Yingwen; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-01-08

    Rechargeable magnesium batteries have attracted wide attention for energy storage. Currently, most studies focus on Mg metal as the anode, but this approach is still limited by the properties of the electrolyte and poor control of the Mg plating/stripping processes.1,2 Here we report the synthesis and application of Bi nanotubes as a high performance anode material for rechargeable Mg ion batteries. The nanostructured Bi anode delivers a high reversible specific capacity (350 mAh/gBi, or 3430 mAh/cm3 Bi), excellent stability, and high columbic efficiency (95 % initial and very close to 100% afterwards). The good performance is attributed to the unique properties of in-situ formed, interconnected nanoporous bismuth. Such nanostructures can effectively accommodate the large volume change without losing electric contact and significantly reduce diffusion length for Mg2+. Significantly, the nanostructured Bi anode can be used with conventional electrolytes which will open new opportunities to study Mg ion battery chemistry and further improve the properties. The performance and the stability of a full cell Mg ion battery have been demonstrated with conventional electrolytes. This work suggests that other high energy density alloy compounds may also be considered for Mg-ion chemistry for high capacity electrode materials.

  18. Structure and electrochemical properties of nanometer Cu substituted ?-nickel hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Zhu, Yanjuan; Zhang, Zhongju; Xu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Weiren; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Han, Quanyong

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Cu substituted ?-nickel hydroxide was prepared by ultrasonic assisted precipitation. ? The XRD peaks are anisotropic broadening. ? The electrode for 0.9 wt.% Cu has the highest capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C. -- Abstract: Nanometer Cu-substituted ?-nickel hydroxide was synthesized by means of ultrasonic-assisted precipitation. Particle size distribution (PSD) measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) were used to characterize the physical properties of the synthesized samples. The results indicate that the average particle size of the samples is about 96110 nm and the XRD diffraction peaks are anisotropic broadening. The crystal grains are mainly polycrystal structure with columnar or needle-like morphology, containing many defects. With increase of Cu content, the shape of primary particles transform from columnar to needle-like. The influences of doping amounts of Cu on the electrochemical performance were investigated through constant current charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetric measurements. The specific capacity increases initially and then decreases with increasing Cu-doping ratio, the electrode C containing 0.9 wt.% Cu shows the maximum discharge capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C, and it has the lowest charging voltage, higher discharge voltage plateau, better cycle performance and larger proton diffusion coefficient than the other electrodes.

  19. Impacts of Mid-level Biofuel Content in Gasoline on SIDI Engine-Out and Tailpipe Particulate Matter Emissions: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, X.; Ireland, J. C.; Zigler, B. T.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Knoll, K. E.; Alleman, T. L.; Tester, J. T.

    2011-02-01

    The influences of ethanol and iso-butanol blended with gasoline on engine-out and post Three-Way Catalyst (TWC) particle size distribution and number concentration were studied using a GM 2.0L turbocharged Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was operated using the production ECU with a dynamometer controlling the engine speed and the accelerator pedal position controlling the engine load. A TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) spectrometer was used to measure the particle size distribution in the range from 5.6 to 560 nm with a sampling rate of 1 Hz. US federal certification gasoline (E0), two ethanol-blended fuels (E10 and E20), and 11.7% iso-butanol blended fuel (BU12) were tested. Measurements were conducted at ten selected steady-state engine operation conditions. Bi-modal particle size distributions were observed for all operating conditions with peak values at particle sizes of 10 nm and 70 nm. Idle and low speed / low load conditions emitted higher total particle numbers than other operating conditions. At idle, the engine-out Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were dominated by nucleation mode particles, and the production TWC reduced these nucleation mode particles by more than 50%, while leaving the accumulation mode particle distribution unchanged. At engine load higher than 6 bar NMEP, accumulation mode particles dominated the engine-out particle emissions and the TWC had little effect. Compared to the baseline gasoline (E0), E10 does not significantly change PM emissions, while E20 and BU12 both reduce PM emissions under the conditions studied. Iso-butanol was observed to impact PM emissions more than ethanol, with up to 50% reductions at some conditions. In this paper, the issues related to PM measurement using FMPS are also discussed. While some uncertainties are due to engine variation, the FMPS must be operated under careful maintenance procedures in order to achieve repeatable measurement results.

  20. Development and Pilot Manufacture of Pseudo-Electric Double Layer Capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dae Young Jung,

    2011-01-26

    Binghamton University carried out basic studies on thermal characteristics of the current ELDC design and characterization of current active and conductive carbon materials used to fabricate ELDC and p-ELDC. Multi physics approach was take for thermal modeling to understand the temperature distribution of an individual cell as well as multi-cell systems, which is an important factor to the reliability of ELDC?s and p-ELDC?s. Structure and properties were characterized for various raw active carbon materials which can be used as electrode to look into potential cost reduction opportunity without degrading the performance. BU team also performed experiments for compositional optimization studies for active carbon, conductive carbon, and binder formulation. A few laboratory instruments were installed for this project at BU. These instruments will continued to be used to carry out further research and development tasks relevant to ELDC and p-ELDC. Project subawardee, Ioxus, Inc., successfully created, enhanced, and then generated a product line of hybrid capacitors which now range in size from 220 Farads (F) to 1000F. These products have been proven to work as the primary energy storage method for LED lighting applications, and two significant commercial applications are evaluating these devices for use. Both of these applications will be used in LED lighting, which replaces traditional batteries and allows for a very fast charge and a high cycle life, over a wide temperature range. This will lead to a significant reduction of waste that ends up in landfills. These products are 70% recyclable, with a 10 year life. In one both applications, it is expected that the hybrid capacitor will power the LED lights for the life of the product, which would have required at least 10 battery changes.

  1. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark with the Coupled Thermal-Hydraulics and Neutronics Code TRAC-M/PARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.; Ulses, Anthony; Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2004-10-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip 2 (TT2) experiment has been performed using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics code TRAC-M/PARCS. The objective of the analysis was to assess the performance of TRAC-M/PARCS on a BWR transient with significance in two-phase flow and spatial variations of the neutron flux. TRAC-M/PARCS results are found to be in good agreement with measured plant data for both steady-state and transient phases of the benchmark. Additional analyses of four fictitious extreme scenarios are performed to provide a basis for code-to-code comparisons and comprehensive testing of the thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling. The obtained results of sensitivity studies on the effect of direct moderator heating on transient simulation indicate the importance of this modeling aspect.

  2. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scalemore » with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  3. Exclusive pi^0 electroproduction at W > 2 GeV with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K.P.; Anderson, M.D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A.S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Isupov, E.L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.Y.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.A.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A.J.R.; Raue, B.A.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-08-01

    Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction (ep-->e'p'pi0) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4sigma/dtdQ2dxBdphipi and structure functions sigmaT+epsilonsigmaL,sigmaTT and ?LT as functions of t were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

  4. Neutron tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Lou, Tak Pui (Berkeley, CA); Reijonen, Jani (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  5. Single crystal growth and characterization of the large-unit-cell compound Cu13Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesche, Anton; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul C.

    2013-10-31

    Single crystals of Cu13Ba were successfully grown out of BaCu self flux. Temperature dependent magnetization, M (T ), electrical resistivity, ?(T)?(T), and specific heat, Cp(T)Cp(T), data are reported. Isothermal magnetization measurements, M(H)M(H), show clear de Haas-van Alphen oscillations at T = 2 K for applied fields as low as View the MathML source?0H=1T. An anomalous behavior of the magnetic susceptibility is observed up to T ? 50 K reflecting the effect of de Haas-van Alphen oscillations at fairly high temperatures. The field- and temperature-dependencies of the magnetization indicate the presence of diluted magnetic impurities with a concentration of the order of 0.01 at.%. Accordingly, the minimum and lower temperature rise observed in the electrical resistivity at and below T = 15 K is attributed to the Kondo-impurity effect.

  6. Thermoacoustic dosimetry of electron beam in extra field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinichenko, A.I.; Kresnin, Yu.A.; Popov, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    The theoretical basis is elaborated for thermoacoustic dosimetry of electron beam by one-dimensional (1-D) thin target TT in extra thermal and electromagnetic fields. The basic equation joining the deposited energy distribution to the stress wave amplitude in the case when the generation coefficient is function of temperature and coordinate in material permits realizing nonlinear thermoacoustic dosimetry with regulated sensitivity. Some variants of joint employment of the thermoacoustic dosimeter and electromagnetic scanner/splitter are considered. The first variant consists in beam scanning along 1-D dosimeter body to create the moving thermoacoustic source. This regime may be used for dosimetry of long beams. The second variant consists in spectral decomposition of the beam in electromagnetic field before its directing to the dosimeter. Principle of operation for some termoelastic dosimeters on the base of 1-D TTs is considered.

  7. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; lvarez Gonzlez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; DellOrso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khader, M.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martnez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Rao, K.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-12-01

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'?g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of ttg. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb? collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c, respectively.

  8. Measurement of the ttbar production cross section in the all-jets final state in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-09-22

    The cross section for tt production in the all-jets final state is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the LHC with the CMS detector, in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.4 fb-1. The inclusive cross section is found to be 275.6 6.1 (stat) 37.8 (syst) 7.2 (lumi) pb. The normalized differential cross sections are measured as a function of the top quark transverse momenta, pT, and compared to predictions from quantum chromodynamics. The results are reported at detector, parton, and particle levels. In all cases, the measured top quark pT spectra are significantly softer than theoretical predictions.

  9. 13691641.tif

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  10. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore »measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  11. Erratum: Measurement of the $$t \\bar{t}$$ production cross section in the dilepton channel in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-05

    In this study, the top-antitop quark (tt¯) production cross section is measured in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb–1. The measurement is performed by analysing events with a pair of electrons or muons, or one electron and one muon, and at least two jets, one of which is identified as originating from hadronisation of a bottom quark. The measured cross section is 239±2 (stat.)±11 (syst.)±6 (lum.) pb, for an assumed top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV, in agreement with the predictionmore » of the standard model.« less

  12. Precise measurement of the top-quark mass from lepton+jets events at D0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-08-09

    We report a measurement of the mass of the top quark in lepton+jets final states of pp&3772; → tt̄ data corresponding to 2.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected at the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Using a matrix element method, we combine an in situ jet energy calibration with the standard jet energy scale derived in studies of Γ + jet and dijet events and employ a novel flavor-dependent jet response correction to measure a top-quark mass of mt = 176.01 ± 1.64 GeV. Combining this result with a previous result obtained on an independent data set, wemore » measure a top-quark mass of mt = 174.94 ± 1.49 GeV for a total integrated luminosity of 3.6 fb-1.« less

  13. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at √s = 1 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improvesmore » to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.« less

  14. DOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /E/A- 0202( 83//Q J Sh or t-T er m En er gy O ut lo ok a to m Quar terly Proje ction s Febru ary 1983 Ene rgy Info rma tion Adm inist ratio n Was hing ton, D.C. t rt jrt .or t lor t lor t .lor t- ior t- ior t <.o rt ort . m .er m -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -Te rm -T erm -T erm -T erm Nrm ue rgy En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg y En erg

  15. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton$+$jets final states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton þ jets final states using the full sample of pp¯ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to 9.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. We also use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from tt¯ production or background. Furthermore, the overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the W boson. We measure mt = 174.98 ± 0.76 GeV. As a result, this constitutes the mostmore » precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.« less

  16. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at ?s = 1 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, T.; Roloff, P.; Strube, J.; Tanabe, T.

    2015-07-04

    We present a study of the expected precision for the measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV. Independent analyses of tt-barH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision on yt of 4.5 % can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1 that is split equally between two configurations for the beam polarization P(e-,e+), (-80 %,+20 %) and (+80 %,-20 %). This estimate improves to 4 % if the 1 ab-1 sample is assumed to be fully in the P(e-,e+)=(-80 %,+20 %) configuration.

  17. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collision data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-02-18

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using tt¯ decays in the l+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb⁻¹ of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp̄ collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f₀=0.669±0.102[±0.078(stat.)±0.065(syst.)] and f₊=0.023±0.053[±0.041(stat.)±0.034(syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f₀ fixed to the value from the standard model yields f₊=0.010±0.037[±0.022(stat.)±0.030(syst.)].

  18. Measurement of the W boson helicity in top quark decays using 5.4 fb? of pp? collision data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Ancu, L. S.; Aoki, M.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Bolton, T. A.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Christoudias, T.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; ?wiok, M.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geist, W.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hossain, S.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jain, S.; Jamin, D.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Khatidze, D.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Love, P.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Owen, M.; Padilla, M.; Pangilinan, M.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Piper, J.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V.M.; Pol, M.-E.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rich, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-02-18

    We present a measurement of the helicity of the W boson produced in top quark decays using tt decays in the l+jets and dilepton final states selected from a sample of 5.4 fb? of collisions recorded using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? collider. We measure the fractions of longitudinal and right-handed W bosons to be f?=0.6690.102[0.078(stat.)0.065(syst.)] and f?=0.0230.053[0.041(stat.)0.034(syst.)], respectively. This result is consistent at the 98% level with the standard model. A measurement with f? fixed to the value from the standard model yields f?=0.0100.037[0.022(stat.)0.030(syst.)].

  19. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop: Final Attendees List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy - Washington, DC January 26, 2006 F FI IN NA AL L A AT TT TE EN ND DE EE ES S L LI IS ST T Name Company E-mail Arlene Anderson U.S. DOE-HFCIT Arlene.anderson@hq.doe.gov Klaus Bonhoff DaimlerChrysler AG klaus.bonhoff@daimlerchrysler.com Ed Casey ConocoPhillips ed.casey@ConocoPhillips.com Steve Chalk U.S. DOE-HFCIT schalk@ee.doe.gov Tan-Ping Chen Nexant tpchen@nexant.com Peter Devlin U.S. DOE-HFCIT peter.devlin@ee.doe.gov K. G. Duleep Energy and Environmental Analysis,

  20. RW

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i, tt 3)'s1 RW Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities I Prepared for Division of I Remedial Action I erolels U.S. DePartment i of Energy COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF.SITE PROPERTY N NORTH NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE LEWlsToN, NEW YORK A. J. BOERNER R a d i o l o g i c a l S i t e A s s e s s m e n t P r o g r a m M a n p o w e r E d u c a t i o n , R e s e a r c h , a n d T r a i n i n g D i v i s i o n FINAL REPORT May 1984 COMPREIIENSIVE RADIOLOGICAI SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY

  1. OAK FMSXSE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  3. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 82 Se e Block 1 6C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 NNSA / Lo s Alamo s Si te Office u.s . Depart me nt o f Ener g y Lo s Alamo s Site Office 374 7 We st Jemez Road Lo s Alamos NM 8754 4 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, State and ZIP Code) L A p L OS ALAMOS NAT IONAL SE CUR I TY , tt n : STE VE K. SHOOK . 0 . BOX 1 6 63 , M S P222 ) S ALAMOS NM 875 4 50001 CODE 17 5 252894 LLC FACILITY CODE 11 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 7 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT

  4. Search for a heavy vector boson decaying to two gluons in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; et al

    2012-12-05

    We present a search for a new heavy vector boson Z' that decays to gluons. Decays to on-shell gluons are suppressed, leading to a dominant decay mode of Z'→g*g. We study the case where the off-shell gluon g* converts to a pair of top quarks, leading to a final state of tt¯g. In a sample of events with exactly one charged lepton, large missing transverse momentum and at least five jets, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb⁻¹ collected by the CDF II detector, we find the data to be consistent with the standard model. We set upper limitsmore » on the production cross section times branching ratio of this chromophilic Z' at 95% confidence level from 300 to 40 fb for Z' masses ranging from 400 to 1000 GeV/c², respectively.« less

  5. LEd:JCD

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  7. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  10. Impacts of side chain and excess energy on the charge photogeneration dynamics of low-bandgap copolymer-fullerene blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huo, Ming-Ming Zhang, Jian-Ping E-mail: hjhzlz@iccas.ac.cn; Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 ; Hu, Rong Xing, Ya-Dong Liu, Yu-Chen Ai, Xi-Cheng; Hou, Jian-Hui E-mail: hjhzlz@iccas.ac.cn

    2014-02-28

    Primary charge photogeneration dynamics in neat and fullerene-blended films of a pair of alternating benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b{sup ?}]dithiophene (BDT) and thieno[3,4-b]thiophene (TT) copolymers are comparatively studied by using near-infrared, time-resolved absorption (TA) spectroscopy under low excitation photon fluence. PBDTTT-E and PBDTTT-C, differed merely in the respective TT-substituents of ester (-E) and carbonyl (-C), show distinctly different charge photogeneration dynamics. The pair of neat PBDTTT films show exciton lifetimes of ?0.1 ns and fluorescence quantum yields below 0.2%, as well as prominent excess-energy enhanced exciton dissociation. In addition, PBDTTT-C gives rise to >50% higher P{sup +} yield than PBDTTT-E does irrespective to the excitation photon energy. Both PBDTTT-E:PC{sub 61}BM and PBDTTT-C:PC{sub 61}BM blends show subpicosecond exciton lifetimes and nearly unitary fluorescence quenching efficiency and, with respect to the former blend, the latter one shows substantially higher branching ratio of charge separated (CS) state over interfacial charge transfer (ICT) state, and hence more efficient exciton-to-CS conversion. For PBDTTT-C:PC{sub 61}BM, the ultrafast charge dynamics clearly show the processes of ICT-CS interconversion and P{sup +} migration, which are possibly influenced by the ICT excess energy. However, such processes are relatively indistinctive in the case of PBDTTT-E:PC{sub 61}BM. The results strongly prove the importance of ICT dissociation in yielding free charges, and are discussed in terms of the film morphology and the precursory solution-phase macromolecular conformation.

  11. ATM Polymorphisms Predict Severe Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Huihua; Liao, Zhongxing; Liu, Zhensheng; Xu, Ting; Wang, Qiming; Liu, Hongliang; Komaki, Ritsuko; Gomez, Daniel; Wang, Li-E; Wei, Qingyi

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene mediates detection and repair of DNA damage. We investigated associations between ATM polymorphisms and severe radiation-induced pneumonitis (RP). Methods and Materials: We genotyped 3 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ATM (rs1801516 [D1853N/5557G>A], rs189037 [-111G>A] and rs228590) in 362 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who received definitive (chemo)radiation therapy. The cumulative severe RP probabilities by genotypes were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier analysis. The associations between severe RP risk and genotypes were assessed by both logistic regression analysis and Cox proportional hazard model with time to event considered. Results: Of 362 patients (72.4% of non-Hispanic whites), 56 (15.5%) experienced grade ≥3 RP. Patients carrying ATM rs189037 AG/GG or rs228590 TT/CT genotypes or rs189037G/rs228590T/rs1801516G (G-T-G) haplotype had a lower risk of severe RP (rs189037: GG/AG vs AA, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.49, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.29-0.83, P=.009; rs228590: TT/CT vs CC, HR=0.57, 95% CI, 0.33-0.97, P=.036; haplotype: G-T-G vs A-C-G, HR=0.52, 95% CI, 0.35-0.79, P=.002). Such positive findings remained in non-Hispanic whites. Conclusions: ATM polymorphisms may serve as biomarkers for susceptibility to severe RP in non-Hispanic whites. Large prospective studies are required to confirm our findings.

  12. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Department of Urology, National Taiwan University Hospital, College of Medicine National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Su, Chien-Tien; Chu, Jan-Show; Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan ; Huang, Shu-Pin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Chung, Chi-Jung; Department of Health Risk Management, College of Public Health, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan ; Wu, Chia-Chang; Department of Urology, Taipei Medical Universtiy-Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan ; Hsueh, Yu-Mei; Department of Public Health, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  13. Evaluation of the dosimetric impact of applying flattening filter-free beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy for early-stage upper thoracic carcinoma of oesophagus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wuzhe; Lin, Zhixiong; Yang, Zhining; Fang, Weisheng; Lai, Peibo; Lu, Jiayang; Wu, Vincent WC

    2015-06-15

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) radiation beams have recently become clinically available on modern linear accelerators in radiation therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the dosimetric impact of using FFF beams in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early-stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer. Eleven patients with primary stage upper thoracic oesophageal cancer were recruited. For each patient, two IMRT plans were computed using conventional beams (Con-P) and FFF beams (FFF-P), respectively. Both plans employed a five-beam arrangement and were prescribed with 64 Gy to (planning target volume) PTV1 and 54 Gy to PTV2 in 32 fractions using 6 MV photons. The dose parameters of the target volumes and organs at risks (OARs), and treatment parameters including the monitor units (MU) and treatment time (TT) for Con-P and FFF-P were recorded and compared. The mean D{sub 5} of PTV1 and PTV2 were higher in FFF-P than Con-P by 0.4 Gy and 0.3 Gy, respectively. For the OARs, all the dose parameters did not show significant difference between the two plans except the mean V{sub 5} and V{sub 10} of the lung in which the FFF-P was lower (46.7% vs. 47.3% and 39.1% vs. 39.6%, respectively). FFF-P required 54% more MU but 18.4% less irradiation time when compared to Con-P. The target volume and OARs dose distributions between the two plans were comparable. However, FFF-P was more effective in sparing the lung from low dose and reduced the mean TT compared with Con-P. Long-term clinical studies are suggested to evaluate the radiobiological effects of FFF beams.

  14. Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2007-09-01

    The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

  15. Advanced Battery Manufacturing (VA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, Jeremy

    2012-09-30

    LiFeBATT has concentrated its recent testing and evaluation on the safety of its batteries. There appears to be a good margin of safety with respect to overheating of the cells and the cases being utilized for the batteries are specifically designed to dissipate any heat built up during charging. This aspect of LiFeBATTs products will be even more fully investigated, and assuming ongoing positive results, it will become a major component of marketing efforts for the batteries. LiFeBATT has continued to receive prismatic 20 Amp hour cells from Taiwan. Further testing continues to indicate significant advantages over the previously available 15 Ah cells. Battery packs are being assembled with battery management systems in the Danville facility. Comprehensive tests are underway at Sandia National Laboratory to provide further documentation of the advantages of these 20 Ah cells. The company is pursuing its work with Hybrid Vehicles of Danville to critically evaluate the 20 Ah cells in a hybrid, armored vehicle being developed for military and security applications. Results have been even more encouraging than they were initially. LiFeBATT is expanding its work with several OEM customers to build a worldwide distribution network. These customers include a major automotive consulting group in the U.K., an Australian maker of luxury off-road campers, and a number of makers of E-bikes and scooters. LiFeBATT continues to explore the possibility of working with nations that are woefully short of infrastructure. Negotiations are underway with Siemens to jointly develop a system for using photovoltaic generation and battery storage to supply electricity to communities that are not currently served adequately. The IDA has continued to monitor the progress of LiFeBATTs work to ensure that all funds are being expended wisely and that matching funds will be generated as promised. The company has also remained current on all obligations for repayment of an IDA loan and lease payments for space to the IDA. A commercial venture is being formed to utilize the LiFeBATT product for consumer use in enabling photovoltaic powered boat lifts. Field tests of the system have proven to be very effective and commercially promising. This venture is expected to result in significant sales within the next six months.

  16. Combustion synthesized nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathiya, K.; Bhuvaneswari, D.; Gangulibabu; Kalaiselvi, N.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C compound has been synthesized using a novel corn assisted combustion (CAC) method, wherein the composite prepared at 850 C is found to exhibit superior physical and electrochemical properties than the one synthesized at 800 C (Fig. 1). Despite the charge disproportionation of V{sup 4+} and a possible solid solution behavior of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} cathode upon insertion and de-insertion of Li{sup +} ions, the structural stability of the same is appreciable, even with the extraction of third lithium at 4.6 V (Fig. 2). An appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} with an excellent columbic efficiency (99%) and better capacity retention upon high rate applications have been exhibited by Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode, thus demonstrating the feasibility of CAC method in preparing the title compound to best suit with the needs of lithium battery applications. Display Omitted Highlights: ? Novel corn assisted combustion method has been used to synthesize Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C. ? Corn is a cheap and eco benign combustible fuel to facilitate CAC synthesis. ? Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C exhibits an appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} (C/10 rate). ? Currently observed columbic efficiency of 99% is better than the reported behavior. ? Suitability of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode up to 10C rate is demonstrated. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C composite synthesized using a novel corn assisted combustion method at 850 C exhibits superior physical and electrochemical properties than the one synthesized at 800 C. Despite the charge disproportionation of V{sup 4+} and a possible solid solution behavior of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} cathode upon insertion and extraction of Li{sup +} ions, the structural stability of the same is appreciable, even with the extraction of third lithium at 4.6 V. An appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} and better capacity retention upon high rate applications have been exhibited by Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode, thus demonstrating the suitability of the same for lithium-ion battery applications.

  17. Improving the Capacity of Sodium Ion Battery Using a Virus-Templated Nanostructured Composite Cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moradi, M; Li, Z; Qi, JF; Xing, WT; Xiang, K; Chiang, YM; Belcher, AM

    2015-05-01

    In this work we investigated an energy-efficient biotemplated route to synthesize nanostructured FePO4 for sodium-based batteries. Self-assembled M13 viruses and single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been used as a template to grow amorphous FePO4 nanoparticles at room temperature (the active composite is denoted as Bio-FePO4-CNT) to enhance the electronic conductivity of the active material. Preliminary tests demonstrate a discharge capacity as high as 166 mAh/g at C/10 rate, corresponding to composition Na0.9FePO4, which along with higher C-rate tests show this material to have the highest capacity and power performance reported for amorphous FePO4 electrodes to date.

  18. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Vissers, Donald R.; Prakash, Jai

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  19. Semi-solid electrodes having high rate capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Duduta, Mihai; Holman, Richard; Limthongkul, Pimpa; Tan, Taison

    2015-11-10

    Embodiments described herein relate generally to electrochemical cells having high rate capability, and more particularly to devices, systems and methods of producing high capacity and high rate capability batteries having relatively thick semi-solid electrodes. In some embodiments, an electrochemical cell includes an anode, a semi-solid cathode that includes a suspension of an active material and a conductive material in a liquid electrolyte, and an ion permeable membrane disposed between the anode and the cathode. The semi-solid cathode has a thickness in the range of about 250 .mu.m-2,500 .mu.m, and the electrochemical cell has an area specific capacity of at least 5 mAh/cm.sup.2 at a C-rate of C/2.

  20. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1996-07-16

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm{sup 3}; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6{times}10{sup 4}cm{sup 2}/g of Ni. 6 figs.

  1. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I. (6851 Carpenter St., Downers Grove, IL 60516); Vissers, Donald R. (611 Clover Ct., Naperville, IL 60540); Prakash, Jai (2205 Arbor Cir. 8, Downers Grove, IL 60515)

    1996-01-01

    An electrochemical cell having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm.sup.3 ; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160.degree. C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6.times.10.sup.4 cm.sup.2 /g of Ni.

  2. Electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, L.I.; Vissers, D.R.; Prakash, J.

    1994-02-01

    An electrochemical cell is described having a bimodal positive electrode, a negative electrode of an alkali metal, and a compatible electrolyte including an alkali metal salt molten at the cell operating temperature. The positive electrode has an electrochemically active layer of at least one transition metal chloride at least partially present as a charging product, and additives of bromide and/or iodide and sulfur in the positive electrode or the electrolyte. Electrode volumetric capacity is in excess of 400 Ah/cm[sup 3]; the cell can be 90% recharged in three hours and can operate at temperatures below 160 C. There is also disclosed a method of reducing the operating temperature and improving the overall volumetric capacity of an electrochemical cell and for producing a positive electrode having a BET area greater than 6[times]10[sup 4] cm[sup 2]/g of Ni. 8 figures.

  3. Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

    2010-03-16

    The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

  4. Mesoporous Silicon Sponge as an Anti-Pulverization Structure for High-Performance Lithium-ion Battery Anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiaolin; Gu, Meng; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Kennard, Rhiannon; Yan, Pengfei; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Chong M.; Sailor, Michael J.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2014-07-08

    Nanostructured silicon is a promising anode material for high performance lithium-ion batteries, yet scalable synthesis of such materials, and retaining good cycling stability in high loading electrode remain significant challenges. Here, we combine in-situ transmission electron microscopy and continuum media mechanical calculations to demonstrate that large (>20 micron) mesoporous silicon sponge (MSS) prepared by the scalable anodization method can eliminate the pulverization of the conventional bulk silicon and limit particle volume expansion at full lithiation to ~30% instead of ~300% as observed in bulk silicon particles. The MSS can deliver a capacity of ~750 mAh/g based on the total electrode weight with >80% capacity retention over 1000 cycles. The first-cycle irreversible capacity loss of pre-lithiated MSS based anode is only <5%. The insight obtained from MSS also provides guidance for the design of other materials that may experience large volume variation during operations.

  5. A=11Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) GENERAL: The mass excess of 11Li is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). [(A.H. Wapstra, private communication) suggests 40.91 ± 0.11 MeV.] Using the value reported by (1975TH08) 11Li is bound with respect to 9Li + 2n by 156 ± 80 keV and with respect to 10Li + n by 966 ± 260 keV [see (1984AJ01) for the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. Systematics suggest Jπ = 1/2- for 11Lig.s.. See also (1979AZ03, 1980AZ01, 1980BO31, 1981BO1X, 1982BO1Y, 1982OG02), (1981HA2C),

  6. A=20F (1959AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1959AJ76) (See Energy Level Diagram for 20F) GENERAL: See also Table 20.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (RA57). 1. 20F(β-)20Ne Qm = 7.050 See 20Ne. 2. 17O(α, p)20F Qm = -5.659 Not observed. 3. 18O(d, n)19F Qm = 5.737 Eb = 12.343 See 19F. 4. 18O(d, p)19O Qm = 1.731 Eb = 12.343 The proton yield has been measured from Ed = 0.79 to 0.88 MeV (AH56B). See also (ZI59A) and 19O. 5. 18O(d, α)16N Qm = 4.237 Eb = 12.343 The cross section has been measured for Ed = 0.5 to 3.0 MeV.

  7. A=8C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35095 ± 23 keV (A.H. Wapstra, private communication). Γc.m. = 230 ± 50 keV: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.13 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied

  8. A=8He (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8He) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1984VA06, 1985PO10, 1987BL18). Complex reactions involving 8He: (1982AL33, 1983AN13, 1985MA13, 1985TA1D, 1986SA30, 1987AR1G, 1987BO40, 1987KO1Z, 1987PE1C, 1987TAZU, 1988GA10, 1988ST06, 1988TA1A). Hypernuclei: (1982KA1D, 1983DO1B, 1984BO1H, 1985AH1A, 1985IK1A, 1986BA1W, 1986DA1B, 1987MI38, 1987PO1H). Other topics: (1983GL1B, 1985AN28, 1987AJ1A,

  9. Carbonaceous materials as lithium intercalation anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.; Song, X.; Kinoshita, K.

    1994-10-01

    Commercial and polymer-derived carbonaceous materials were examined as lithium intercalation anodes in propylene carbonate (pyrolysis < 1350C, carbons) and ethylene carbonate/dimethyl carbonate (graphites) electrolytes. The reversible capacity (180--355 mAh/g) and the irreversible capacity loss (15--200 % based on reversible capacity) depend on the type of binder, carbon type, morphology, and phosphorus doping concentration. A carbon-based binder was chosen for electrode fabrication, producing mechanically and chemically stable electrodes and reproducible results. Several types of graphites had capacity approaching LiC{sub 6}. Petroleum fuel green cokes doped with phosphorous gave more than a 20 % increase in capacity compared to undoped samples. Electrochemical characteristics are related to SEM, TEM, XRD and BET measurements.

  10. B J

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    j j B J j s i u i u j p v U O H E I U J O J U I A B j e u g o i i o 3 r o a d \ > \ A O U 3 N 3 P Q Q I i s n B n y This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. AH telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402

  11. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! NUG New User Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUG New User Training! February 23, 2015 Next Steps You A re N ot A lone ! A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S FINCS c ode o n Edison. T he c olors represent t he a mount o f electric c urrent a long the magne'c field, and the b lack l ines s how magne'c fi eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful ! Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a

  12. David Turner! NERSC User Services Group! New User Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New User Training! October 30, 2014 Next Steps You A re N ot A lone ! A c alcula'on o f t he s elf--- generated p lasma current i n t he W 7---X reactor, p erformed u sing the S FINCS c ode o n Edison. T he c olors represent t he a mount o f electric c urrent a long the magne'c field, and the b lack l ines s how magne'c fi eld l ines. Image: M aH L andreman You W ill B e S uccessful ! Collision b etween t wo shells o f m aHer e jected in t wo s upernova erup'ons, s howing a slice t hrough a c

  13. Graphene Modified LiFePO4 Cathode Materials for High Power Lithium ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Wang, F.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2011-01-24

    Graphene-modified LiFePO{sub 4} composite has been developed as a Li-ion battery cathode material with excellent high-rate capability and cycling stability. The composite was prepared with LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene oxide nanosheets by spray-drying and annealing processes. The LiFePO{sub 4} primary nanoparticles embedded in micro-sized spherical secondary particles were wrapped homogeneously and loosely with a graphene 3D network. Such a special nanostructure facilitated electron migration throughout the secondary particles, while the presence of abundant voids between the LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene sheets was beneficial for Li{sup +} diffusion. The composite cathode material could deliver a capacity of 70 mAh g{sup -1} at 60C discharge rate and showed a capacity decay rate of <15% when cycled under 10C charging and 20C discharging for 1000 times.

  14. Temperature dependent DC electrical conductivity studies of ZnO nanoparticle thick films prepared by simple solution combustion method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naveen, C. S. Jayanna, H. S. Lamani, Ashok R. Rajeeva, M. P.

    2014-04-24

    ZnO nanoparticles of different size were prepared by varying the molar ratio of glycine and zinc nitrate hexahydrate as fuel and oxidizer (F/O = 0.8, 1.11, 1.7) by simple solution combustion method. Powder samples were characterized by UV-Visible spectrophotometer, X-ray diffractometer, Scanning electron microscope (SEM). DC electrical conductivity measurements at room temperature and in the temperature range of 313-673K were carried out for the prepared thick films and it was found to increase with increase of temperature which confirms the semiconducting nature of the samples. Activation energies were calculated and it was found that, F/O molar ratio 1.7 has low E{sub AL} (Low temperature activation energy) and high E{sub AH} (High temperature activation energy) compared to other samples.

  15. Controlled porosity in electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Bae, Chang-Jun; Halloran, John William; Fu, Qiang; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Erdonmez, Can K.

    2015-06-23

    Porous electrodes in which the porosity has a low tortuosity are generally provided. In some embodiments, the porous electrodes can be designed to be filled with electrolyte and used in batteries, and can include low tortuosity in the primary direction of ion transport during charge and discharge of the battery. In some embodiments, the electrodes can have a high volume fraction of electrode active material (i.e., low porosity). The attributes outlined above can allow the electrodes to be fabricated with a higher energy density, higher capacity per unit area of electrode (mAh/cm.sup.2), and greater thickness than comparable electrodes while still providing high utilization of the active material in the battery during use. Accordingly, the electrodes can be used to produce batteries with high energy densities, high power, or both compared to batteries using electrodes of conventional design with relatively highly tortuous pores.

  16. SSRL Light Source Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Beam Current: 496.25 mA Beam Status: Beams (ACR) Loss Rate: 1.06 mA/min SPEAR Plot SPEAR Operator Messages 7-MAR-2016 06:07 Beam loss detected 7-MAR-2016 06:07:39.17 SSRL BEAMLINES Beamline Steering Periods Gap(mm) Field(T) K Pwr(W) Yield(Ah) 1 Open OK - 48.0 1.249 - 71 1050.72 2 Open OK - 48.0 1.249 - 71 1063.24 4 Open - 10 18.0 1.892 40.64 23289 1063.30 5 Open - 14 30.7 0.340 4.45 643 1052.95 6 Open OK 27 16.0 0.850

  17. Thin-film Rechargeable Lithium Batteries for Implantable Devices

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Bates, J. B.; Dudney, N. J.

    1997-05-01

    Thin films of LiCoO{sub 2} have been synthesized in which the strongest x ray reflection is either weak or missing, indicating a high degree of preferred orientation. Thin film solid state batteries with these textured cathode films can deliver practical capacities at high current densities. For example, for one of the cells 70% of the maximum capacity between 4.2 V and 3 V ({approximately}0.2 mAh/cm{sup 2}) was delivered at a current of 2 mA/cm{sup 2}. When cycled at rates of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, the capacity loss was 0.001%/cycle or less. The reliability and performance of Li LiCoO{sub 2} thin film batteries make them attractive for application in implantable devices such as neural stimulators, pacemakers, and defibrillators.

  18. PBi3aws

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  19. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :::, pL' /Z 1 ~etaIturgital Xalboratorp a* -9- g-/i c> ylr3' w - .yuc- bl# 7-L c/"v. tP cq \ 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O! sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah uwmud y.::::: .:..... ,.>:. I C~.4SS~F!Ct4T@N CHANGED f %H=slwffn;lDc1 &4-e-- :: . IRKED TO EE UNCLASSIFIED UTHORITY: DOE-~PP DECLASSIFIED huthority PruD z?3OL7 BY hR-m ,I(ARqD& Il/lr/X'

  20. REFHRYO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    REFHRYO 4 .* f c g c ,. 3 -2/L $q - 2 -. & ,.::c.l I HUNTER:C,~~ :. I/X / ., 1' s ; ( 1 'n,. ._ . .yL , j',' -, A*. ["',i 1, C'/ I S.R.Syririr,Dirsotor of PWduotion~ JGly 28, 194rQ m&-ah mk =4P 3. P, Hiorgen, Aid&ant Dfr#rtor, Produatian D;CPirioa, 6oew Yorlc operationa Offitle UiW'?ItM OXIDE SCRAP / '\ M,ti' ~W:/JbS $' ( && ) SYMBOL& PUtDH \ / / ' :o,.:?:* ,I Attention: U. 0. tullw / xz Pleuae shi.ptherrolrpoovrredinyotPIrPslPorlandtnDoftiy Bby sealud freight tot