National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bu tt ah

  1. Ah

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _I L.. Ah _; . . -c ' . ' , c- (oaaltlawd) D -. i; i .,... :::;::::.: {:;:y::: .,,, ,,, :p"' :' :. .:: : . .r:. .,..,

  2. Evidence for tt?? Production and Measurement of (? tt?)?/(?tt?)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, tt??. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (?), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The tt?? sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selection optimized for the tt?? candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt? (?tt?), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 tt?? candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 3.4 events. We measure the tt?? cross section (?tt?) to be 0.18 0.08 pb, and the ratio of ?tt?? to ?tt? to be 0.024 0.009. Assuming no tt?? production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.

  3. Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christina Martos Hilton Deirdre Monroe Hai Ah Nam Denise Neudecker Phil & Monica Noll Amy Ross Bryant Roybal Max Schulze Denise Thronas Michael Torrez Jos Valdez Darleen...

  4. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline Total Total Total...

  5. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline Total Total Total Number...

  6. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline Total Total Total...

  7. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  8. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Gas

  9. ALT AMONT BLU EBELL NATUR AL BU TT ES PLAT EAU CATHED RAL RED WASH

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Uinta-Piceance 180 254,329 7,181,669 1,451,274 Basin Uinta-Piceance Basin Oil & Gas Fields By 2001 Liquids

  10. Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hai Ah Nam July 28, 2015 The power of yes In 1999, the Computer, Computational and Statistical Sciences Division's Hai Ah Nam left graduate school for a summer hiatus to take care of her ailing father and save a marriage that was cracking under the grad school pressure. The summer hiatus ended up lasting five years. "I had a master's degree in physics at that point," Nam says, "but it wasn't getting me anywhere in southern California. I went to work in the internet industry for a

  11. Haskel/BuTech/PPI

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation For Argonne National Laboratory Haskel/BuTech/PPI Products * 100,000psi Liquid Pumps * 37,000psi Gas Boosters * 15,000psi Diaphragm Comp * 4,500psi Air Amplifiers * 150,000psi Valves, Fittings, and Tubing * 15,000psi Sub-Sea Valves (1" orifice) * Air Pilot Switches & Relief Valves Valves, Fittings & Tubing Pumps, Boosters, & Diaphragm Compressors & Systems Hydraulic Gas Booster Challenges * Global Material Regulations - KHK Japan recommends A286 & 316 SS

  12. Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PolicyStatementonTT.pdf PolicyStatementonTT.pdf PolicyStatementonTT.pdf More Documents & Publications PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf Chapter 17 - Special...

  13. Evidence for tt̄γ Production and Measurement of (σ tt̄)γ/(σtt̄)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, tt̄γ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The tt̄γ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the tt̄γ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tt̄ (σtt̄), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 tt̄γ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the tt̄γ cross section (σtt̄) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σtt̄γ to σtt̄ to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tt̄γ production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  14. Bu Sung: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-42007)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Bu Sung America Corporation d/b/a Everest Refrigeration finding that basic model ESRF2, a commercial refrigerator-freezer does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  15. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Order authorizing Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination,

  16. Bu Sung: Order (2015-SE-42007) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Order (2015-SE-42007) Bu Sung: Order (2015-SE-42007) October 13, 2015 DOE ordered Bu Sung America Corporation to pay a $71,480 civil penalty after finding Bu Sung had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 361 units of basic model ESRF2, a noncompliant commercial refrigerator-freezer. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Bu Sung. Bu Sung: Order (2015-SE-42007) (123.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Bu Sung:

  17. Evidence for tty Production and Measurement of (σ tt)γ/(σtt)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-31

    Using data corresponding to 6.0 fb-1 of pp collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector, we present a cross section measurement of top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, ttγ. The events are selected by looking for a lepton (ell), a photon (γ), significant transverse momentum imbalance (ET), large total transverse energy, and three or more jets, with at least one identified as containing a b quark (b). The ttγ sample requires the photon to have 10 GeV or more of transverse energy, and to be in the central region. Using an event selectionmore » optimized for the ttγ candidate sample we measure the production cross section of tttt), and the ratio of cross sections of the two samples. Control samples in the dilepton+photon and lepton+photon+ET, channels are constructed to aid in decay product identification and background measurements. We observe 30 ttγ candidate events compared to the standard model expectation of 26.9 ± 3.4 events. We measure the ttγ cross section (σtt) to be 0.18 ± 0.08 pb, and the ratio of σttγ to σtt to be 0.024 ± 0.009. Assuming no tty production, we observe a probability of 0.0015 of the background events alone producing 30 events or more, corresponding to 3.0 standard deviations.« less

  18. Evidence for spin correlation in tt production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2012-01-19

    We present a measurement of the ratio of events with correlated t and t spins to the total number of tt events. This ratio f is evaluated using a matrix-element-based approach in 729 tt candidate events with a single lepton ℓ (electron or muon) and at least four jets. The analyzed pp collisions data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb-1 and were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy \\(\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\) TeV. Combining this result with a recent measurement of f in dileptonic final states, we find f in agreement withmore » the standard model. In addition, the combination provides evidence for the presence of spin correlation in tt events with a significance of more than 3 standard deviations.« less

  19. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel Authors: Chou, Weiren ; Mourou, ...

  20. Women @ Energy: Hai Ah Nam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "I caught the bug to want to know more than what was presented in textbooks. I wanted to be part of the quest to unravel the mysteries of the universe, which meant following the arduous path of physics. It was…and still is such a challenge working in STEM, but, it’s never boring. I get to question our basic understanding of the world where the answers are not in the back of the book." Read more from Hai Ah on her profile here.

  1. The double contact nature of TT Herculis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrell, Dirk; Nelson, Robert H. E-mail: bob.nelson@shaw.ca

    2014-03-01

    We present new radial velocities and photometry of the short-period Algol TT Herculis. Previous attempts to model the light curves of the system have met with limited success, primarily because of the lack of a reliable mass ratio. Our spectroscopic observations are the first to result in radial velocities for the secondary star, and thus provide a spectroscopic mass ratio. Simultaneous analysis of the radial velocities and new photometry shows that the system is a double contact binary, with a rapidly rotating primary that fills its limiting lobe.

  2. Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf (215.7 KB) More Documents & Publications Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Chapter 17 - Special Contracting Methods GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM

  3. Bu Sung: Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42007) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42007) Bu Sung: Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42007) September 29, 2015 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Bu Sung America Corporation d/b/a Everest Refrigeration manufactured and distributed noncompliant commercial refrigerator-freezers in the U.S. Federal law subjects manufacturers and private labelers to civil penalties if those parties distribute in the U.S. products that do not meet applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice

  4. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Inc. | Department of Energy 4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT Energy to export electric energy to Canada. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy (CN).pdf (672.72 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management

  5. HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhO SAFETY DIVISION Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. m 1956 w I. H.# 7g2 Semplb Nos l2 Date Collected- 512 by RlX -----Route to EA LocetionKN(U[YTr-r-ETyp of Sample ~hd%---Analyzed for F Alphaxx Rema&mre t&n from the furnace and from U= Beta JOC slap ladles. No, Ro Oil PH Be Th Nc0 NO 8506 BcA-j &A- ii \JC cL"w-- Anolyticol Chemistry Secrion: Date Received--!b4-56 by Lab* Date Reported 6-X-66 bu I&b , Method of Analyair

  6. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ASH BU RN C REEK HUNT ING CREEK RED BIRD C OALBED GREEN GROVE RPD-WAYNE-3 LOC UST HILL BU ... Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to ...

  7. Comment on measuring the tt forward-backward asymmetry at ATLAS and CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arguin, Jean-Francois; Ligeti, Zoltan; Freytsis, Marat

    2011-10-01

    We suggest a new possibility for ATLAS and CMS to explore the tt forward-backward asymmetry measured at the Tevatron, by attempting to reconstruct tt events, with one of the tops decaying semileptonically in the central region (|{eta}|<2.5) and the other decaying hadronically in the forward region (|{eta}|>2.5). For several models which give comparable Tevatron signals, we study the charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of cuts on |{eta}| and on the tt invariant mass, m{sub tt}. We show that there is an interesting complementarity between cuts on |{eta}| and m{sub tt} to suppress the dominant and symmetric gg{yields}tt rate, and different combinations of cuts enhance the distinguishing power between models. This complementarity is likely to hold in other new physics scenarios as well, which affect the tt cross section, so it motivates extending tt reconstruction to higher |{eta}|.

  8. The TT, TB, EB and BB correlations in anisotropic inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingang [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Emami, Razieh [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Firouzjahi, Hassan [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P. O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Wang, Yi, E-mail: Xingang.Chen@utdallas.edu, E-mail: emami@ipm.ir, E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir, E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk [Centre for Theoretical Cosmology, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    The ongoing and future experiments will measure the B-mode from different sky coverage and frequency bands, with the potential to reveal non-trivial features in polarization map. In this work we study the TT, TB, EB and BB correlations associated with the B-mode polarization of CMB map in models of charged anisotropic inflation. The model contains a chaotic-type large field complex inflaton which is charged under the U(1) gauge field. We calculate the statistical anisotropies generated in the power spectra of the curvature perturbation, the tensor perturbation and their cross-correlation. It is shown that the asymmetry in tensor power spectrum is a very sensitive probe of the gauge coupling. While the level of statistical anisotropy in temperature power spectrum can be small and satisfy the observational bounds, the interactions from the gauge coupling can induce large directional dependence in tensor modes. This will leave interesting anisotropic fingerprints in various correlations involving the B-mode polarization such as the TB cross-correlation which may be detected in upcoming Planck polarization data. In addition, the TT correlation receives an anisotropic contribution from the tensor sector which naturally decays after l?>100. We expect that the mechanism of using tensor sector to induce asymmetry at low l to be generic which can also be applied to address other low l CMB anomalies.

  9. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯Wmore » nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.« less

  10. Measurement of the tt¯W and tt¯Z production cross sections in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. 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M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-11-24

    The production cross sections of top-quark pairs in association with massive vector bosons have been measured using data from pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012 at the LHC. Final states with two, three or four leptons are considered. A fit to the data considering the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes simultaneously yields a significance of 5.0σ (4.2σ) over the background-only hypothesis for tt¯W (tt¯Z) production. The measured cross sections are σtt¯W = 369+100–91 fband σtt¯Z =176+58–52 fb. The background-only hypothesis with neither tt¯W nor tt¯Z production is excluded at 7.1σ. As a result, all measurements are consistent with next-to-leading-order calculations for the tt¯W and tt¯Z processes.

  11. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  12. Microsoft Word - CR-AH Policy.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After-Hours Policy Original: 11/04 Revised: 2//05 CAMD strives to maintain and improve laboratory and User safety along with User efficiency. After- Hours work inside the cleanroom (CR-AH) is an access privilege that requires deliberate selection of requested Users to maintain a safe, productive environment. * Workdays = 7am - 10pm weekdays * After-Hours = 10pm - 7am workdays + all hours on weekends + all hours of LSU Staff holidays. After-Hours Access Request * Cleanroom-trained Users can apply

  13. BuD, a helixloophelix DNA-binding domain for genome modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stella, Stefano; Molina, Rafael; Lpez-Mndez, Blanca; Juillerat, Alexandre; Bertonati, Claudia; Daboussi, Fayza; Campos-Olivas, Ramon; Duchateau, Phillippe; Montoya, Guillermo

    2014-07-01

    Crystal structures of BurrH and the BurrHDNA complex are reported. DNA editing offers new possibilities in synthetic biology and biomedicine for modulation or modification of cellular functions to organisms. However, inaccuracy in this process may lead to genome damage. To address this important problem, a strategy allowing specific gene modification has been achieved through the addition, removal or exchange of DNA sequences using customized proteins and the endogenous DNA-repair machinery. Therefore, the engineering of specific proteinDNA interactions in protein scaffolds is key to providing toolkits for precise genome modification or regulation of gene expression. In a search for putative DNA-binding domains, BurrH, a protein that recognizes a 19 bp DNA target, was identified. Here, its apo and DNA-bound crystal structures are reported, revealing a central region containing 19 repeats of a helixloophelix modular domain (BurrH domain; BuD), which identifies the DNA target by a single residue-to-nucleotide code, thus facilitating its redesign for gene targeting. New DNA-binding specificities have been engineered in this template, showing that BuD-derived nucleases (BuDNs) induce high levels of gene targeting in a locus of the human haemoglobin ? (HBB) gene close to mutations responsible for sickle-cell anaemia. Hence, the unique combination of high efficiency and specificity of the BuD arrays can push forward diverse genome-modification approaches for cell or organism redesign, opening new avenues for gene editing.

  14. Controlled Pd(0)/t Bu3P Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Coupling Polymerization of AB-Type Monomers with ArPd(t Bu3P)X or Pd2(dba)3/t Bu3P/ArX as the Initiator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Honghai; Xing, Chun-Hui; Hu, Qiao-Sheng; Hong, Kunlun

    2015-02-05

    The synthesis of well-defined and functionalized conjugated polymers, which are essential in the development of efficient organic electronics, through Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations has been a challenging task. We developed controlled Pd(0)/t-Bu3P-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling polymerizations of AB-type monomers via the chain-growth mechanism with a series of in situ generated ArPd(t-Bu3P)X (X = I, Br, Cl) complexes as initiators. Among them, the combinations of Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4I, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br were identified as highly robust initiator systems, resulting in polymers with predictable molecular weight and narrow polydispersity (PDI~1.13-1.20). In addition, Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-BrC6H4CH2OH and Pd2(dba)3/t-Bu3P/p-PhCOC6H4Br initiator systems afforded functional polymers with >95% fidelity. Our results pavedmore » the road to access well-defined conjugated polymers, including conjugated polymers with complex polymer architectures such as block copolymers and branch copolymers.« less

  15. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Application from Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada.  Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination.

  16. B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe > Archived News Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Archived News Stories Latest News The perfect atom sandwich requires an extra layer › Cornell boasts 22 'highly cited' researchers › Postdoc brings open access issue to the table › In This Section EMC2 News Archived News Stories B.U. Students Talk Energy Research at Lost Dog Cafe April 10th, 2014 › There was a science café at the Lost Dog Cafe in Binghamton last night. A group of Binghamton University students and professors talked about

  17. Closure Plan for Corrective Action Unit 109: U-2bu Subsidence Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Parsons

    1999-03-01

    The U-2bu subsidence crater, Corrective Action Unit 109, will be closed in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection operational permit, and the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. The U-2bu subsidence crater is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. It was created in 1971 by an underground nuclear test with the name Miniata. The crater has a diameter of 288 meters (944 feet) and an approximate depth of 35 meters (115 feet). The subsidence crater was used as a land disposal unit for radioactive and hazardous waste from 1973 to 1988. Site disposal history is supported by memorandums, letters, and personnel who worked at the Nevada Test Site at the time of active disposal. Closure activities will include the excavation and disposal of impacted soil form the tip of the crater. Upon completion of excavation, verification samples will be collected to show that lead has been removed to concentrations be low regulatory action level. The area will then be backfilled and a soil flood diversion berm will be constructed, and certified by an independent professional engineer as to having followed the approved Closure Plan.

  18. Measurement of the fraction of tt production via gluon-gluon fusion in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.

    2009-02-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of the tt production cross section via gluon-gluon fusion to the total tt production cross section in pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV at the Tevatron. Using a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 955 pb{sup -1} recorded by the CDF II detector at Fermilab, we select events based on the tt decay to lepton+jets. Using an artificial neural network technique we discriminate between tt events produced via qq annihilation and gg fusion, and find G{sub f}={sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)<0.33 at the 68% confidence level. This result is combined with a previous measurement to obtain the most stringent measurement of this quantity by CDF to date, G{sub f}=0.07{sub -0.07}{sup +0.15}.

  19. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks or gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.

  20. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore » gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  1. Measurement of the top quark mass in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels using √s = 7   TeV ATLAS data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-17

    The top quark mass was measured in the channels tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton (lepton = e,μ) based on ATLAS data recorded in 2011. The data were taken at the LHC with a proton–proton centre-of-mass energy of √s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. The tt¯→ lepton+jets analysis uses a three-dimensional template technique which determines the top quark mass together with a global jet energy scale factor (JSF), and a relative b-to-light-jet energy scale factor (bJSF), where the terms b-jets and light-jets refer to jets originating from b-quarks and u, d, c, s-quarks ormore »gluons, respectively. The analysis of the tt¯→ dilepton channel exploits a one-dimensional template method using the mℓb observable, defined as the average invariant mass of the two lepton+b-jet pairs in each event. The top quark mass is measured to be 172.33 ± 0.75 (stat + JSF + bJSF) ± 1.02(syst) GeV, and 173.79 ± 0.54(stat) ± 1.30(syst) GeV in the tt¯→ lepton+jets and tt¯→ dilepton channels, respectively. Thus, the combination of the two results yields mtop = 172.99 ± 0.48(stat) ± 0.78(syst) GeV, with a total uncertainty of 0.91 GeV.« less

  2. Spin polarisation of tt¯γγ production at NLO+PS with GoSam interfaced to MadGraph5_aMC@NLO

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Deurzen, Hans; Frederix, Rikkert; Hirschi, Valentin; Luisoni, Gionata; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Ossola, Giovanni

    2016-04-22

    Here, we present an interface between the multipurpose Monte Carlo tool MadGraph5_aMC@NLO and the automated amplitude generator GoSam. As a first application of this novel framework, we compute the NLO corrections to pp→ tt¯H and pp→ tt¯γγ matched to a parton shower. In the phenomenological analyses of these processes, we focus our attention on observables which are sensitive to the polarisation of the top quarks.

  3. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  4. Au133(SPh-tBu)52 Nanomolecules: X-ray Crystallography, Optical, Electrochemical, and Theoretical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dass, Amala; Theivendran, Shevanuja; Nimmala, Praneeth Reddy; Kumara, Chanaka; Jupally, Vijay Reddy; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Sementa, Luca; Barcaro, Giovanni; Zuo, Xiaobing; Noll, Bruce C.

    2015-04-15

    Crystal structure determination has revolutionized modern science in biology, chemistry, and physics. However, the difficulty in obtaining periodic crystal lattices which are needed for X-ray crystal analysis has hindered the determination of atomic structure in nanomaterials, known as the nanostructure problem. Here, by using rigid and bulky ligands, we have overcome this limitation and successfully solved the X-ray crystallographic structure of the largest reported thiolated gold nanomolecule, Au133S52. The total composition, Au133(SPh-tBu)52, was verified using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The experimental and simulated optical spectra show an emergent surface plasmon resonance that is more pronounced than in the slightly larger Au144(SCH2CH2Ph)60. Theoretical analysis indicates that the presence of rigid and bulky ligands is the key to the successful crystal formation.

  5. TtP-3 Tt-4 Tt-2 Tt-3 Tt-1 Tt-5 Tt-6 TtP-5 TtP-1 TtP-2 Tt-7 TtP...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Limitations The above opinions and recommendations are based on a reasonable degree of certainty. This report has been prepared based upon a review of climate, weather and design ...

  6. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross section in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a τ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; et al

    2012-06-19

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying τ lepton from the decay tt¯→(lνl)(τhντ)bb¯, (l=e,μ). The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb⁻¹ for the electron channel and 2.2 fb⁻¹ for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the tt¯ cross section explicitly including τ leptons in proton-proton collisions at √s=7 TeV. The measured value σtt¯=143±14(stat)±22(syst)±3(lumi) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  7. Pressure Build-Up During the Fire Test in Type B(U) Packages Containing Water - 13280

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldkamp, Martin; Nehrig, Marko; Bletzer, Claus; Wille, Frank

    2013-07-01

    The safety assessment of packages for the transport of radioactive materials with content containing liquids requires special consideration. The main focus is on water as supplementary liquid content in Type B(U) packages. A typical content of a Type B(U) package is ion exchange resin, waste of a nuclear power plant, which is not dried, normally only drained. Besides the saturated ion exchange resin, a small amount of free water can be included in these contents. Compared to the safety assessment of packages with dry content, attention must be paid to some more specific issues. An overview of these issues is provided. The physical and chemical compatibility of the content itself and the content compatibility with the packages materials must be demonstrated for the assessment. Regarding the mechanical resistance the package has to withstand the forces resulting from the freezing liquid. The most interesting point, however, is the pressure build-up inside the package due to vaporization. This could for example be caused by radiolysis of the liquid and must be taken into account for the storage period. If the package is stressed by the total inner pressure, this pressure leads to mechanical loads to the package body, the lid and the lid bolts. Thus, the pressure is the driving force on the gasket system regarding the activity release and a possible loss of tightness. The total pressure in any calculation is the sum of partial pressures of different gases which can be caused by different effects. The pressure build-up inside the package caused by the regulatory thermal test (30 min at 800 deg. C), as part of the cumulative test scenario under accident conditions of transport is discussed primarily. To determine the pressure, the temperature distribution in the content must be calculated for the whole period from beginning of the thermal test until cooling-down. In this case, while calculating the temperature distribution, conduction and radiation as well as evaporation

  8. Search for resonant tt¯ production in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-10

    A search is performed for the production of heavy resonances decaying into top-antitop quark pairs in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. Data used for the analyses were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb–1. The search is performed using events with three different final states, defined by the number of leptons (electrons and muons) from the tt¯ → WbWb decay. The analyses are optimized for reconstruction of top quarks with high Lorentz boosts, where jet substructure techniques are used to enhance the sensitivity. Results are presented for all channels and a combination is performed. Furthermore, no significant excess of events relative to the expected yield from standard model processes is observed.

  9. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlDN I -. . Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1956 I. H.# 984 Sample Nos. l2 Date Collected- o/2g by&- Route to J" Location SSi4.X CUiTn! CXJitP. Type of Sample&-dust Analyzed for F Alpha x Remarks P~UXC~JGIi.' ON. 14lCI11~ U Beta - IIoll0Wi.n~ slucs - NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. 7573p Hour Sample Description 1355 CZ Orxxator sets slul: into place, closes shield over machine S starts &ill. oil coolant flows through hollow drill ____

  10. A search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt? pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp? collision data at ?s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt? candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt? production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt? pairs. A benchmark model of leptophobic Z' ? tt? is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  11. A search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-27

    We search for resonant production of tt̄ pairs in 4.8 fb-1 integrated luminosity of pp̄ collision data at √s = 1.96 TeV in the lepton+jets decay channel, where one top quark decays leptonically and the other hadronically. A matrix element reconstruction technique is used; for each event a probability density function (pdf) of the tt̄ candidate invariant mass is sampled. These pdfs are used to construct a likelihood function, whereby the cross section for resonant tt̄ production is estimated, given a hypothetical resonance mass and width. The data indicate no evidence of resonant production of tt̄ pairs. A benchmark modelmore » of leptophobic Z' → tt̄ is excluded with mZ' < 900 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  12. Search for resonant production of tt? decaying to jets in pp? collisions at ?{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-10-11

    This Letter reports a search for non-standard model topquark resonances, Z', decaying to ttMs; ?W+bW-b? , where both W decay to quarks. We examine the top-antitop quark invariant mass spectrum for the presence of narrow resonant states. The search uses a data sample of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. No evidence for top-antitop quark resonant production is found. We place upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for a specific topcolor assisted technicolor model with width of ?Z' = 0.012 MZ'. Within this model, we exclude Z' boson with masses below 805 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  13. Development of high productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikejiri, T.; Hamamoto, N.; Hisada, S.; Iwasawa, K.; Kawakami, K.; Kokuryu, K.; Miyamoto, N.; Nogami, T.; Sakamoto, T.; Sasada, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamashita, T. [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., LTD., 575, Kuze-tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2011-01-07

    High productivity medium current ion implanter 'EXCEED 3000AH Evo2' is developed. In semiconductor manufacturing field, improvement of the productivity is continuously required. Especially mass production lines recently tend to use low energy beam and 2 pass implant for higher throughput. The 'Evo2' has been developed in an effort to fulfill these requirements. The 'Evo2' increases low energy beam current by 150 to 250% by applying electrostatic einzel lens called 'V-lens' installed at the exit of the Collimator magnet. This lens is also able to control the beam incident angle by adjusting the upper and lower electrode's voltages independently. Besides, mechanical scanning speed is enhanced to minimize process time of 2 pass implant, while also frequency of the fast beam scanning is enhanced to keep dose uniformity. In addition, a vacuum pumping capability at the target chamber is enhanced to reduce a vacuum waiting time during processing photo-resist wafers. This improvement achieved to reduce process time by 40% for a specific recipe. Furthermore, a modified Indirectly Heated Cathode with electron active Reflection 2 (IHC-R2) ion source which has a long life time filament has been installed. These new elements and/or functions have realized typically 25% improvement of productivity compared to standard EXCEED, and also improve a precise implantation capability.

  14. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jet from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.

  15. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section using eμ events with b-tagged jets in pp collisions at √s = 7 and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2014-10-29

    The inclusive top quark pair (tt¯) production cross-section σtt¯ has been measured in proton–proton collisions at √s = 7 TeV √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, using tt¯ events with an opposite-charge eμ pair in the final state. Thus, the measurement was performed with the 2011 7 TeV dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 and the 2012 8 TeV dataset of 20.3 fb–1. The numbers of events with exactly one and exactly two b-tagged jets were counted and used to simultaneously determine σtt¯ and the efficiency to reconstruct and b-tag a jetmore » from a top quark decay, thereby minimizing the associated systematic uncertainties.« less

  16. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  17. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  18. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  19. Accessing conjugated polymers with precisely controlled heterobisfunctional chain ends via post-polymerization modification of the OTf group and controlled Pd(0)/t-Bu3P-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling polymerization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Qiao -Sheng; Hong, Kunlun; Zhang, Hong -Hai

    2015-08-12

    In this study, a general strategy toward the synthesis of well-defined conjugated polymers with controlled heterobisfunctional chain ends via combination of controlled Pd(0)/t-Bu3P Suzuki cross-coupling polymerization with the post-polymerization modification of the triflate (OTf) group was disclosed.

  20. Search for resonant production of tt decaying to jets in pp collisions at √{s}=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-10-11

    This Letter reports a search for non-standard model topquark resonances, Z', decaying to ttMs; →W+bW-b , where both W decay to quarks. We examine the top-antitop quark invariant mass spectrum for the presence of narrow resonant states. The search uses a data sample of p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron, with an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. No evidence for top-antitop quark resonant production is found. We place upper limits on the production cross section times branching ratio for a specific topcolor assisted technicolormore » model with width of λZ' = 0.012 MZ'. Within this model, we exclude Z' boson with masses below 805 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level.« less

  1. Observation of Spin Correlation in tt¯ Events from pp Collisions at √s=7 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2012-05-24

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is reported using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb⁻¹. Candidate events are selected in the dilepton topology with large missing transverse energy and at least two jets. The difference in azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame is used to extract the correlation between the top and antitop quark spins. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.40+0.09-0.08, in agreement with the next-to-leading-order standard model prediction. The hypothesis of zero spin correlation ismore » excluded at 5.1 standard deviations.« less

  2. Ab initio energies and tunneling lifetimes of the doubly charged AH{sup 2+} (A = Mg-Ar) diatomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nefedova, V.V.; Boldyrev, A.I.; Simons, J.

    1995-09-15

    Potential energy curves for the ground and low-lying excited states of the AH{sup 2+} (A = Mg-Ar) dications have been calculated using high-level ab initio methods with large atomic orbital basis sets. Quasi-bound potential energy curves with local minima and deprotonation barriers have been found for most of the dications studied. The energies, tunneling lifetimes, and widths of the quasi-bound states have been calculated by numerical solution of the radial Schroedinger equation using the Numeov method. All these dications except ArH{sup 2+} have low-lying states which support quasi-bound vibrational states. The ArH{sup 2+} dication has a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub i} potential energy curve with a minimum so shallow that it does not support any quasi-bound vibrational states. Results of our calculations are compared with previous ab initio calculations and available experimental data. 24 refs., 8 figs., 12 tabs.

  3. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-07-23

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb⁻¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy √s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ →WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to themore » Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with Γ/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.« less

  4. Haskel/BuTech/PPI

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013.

  5. Precursors to potential severe core damage accidents: 1994, a status report. Volume 21: Main report and appendices A--H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belles, R.J.; Cletcher, J.W.; Copinger, D.A.; Vanden Heuvel, L.N.; Dolan, B.W.; Minarick, J.W. |

    1995-12-01

    Nine operational events that affected eleven commercial light-water reactors (LWRs) during 1994 and that are considered to be precursors to potential severe core damage are described. All these events had conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage greater than or equal to 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. These events were identified by computer-screening the 1994 licensee event reports from commercial LWRs to identify those that could be potential precursors. Candidate precursors were then selected and evaluated in a process similar to that used in previous assessments. Selected events underwent engineering evaluation that identified, analyzed, and documented the precursors. Other events designated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) also underwent a similar evaluation. Finally, documented precursors were submitted for review by licensees and NRC headquarters and regional offices to ensure that the plant design and its response to the precursor were correctly characterized. This study is a continuation of earlier work, which evaluated 1969--1981 and 1984--1993 events. The report discusses the general rationale for this study, the selection and documentation of events as precursors, and the estimation of conditional probabilities of subsequent severe core damage for events. This document is bound in two volumes: Vol. 21 contains the main report and Appendices A--H; Vol. 22 contains Appendix 1.

  6. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using themore » lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.« less

  7. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the tt¯ dilepton channel using the full CDF Run II data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2015-08-06

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass in events containing two leptons (electrons or muons) with a large transverse momentum, two or more energetic jets, and a transverse-momentum imbalance. We use the full proton-antiproton collision data set collected by the CDF experiment during the Fermilab Tevatron Run II at center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.1 fb–1. A special observable is exploited for an optimal reduction of the dominant systematic uncertainty, associated with the knowledge of the absolute energy of the hadronic jets. The distribution of this observable in the selected events is compared to simulated distributions of tt¯ dilepton signal and background. We measure a value for the top-quark mass of 171.5±1.9 (stat)±2.5 (syst) GeV/c2.

  8. Determination of the top-quark pole mass using tt¯ + 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS experiment in 7TeV pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charfeddine, D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. 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I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-10-19

    In this study, the normalized differential cross section for top-quark pair production in association with at least one jet is studied as a function of the inverse of the invariant mass of the tt¯ + 1-jet system. This distribution can be used for a precise determination of the top-quark mass since gluon radiation depends on the mass of the quarks. The experimental analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC with a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1 . The selected events were identified using the lepton+jets top-quark-pair decay channel, where lepton refers to either an electron or a muon. The observed distribution is compared to a theoretical prediction at next-to-leading-order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics using the pole-mass scheme. With this method, the measured value of the top-quark pole mass, mpolet , is: mpolet = 173.7 ± 1.5(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.)+1.0–0.5(theory) GeV.

  9. Neutron scattering studies of the H2a-H2b and (H3-H4)/sub 2/ histone complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have shown that both the (H3-H4)/sub 2/ and H2a-H2b histone complexes are quite asymmetric in solution. The (H3-H4)/sub 2/ tetramer is an oblate or flattened structure, with a radius of gyration almost as large as that of the core octamer. If the tetramer is primarily globular, it must have an axial ratio of about 1:5. It is more likely, however, that this asymmetry results in part from N-terminal arms that extend outward approximately within the major plane of the particle. If this is the case, less asymmetric models for the globular part of the tetramer, including a dislocated disk, can be made consistent with the scattering data. The H2a-H2b dimer, on the other hand, is an elongated structure. 48 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  10. Measurement of the tt? production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt? production cross section of 7.99 0.55(stat) 0.76(syst) 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.

  11. Measurements of fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b-jets in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-01-07

    Fiducial cross-sections for tt¯ production with one or two additional b -jets are reported, using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1 of proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider, collected with the ATLAS detector. The cross-section times branching ratio for tt¯ events with at least one additional b-jet is measured to be 950 ± 70 (stat.) +240-190 (syst.) fb in the lepton-plus-jets channel and 50 ± 10 (stat.) +15-10 (syst.) fb in the eμ channel. The cross-section times branching ratio for events with at least two additional b -jets is measured to bemore » 19.3 ± 3.5 (stat.) ± 5.7 (syst.) fb in the dilepton channel ( eμ , μμ , and ee ) using a method based on tight selection criteria, and 13.5 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 3.6 (syst.) fb using a looser selection that allows the background normalisation to be extracted from data. The latter method also measures a value of 1.30 ± 0.33 (stat.) ± 0.28 (syst.)% for the ratio of tt¯ production with two additional b-jets to tt¯ production with any two additional jets. As a result, all measurements are in good agreement with recent theory predictions.« less

  12. AhR-dependent secretion of PDGF-BB by human classically activated macrophages exposed to DEP extracts stimulates lung fibroblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-06-15

    Lung diseases are aggravated by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) found in air pollution. Macrophages are thought to play a crucial role in lung immune response to these pollutants, even if the mechanisms involved remain incompletely characterized. In the present study, we demonstrated that classically and alternative human macrophages (MΦ) exhibited increased secretion of PDGF-B in response to DEP extract (DEPe). This occurred via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activation because DEPe-induced PDGF-B overexpression was abrogated after AhR expression knock-down by RNA interference, in both M1 and M2 polarizing MΦ. In addition, TCDD and benzo(a)pyrene, two potent AhR ligands, also significantly increased mRNA expression of PDGF-B in M1 MΦ, whereas some weak ligands of AhR did not. We next evaluated the impact of conditioned media (CM) from MΦ culture exposed to DEPe or of recombinant PDGF-B onto lung fibroblast proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG-1295, prevents phosphorylations of PDGF-Rβ, AKT and ERK1/2 and the proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts induced by recombinant PDGF-B and by CM from M1 polarizing MΦ, strongly suggesting that the PDGF-BB secreted by DEPe-exposed MΦ is sufficient to activate the PDGF-Rβ pathway of human lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that human MΦ, whatever their polarization status, secrete PDGF-B in response to DEPe and that PDGF-B is a target gene of AhR. Therefore, induction of PDGF-B by DEP may participate in the deleterious effects towards human health triggered by such environmental urban contaminants. - Highlights: • PDGF-B expression and secretion are increased by DEPe exposure in human M1 and M2 MΦ. • DEPe-induced PDGF-B expression is aryl-hydrocarbon-dependent. • DEPe-exposed M1 MΦ secrete sufficient PDGF-B to increase lung fibroblast proliferation.

  13. A Linear trans -Bis(imido) Neptunium(V) Actinyl Analog: NpV (NDipp)2 ( tBu2 bipy)2Cl (Dipp = 2,6- i Pr2C6H3)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boncella, James M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Tomson, Neil C.

    2015-07-22

    We present the discovery that imido analogs of actinyl dioxo cations can be extended beyond uranium into the transuranic elements. Synthesis of the Np(V) complex, Np(NDipp)2(tBu2bipy)2Cl (1), is achieved through treatment of a Np(IV) precursor with a bipyridine co-ligand and lithium-amide reagent. Complex 1 has been structurally characterized, analyzed by 1H NMR and UV/vis/NIR spectroscopies, and the electronic structure evaluated by DFT calculations.

  14. Assessment of energetic costs of AhR activation by β-naphthoflavone in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes using metabolic flux analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nault, Rance; Abdul-Fattah, Hiba; Mironov, Gleb G.; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Moon, Thomas W.

    2013-08-15

    Exposure to environmental contaminants such as activators of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) leads to the induction of defense and detoxification mechanisms. While these mechanisms allow organisms to metabolize and excrete at least some of these environmental contaminants, it has been proposed that these mechanisms lead to significant energetic challenges. This study tests the hypothesis that activation of the AhR by the model agonist β-naphthoflavone (βNF) results in increased energetic costs in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes. To address this hypothesis, we employed traditional biochemical approaches to examine energy allocation and metabolism including the adenylate energy charge (AEC), protein synthesis rates, Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity, and enzyme activities. Moreover, we have used for the first time in a fish cell preparation, metabolic flux analysis (MFA) an in silico approach for the estimation of intracellular metabolic fluxes. Exposure of trout hepatocytes to 1 μM βNF for 48 h did not alter hepatocyte AEC, protein synthesis, or Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase activity but did lead to sparing of glycogen reserves and changes in activities of alanine aminotransferase and citrate synthase suggesting altered metabolism. Conversely, MFA did not identify altered metabolic fluxes, although we do show that the dynamic metabolism of isolated trout hepatocytes poses a significant challenge for this type of approach which should be considered in future studies. - Highlights: • Energetic costs of AhR activation by βNF was examined in rainbow trout hepatocytes. • Metabolic flux analysis was performed on a fish cell preparation for the first time. • Exposure to βNF led to sparing of glycogen reserves and altered enzyme activities. • Adenylate energy charge was maintained despite temporal changes in metabolism.

  15. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore » cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  16. Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯,W+W–, and Z/γ*→ττ production cross-sections in pp collisions ats=7TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-03-06

    Simultaneous measurements of the tt¯, W⁺W⁻, and Z/γ∗ → ττ production cross-sections using an integrated luminosity of 4.6  fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s = 7  TeV collected by the ATLAS detector at the LHC are presented. Events are selected with two high transverse momentum leptons consisting of an oppositely charged electron and muon pair. The three processes are separated using the distributions of the missing transverse momentum of events with zero and greater than zero jet multiplicities. Measurements of the fiducial cross-section are presented along with results that quantify for the first time the underlying correlations in the predicted and measuredmore »cross-sections due to proton parton distribution functions. These results indicate that the correlated next-to-leading-order predictions for tt¯ and Z/γ∗ → ττ underestimate the data, while those at next-to-next-to-leading-order generally describe the data well. The full cross-sections are measured to be σ(tt¯) = 181.2 ± 2.8⁺⁹̣˙⁷₋₉̣₅ ± 3.3 ± 3.3  pb, σ(W⁺W⁻) = 53.3 ± 2.7⁺⁷˙³₋₈̣₀ ± 1.0 ± 0.5  pb, and σ(Z/γ∗ → ττ) = 1174 ± 24⁺⁷²₋₈₇ ± 21 ± 9  pb, where the cited uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects, luminosity and the LHC beam energy measurement, respectively. The W⁺W⁻ measurement includes the small contribution from Higgs boson decays, H → W⁺W⁻.« less

  17. Precursor systems analyses of automated highway systems. Activity Area A: Urban and rural ahs analysis. Resource materials. Final report, August 1993-November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, H.; Holstein, J.; Ottesen, J.; Hoffman, P.

    1995-11-01

    The identification of technical, operational, and safety issues was accomplished primarily through a comprehensive literature search and a series of expert workshops. The literature search included identification and review of a broad range of previous AHS, IVHS, and related topic research and findings. This work supported a preliminary identification and/or confirmation and detailed description of major technical features, for example, (1) geometric design characteristics such as interchange design, lane width, and median configuration and (2) vehicle characteristics such as braking and acceleration capabilities. Accident type and severity data were also obtained and analyzed for various roadway categories and roadway improvements. Considering improved safety as a primary driver for the implementation of AHSs, current accident statistics were examined carefully to assess their potential utility as an indicator of likely AHS benefits. A summary of freeway design and operating characteristic information was developed not only to guide the ongoing work in this activity area, but to serve as a key point of reference for the team`s other seven activity areas throughout the remainder of the program.

  18. Measurement of the tt̄ production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV using events with large Missing ET and jets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-09

    In this paper we report a measurement of the t{anti t} production cross section in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb-1 collected with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron accelerator. We select events with significant missing transverse energy and high jet multiplicity. This measurement vetoes the presence of explicitly identified electrons and muons, thus enhancing the tau contribution of ttMs; decays. Signal events are discriminated from the background using a neural network and heavy flavor jets are identified by a secondary-vertex tagging algorithm. We measure a tt̄ productionmore » cross section of 7.99 ± 0.55(stat) ± 0.76(syst) ± 0.46(lumi) pb, assuming a top mass mtop = 172.5 GeV/c2, in agreement with previous measurements and standard model predictions.« less

  19. EGCG protects endothelial cells against PCB 126-induced inflammation through inhibition of AhR and induction of Nrf2-regulated genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Sung Gu; Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536 ; Han, Seong-Su; Toborek, Michal; Hennig, Bernhard; Department of Animal and Food Sciences, College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536

    2012-06-01

    Tea flavonoids such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) protect against vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis via their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory functions. Persistent and widespread environmental pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), can induce oxidative stress and inflammation in vascular endothelial cells. Even though PCBs are no longer produced, they are still detected in human blood and tissues and thus considered a risk for vascular dysfunction. We hypothesized that EGCG can protect endothelial cells against PCB-induced cell damage via its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. To test this hypothesis, primary vascular endothelial cells were pretreated with EGCG, followed by exposure to the coplanar PCB 126. Exposure to PCB 126 significantly increased cytochrome P450 1A1 (Cyp1A1) mRNA and protein expression and superoxide production, events which were significantly attenuated following pretreatment with EGCG. Similarly, EGCG also reduced DNA binding of NF-κB and downstream expression of inflammatory markers such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular cell adhesion protein-1 (VCAM-1) after PCB exposure. Furthermore, EGCG decreased endogenous or base-line levels of Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 in endothelial cells. Most of all, treatment of EGCG upregulated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-controlled antioxidant genes, including glutathione S transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, silencing of Nrf2 increased Cyp1A1, MCP-1 and VCAM-1 and decreased GST and NQO1 expression, respectively. These data suggest that EGCG can inhibit AhR regulated genes and induce Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzymes, thus providing protection against PCB-induced inflammatory responses in endothelial cells. -- Highlights: ► PCBs cause endothelial inflammation and subsequent atherosclerosis. ► Nutrition can modulate toxicity by environmental pollutants. ► We

  20. Energy and charge transfers between (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (N719) and ZnO thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni Manman; Cheng Qiang; Zhang, W. F.

    2010-03-15

    ZnO thin films and (Bu{sub 4}N){sub 2}(Ru)(dcbpyH){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2} (called N719) sensitized ZnO thin films are grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) conducting glass substrates using laser molecular beam epitaxy. Ultraviolet-visible absorption, photoluminescence (PL), surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and Raman scattering are employed to probe into the transition process of photogenerated charges and the interaction between ZnO and N719. The experimental results indicate that there is a significant electronic interaction between N719 and ZnO through chemiadsorption. The interaction greatly enhances the photogenerated charge separation and thus the photovoltaic response of the ZnO film but remarkedly weakens its radiative recombination, i.e., PL, implying strong energy and charge transfer occurring between N719 and ZnO. In addition, a new PL peak observed at about 720 nm in N719 sensitized ZnO/FTO is attributed to the electron-hole recombination of N719.

  1. BPA CPTC BU Certification.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BAKERBOTTS.-.* February 3,2015 THE WARNER I299 PENNSYIVANIA AVE , NW WASHING]ON, D C 20C04-2400 IEI +l 202.6397700 FAX +l 202 6397890 BokerBolls com AUSTIN BEIIING BRUSSELS DAITAS DUBAI HONG KONG HOUSTON IONDON MOSCOW NEW YORK PALO AITO RIO DE JANEIRO RIYADH WASHINGTON PUBLIC VERSION Christopher Lawrence U.S. Department of Energy, OE-20 Offrce of Electric Delivery and Energy Reliability 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Informational Filing; Frontera MarketingrLLC, Docket No.

  2. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    Tmore » he tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 eV in the single-lepton channel. his data was collected with the ALAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. he results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.« less

  3. Search for New Phenomena in tt¯ Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum in Proton-Proton Collisions at √s=7 TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2012-01-26

    A search for new phenomena in tt¯ events with large missing transverse momentum in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The measurement is based on 1.04  fb⁻¹ of data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Contributions to this final state may arise from a number of standard model extensions. The results are interpreted in terms of a model where new top-quark partners are pair produced and each decay to an on-shell top (or antitop) quark and a long-lived undetected neutral particle. The data are found to be consistent with standard model expectations. A limitmore » at 95% confidence level is set excluding a cross section times branching ratio of 1.1 pb for a top-partner mass of 420 GeV and a neutral particle mass less than 10 GeV. In a model of exotic fourth generation quarks, top-partner masses are excluded up to 420 GeV and neutral particle masses up to 140 GeV.« less

  4. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  5. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN)_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  6. TT_Awards_cover_front_FINAL.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... gated imaging for reducing the background ... Particle Detection Systems and Methods ... PENS can be used to track move- ment of CO2 from sources such as coal fired power plants...

  7. UI,!JTYT) CTaTT:$ A'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    It can bt? used, like graphite or heavy water, as a moderator in an atomic reactor. "Beca.;se of the reported toxisity of borylliul., we are taking every possible safeguard in the ...

  8. A Linear trans -Bis(imido) Neptunium(V) Actinyl Analog: NpV (NDipp)2 ( tBu2 bipy)2Cl (Dipp = 2,6- i Pr2C6H3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boncella, James M.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Reilly, Sean D.; Scott, Brian L.; Tomson, Neil C.

    2015-07-22

    We present the discovery that imido analogs of actinyl dioxo cations can be extended beyond uranium into the transuranic elements. Synthesis of the Np(V) complex, Np(NDipp)2(tBu2bipy)2Cl (1), is achieved through treatment of a Np(IV) precursor with a bipyridine co-ligand and lithium-amide reagent. Complex 1 has been structurally characterized, analyzed by 1H NMR and UV/vis/NIR spectroscopies, and the electronic structure evaluated by DFT calculations.

  9. AH Bolte A S | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind energy Product: Suppliers of flanges to the wind turbine industry. Coordinates: 56.470699, 8.77293 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

  10. Microsoft Word - TT Coordinator Letter dated May 13 2010.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2010 [Address] Dear (Lab/Facility Director): I am writing to ask you to support and promote the technology transfer partnership ombudsman that has been appointed in your laboratory/facility. The role of the ombudsman is to assist the public and industry in resolving complaints and disputes with National Laboratories or research facilities regarding technology partnerships, patents, and technology licensing. Each DOE National Laboratory and research facility should have appointed a technology

  11. TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    J-I- 1 SECTION J APPENDIX I REPORTS & PLANS REQUIREMENTS LIST Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-I- 2 PART III -LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J - LIST OF ATTACHMENTS APPENDIX I - REPORTS & PLANS REQUIREMENTS LIST Reporting Requirement Freq. Distribution Date Due 1. Annual Work Plans Y OPM&P, OGS As Directed 2. S/C small/disadvantaged contract Report (FM294/5) S CO April 25 and October 25 3. Cyber Security Program A OGS As Required, every 2 yrs 4.

  12. Distinguishing technicolor models via tt production at polarized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Center for High Energy Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China) and Center for High Energy Physics, Tsinghua ...

  13. HFiTT - Higgs Factory in Tevatron Tunnel (Technical Report) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov....

  14. Measurement of BR(Bu to phi K)/BR(Bu to J/psi K) at the collider detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napora, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    This thesis presents evidence for the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using (120 {+-} 7)pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). This signal is then used to measure the branching ratio relative to the decay mode B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}. The measurement starts from reconstructing the two decay modes: B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}, where {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. The measurement yielded 23 {+-} 7 B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} events, and 406 {+-} 26 B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events. The fraction of B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} events where the J/{psi} subsequently decayed to two muons (as opposed to two electrons) was found to be f{sub {mu}{mu}} = 0.839 {+-} 0.066. The relative branching ratio of the two decays is then calculated based on the equation: BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = N{sub {phi}K}/N{sub {psi}K} {center_dot}f{sub {mu}{mu}} BR(J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -})/BR({phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) {epsilon}{sub {mu}{mu}}K/{epsilon}KKK R({epsilon}{sub iso}). The measurement finds BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}})/BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}}) = 0.0068 {+-} 0.0021(stat.) {+-} 0.0007(syst.). The B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} branching ratio is then found to be BR(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}}) = [6.9 {+-} 2.1(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.)] x 10{sup -6}. This value is consistent with similar measurements reported by the e{sup +}e{sup -} collider experiments BaBar[1], Belle[2], and CLEO[3].

  15. Microsoft Word - CR-AH Request Form.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanroom After-Hours Request Form Personal Contact Information Date ___/___/___ Name ____________________ Email ___________________ Phone _________________ Project Number _________________ Group Code ___________________ Requested duration of After-Hours access: Begin Date: __________________ End Date: __________________ Justification for After-Hours clearance Include details of project requirements, processing routine, and/or other reasons why workday hours are insufficient. * Workday hours =

  16. 2016 Race to Zero Competition: Green Future Team AH Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Summary The Independence Heights neighborhood is Historically significant in that it was the first Incorporated black municipality in Texas (19010). The Neighborhood was subsequently incorporated into the City of Houston and most recently, sustained significant damage from Hurricane Ike in 2008. This net zero ready home was designed to provide an affordable, high performance, small Footprint home for low-income families in an area that needs it the most. Relevance of Project to the Goals

  17. Controlled Pd(0)/t Bu3P Catalyzed Suzuki Cross-Coupling Polymerization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    systems afforded functional polymers with >95% fidelity. Our results paved the road to access well-defined conjugated polymers, including conjugated polymers with complex ...

  18. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Miles 2001 Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Appalachian ...

  19. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lands' Oil and Gas Resources and Reserves and the Extent and Nature of Restrictions to Their Development", prepared by the US Departments of Interior, Agriculture and Energy. ...

  20. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Map created June 2005; projection is UTM-13, NAD-27. Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin (1), Steve Jackson (1) and Robert King ...

  1. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Unnamed fields and fields generically named "wildcat" were renamed to a concatenate of their basin and state of occurrence, e.g. UPUT (Uinta-Piceance Basin and Utah). Map created ...

  2. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  3. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of Onshore

  4. BASIN VER DE GREAT ER ANETH BU G BAR KER DOME HOR SESH OE UTE DOME

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class 0 20 40 10 30 Miles ± The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by Section 604 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act Amendments of 2000 (P.L. 106-469). The boundaries are not informed by subsurface structural information. The data and methods used in their creation are detailed in a report, "Scientific Inventory of

  5. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    315 Miles ¯ 2001 BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  6. GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK ... Authors: Sam Limerick (1), Lucy Luo (1), Gary Long (2), David Morehouse (2), Jack Perrin ...

  7. BIG SANDY IDA ONEID A WILL IAM SBU RG BU RNIN G SPRIN GS WIN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Appalachian Basin Boundary Appalachian Basin, TN-KY (Panel 7 of 7) Oil and Gas Fields By 2001 BOE

  8. Inclusive and differential measurements of the tt¯ charge asymmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 757; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  9. Searches for new physics in the tt-bar events at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loginov, Andrey; /Yale U.

    2009-01-01

    The authors review the latest results on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model in the top quark sector at CDF Run II in a data sample with integrated luminosity up to 2.8 fb{sup -1}. Since its discovery, the top quark has appeared to be a very special object. It is distinguished by its large mass ({approx} 170 GeV) close to the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB), and a Yukawa coupling surprisingly close to one (0.98). Is the top quark mass generated by the Higgs mechanism as the Standard Model (SM) predicts, or does it play a more fundamental role in the EWSB? How would physics beyond the standard model (SM) affect top quark properties? Searches for new physics (NP) should provide answers to the many open questions left by the SM. In these proceedings they present the latest CDF results on the searches for exotic decay modes of the top quark, as well as the production and decay of new particles into final states with a top quark pair. The analyses of the Run II data are performed with approximately 30 times the statistics of the Run I top quark discovery.

  10. Search for New Phenomena in tt Events with Large Missing Transverse Momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golling, Tobias

    2014-06-12

    The ATLAS Run I data as provided by CERNs LHC has been systematically searched for the presence of supersymmetric partners of the top quark (stops) using the identification of charm-flavored jets and boosted top tagging. No signs of stop could be established yet.

  11. AHS National Specialists' Meeting on Rotorcraft Dynamics, Arlington, TX, Nov. 13, 14, 1989, Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Various papers on rotorcraft dynamics are presented. Individual topics addressed include: aeromechanical stability of helicopters, evolution and test history of the V-22 Aeroelastic Model Series, helicopter individual blade control through optimal output feedback, dynamic characteristics of composite beam structures, dynamic testing of thin-walled composite box beams in a vacuum chamber, fundamental dynamics issues for comprehensive rotorcraft analyses, and development of the second generation Comprehensive Helicopter Analysis System. Also considered are: experiences in NASTRAN airframe vibration predictions, application of CRFD program to total helicopter dynamics, vibration reduction on servoflap controlled rotor using HHC, V-22 MSC/NASTRAN airframe vibration analysis and correlation, responses of helicopter rotors to vibratory airloads, helicopter rotor load calculations, prediction and alleviation of V-22 rotor dynamic loads, free wake analysis of rotor configurations for reduced vibratory airloads.

  12. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Berm 7 Buttress area: looking west Appendix C, Page 14 EPC construction zone: looking north EPC construction zone: looking south Appendix C, Page 15 East cover area: looking ...

  13. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Original Landfill October 2011 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on October 31. The Site received approximately 10 inches of snow on October 25 and 26, however the cover was dry at the time of the inspection except for

  14. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Original Landfill October 2012 Monthly Inspection-Attachment 1 The monthly inspection of the OLF was completed on October 30. The Rocky Flats Site received 1.44 inches of precipitation during the month of October. The cover was dry at the time of the inspection including the majority of the seep locations. The slump in the

  15. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Appendix C, Page 12 Appendix C, Page 13 Appendix C, Page 14 Appendix C, Page 15 Appendix C, Page 16 Appendix C, Page 17 Appendix C, Page 18 Appendix C, Page 19 Appendix C, Page 20 Appendix C, Page 21 Appendix C, Page 22 Appendix C, Page 23 Appendix C, Page 24

  16. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    0 Appendix C, Page 1 C.1 Original Landfill Appendix C, Page 2 Appendix C, Page 3 Appendix C, Page 4 Appendix C, Page 5 Appendix C, Page 6 Appendix C, Page 7 Appendix C, Page 8 Appendix C, Page 9 Appendix C, Page 10 Appendix C, Page 11 Appendix C, Page 12 Appendix C, Page 13 Appendix C, Page 14 Appendix C, Page 15 Appendix C, Page 16 Appendix C, Page 17 Appendix C, Page 18 Appendix C, Page 19 Appendix C, Page 20 Appendix C, Page 21 Appendix C, Page 22 Appendix C, Page 23 Appendix C, Page 24

  17. Microsoft Word - Appendix A-H from 2007 Annual Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    from the channel until more permanent repairs can be completed in that location. A geotechnical engineering firm is completing an evaluation of the slumping area on the OLF and...

  18. HUD lead-based-paint abatement demonstration (FHA). Volume 1. Appendices a-h

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The document is Volume 1 of the two-volume appendices accompanying 'The HUD Lead-Based Paint Abatement Demonstration' report. The document contains contract documents; management and work plan narrative in support of HUD 441.1-baseline plan; research design of the lead based paint abatement demonstration; field detection of lead; quality assurance plan of detection of lead; and different forms used in recording data.

  19. Modelling Z→TT processes in ATLAS with T-embedded Z →μμ data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-15

    We describe the concept, technical realisation and validation of a largely data-driven method to model events with Z→ττ decays. In Z→μμ events selected from proton-proton collision data recorded at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012, the Z decay muons are replaced by τ leptons from simulated Z →ττ decays at the level of reconstructed tracks and calorimeter cells. The τ lepton kinematics are derived from the kinematics of the original muons. Thus, only the well-understood decays of the Z boson and τ leptons as well as the detector response to the τ decay products aremore » obtained from simulation. All other aspects of the event, such as the Z boson and jet kinematics as well as effects from multiple interactions, are given by the actual data. This so-called τ-embedding method is particularly relevant for Higgs boson searches and analyses in ττ final states, where Z→ττ decays constitute a large irreducible background that cannot be obtained directly from data control samples. In this paper, we discuss the relevant concepts based on the implementation used in the ATLAS Standard Model H→ττ analysis of the full datataset recorded during 2011 and 2012.« less

  20. QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... World Oil PricesInternational Petroleum Michael Grillot Macroeconomic ...... Kay A. Smith Energy Product Prices ...... Neil Gamson Petroleum Demands ...

  1. Measurement of the tt, WW and Z -> tautau Production Cross Sections in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carron Montero, Sebastian Fernando; /Duke U.

    2006-11-01

    In this thesis we present a new technique to analyze events containing two highly energetic leptons, as a probe of the Standard Model. The philosophy is to consider the data in a more global way, as opposed to the more traditional process dependent approach of extracting a given signal over the expected backgrounds by using various kinematical requirements. We use our global technique to simultaneously measure the cross sections of the main Standard Model processes; the t{bar t}, WW and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} production from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF detector at Fermilab. We select events by requiring they contain two highly energetic leptons (e{mu}, ee, or {mu}{mu}), and make no other kinematic requirements, except for the ee and {mu}{mu} channels. We then use a likelihood fit of the data in the two-dimensional phase space defined by the missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) and the number of jets in the event (N{sub jet}), to the expected Standard Model distributions, to simultaneously extract the production cross-sections of the main process contributing to our dilepton sample.

  2. Measurements of normalized differential cross sections for tt¯ production in pp collisions at (s)=7  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; et al

    2014-10-13

    We present measurements of normalized differential cross sections for top-quark pair production as a function of the top-quark transverse momentum, and of the mass, transverse momentum, and rapidity of the t¯t system, in proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of √ s=7 TeV. The data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb₋1, recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Events are selected in the lepton + jets channel, requiring exactly one lepton and at least four jets with at least one of the jets tagged as originating from a b-quark. The measuredmore » spectra are corrected for detector efficiency and resolution effects and are compared to several Monte Carlo simulations and theory calculations. The results are in fair agreement with the predictions in a wide kinematic range. Nevertheless, data distributions are softer than predicted for higher values of the mass of the t¯t system and of the top-quark transverse momentum. Lastly, the measurements can also discriminate among different sets of parton distribution functions.« less

  3. Search for Z' resonances decaying to tt¯; in dilepton+jets final states in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; et al

    2013-04-03

    A search for resonances decaying to top quark-antiquark pairs is performed using a dilepton+jets data sample recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 b⁻¹. No significant deviations from the standard model background are observed. Upper limits are presented for the production cross section times branching fraction of top quark-antiquark resonances for masses from 750 to 3000 GeV. In particular, the existence of a leptophobic topcolor particle Z' is excluded at the 95% confidence level for resonance masses MZ'Z'=0.012MZ', and MZ'=0.10MZ'.

  4. Search for Z' resonances decaying to tt¯; in dilepton+jets final states in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; et al

    2013-04-03

    A search for resonances decaying to top quark-antiquark pairs is performed using a dilepton+jets data sample recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.0 b⁻¹. No significant deviations from the standard model background are observed. Upper limits are presented for the production cross section times branching fraction of top quark-antiquark resonances for masses from 750 to 3000 GeV. In particular, the existence of a leptophobic topcolor particle Z' is excluded at the 95% confidence level for resonance masses MZ'<1.3 TeV for ΓZ'=0.012MZ', and M<1.9 TeV for ΓZ'=0.10MZ'.

  5. Assignment of the luminescing states of [Au{sup 1}Rh{sup 1}({sup t}BuNC){sub 2}({mu}-dppm){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}]{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Striplin, D.R.; Crosby, G.A.

    1995-07-13

    Fluorescence, phosphorescence, and excitation spectra were measured on the title compound. These results were augmented with polarization ratios obtained at 77 K and detailed studies of the temperature dependence of the phosphorescence in the 77-4 K range. The phosphorescence decay rate at K was also recorded as a function of an applied magnetic field. All the results are consistent with a 4d{sub z}Rh{sup 1} {yields} 6p{sub 2}Au{sup 1} orbital promotion leading to emitting {sup 1}A, {sup 3}A{sub 1} terms in pseudo-C{sub 2v} symmetry. The {sup 3}A{sub 1} term is split by spin-orbit coupling into a forbidden A{sub 2} state lying lowest followed by a quasi-degenerate pair, [B{sub 1}(x), B{sub 2}(y)] lying approximately 16 cm{sup -1} higher that decays >500 times faster than the lowest one. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT Energy to export electric...

  7. Top physics: measurement of the tt-bar production cross section in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev using lepton + jets events with secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-04-07

    We present a measurement of the t{bar t} production cross section using events with one charged lepton and jets from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96TeV. In these events, heavy flavor quarks from top quark decay are identified with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. From 162 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab, a total of 48 candidate events are selected, where 13.5 {+-} 1.8 events are expected from background contributions. We measure a t{bar t} production cross section of 5.6{sub -1.1}{sup _1.2}(stat.){sub -0.6}{sup +0.9}(syst.)pb.

  8. Measurement of the tt¯ production cross-section as a function of jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-01-08

    The tt¯ production cross-section dependence on jet multiplicity and jet transverse momentum is reported for proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV in the single-lepton channel. This data was collected with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider and comprise the full 2011 data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb–1. Differential cross-sections are presented as a function of the jet multiplicity for up to eight jets using jet transverse momentum thresholds of 25, 40, 60, and 80 GeV, and as a function of jet transverse momentum up to the fifth jet. The results are shown after background subtraction and corrections for all known detector effects, within a kinematic range closely matched to the experimental acceptance. Several QCD-based Monte Carlo models are compared with the results. Sensitivity to the parton shower modelling is found at the higher jet multiplicities, at high transverse momentum of the leading jet and in the transverse momentum spectrum of the fifth leading jet. As a result, the MC@NLO+HERWIG MC is found to predict too few events at higher jet multiplicities.

  9. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, ... Application from Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. Record of Categorical ...

  10. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. | Department of Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Application from Chubu TT to export electric energy to Canada. Record of Categorical Exclusion. EA-404 Chubu TT (CN).pdf (77.04 KB) More Documents &

  11. Final Scientific/Technical Report Grant title: Use of ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction This is a collaborative project with the NASA GSFC project of Dr. A. Marshak and W. Wiscombe (PIs). This report covers BU activities from February 2011 to June 2011 and BU "no-cost extension" activities from June 2011 to June 2012. This report summarizes results that complement a final technical report submitted by the PIs in 2011.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knyazikhin, Y

    2012-09-10

    Main results are summarized for work in these areas: spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer; spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths; seasonal changes in leaf area of Amazon forests from leaf flushing and abscission; and Cloud droplet size and liquid water path retrievals from zenith radiance measurements.

  12. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Record 13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) This record from the ...

  13. Measurement of the partial cross sections {sigma}{sub TT}, {sigma}{sub LT}, and ({sigma}{sub T} + {epsilon}{sigma}{sub L}) of the {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n reaction in the {Delta}(1232) resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, J. M.; Calarco, J.; Holtrop, A.; Sparveris, N. F.; Nakagawa, I.; Bernstein, A. M.; Bertozzi, W.; Botto, T.; Casagrande, F.; Dow, K.; Farkondeh, M.; Gilad, S.; Kowalski, S.; Milner, R.; Sirca, S.; Stave, S.; Tsentalivich, G.; Tschalaer, C.; Turchinetz, W.; Zhou, Z.-L.

    2011-08-15

    We report precision {sup 1}H(e, e{sup '{pi}+})n measurements in the {Delta}(1232) resonance at Q{sup 2}=0.127(GeV/c){sup 2} obtained at the MIT-Bates out-of-plane scattering facility. These are the lowest, but nonzero, Q{sup 2} measurements in the {pi}{sup +} channel. The data offer tests of the theoretical calculations, particularly of the background amplitude contributions. The chiral effective field theory and Sato-Lee model calculations are not in agreement with this experiment.

  14. First measurement of the fraction of top-quark pair production through gluon-gluon fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K.; Yorita, K.

    2008-12-01

    We present the first measurement of {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt). We use 0.96 fb{sup -1} of {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV pp collision data recorded with the CDF II detector at Fermilab. Using charged particles with low transverse momentum in tt events, we find {sigma}(gg{yields}tt)/{sigma}(pp{yields}tt)=0.07{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.07(syst), corresponding to a 95% confidence level upper limit of 0.33, in agreement with the standard model next-to-leading-order prediction of 0.15{+-}0.05.

  15. AXT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... DE...T .. ) o. ---... - --- ' I ... .... to - : - --.---- 4 3.01 . I T'-r;; -- : TT- ... .. F.... ...... 0.8: i. . . . . * .. 0.4 . J :- Regional Geology The proposed ...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - OTT RFI Summary of Input_Public_Oct 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... and standardization of TT processes, activities and policies - Unify IP agreements, NDA protocols, COI's - Clarify what terms areare not negotiable - Clear long-term ...

  17. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-404 Chubu TT Energy Management Inc. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and...

  18. Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... effort. For any R&D program to be successful, ... existing TT mechanisms (i.e.: especially recognized ... Mason Gregory The Energy Cooperative Newark OH Dr. Mohaghegh ...

  19. Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-78 Attachment 1 Unsuccessful...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    name and address of the offeror receiving the award: ABC Company. 2222 Anywhere Street Sun City, TT 22222 4. Contract Value: 5. Contract award date:...

  20. Microcab Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Microcab Industries Ltd Place: Coventry, United Kingdom Zip: CV1 2TT Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Urban taxi and light freight vehicle powered by a hydrogen fuel cell....

  1. Graphdiyne as a high-capacity lithium ion battery anode material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Byungryul; Koo, Jahyun; Park, Minwoo; Kwon, Yongkyung; Lee, Hoonkyung; Lee, Hosik; Nam, Jaewook

    2013-12-23

    Using the first-principles calculations, we explored the feasibility of using graphdiyne, a 2D layer of sp and sp{sup 2} hybrid carbon networks, as lithium ion battery anodes. We found that the composite of the Li-intercalated multilayer ?-graphdiyne was C{sub 6}Li{sub 7.31} and that the calculated voltage was suitable for the anode. The practical specific/volumetric capacities can reach up to 2719?mAh?g{sup ?1}/2032?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, much greater than the values of ?372?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?818?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, ?1117?mAh?g{sup ?1}/?1589?mAh?cm{sup ?3}, and ?744?mAh?g{sup ?1} for graphite, graphynes, and ?-graphdiyne, respectively. Our calculations suggest that multilayer ?-graphdiyne can serve as a promising high-capacity lithium ion battery anode.

  2. TO. TO. , W. B; Harris, Chief, Industrial Hygiene'Branch DA ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    To study operations planned byBu.reau of Ea: factors for Be, II, thorium, zirconium, etc, ... laboratory paper. containing uranium ;thorium ,,beryllium and zirconi turned to AEC ...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Katz, Emanuel Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States) (1) Katz, Emanuel, E-mail: bfeldste@buphy.bu.edu, E-mail: ...

  4. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics QCD-BU.jpg Key Challenges: Although the QCD theory has been extensively tested at at high energies, at low energies or...

  5. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Protection Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Bu ...

  6. Envirocapital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Envirocapital Jump to: navigation, search Name: Envirocapital Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC4M 8BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Provides corporate finance advice to the...

  7. Alternative Energy Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alternative Energy Finance Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: NW11 8BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: String representation...

  8. A=19Ne (1978AJ03)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ03) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 19Ne) GENERAL: See (1972AJ02) and Table 19.24 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1972EN03, 1972NE1B, 1972WE01, 1973DE13, 1977BU05). Electromagnetic transitions: (1972EN03, 1972LE06, 1973HA53, 1973PE09, 1977BU05). Special states: (1972EN03, 1972GA14, 1972HI17, 1972NE1B, 1972WE01, 1977BU05, 1977SC08). Complex reactions involving 19Ne: (1976HI05, 1977BU05). Astrophsyical questions: (1973CL1E). Muon capture: (1972MI11). Pion capture and

  9. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor-dependent regulation of miR-196a expression controls lung fibroblast apoptosis but not proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, Emelia; Zago, Michela; Sarill, Miles; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gomez, Alvin; Matthews, Jason; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2014-11-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor implicated in the regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Although activation of the AhR by xenobiotics such as dioxin inhibits the cell cycle and control apoptosis, paradoxically, AhR expression also promotes cell proliferation and survival independent of exogenous ligands. The microRNA (miRNA) miR-196a has also emerged as a regulator of proliferation and apoptosis but a relationship between the AhR and miR-196a is not known. Therefore, we hypothesized that AhR-dependent regulation of endogenous miR-196a expression would promote cell survival and proliferation. Utilizing lung fibroblasts from AhR deficient (AhR{sup −/−}) and wild-type (AhR{sup +/+}) mice, we show that there is ligand-independent regulation of miRNA, including low miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} cells. Validation by qRT-PCR revealed a significant decrease in basal expression of miR-196a in AhR{sup −/−} compared to AhR{sup +/+} cells. Exposure to AhR agonists benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and FICZ as well as AhR antagonist CH-223191 decreased miR-196a expression in AhR{sup +/+} fibroblasts concomitant with decreased AhR protein levels. There was increased proliferation only in AhR{sup +/+} lung fibroblasts in response to serum, corresponding to a decrease in p27{sup KIP1} protein, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Increasing the cellular levels of miR-196a had no effect on proliferation or expression of p27{sup KIP1} in AhR{sup −/−} fibroblasts but attenuated cigarette smoke-induced apoptosis. This study provides the first evidence that AhR expression is essential for the physiological regulation of cellular miRNA levels- including miR-196a. Future experiments designed to elucidate the functional relationship between the AhR and miR-196a may delineate additional novel ligand-independent roles for the AhR. - Highlights: • The AhR controls proliferation and apoptosis in lung cells. • The AhR regulates the

  10. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quark–antiquark pairs (tt¯) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and μ) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting tt¯W events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for tt¯Z events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the tt¯W cross section is measured as σtt¯W=170+90-80(stat)±70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore » 1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the tt¯Z cross section, σtt¯Z=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive tt¯V process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.« less

  11. Measurement of top quark-antiquark pair production in association with a W or Z boson in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ $\\,\\text {TeV}$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    The measurement of a cross section for the production of top quarkantiquark pairs (tt) in association with a vector boson V (W or Z) in proton-proton collisions at ?s=8 TeV is presented. The results are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurement is performed in three leptonic (e and ?) channels: a same-sign dilepton analysis targeting ttW events, and trilepton and four-lepton analyses designed for ttZ events. In the same-sign dilepton channel, the ttW cross section is measured as ?ttW=170+90-80(stat)70(syst)fb, corresponding to a significance ofmore1.6 standard deviations over the background-only hypothesis. Combining the trilepton and four-lepton channels, a direct measurement of the ttZ cross section, ?ttZ=200+80-70(stat)+40-30(syst)fb-1, is obtained with a significance of 3.1 standard deviations. Finally, the measured cross sections are compatible with standard model predictions within their experimental uncertainties. The inclusive ttV process is observed with a significance of 3.7 standard deviations from the combination of all three leptonic channels.less

  12. Everest Refrigeration: Order (2015-SE-42001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) to pay a $12,080 civil penalty after finding Bu Sung had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 64 units of noncompliant commercial refrigerator basic model ESGR3.

  13. Microsoft Word - S06397_Apr09 thru Mar10.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... 5062.19 5059.6 2 03-Apr-00 731569 1871746 0266 MW D 4890.6 4870.6 4850.6 160.0 180.0 ... NS 0264 D 0.0031 2001 0.0005 B 0.00087 BU 0266 D 0.00058 2001 0.00061 B 0.00082 BU 0272 D ...

  14. A=18O (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1979DA15, 1979WU06, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1982KI02, 1982OL01). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978CH26, 1978PI1E,...

  15. A=18F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18F) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.11 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1977AN1P, 1977GR16, 1977SO1C, 1978CO08, 1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979BU12, 1979DA15, 1980GO01, 1980KU05, 1980MA18, 1981EL1D, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and deformed models: (1977BU22, 1978BU03, 1978PI1E, 1978SA15, 1978TA1A, 1979BU12, 1979SA31, 1980RO19, 1981CH24). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976MC1G, 1977BU22, 1977HA1Z, 1977HE1L,

  16. Rugged Renewables EMAT Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EMAT Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rugged Renewables EMAT Inc Address: Unit 3 Gear House Saltmeadows Road Place: Gateshead Zip: NE8 3AH Region: United Kingdom...

  17. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Italy), R. Asgari (Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, Iran), and A.H. MacDonald (University of Texas at Austin). Research funding: German Research Foundation,...

  18. Substrate-Induced Band-Gap Opening in Epitaxial Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology), D.-H. Lee (University of California, Berkeley), F. Guinea (Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Spain), and A.H. Castro Neto (Boston University). Research...

  19. MHK ISDB/Instruments/HOBO U30 Weather Station Data Logger | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type: Battery Power Specification: 10 Ah rechargeable battery; AC power adapter and solar panel options. ExternalInput: 15 Input Channels Spec Sheet: http:...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States) Yucca Mountain ... Lenardo, Michael J. (1) Park, Ah Young (1) Raunser, Stefan (1) Rice, Amanda J. (1) ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Performance Analysis Tools Allinea MAP: Use & Functionality Nam, Hai Ah ; Green, Jennifer ... The Energy Sciences Net- work (ESnet) recently launched its fifth generation network, a ...

  2. Deirdre Monroe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Christina Martos Hilton Deirdre Monroe Hai Ah Nam Denise Neudecker Phil & Monica Noll Amy Ross Bryant Roybal Max Schulze Denise Thronas Michael Torrez Jos Valdez Darleen...

  3. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... W. ; Nam, Hai Ah ; Rockefeller, Gabriel M. ; Garrett, Charles Kristopher ; Krueger, Brendan K. ; Schoonover, Joseph Arthur ; Aguilar Garcia, Nickole A. This document summarizes ...

  4. Generation Investment Management LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Investment Management LLP Jump to: navigation, search Name: Generation Investment Management LLP Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip: W1J 0AH Product: Fund manager of...

  5. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal system have been debated for some time. The primary structural model ahs been a single fault with 54 dip. New data including a detailed gravity survey,...

  6. MICROBIAL AND CHEMICAL ENHANCEMENT OF IN-SITU CARBON MINERALIZATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... University (July 18 th , 2012). Invited talk at the symposium titled "Green Chemistry in Energy and Fuels": A.-H. A. Park, "Towards Sustainable Energy: Carbon Capture, ...

  7. Iron Complexes Bearing Diphosphine Ligands with Positioned Pendant Amines as Electrocatalysts for the Oxidation of H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Tianbiao L.; Liao, Qian; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Hulley, Elliott; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2015-06-22

    The synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)Cl, [3-Cl] (where C5F4N is the tetrafluorpyridyl substituent and PtBu2NBn2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-di(benzyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane) are reported. Complex 3-Cl and previously reported [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)Cl], 4-Cl, are precursors to intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of H2, including CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)H (3-H), CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)H (4-H), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)]BArF4 ([3](BArF4), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2)]BArF4 ([4](BArF4), [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NBn2)(H2)]BArF4 ([3-H2]BArF4), and [CpC5F4NFe(PtBu2NtBu2H)H]BArF4 ([4-FeH(NH)]BArF4). All of these complexes were characterized by spectroscopic and electrochemical studies; 3-Cl, 3-H and 4-Cl were also characterized by single crystal diffraction studies. 3-H and 4-H are electrocatalysts for H2 (1.0 atm) oxidation in the presence of a excess of the amine base N-methylpyrrolidine, with turnover frequencies at 22 °C of 2.5 s-1 and 0.5 s-1, and overpotentials at Ecat/2 of 235 mV and 95 mV, respectively. Studies of individual chemical and/or electrochemical reactions of the various intermediates provide important insights into the factors governing the overall catalytic activity for H2 oxidation, and provide important insights into the role of the pendant base of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. This work was supported by the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Cobalt Complexes Containing Pendant Amines in the Second Coordination Sphere as Electrocatalysts for H2 Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Ming; Wiedner, Eric S.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2014-10-27

    A series of heteroleptic 17e- cobalt complexes, [CpCoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [CpC6F5CoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [CpC5F4NCoII(PtBu2NPh2)](BF4), [where P2tBuN2Ph = 1,5-diphenyl-3,7-di(tert-butyl)-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane, CpC6F5 = C5H4(C6F5), and CpC5F4N = C5H4(C5F4N)] were synthesized, and structures of all three were determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical studies showed that the CoIII/II couple of [CpC5F4NCoII(PtBu2NPh2)]+ appears 250 mV positive of the CoIII/II couple of [CpCoII(PtBu2NPh2)] as a result of the strongly electron-withdrawing perfluorpyridyl substituent on the Cp ring. Reduction of these paramagnetic CoII complexes by KC8 led to the diamagnetic 18e- complexes CpICo(PtBu2NPh2), CpC6F5CoI(PtBu2NPh2), CpC5F4NCoI(PtBu2NPh2), which were also characterized by crystallography. Protonation of these neutral CoI complexes led to the cobalt hydrides [CpCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4), [CpC6F5CoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4), and [CpC5F4NCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H](BF4). The cobalt hydride with the most electron-withdrawing Cp ligand, [CpC5F4NCoIII(PtBu2NPh2)H]+ is an electrocatalyst for production of H2 using 4-MeOC6H4NH3BF4 (pKaMeCN = 11.86) with a turnover frequency of 350 s-1 and an overpotential of 0.75 V. Experimental measurement of thermochemical data provided further insights into the thermodynamics of H2 elimination. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Hypoxia perturbs aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 in human skin and liver-derived cell lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorrink, Sabine U.; Severson, Paul L.; Kulak, Mikhail V.; Futscher, Bernard W.; Domann, Frederick E.

    2014-02-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is an important mediator of toxic responses after exposure to xenobiotics including 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Activation of AhR responsive genes requires AhR dimerization with the aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), a heterodimeric partner also shared by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein. TCDD-stimulated AhR transcriptional activity can be influenced by hypoxia; however, it less well known whether hypoxia interferes with AhR transcriptional transactivation in the context of PCB-mediated AhR activation in human cells. Elucidation of this interaction is important in liver hepatocytes which extensively metabolize ingested PCBs and experience varying degrees of oxygen tension during normal physiologic function. This study was designed to assess the effect of hypoxia on AhR transcriptional responses after exposure to 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126). Exposure to 1% O{sub 2} prior to PCB 126 treatment significantly inhibited CYP1A1 mRNA and protein expression in human HepG2 and HaCaT cells. CYP1A1 transcriptional activation was significantly decreased upon PCB 126 stimulation under conditions of hypoxia. Additionally, hypoxia pre-treatment reduced PCB 126 induced AhR binding to CYP1 target gene promoters. Importantly, ARNT overexpression rescued cells from the inhibitory effect of hypoxia on XRE-luciferase reporter activity. Therefore, the mechanism of interference of the signaling crosstalk between the AhR and hypoxia pathways appears to be at least in part dependent on ARNT availability. Our results show that AhR activation and CYP1A1 expression induced by PCB 126 were significantly inhibited by hypoxia and hypoxia might therefore play an important role in PCB metabolism and toxicity. - Highlights: • Significant crosstalk exists between AhR and HIF-1α signaling. • Hypoxia perturbs PCB 126 induced AhR function and

  10. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  11. Novel Approach for Biomass Synthesis Gas Cleaning for Liquid Fuel Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Approach for Biomass Synthesis Gas Cleaning for Liquid Fuel Applications WBS 3.2.5.9 May 22, 2013 Thermo-chemical Platform Review Presented by: Ben Phillips, Emery Energy Lyman Frost, Ceramatec 2 Project Overview * Start Date - 9/30/2008 * Completion Date - Dec 2012 * Construction - 100% complete * Project - 100% complete 1. Tt-C - Gasification of Wood, Biorefinery Residue Streams and Low Sugar Biomass 2. Tt-F - Syngas Cleanup & Conditioning 3. Tt-H - Validation of Syngas Quality Total

  12. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Backup Power (BuP) | Department of Energy Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) This record from the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program describes the number of current and planned fuel cell deployments for backup power applications. 13007_industry_bup_deployments.pdf (307.65 KB) More Documents & Publications Early Stage Market Change and Effects of the Recovery

  13. Quantification of Lithium-ion Cell Thermal Runaway Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orendorff, Christopher J.; Lamb, Joshua; Steele, Leigh Anna Marie; Spangler, Scott Wilmer; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2016-01-01

    Much of what is known about lithium-ion cell thermal runaway energetics has been measured and extrapolated from data acquired on relatively small cells (< 3 Ah). This work is aimed at understanding the effects of cell size on thermal runaway energetics on cells from 3 to 50 Ah of both LiFePO4 (LFP) and LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) chemistries. Results show that for both LFP and NCA cells, the normalized heating rate (W/Ah) increases roughly linearly for cells from 3-38 Ah while the normalized total heat released (kJ/Ah) is relatively constant over that cell size range. The magnitude of the normalized heating rate is on the order of 2x greater for NCA relative to LFP chemistries for 2-3 Ah cells, while that difference is on the order of 10x for 30-40 Ah cells. The total normalized heat release is ~ 15-20% greater for NCA relative to LFP cells across the entire size range studied 3-38 Ah.

  14. Search for supersymmetry in the multijet and missing transverse...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of the coordinate system and relevant kinematic variables, is given in Ref. 24. ... simulated and measured pT spectra of the system recoiling against the ISR jets in tt ...

  15. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...UAV Payload McCoy, R.F, Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The ARM-UAV payload is ...

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instrumentation for the AMR-UAV Payload McCoy, R.F., Tooman, T.T., and Bolton, W.B., Sandia National Laboratories Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team ...

  17. Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf (91.42 KB) More Documents & Publications Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf livermorecmp.pdf

  18. Biological Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading Presentation for BETO 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading WBS 2.3.2.301 2015 DOE BioEnergy Technologies Office (BETO) ... * Tt-J Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil Intermediates to Fuels and Chemicals ...

  19. Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil Presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Fractionation and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil ... Deconstruction of Biomass to Form Bio-Oil Intermediates Tt-I. Catalytic Upgrading of ...

  20. DOE/NV--1032

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... DIFFUSION PLANT, OH PO SANDIA NATIONAL LAB-CA, CA SL SANDIA NATIONAL LAB-NM, NM SA TT FOSTER WHEELER, TN FW WESTINGHOUSE SAVANNAH RIVER, SC SR WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION ...

  1. Phone Log: Spoke to: C.V. Chung I Date/Time: 5/29/14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L (CONTR) - TOT-D1TT-2 Subject: FW: Request for WECC Maps - by non-profit org Hello Kim: One of my staff members received this third-party request from WECC for a "BPA...

  2. ZL,o-c'3

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' F.EC-Tt4ED INVOLVE?ENi- AT SITE ...-------... Control E Health Physics Protection 0 AECtlED managed operations G Little or None G AECHED responsible for c ...

  3. 4H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectrum. 1980SE08: 7Li(-, nt), E at rest; measured tt-coin. 4H deduced possible ... 1985DO19: 6Li(-, 2p), (-, nt), E at rest; measured (particle)(particle)-coin ...

  4. Search for new physics in t?+ large ET-> bb?qq?qq? + large ET final state in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The datamoreare consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.less

  5. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... M. NA Weber, Sally A. NA Young, David NA Becker, Melanie NE Morgan, Kelly NE Lyles, Monica D. OE Moore, Sharon M. OR Nance, Deborah L SC Mayes, Lynda A. SR Bectel, Robert W. TT

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the ... Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C ...

  7. Eectronia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    desclribes the electlromagnuetic anaalysis that has beena completed usinag the OPERA-3d product I;o charact;erize TT. ELECTROMAGNETIC MODELING the folrces ona the ITE1R shield...

  8. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanova, L. N.; Bom, V. R.; Demin, A. M.; Demin, D. L.; Eijk, C. W. E. van; Filchagin, S. V.; Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. Grishechkin, S. K.; Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D.; Kuryakin, A. V.; Medved', S. V.; Musyaev, R. K.; Rudenko, A. I.; Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A.; Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G.

    2009-02-15

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  9. Microsoft Word - Policy Flash 2010-78 Attachment 4 Successful...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date Mr. John Doe President ABC Company 2222 Anywhere Street Sun City, TT 22222 Dear Mr. Doe: NOTICE OF SELECTION OF insert name of successful offeror FOR THE (insert title...

  10. Health and Safety Research Divlsion RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Anbient Radon and Radon Daughters in Residential Buildings in the New Jersey - New York ... J. Bair, Battelle Pacific lorthwest Laboratories to tt. E. l,fott, Department of Energy, ...

  11. Recent Results in the Top Quark Sector from the D0 Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with CDF. Furthermore, I will review the measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry in tt-bar events, and conclude with the world's most precise single measurement of ...

  12. PEMP General Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... LAW - Mechanical Systems Engineering Complete 7Dec ... 4TT4821 LAB - Install Hot Cell GloveboxFumehoods PA21B 27 ... Objectives, Elem ents, & Measures PEM B.1 Project Management ...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - OTT RFI Summary of Input_Public_Oct 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... has been done * Make TT a priority and factor in all DOE lab strategic planning - OTT ... Regularly seek external feedback on tech transfer efforts - Adopt best practices of other ...

  14. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Walker, Elizabeth M. NA Weber, Sally A. NA Becker, Melanie NE Morgan, Kelly NE Lyles, Monica D. OE Moore, Sharon M. OR Nance, Deborah L SC Mayes, Lynda A. SR Bectel, Robert W. TT

  15. Audit Report: IG-0743

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Llevelopttiertr Itz-Situ Tt-(irir(ltlic W L . C Lltlireetirl (inel Wlste Rr.rrzovcr1 l t Hclrzftlrd 618-1 0 cncl 618-1 1 Bzlrill Grozlrlds, January 23, 2003, ...

  16. Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution (339.67 KB) More Documents & Publications The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 ...

  17. Windows and Building Envelope Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LBNL’s has three facilities specifically dedicated to windows: the Optical Properties Laboratory, the Infrared Thermography Laboratory, and the Mobile Window Thermal Test Facility (MoWiTT). These...

  18. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.; Decker, S. .R; Bu, L. T.; Zhao, X. C.; McCabe, C.; Wohlert, J.; Bergenstrahle, M.; Brady, J. W.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F., ":The O-Glycosylated Linker from...

  19. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Clayton, T. (4) Duan, L. (4) Hampton, E. (4) Harrison, Stephen C. (4) Haynes, Barton F. ... Moody, M. Anthony ; Haynes, Barton F. ; Harrison, Stephen C. ; BU-M) ; Duke-MED) ; et al ...

  20. MHK Projects/Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mooringanchoring and electrical connection system; (2) a 3.7-statute-mile-long, direct current (DC) submarine transmission cable connecting from one of the AquaBuOY's...

  1. Llr. Norgnn of the St. Louis office tolepbonod Dr. ;PuAuff mcently

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Company of 122 East l&xi Btmot, f&w PO* 17, N. ,P., had also expressed an intereat ir.having their mbsidi.arg, the J. T. Baker Chemical Coqany, get into the field. BU aeked...

  2. Island Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: W1J 7BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based coal bed methane company, Island Gas was the subject of a reverse takeover by KP Renewables in...

  3. West Central Soy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soy Jump to: navigation, search Name: West Central Soy Place: Iowa Product: Biodiesel producer based in Iowa, Owned bu a soy farmer coop References: West Central Soy1 This...

  4. Atmospheric formation and removal of C3-C5 peroxyacyl nitrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosjean, D.

    1993-12-31

    The C3-C5 peroxyacyl nitrates RC(O)OONO{sub 2} (R=Et, n-Pr, i-Pr, n-Bu, i-Bu, sec-Bu, t-Bu, Ch{sub 2}=CH- and CH{sub 2}=C(CH{sub 3})-) have been synthesized and prepared in situ and have been characterized by electron capture gas chromatography. Their thermal decomposition rates have been measured and are similar to that of PAN (R = CH{sub 3}). Carbonyl products have been identified and the corresponding reaction mechanisms have been outlined. Ambient levels of several peroxyacyl nitrates (R =CH{sub 3}, Et, n-Pr and CH{sub 2}=(CH{sub 3})-) have been measured. The results are discussed with focus on atmospheric hydrocarbons as precursors to C3-C5 peroxyacyl nitrates in the atmosphere.

  5. Everest Refrigeration: Proposed Penalty (2015-SE-42001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) manufactured and distributed noncompliant commercial refrigeration equipment model ESGR3 in the U.S.

  6. Everest Refrigeration: Noncompliance Determination (2015-SE-42001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to Bu Sung America Corporation (dba Everest Refrigeration) finding that commercial refrigeration equipment model number ESGR3 does not comport with the energy conservation standards.

  7. NREL: Biomass Research - Mary Ann Franden

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Biotechnology for Biofuels (Manuscript in review). Franden, M.A.; Pienkos, P.T.; Zhang, M. ... Journal of Biotechnology (144); pp. 259-267. Knoshaug, E.; Franden, M.A.; Stambuk, B.U.; ...

  8. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bu il ding 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 JUL 0 5 2011 Subject: Notification of a Class 1 Permit...

  9. NREL: Biomass Research - Eric P. Knoshaug

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Algal Biofuels: The Process." Chem. Engin. Prog. (107); pp. 37-47. Knoshaug, E.P.; Franden, M.A.; Stambuk, B.U.; Zhang, M.; Singh, A. (2009). "Utilization and Transport of ...

  10. Polymer Exposure and Testing Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf (215.7 KB) More Documents & Publications Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Chapter 17 - Special Contracting Methods GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM Energy

    Activity at DOE Facilities by DOE Contractors Political Activity at DOE Facilities by DOE Contractors The attached guidance is issued to Contracting Officers to remind them of restrictions on political activity by DOE contractors at the

  11. DOE/EIA-0202(87/4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1987 i- rt- jrt ort lort lort lort- iort- lort- ort- ort Tt- " t- . m erm Perm -Term -Term -Term -Term ,-Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term 71 e rrn TT1 "1 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy "nergy -cry Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  12. The selective catalytic reduction of NOx over Ag/Al2O3 with isobutanol as the reductant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brookshear, Daniel William; Pihl, Josh A.; Toops, Todd J.; West, Brian H.; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y.

    2016-02-13

    Here, this study investigates the potential of isobutanol (iBuOH) as a reductant for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx over 2 wt% Ag/Al2O3 between 150 and 550 °C and gas hourly space velocities (GHSV) between 10,000 and 35,000 h-1. The feed gas consists of 500 ppm NO, 5% H2O, 10% O2, and 375-1500 ppm iBuOH (C1:N ratios of 3-12); additionally, blends of 24 and 48% iBuOH in gasoline are evaluated. Over 90% NOx conversion is achieved between 300 and 400 C using pure iBuOH, including a 40% peak selectivity towards NH3 that could be utilized in a dual HC/NH3more » SCR configuration. The iBuOH/gasoline blends are only able to achieve greater than 90% NOx conversion when operated at a GHSV of 10,000 h-1 and employing a C1:N ratio of 12. Iso-butyraldehyde and NO2 appear to function as intermediates in the iBuOH-SCR mechanism, which mirrors the mechanism observed for EtOH-SCR. In general, the performance of iBuOH in the SCR of NOx over a Ag/Al2O3 catalyst is comparable with that of EtOH, although EtOH/gasoline blends display higher NOx reduction than iBuOH/gasoline blends. The key parameter in employing alcohols in SCR appears to be the C-OH:N ratio rather than the C1:N ratio.« less

  13. Observation of top quark pairs produced in association with a vector boson in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-06

    Measurements of the cross sections for top quark pairs produced in association with a W or Z boson are presented, using 8 TeV pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. We found that final states are selected in which the associated W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino or the Z boson decays to two charged leptons. Signal events are identified by matching reconstructed objects in the detector to specific final state particles from tt-W or tt-Z decays. The tt-W cross section is measured to be 382+117 -102 fb with a significance of 4.8 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. The tt-Z cross section is measured to be 242+65 -55 fb with a significance of 6.4 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. These measurements are used to set bounds on five anomalous dimension-six operators that would affect the tt-W and tt-Z cross sections.

  14. Observation of top quark pairs produced in association with a vector boson in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-01-18

    Measurements of the cross sections for top quark pairs produced in association with a W or Z boson are presented, using 8 TeV pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1, collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC. We found that final states are selected in which the associated W boson decays to a charged lepton and a neutrino or the Z boson decays to two charged leptons. Signal events are identified by matching reconstructed objects in the detector to specific final state particles from tt-W or tt-Z decays. The tt-W cross section is measured tomore » be 382+117 -102 fb with a significance of 4.8 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. The tt-Z cross section is measured to be 242+65 -55 fb with a significance of 6.4 standard deviations from the background-only hypothesis. These measurements are used to set bounds on five anomalous dimension-six operators that would affect the tt-W and tt-Z cross sections.« less

  15. Homoleptic Ce(III) and Ce(IV) Nitroxide Complexes: Significant Stabilization of the 4+ Oxidation State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lewis, Andrew J.; Medling, Scott A.; Piro, Nicholas A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Booth, Corwin H.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-25

    Electrochemical experiments performed on the complex Ce-IV[2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](4), where [2-((BuNO)-Bu-t)py](-) = N-tert-butyl-N-2-pyridylnitroxide, indicate a 2.51 V stabilization of the 4+ oxidation state of Ce compared to [(Bu4N)-Bu-n](2)[Ce(NO3)(6)] in acetonitrile and a 2.95 V stabilization compared to the standard potential for the ion under aqueous conditions. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this preference for the higher oxidation state is a result of the tetrakis(nitroxide) ligand framework at the Ce cation, which allows for effective electron donation into, and partial covalent overlap with, vacant 4f orbitals with delta symmetry. The results speak to the behavior of CeO2 and related solid solutions in oxygen uptake and transport applications, in particular an inherent local character of bonding that stabilizes the 4+ oxidation state. The results indicate a cerium(IV) complex that has been stabilized to an unprecedented degree through tuning of its ligand-field environment.

  16. Molecular and Electronic Structure of Cyclic Trinuclear Gold(I) Carbeniate Complexes: Insights for Structure/Luminescence/Conductivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDougaldJr, Roy N; Chilukuri, Bhaskar; Jia, Huiping; Perez, Michael R; Rabaa, Hassan; Wang, Xiaoping; Nesterov, Vladimir; Cundari, Thomas R.; Gnade, Bruce E; Omary, Mohammad A

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study of correlations between solid-state structure and optical/electronic properties of cyclotrimeric gold(I) carbeniates, [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] (R, R' = H, Me, Bu-n, or (c)Pe), is reported. Synthesis and structural and photophysical characterization of novel complexes [Au-3(MeN=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=COMe)(3)], [Au-3((BuN)-Bu-n=(COBu)-Bu-n)(3)], and [Au-3((c)PeN=COMe)(3)] are presented. Changes in R and R' lead to distinctive variations in solid-state stacking, luminescence spectra, and conductive properties. Solid-state emission and excitation spectra for each complex display a remarkable dependence on the solid-state packing of the cyclotrimers. The electronic structure of [Au-3(RN=COR')(3)] was investigated via molecular and solid-state simulations. Calculations on [Au-3(HN=COH)(3)] models indicate that the infinitely extended chain of eclipsed structures with equidistant Au-Au intertrimer aurophilic bonding can have lower band gaps, smaller Stokes shifts, and reduced reorganization energies (lambda). The action of one cyclotrimer as a molecular nanowire is demonstrated via fabrication of an organic field effect transistor and shown to produce a p-type field effect. Hole transport for the same cyclotrimer-doped within a poly(9-vinylcarbazole) host-produced a colossal increase in current density from similar to 1 to similar to 1000 mA/cm(2). Computations and experiments thus delineate the complex relationships between solid-state morphologies, electronic structures, and optoelectronic properties of gold(I) carbeniates.

  17. A=10F (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0

  18. A=10O (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0

  19. A=10Ne (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0

  20. A=10N (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (Not illustrated) Not observed: see (1979AJ01). A.H. Wapstra (private communication) suggests 39.5 MeV for the atomic mass excess of 10N. See also (1982NG0

  1. ALS Capabilities Reveal How Like Can Attract Like

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the ALS is supported by DOE BES. Publication about this research: O. Shih, A.H. England, G.C. Dallinger, J.W. Smith, K.C. Duffey, R.C. Cohen, D. Prendergast, and R.J....

  2. Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and applications development Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant...

  3. ANALOG QUANTUM NEURON FOR FUNCTIONS APPROXIMATION (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LA-UR-01-2580 TRN: AH200124%%156 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-36 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Conference title not supplied, Conference location...

  4. Visualization Dot Com (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report Number(s): LBNL--44871 R&D Project: K18505; TRN: AH200135%%96 DOE Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: IEEE ...

  5. Microsoft Word - 3Q15 Web Rev0 11-2-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 0 Post Date: November 30, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of...

  6. ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... May 2001, http:www.who.int mediacentrefactsheetsfs210en. 3 A.H. Smith and M.M.H. Smith, "Arsenic Drinking Water Regulations in Developing Countries with Extensive ...

  7. ScienceDirect JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Marine Pollution Bulletin 36, 19-26. Statistical Analysis System (SAS), 1995. SAS Users' ... Inc., Cary, NC. Seymour, A.H., Nelson, V.A., 1977. Radionuclides in air, water, and biota. ...

  8. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2006.02.045

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Arctic pollution. http:www.amp.nohomepage.htm (accessed December 2002). Baskaran M, ... Al Med 2002;4:89-102. Seymour AH, Nelson VA. Radionuclides in air, water, and biota. In: ...

  9. Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A B 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 04 05 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J ...

  10. Nuclear Material Transaction Report nrc741_1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    A A 1 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT FOREIGN COMPANY NAME COMPANY ADDRESS CITY, STATE ZIP CODE CONTACT 2 YYY RRRR 03 31 2008 1 AH31 1 EG 309 J ...

  11. CX-008231: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oklahoma State Energy Program American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Large Systems Request AH CX(s) Applied: B5.19 Date: 04/11/2012 Location(s): Oklahoma Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  12. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Qds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel& will be require& In :...

  13. Characterizing the Fabric of the Urban Environment: A Case Study...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Akbari, Hashen ; Rose, L. Shea ; Taha, Haider Publication Date: 1999-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 764362 Report Number(s): LBNL--44688 R&D Project: 437001; TRN: AH200102%%389 ...

  14. PROPERTIES AND PERFORMANCE OF CEMENT-BASED GROUTS FOR GEOTHERMAL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1999-09-30 OSTI Identifier: 751116 Report Number(s): BNL--67006; EB4001 R&D Project: AS017EECD; EB4001; TRN: AH200037%%67 DOE Contract Number: AC02-98CH10886 ...

  15. ELECTROMOTIVE FORCE, EMF (CELLS) (Miscellaneous) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1998-09-16 OSTI Identifier: 760971 Report Number(s): BNL--65847; KC030101 R&D Project: AS002CSD; KC030101; TRN: AH200035%%46 DOE Contract Number: AC02-98CH10886 ...

  16. SURVEY OF NOISE SUPPRESSION SYSTEMS FOR ENGINE GENERATOR SETS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1999-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 752962 Report Number(s): BNL--67163; 400403209 R&D Project: OFA; 400403209; TRN: AH200037%%242 DOE Contract Number: AC02-98CH10886 ...

  17. Nice Car Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Nice Car Company Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W10 5AH Product: UK electric car producer. Coordinates: 51.506325, -0.127144 Show Map Loading map......

  18. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TRN: AH200037%%67","Technical Report",,,"Other Information: PBD: 30 Sep 1999","Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (US)","USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)","15...

  19. A β-VOPO4/ε-VOPO4 composite Li-ion battery cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zehua; Chen, Qiyuan; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Ruibo; Zhou, Hui; Chen, Liquan; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2014-09-01

    VOPO4 is an example of a Li-ion battery cathode that can achieve over 300 Ah/kg when two Li-ions are intercalated. A two phase β-VOPO4/ε-VOPO4 composite was found to improve the cycling capacity of ε-VOPO4 from tetragonal H2VOPO4, particularly as the rate is increased. In the potential range of 2.0–4.5 V, this composite showed an initial electrochemical capacity of 208 mAh/g at 0.08 mA/cm2, 190 mAh/g at 0.16 mA/cm2, and 160 mAh/g at 0.41 mA/cm2.

  20. Analysis of Cleanup Alternatives and Supplemental Characterization...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Ah.rnrtkm 3 SOH Cwmr . lwlales lha mntamhwna from the envlronmant by m d n p a m U layer war the drllng mud p h . . Reducss fulurm mbratbn by diidlng surlsca water hom the drMing ...

  1. Microsoft Word - 2Q11 Web Rev 1, 10-13-11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2011-00083 Revision 1 November 11, 2011 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  2. Microsoft Word - 1Q12 Web Rev 1, 8-7-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00051 Revision 1 August 28, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  3. Microsoft Word - 2Q15 Web Rev1 11-2-15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00076 Revision 1 Post Date: November 30, 2015 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of ...

  4. Microsoft Word - 2Q12 Web Rev 1 10-22-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00078 Revision 1 November 28, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  5. Microsoft Word - 4Q11 Web Rev 1, 5-10-12.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2012-00014 Revision 1 May 30, 2012 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information ...

  6. Microsoft Word - 4Q12 Web Rev 1 4-26-13 .docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2013-00010 Revision 1 May 29, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information ...

  7. Microsoft Word - 1Q11 Web Rev 1, 7-18-11.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SRR-ESH-2011-00052 Revision 1 August 12, 2011 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  8. Microsoft Word - 2Q13 Web Rev1 10-24-13.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00094 Revision 1 December 2, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  9. Microsoft Word - 3Q13 Web Rev1 1-31-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2013-00112 Revision 1 February 28, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  10. Microsoft Word - 3Q12 Web Rev 1 1-17-13_DBD .docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 SRR-ESH-2012-00097 Revision 1 February 28, 2013 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h ...

  11. Microsoft Word - 4Q13 Web Rev1 5-6-14

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SRR-ESH-2014-00010 Revision 1 May 30, 2014 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section ...

  12. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in top-quark pair production in the lepton-plus-jets final state in pp collision data at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-02-19

    This paper reports inclusive and differential measurements of the tt¯ charge asymmetry AC in 20.3 fb–1 of √s = 8 TeV pp collisions recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Three differential measurements are performed as a function of the invariant mass, transverse momentum and longitudinal boost of the tt¯ system. The tt¯ pairs are selected in the single-lepton channels (e or μ) with at least four jets, and a likelihood fit is used to reconstruct the tt¯ event kinematics. A Bayesian unfolding procedure is performed to infer the asymmetry at parton level from themore » observed data distribution. The inclusive tt¯ charge asymmetry is measured to be AC = 0.009 ± 0.005) (stat. + syst.). As a result, the inclusive and differential measurements are compatible with the values predicted by the Standard Model.« less

  13. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Liam P; Batista, Enrique R; Boncella, James M; Yang, Ping; Scott, Brian L

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  14. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me{sub 3}Si). Reactions of (MeC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 4}U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 3}U with (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 2}Hg results in formation of (RC{sub 5}H{sub 4}){sub 4}U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  15. Tris(Cyclopentadienyl)Uranium-t-Butyl: Synthesis, reactions, and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weydert, M.

    1993-04-01

    Compounds (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) were prepared for R = H, Me, Et. Their decomposition products in aromatic solvents are consistent with a radical decomposition pathway induced by solvent-assisted U-C bond homolysis. NMR was used to study the reactions of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]UCl with t-BuLi (R = t-Bu, Me[sub 3]Si). Reactions of (MeC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U(t-Bu) with Lewis bases and fluorocarbons were studied. Analogous reaction chemistry between (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]ThX systems and t-BuLi was also studied, and reactivity differences between U and Th are discussed. Synthesis of sterically crowded (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U compounds is next considered. Reaction of the trivalent (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 3]U with (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 2]Hg results in formation of (RC[sub 5]H[sub 4])[sub 4]U. Steric congestion, cyclopentadienyl ligand exchange, and electron transfer are discussed. (DLC)

  16. Buckling transition in long ?-helices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palen?r, Peter; Bleha, Tom

    2014-11-07

    The treatment of bending and buckling of stiff biopolymer filaments by the popular worm-like chain model does not provide adequate understanding of these processes at the microscopic level. Thus, we have used the atomistic molecular-dynamic simulations and the Amber03 force field to examine the compression buckling of ?-helix (AH) filaments at room temperature. It was found that the buckling instability occurs in AHs at the critical force f{sub c} in the range of tens of pN depending on the AH length. The decrease of the force f{sub c} with the contour length follows the prediction of the classic thin rod theory. At the force f{sub c} the helical filament undergoes the swift and irreversible transition from the smoothly bent structure to the buckled one. A sharp kink in the AH contour arises at the transition, accompanied by the disruption of the hydrogen bonds in its vicinity. The kink defect brings in an effective softening of the AH molecule at buckling. Nonbonded interactions between helical branches drive the rearrangement of a kinked AH into the ultimate buckled structure of a compact helical hairpin described earlier in the literature.

  17. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e–, μ+μ–, and e±μ∓) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic upmore » to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.« less

  18. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.

  19. Higher-order gravitational lensing reconstruction using Feynman diagrams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E.; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Yadav, Amit P.S.; Waalewijn, Wouter J. E-mail: amanohar@ucsd.edu E-mail: ayadav@physics.ucsd.edu

    2014-09-01

    We develop a method for calculating the correlation structure of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) using Feynman diagrams, when the CMB has been modified by gravitational lensing, Faraday rotation, patchy reionization, or other distorting effects. This method is used to calculate the bias of the Hu-Okamoto quadratic estimator in reconstructing the lensing power spectrum up to O(?{sup 4}) in the lensing potential ?. We consider both the diagonal noise TT TT, EB EB, etc. and, for the first time, the off-diagonal noise TT TE, TB EB, etc. The previously noted large O(?{sup 4}) term in the second order noise is identified to come from a particular class of diagrams. It can be significantly reduced by a reorganization of the ? expansion. These improved estimators have almost no bias for the off-diagonal case involving only one B component of the CMB, such as EE EB.

  20. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMt¯tt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set atmore » a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.« less

  1. Search for standard model production of four top quarks in the lepton + jets channel in pp collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-11-27

    A search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t?tt?t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6? recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM (t?tt?t) production is ?SM(t?tt?t). A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. The data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence levelmoreon the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 17 fb is expected.less

  2. Search for Standard Model Production of Four Top Quarks in the Lepton + Jets Channel in pp Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-27

    Our search is presented for standard model (SM) production of four top quarks (t¯tt¯t) in pp collisions in the lepton + jets channel. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.6 fb-1 recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The expected cross section for SM t¯tt¯t production is σSMtt¯t≈1fb. A combination of kinematic reconstruction and multivariate techniques is used to distinguish between the small signal and large background. We determined that the data are consistent with expectations of the SM, and an upper limit of 32 fb is set at a 95% confidence level on the cross section for producing four top quarks in the SM, where a limit of 32 ± 17 fb is expected.

  3. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 50

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elekes, Zoltan; Timar, Janos; Singh, Balraj

    2011-01-15

    The experimental nuclear spectroscopic data for known nuclides of mass number 50 (Cl,Ar,K,Ca,Sc,Ti,V, Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni) have been evaluated and presented together with Adopted properties for levels and {gamma} rays. This evaluation has been carried out about 15 years after the previous one by Thomas Burrows (1995Bu29). Except for {sup 50}Sc and {sup 50}V, extensive new data have become available for all the other nuclides in the intervening years. The data for {sup 50}Sc and {sup 50}V have also been checked again in detail and several changes made. No data are yet available for excited states in {sup 50}Cl, {sup 50}Ar and {sup 50}Ni. This work supersedes earlier evaluations (1995Bu29, 1990Bu18, 1984Al29, 1976Au07) of A=50 nuclides.

  4. Simultaneous measurement of forward-backward asymmetry and top polarization in dilepton final states from tt¯ production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2015-09-01

    We present a simultaneous measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry and the top-quark polarization in tt¯ production in dilepton final states using 9.7 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV with the D0 detector. To reconstruct the distributions of kinematic observables we employ a matrix element technique that calculates the likelihood of the possible tt¯ kinematic configurations. After accounting for the presence of background events and for calibration effects, we obtain a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(15.0±6.4(stat)±4.9(syst))% and a top-quark polarization times spin analyzing power in the beam basis of κP=(7.2±10.5(stat)±4.2(syst))%, with a correlation of -56% between the measurements. If we constrain the forward-backward asymmetry to its expected standard model value, we obtain a measurement of the top polarization ofκP=(11.3±9.1(stat)±1.9(syst))%. If we constrain the top polarization to its expected standard model value, we measure a forward-backward asymmetry of Att¯=(17.5±5.6(stat)±3.1(syst))%. A combination with the D0 Att¯ measurement in the lepton+jets final state yields an asymmetry of Att¯=(11.8±2.5(stat)±1.3(syst))%. Within their respective uncertainties, all these results are consistent with the standard model expectations.

  5. SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    SITES ELIHlNAlED FRCil FUW' ~1WWk'l ffi LY Lfcfi0n 31, I?%7 STGTE m rtE!xm ICmFIED cm&B fi re3xf.H ROJECT TIM #% HER M JWDlCTICd Cf M W.&f&t ff NIF, Ml TtE FKILIIY If0 LICWSES TO WRE ffiDliXClIVE tt%iML. IVJ R&w mm IS h-m. STTE S#W MC&TED W P4DlOKTIVIN kmvi t+mi BkcTmam

  6. Measurement of fenestration performance under realistic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klems, J.H.

    1984-02-01

    The need for fenestration performance measurements under realistic conditions is noted, and the Mobile Window Thermal Test facility (MoWiTT), newly constructed at LBL to make these measurements, is described. A key feature of the MoWiTT is the direct measurement of instantaneous net energy flow in the presence of sunlight. Ongoing calibration to establish the accuracy of this facility is described, and calibration data so far obtained are presented. Estimates from these data indicate that the facility will have sufficient accuracy for most fenestration measurements of interest.

  7. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - SequoiaFLOPWatt4Salishan2009_v1-Seager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i S t N FLOP/ W tt S i S t N FLOP/ W tt Sequoia Sets New FLOP/s:Watt Sequoia Sets New FLOP/s:Watt Standard Standard S d d S d d Salishan 2009 Mark Seager g Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Version 1 28 April 2009 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL-PRES-TBD This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Overview The case for a low power approach Hi h l l S i ti d i High level

  9. Copy of Capitalized Property RO23_120213_1.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capitalized Property 1 RO BARCODE DESCRIPTION MANUF. MODEL SN COST BLDG ROOM INVT_DATE 23 C5508 PRECISION ION POLISH GATAN INC 691 UNIT 427 01070301 $50,626.00 28 113 24-Sep-13 23 0000002116 TouchTable System TOUCHTABLE TT45 TT45S000378 $52,986.00 B03 134 19-Sep-13 23 0000002362 SYSTEM PUMP AMETEK Q AMETEK Q5000 CYL1A1308CYLIB1309CM $56,260.00 OFF TEXAS 11-Sep-12 23 0000000577 ANALYSIS SYSTEM BENC PFEIFFER GSD 301 C 44253789 $57,731.50 B25 115 30-Sep-13 23 0000002222 SLAVE NODES PSSC LABS PSSC

  10. The interactions of azure B, a metabolite of methylene blue, with acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzer, Anél; Harvey, Brian H.; Petzer, Jacobus P.

    2014-02-01

    Methylene blue (MB) is reported to possess diverse pharmacological actions and is attracting increasing attention for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Among the pharmacological actions of MB, is the significant inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE). These activities may, at least in part, underlie MB's beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. MB is metabolized to yield N-demethylated products of which azure B, the monodemethyl metabolite, is the predominant species. Azure B has been shown to be pharmacologically active and also possesses a variety of biological actions. Azure B therefore may contribute to the pharmacological profile of MB. Based on these considerations, the present study investigates the possibility that azure B may, similar to MB, act as an inhibitor of human AChE and BuChE. The results document that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE with IC{sub 50} values of 0.486 μM and 1.99 μM, respectively. The results further show that azure B inhibits AChE and BuChE reversibly, and that the modes of inhibition are most likely competitive. Although the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activities of azure B are twofold and fivefold, respectively, less potent than those recorded for MB [IC{sub 50}(AChE) = 0.214 μM; IC{sub 50}(BuChE) = 0.389 μM] under identical conditions, azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system and beneficial effects in Alzheimer's disease. - Highlights: • Methylene blue (MB) is a known inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. • Azure B, the major metabolite of MB, also is an inhibitor of AChE and BuChE. • Azure B may be a contributor to MB's in vivo activation of the cholinergic system. • Azure B may contribute to MB's potential in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  11. GNU Bug Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY GLENVILLE N MINNORA JARVISVILLE FAR MINGTON PH ILIPPI BELIN GT ON WAYN ESBUR G PR UNT Y GLENVILLE S CAVE RUN TAYLOR DRAIN ROSEDALE ST MPT-N RMNT-SHK WESTON-JAN E LEW SWN DL-WID EN VADIS STANL EY DEKALB UNION TALLM AN SVILL E ASPINALL-FIN ST ER ZOLLARSVILLE WILBU R RAMSEY HEATER S BR IDGEPORT-PRUNT YTOWN ALEXAND ER LILLY FORK SH ERMAN HIRAM ST FK-BLST N CK BU RNS CH APEL S BR WN -LUM BER PORT CON INGS PR ATT BOSWELL REVEL ELK C REEK

  12. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DAN damage in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies. - Highlights: • DPAA, an environmental neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis in rats. • DPAA is an activator of AhR signaling pathway. • DPAA promoted oxidative DNA damage in rat livers. • AhR target gene CYP 1B1 might be involved in the metabolism of DPAA.

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The ARM-UAV Grand Tour, SGP, NSA, TWP Tooman, T.T., Bolton, W.B.(a), and McCoy, R.F.(a), ... The ARM-UAV Fall 2002 experiment was the first experiment in the grand tour of the three ...

  14. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T decaying to a top quark via T = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp collisions with √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp = TT= tt+XX=bqqbqq + XX. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data aremore » consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of TT = tt =+ XX, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T at 95% confidence level up to mT = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ≤ 70 GeV/c2.« less

  15. Measurement of $$\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $$ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-07-07

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-,μ+μ- and e±μ∓). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented formore » the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.« less

  16. NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    t-t AL- 1. + T fi r,y* t ,.- . NATIONAL LEAD COMPANY OF OHIO Ofll i iy Ci)wp HEALTH AND SAFETY DIVISION - ANALYTICAL DEPT. ANALYTICAL DATA SHEET U-G b ;33y jl:tL G c-w &3(y I...

  17. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  18. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , ".' .-.' .; . " c . ':-, A Publication of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory National Environmental Research Park Program United States Department of Energy , ' , ' : '.- -; , .' : ..:,:...' ~, -~ .' '. "-:; 7A ,', , ' '.'; .~. . ",' " '~ ....;" . ',':' ._-~ ,... : . .... .~ <: ;:~,~.:,: :r. o * i * ~' . ,'." ..... , ~' J;i1'i~ '. J~. , " ', ' "" ,;; ;t! :':;J 'I1I$):i'iR tt ,WJ,S( ' (~,,!~d;;a~ an ,' account of.WQrk ; '*

  19. Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf (210.86 KB) More Documents & Publications Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles, Responsibilities, Authorities and Accountabilities

  20. Ab initio thermodynamic approach to identify mixed solid sorbents for CO2 capture technology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duan, Yuhua

    2015-10-15

    Because the current technologies for capturing CO2 are still too energy intensive, new materials must be developed that can capture CO2 reversibly with acceptable energy costs. At a given CO2 pressure, the turnover temperature (Tt) of the reaction of an individual solid that can capture CO2 is fixed. Such Tt may be outside the operating temperature range (ΔTo) for a practical capture technology. To adjust Tt to fit the practical ΔTo, in this study, three scenarios of mixing schemes are explored by combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations. Our calculated resultsmore » demonstrate that by mixing different types of solids, it’s possible to shift Tt to the range of practical operating temperature conditions. According to the requirements imposed by the pre- and post- combustion technologies and based on our calculated thermodynamic properties for the CO2 capture reactions by the mixed solids of interest, we were able to identify the mixing ratios of two or more solids to form new sorbent materials for which lower capture energy costs are expected at the desired pressure and temperature conditions.« less

  1. Search for new T' particles in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse energy in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-11

    We present a search for a new particle T' decaying to a top quark via T' = t + X, where X goes undetected. We use a data sample corresponding to 5.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity of pp? collisions with ?s = 1.96 TeV, collected at Fermilab Tevatron by the CDF II detector. Our search for pair production of T' is focused on the hadronic decay channel, pp? = T'T' ?= tt?+XX?=bqq?b?q?q + XX?. We interpret our results in terms of a model where T' is an exotic fourth generation quark and X is a dark matter particle. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. We set a limit on the generic production of T'T' ? = tt ?=+ XX?, excluding the fourth generation exotic quarks T' at 95% confidence level up to mT` = 400 GeV/c2 for mX ? 70 GeV/c2.

  2. Measurement of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} } $ production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-13

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair (tt) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e+e-+μ- and e±μ). Furthermore, the absolute and normalized differential cross sections for tt production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential tt-b and tt-bb- cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. Finally, the data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading ordercalculation.

  3. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into bb¯ in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    In this study, a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair, tt¯H, is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb–1 of pp collision data at √s=8 TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the H→bb¯ decay mode and uses events containing one or two electrons or muons. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and b-tagged jet multiplicities. A neural network is used to discriminate between signal and background events, the latter being dominatedmore » by tt¯+jets production. In the single-lepton channel, variables calculated using a matrix element method are included as inputs to the neural network to improve discrimination of the irreducible tt¯+bb¯ background. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found and an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross section is obtained at 95 % confidence level. The ratio of the measured tt¯H signal cross section to the Standard Model expectation is found to be μ=1.5±1.1 assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV.« less

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with top quarks and decaying into bb¯ in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-29

    In this study, a search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair, tt¯H, is presented. The analysis uses 20.3 fb–1 of pp collision data at √s=8 TeV, collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider during 2012. The search is designed for the H→bb¯ decay mode and uses events containing one or two electrons or muons. In order to improve the sensitivity of the search, events are categorised according to their jet and b-tagged jet multiplicities. A neural network is used to discriminate between signal and background events, the latter being dominated by tt¯+jets production. In the single-lepton channel, variables calculated using a matrix element method are included as inputs to the neural network to improve discrimination of the irreducible tt¯+bb¯ background. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is found and an observed (expected) limit of 3.4 (2.2) times the Standard Model cross section is obtained at 95 % confidence level. The ratio of the measured tt¯H signal cross section to the Standard Model expectation is found to be μ=1.5±1.1 assuming a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV.

  5. BPA-2010-02106-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .ddrr*. ph-, 11Ni Central Avenue, Bellingham, WA )8225 www,copp ugercarter.coni 1(Ii.67G.7545 36u.3m.tt369 September 15, 2010 F9 M .A1IIl m. -11PI 1 VI '..aIui Bethany C. Alien...

  6. Atterbury,Laura M DK-7 From: Ex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 09, 2010 1234 PM To, FOIA Subject: FO(A Request i:l ( 11% 1) ON RI I % t t 11 I TIUS 1tt4 :- '' to e'a The following is a New FOJA request: Name: Torn Jacobs No...

  7. S Government

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The transfer function of the filter is given in the following. sT2+ 1 s3T2L,C, + s2(T,T2 + ... Magnets, L 340.00815 H Current Ripple Factor, R.F 2x10-4 Cut off frequency, f 720 ...

  8. ANUEAIS/TM.8g

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... s'R'' 1972 ' Disposal of Excess R-eal Property - parcel 22g,letterfrom sapirie to J'L' smith (Attachmetttt et'tt o"i"tio'for Remldii A.tioo at the Melton Lake Industrial ;,*:?:H ...

  9. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2003-07-25

    NEA completed the CFD simulations for all NBFZ tests. SRI resumed work on HPBO experiments and conducted preliminary tests using the UCONN impactor. UCONN prepared several samples of char for cross-sectional analysis by SEM and characterization is underway. BU completed the NBFZ char characterization program. CBK model had been implemented into Fluent.

  10. Lanthanide(III) di- and tetra-nuclear complexes supported by a chelating tripodal tris(amidate) ligand

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Jessie L.; Jones, Matthew B.; Gaunt, Andrew J.; Scott, Brian L.; MacBeth, Cora E.; Gordon, John C.

    2015-04-06

    Syntheses, structural, and spectroscopic characterization of multinuclear tris(amidate) lanthanide complexes is described. Addition of K3[N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3] to LnX3 (LnX3 = LaBr3, CeI3, and NdCl3) in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) results in the generation of dinuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)(DMF)]2(μ-DMF) (Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Nd(3)), in good yields. Syntheses of tetranuclear complexes, [Ln(N(o-PhNC(O)tBu)3)]4 (Ln = Ce (4), Nd(5)), resulted from protonolysis of Ln[N(SiMe3)2]3 (Ln = Ce, Nd) with N(o-PhNCH(O)tBu)3. As a result, in the solid-state, complexes 1–5 exhibit coordination modes of the tripodal tris(amidate) ligand that are unique to the 4f elements and have not been previously observed in transition metal systems.

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hong, Kunlun (1) Hu, Qiao-Sheng (1) Xing, Chun-Hui (1) Zhang, Honghai (1) Save Results ... or Pd2(dba)3t Bu3PArX as the Initiator Zhang, Honghai ; Xing, Chun-Hui ; Hu, Qiao-Sheng ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium ...

  13. Microsoft Word - lblsubethers.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp' 2 Ce(O-n- Pr) and propane or Cp' 2 Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp' 2 CeD, the propane and butane contain ...

  14. Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers withbis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium ...

  15. S?. LL-UIIS WLLM

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    No. 31 12187 IEmN wffi WE ST. Lulls m ST. cows awv m S?. LL-UIIS WLLM ftl M NV 9 HIC ltRElWXDwIDloIC6IC WVCf ., sm. m buTm1Iv IJm-n Fww. DECMPIISSI 1NltEEhU 1"O'S. llE...

  16. A=19F (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1978DA1N, 1978MA2H, 1979DA15, 1980KU05, 1980MC1L, 1981ER03, 1981GR06, 1982KI02). Cluster, collective and rotational models: (1977BU22, 1977FO1E, 1978BR21, 1978CH26,...

  17. Controlled Synthesis of Polyenes by Catalytic Methods. Progress Report, December 1, 1992 -- November 30, 1993

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Schrock, R. R.

    1993-12-01

    Four studies are reported: living cyclopolymerization of diethyl dipropargylmalonate by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)[OCMe(CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2} in dimethoxyethane, effect of chain length on conductivity of polyacetylene, nonlinear optical analysis of a series of triblock copolymers containing model polyenes, and synthesis of bifunctional hexafluoro-t-butoxide Mo species and their use as initiators in ROMP reactions.

  18. A=19C (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (Not illustrated) 19C may have been observed in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of a 197Au target: if so it is particle stable (1970RA1A). Its mass excess must then be < 37.9 MeV (18C + n). See also (1960ZE03, 1971BU1E

  19. A=20N (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (Not illustrated) 20N has been observed in the bombardment of 232Th by 122 MeV 18O ions (1969AR13, 1970AR1D) and in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of 197Au (1970RA1A): it is particle stable. See also (1960ZE03, 1961BA1C, 1971BU1E

  20. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDES FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Au, M.

    2009-12-04

    The aligned nanorods of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and nanoporous hollow spheres (NHS) of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated as the anodes for Li-ion rechargeable batteries. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods demonstrated 1433 mAh/g reversible capacity. The NHS of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered 400 mAh/g and 250 mAh/g capacities respectively in multiple galvonastatic discharge-charge cycles. It was found that high capacity of NHS of metal oxides is sustainable attributed to their unique structure that maintains material integrity during cycling. The nanostructured metal oxides exhibit great potential as the new anode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, low cost and inherent safety.

  1. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  2. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.

  3. Daily treatment with {alpha}-naphthoflavone enhances follicular growth and ovulation rate in the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barreiro, Karina A.; Di Yorio, Maria P.; Artillo-Guida, Romina D.; Paz, Dante A.; Faletti, Alicia G.

    2011-04-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor and the first protein involved in a variety of physiological and toxicological processes, including those of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. AhR has been found in the ovary of many species and seems to mediate the ovarian toxicity of many environmental contaminants, which are AhR ligands. However, the role of AhR in the ovarian function is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the action of {alpha}-naphthoflavone ({alpha}NF), known to be an AhR antagonist, on both follicular growth and ovulation. Immature Sprague-Dawley rats were daily injected intraperitoneally with {alpha}NF (0.1-80 mg/kg) or vehicle for 12 days, and primed with gonadotrophins (eCG/hCG) to induce follicular growth and ovulation. Ovaries were obtained 20 h after hCG administration. By means of immunohistochemistry, we found that the numbers of primordial, primary and antral follicles were increased in rats treated with 80 mg/kg {alpha}NF and that there were no differences with other doses. Likewise, the ovarian weight and the ovulation rate, measured by both number of oocytes within oviducts and corpora lutea in ovarian sections, were increased when the rats received either 1 or 10 mg/kg daily. Although further studies are necessary to know the mechanism of action of {alpha}NF, it is possible that the different ovarian processes can be differentially responsive to the presence of different levels of {alpha}NF, and that the same or different endogenous AhR ligands can be involved in these ovarian processes in a cell type-dependent manner.

  4. Microwave-assisted synthesis and electrochemical evaluation of VO2 (B) nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashton, Thomas E.; Borras, David Hevia; Iadecola, Antonella; Wiaderek, Kamila Magdalena; Chapman, Karena W.; Corr, Serena A.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract Understanding how intercalation materials change during electrochemical operation is paramount to optimising their behaviour and function and in situ characterisation methods allow us to observe these changes without sample destruction. Here, we first report the improved intercalation properties of bronze phase vanadium dioxide VO2 (B) prepared by a microwave assisted route which exhibits a larger electrochemical capacity (232 mAh g-1) compared to VO2 (B) prepared by a solvothermal route (197 mAh g-1). These electrochemical differences have also been followed using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy allowing us to follow oxidation state changes as they occur during battery operation.

  5. Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs Yimin Zhu, PD/PI OneD Material, LLC (former Nanosys Energy Storage) Palo Alto, California June 16 ~20, 2014 DOE Vehicle Technologies AMR 2014 ES130_zhu_2014_p This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information TM * Barriers addressed - Performance: Low Wh/kg & Wh/L - Life: Poor deep discharge cycles - Cost: High $/kWh * Targets Anode: >700 mAh/g 1,600 mAh/g >800 cycles

  6. Polymorphism of inflammatory genes and arsenic methylation capacity are associated with urothelial carcinoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chia-Chang; Huang, Yung-Kai; Chung, Chi-Jung; Huang, Chao-Yuan; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Lai, Li-An; Lin, Ying-Chin; Su, Chien-Tien; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2013-10-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic can generate reactive oxidative species, which can induce certain proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-8 (IL-8). TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 have been shown to be involved in the development and progression of various cancers, including bladder cancer. This study aimed to investigate the joint effect of the polymorphism of TNF-α − 308 G/A, IL-6 − 174 G/C, IL-8 − 251 T/A and urinary arsenic profiles on urothelial carcinoma (UC) risk. This study evaluated 300 pathologically-confirmed cases of UC and 594 cancer-free controls. Urinary arsenic species were detected using high-performance liquid chromatography-linked hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. The polymorphism of TNF-α − 308 G/A, IL-6 − 174 G/C and IL-8 − 251 T/A was determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The joint effects on UC risk were estimated by odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals using unconditional logistic regression. We found that the TNF-α − 308 A/A and IL-8 − 251 T/T polymorphisms were significantly associated with UC. Moreover, significant dose–response joint effect of TNF-α − 308 A/A or IL-8 − 251 T/T genotypes and arsenic methylation indices were seen to affect UC risk. The present results also showed a significant increase in UC risk in subjects with the IL-8 − 251 T/T genotype for each SD increase in urinary total arsenic and MMA%. In contrast, a significant decrease in UC risk was found in subjects who carried the IL-8 − 251 T/T genotype for each SD increase in DMA%. - Highlights: • Joint effect of the TNF-α -308 A/A genotype and urinary total arsenic affected UC. • Joint effect of the IL-8 -251 T/T genotype and urinary total arsenic affected UC. • Urinary total arsenic level, TNF-α -308 A/A and IL-8 -251 T/T genotype affected UC.

  7. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon; Wang, Guoxiu; Ahn, Jae-Pyeung; Ahn, Hyo-Jun

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  8. Drivers` activities and information needs in an automated highway system. Working paper, August 1995-May 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitan, L.; Bloomfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In most visions of the AHS--including that of the National Automated Highway System Consortium--it has been assumed that when a vehicle was under automated control, the driver would be allowed to engage in any of a variety of activities not related to driving (e.g, working, reading, sleeping). The objective of the first study reported here--one of the noncommuter studies--was to determine what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and whether the age of and/gender or the driver and/or the intrastring gap have an influence on those activities. One the objectives of the commuter experiment--of relevance for this report--was to determine whether what drivers do when traveling under automated control changes as a function of experience with the AHS (i.e., across trials). As conceptualization of the AHS proceeds, the details of the interface between the driver and the in-vehicle system will become more important. One part of that interface will be information supplied by the AHS to the driver, perhaps about such things as traffic conditions ahead predicted trip time to the driver`s selected exit, and so on. To maximize the utility of that information, it is important to determine what it is that drivers would like to know when traveling under automated control. The objective of the third study reported here--the second of the five noncommuter experiments--was to provide a first investigation of that issue.

  9. Improved electrochemical performances of CuO nanotube array prepared via electrodeposition as anode for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Anguo Zhou, Shibiao; Zuo, Chenggang; Zhuan, Yongbing; Ding, Xiang

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: CuO nanotube array electrodes prepared by electrodeposition method exhibit an excellent lithium ion storage ability as anode of Li-ion battery. - Highlights: • CuO nanotube arrays are synthesized by an electrodeposition method. • CuO nanotube shows a high-rate performance. • CuO nanotube shows an excellent cycling performance. - Abstract: We report a facile strategy to prepared CuO nanotube arrays directly grown on Cu plate through the electrodeposition method. The as-prepared CuO nanotubes show a quasi-cylinder nanostructure with internal diameters of ca. ∼100 nm, external diameters of ca. ∼120 nm, and average length of ∼3 μm. As an anode for lithium ion batteries, the electrochemical properties of the CuO nanotube arrays are investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. Due to the unique nanotube nanostructure, the as-prepared CuO electrodes exhibit good rate performance (550 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 464 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C) and cycling performance (581 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.1 C and 538 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 C)

  10. Pl#xmam-*twe,m%-~h,i~tu.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    bl 7-L c"v. tP cq 9hi 8 documen t? O?,?O sta 0f-A Je 4 %muw pace? and-.-G?-. fi::ur-e;. Q&LOPifx3, Series.... ' d o,.L Plxmam-*twe,m%-h,itu. vzP-1014uMalg* budi&&ah...

  11. Compositionally graded SiCu thin film anode by magnetron sputtering for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polat, B. D.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Keles, O; Erdemir, A; Amine, Khalil

    2015-10-22

    Compositionally graded and non-graded composite SiCu thin films were deposited by magnetron sputtering technique on Cu disks for investigation of their potentials in lithium ion battery applications. The compositionally graded thin film electrodes with 30 at.% Cu delivered a 1400 mAh g-1 capacity with 80% Coulombic efficiency in the first cycle and still retained its capacity at around 600 mAh g-1 (with 99.9% Coulombic efficiency) even after 100 cycles. On the other hand, the non-graded thin film electrodes with 30 at.% Cu exhibited 1100 mAh g-1 as the first discharge capacity with 78% Coulombic efficiency but the cycle life of this film degraded very quickly, delivering only 250 mAh g-1 capacity after 100th cycles. Not only the Cu content but also the graded film thickness were believed to be the main contributors to the much superior performance of the compositionally graded SiCu films. We also believe that the Cu-rich region of the graded film helped reduce internal stress build-up and thus prevented film delamination during cycling. In particular, the decrease of Cu content from interface region to the top of the coating reduced the possibility of stress build-up across the film during cycling, thus leading to a high electrochemical performance.

  12. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps","Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.","1999-01-14T05:00:00Z",3261,,"SAND99-0093C","AC04-94AL85000","TRN: AH200112%%456","Conference",,,"Conference:...

  13. REFHRYO

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    , j',' -, A*. "',i 1, C' I S.R.Syririr,Dirsotor of PWduotion JGly 28, 194rQ m&-ah mk 4P 3. P, Hiorgen, Aid&ant Dfrrtor, Produatian D;CPirioa, 6oew Yorlc operationa Offitle...

  14. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacitymore » only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.« less

  15. Distinct Luminal-Type Mammary Carcinomas Arise from Orthotopic Trp53-Null Mammary Transplantation of Juvenile versus Adult Mice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nguyen, David H.; Ouyang, Haoxu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Hlatky, Lynn; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2014-12-01

    Age and physiologic status, such as menopause, are risk factors for breast cancer. Less clear is what factors influence the diversity of breast cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of host age on the distribution of tumor subtypes in mouse mammary chimera consisting of wild-type hosts and Trp53 nullizygous epithelium, which undergoes a high rate of neoplastic transformation. Wild-type mammary glands cleared of endogenous epithelium at 3 weeks of age were subsequently transplanted during puberty (5 weeks) or at maturation (10 weeks) with syngeneic Trp53-null mammary tissue fragments and monitored for one year. Tumors arose sooner from adultmore » hosts (AH) compared with juvenile hosts (JH). However, compared with AH tumors, JH tumors grew several times faster, were more perfused, exhibited a two-fold higher mitotic index, and were more highly positive for insulin-like growth factor receptor phosphorylation. Most tumors in each setting were estrogen receptor (ER)-positive (80% JH vs. 70% AH), but JH tumors were significantly more ER-immunoreactive (P = 0.0001) than AH tumors. A differential expression signature (JvA) of juvenile versus adult tumors revealed a luminal transcriptional program. Centroids of the human homologs of JvA genes showed that JH tumors were more like luminal A tumors and AH tumors were more like luminal B tumors. Hierarchical clustering with the JvA human ortholog gene list segregated luminal A and luminal B breast cancers across datasets. Lastly, these data support the notion that age-associated host physiology greatly influences the intrinsic subtype of breast cancer.« less

  16. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  17. Precise measurement of the top quark mass in dilepton decays using optimized neutrino weighting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-11-11

    We measure the top quark mass in dilepton final states of tt¯ events in pp¯ collisions at √s= 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The analysis features a comprehensive optimization of the neutrino weighting method to minimize the statistical uncertainties. Furthermore, we improve the calibration of jet energies using the calibration determined in tt¯ → lepton + jets events, which reduces the otherwise limiting systematic uncertainty from the jet energy scale. As a result, the measured top quark mass is mt = 173.32±1.36(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV.

  18. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (splitring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gap and gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.

  19. Mechanism of the metallic metamaterials coupled to the gain material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Zhixiang; Droulias, Sotiris; Koschny, Thomas; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2014-10-11

    We present evidence of strong coupling between the gain material and the metallic metamaterials. It is of vital importance to understand the mechanism of the coupling of metamaterials with the gain medium. Using a four-level gain system, the numerical pump-probe experiments are performed in several configurations (splitring resonators (SRRs), inverse SRRs and fishnets) of metamaterials, demonstrating reduction of the resonator damping in all cases and hence the possibility for loss compensation. We find that the differential transmittance ?T/T can be negative in different SRR configurations, such as SRRs on the top of the gain substrate, gain in the SRR gapmoreand gain covering the SRR structure, while in the fishnet metamaterial with gain ?T/T is positive.less

  20. Strong Electroweak Symmetry Breaking and Spin-0 Resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Jared; Luty, Markus A.

    2009-09-04

    We argue that theories of the strong electroweak symmetry breaking sector necessarily contain new spin 0 states at the TeV scale in the tt and tb/bt channels, even if the third generation quarks are not composite at the TeV scale. These states couple sufficiently strongly to third generation quarks to have significant production at LHC via gg->phi{sup 0} or gb->tphi{sup -}. The existence of narrow resonances in QCD suggests that the strong electroweak breaking sector contains narrow resonances that decay to tt or tb/bt, with potentially significant branching fractions to 3 or more longitudinal W and Z bosons. These may give new 'smoking gun' signals of strong electroweak symmetry breaking.

  1. Color sextet scalars at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.-R.; Klemm, William; Rentala, Vikram; Wang Kai

    2009-03-01

    Taking a phenomenological approach, we study a color sextet scalar at the LHC. We focus on the QCD production of a color sextet pair {phi}{sub 6}{phi}{sub 6} through gg fusion and qq annihilation. Its unique coupling to {psi}{sup c}{psi} allows the color sextet scalar to decay into same-sign diquark states, such as {phi}{sub 6}{yields}tt/tt*. We propose a new reconstruction in the multijet plus same-sign dilepton with missing transverse energy samples (bb+l{sup {+-}}l{sup {+-}}+Ee{sub T}+Nj, N{>=}6) to search for on-shell tttt final states from sextet scalar pair production. Thanks to the large QCD production, the search covers the sextet mass range up to 1 TeV for 100 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity.

  2. AmeriFlux US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bible, Ken; Wharton, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    This is the AmeriFlux version of the carbon flux data for the site US-Wrc Wind River Crane Site. Site Description - Wind River Field Station flux tower site is located in the T.T. Munger Research Area of the Wind River Ranger District in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. Protected since 1926, the T.T. Munger Research Natural Area (RNA) is administered by the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The Douglas-fir/western hemlock dominant stand is approximately 500 years old and represents end points of several ecological gradients including age, biomass, structural complexity, and density of the dominant overstory species. A complete stand replacement fire, approximately 450-500 years ago, resulted in the initial establishment. No significant disturbances have occurred since the fire aside from those confined to small groups of single trees, such as overturn from high wind activity and mechanical damage from winter precipitation.

  3. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-14

    Our search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (ttH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb-1 and 19.7 fb-1 collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H → hadrons, H → photons, and H → leptons. These results are characterized by an observed ttH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, µ = σ/σSM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expectedmore » in the standard model. The best fit value is µ = 2.8 ± 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV« less

  4. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-14

    Our search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (ttH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb-1 and 19.7 fb-1 collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H → hadrons, H → photons, and H → leptons. These results are characterized by an observed ttH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, µ = σ/σSM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in the standard model. The best fit value is µ = 2.8 ± 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV

  5. Boltzmann equation solver adapted to emergent chemical non-equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birrell, Jeremiah; Wilkening, Jon; Rafelski, Johann

    2015-01-15

    We present a novel method to solve the spatially homogeneous and isotropic relativistic Boltzmann equation. We employ a basis set of orthogonal polynomials dynamically adapted to allow for emergence of chemical non-equilibrium. Two time dependent parameters characterize the set of orthogonal polynomials, the effective temperature T(t) and phase space occupation factor ?(t). In this first paper we address (effectively) massless fermions and derive dynamical equations for T(t) and ?(t) such that the zeroth order term of the basis alone captures the particle number density and energy density of each particle distribution. We validate our method and illustrate the reduced computational cost and the ability to easily represent final state chemical non-equilibrium by studying a model problem that is motivated by the physics of the neutrino freeze-out processes in the early Universe, where the essential physical characteristics include reheating from another disappearing particle component (e{sup }-annihilation)

  6. A=11C (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 11C) GENERAL: See also (1975AJ02) and Table 11.19 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special levels: (1976IR1B). Astrophysical questions: (1976VI1A, 1977SC1D, 1977SI1D, 1978BU1B). Special reactions: (1975HU14, 1976BE1K, 1976BU16, 1976DI01, 1976HE1H, 1976LE1F, 1976SM07, 1977AR06, 1977AS03, 1977SC1G, 1978DI1A, 1978GE1C, 1978HE1C, 1979KA07, 1979VI05). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1975DO1F, 1976DO1G). Pion capture and reactions (See also

  7. A=12O (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 12O) 12O has been observed in the 16O(α, 8He) reaction at Eα = 117.4 MeV (1978KE06) and in the 12C(π+, π-) reaction at Eπ = 164 MeV (1983BL08; see for angular distribution) and 180 MeV (1980BU15). The mass excess of 12O is 32.10 ± 0.12 MeV (1978KE06), 32.059 ± 0.048 MeV (1980BU15): we adopt 32.065 ± 0.045 MeV. 12O is thus unstable to decay into 10C + 2p by 1.79 MeV and into 11N* + p by 0.45 MeV [note that 11N* is probably not the ground state of 11N and

  8. A=15O (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    81AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 15O) GENERAL: See also (1976AJ04) and Table 15.18 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1976LI16, 1976SA37, 1977EM01, 1977PO16). Special states: (1976LI16, 1977RI08). Electromagnetic transitions: (1976LI16, 1976SH04, 1977HO04, 1978KR19). Astrophysical questions: (1977BA1V, 1977SI1D, 1978BU1B, 1978WO1E, 1979PE1E). Special reactions involving 15O: (1976AB04, 1976BU16, 1976HE1H, 1976HI05, 1976LE1F, 1977AR06, 1977SC1G, 1978AB08, 1978BO1W,

  9. Application of Gold Electrodes for the Study of Nickel Based Homogeneous Catalysts for Hydrogen Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nepomnyashchii, Alexander B.; Liu, Fei; Roberts, John A.; Parkinson, Bruce A.

    2013-08-12

    Gold and glassy carbon working electrode materials are compared as suitable substrates for the hydrogen oxidation reaction with Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2(BF4)2 used as a catalyst. Voltammetric responses showing electrocatalytic hydrogen oxidation mediated by the homogeneous electrocatalyst Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2(BF4)2 are identical at glassy carbon and gold electrodes, which shows that gold electrode can be used for hydrogen oxidation reaction. This work is supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under FWP 56073.

  10. Synthesis and structural characterization of two half-sandwich nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.-F. E-mail: s-shuwen@163.com; Zhang, X.; Sun, S.-W.; Sun, H.; Ma, H.-X.

    2015-12-15

    The synthesis and characterization of two new halfsandwich mononuclear nickel(II) complexes with the scorpionate ligands, [k{sup 3}-N, N',N''-Tp{sup t-Bu}, {sup Me}NiI] (1) and [k{sup 3}-N,N',N''-Tp{sup t-Bu}, {sup Me}NiNO{sub 3}] (2), are reported. These complexes have been fully characterized by elemental analyses and infrared spectra. Their molecular structures were determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The nickel(II) ion of complex 1 is in a four-coordinate environment, in which the donor atoms are provided by three nitrogen atoms of a hydrotris(pyrazolyl) borate ligand and one iodide atom, while that of complex 2 is in a five-coordinate environment with three nitrogen atoms from a hydrotris(pyrazolyl)borate ligand and two oxygen atoms from a nitrate ion.

  11. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svard, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.

  12. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  13. Evaluating ligands for use in polymer ligand film (PLF) for plutonium and uranium extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rim, Jung H.; Peterson, Dominic S.; Armenta, Claudine E.; Gonzales, Edward R.; Ünlü, Kenan

    2015-05-08

    We describe a new analyte extraction technique using Polymer Ligand Film (PLF). PLFs were synthesized to perform direct sorption of analytes onto its surface for direct counting using alpha spectroscopy. The main focus of the new technique is to shorten and simplify the procedure for chemically isolating radionuclides for determination through a radiometric technique. 4'(5')-di-t-butylcyclohexano 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) were examined for plutonium extraction. Di(2-ethyl hexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) were examined for plutonium and uranium extraction. DtBuCH18C6 and HEH[EHP] were not effective in plutonium extraction. HDEHP PLFs were effective for plutonium but not for uranium.

  14. A=7Be (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Be) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.7 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983BU1B, 1983FU1D, 1983HO22, 1983PA06, 1984BA53, 1984KA06, 1984WA02, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986KR12, 1986VA13). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983BU1B, 1983HO22, 1984FI20, 1984WA02, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986VA13, 1986XU02, 1988KW02). Electromagnetic transitions, giant resonances: (1984KA06, 1985FI1E, 1986FI07, 1986ME13). Astrophysical questions:

  15. Deeply Pseudoscalar Meson Electroproduction with CLAS and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidal, Michel; Kubarovsky, Valery P.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the recent data of exclusive $\\pi^0$ (and $\\pi^+$) electroproduction on the proton obtained by the CLAS collaboration at Jefferson Lab. It is observed that the cross sections, which have been decomposed in $\\sigma_T+\\epsilon\\sigma_L$, $\\sigma_{TT}$ and $\\sigma_{LT}$ structure functions, are dominated by transverse amplitude contributions. The data can be interpreted in the Generalized Parton Distribution formalism provided that one includes helicity-flip transversity GPDs.

  16. DOE/EIS-0200-SA-04 August

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  17. Senior Program Analyst (List the parenthetical here, leave blank if none.)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Senior Program Analyst (List the parenthetical here, leave blank if none.) Senior Program Analyst (List the parenthetical here, leave blank if none.) Submitted by admin on Mon, 2016-08-08 00:15 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency SubElement Department of Energy Locations District of Columbia, District of Columbia Announcement Number SE-16-TT-00001-DE Job Summary The OTT will execute technology transfer leadership and coordination roles and

  18. Fort Collins CO 80525

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    3801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Ms. Linda Kaiser From: Thomas A. Chapel, CPG, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 21, 2014 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill (OLF)

  19. Microsoft Word - RFOLF Yearly Report - 2013_TAC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Mr. Rick DiSalvo From: Lance Heyer, EI Thomas A. Chapel, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 29, 2013 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill

  20. ETATP12rev0.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... si io on n b ba at tt te er ry y p pa ac ck k a an nd d m mo od du ul le e v vo ol lt ta ... F Fu ur rt th he er r, , t th he e B BM MS S s sh ha al ll l a au ut to om ma at ti ic ca ...

  1. Hybrid Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution Human Capital: The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution (339.67 KB) More Documents & Publications The Role of Ombudsmen in Dispute Resolution TT Coordinator Ltr dated May 13 2010 Microsoft Word - ADR Revised Policy82508Reformatted.doc

    7 2.0 DESIGN FOR MAINTAINABILITY This section contains human factors guidance for designing systems, subsystems, equipment

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - TFG Nov 2015.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    What we have seen from these Visiting Speaker Programs is an opportunity for ll b ti Th l tt di HSS Visiting Speaker Program - September 18, 2008. Washington DC collaboration. The people attending are representative of organizations investing their time and they too are struggling to solve the same issues we are ; to keep America sustainable, secure, and to foster responsible leadership. Companies have been successful preparing for and navigating this new shifting global landscape." Index

  3. Analysis of Hydraulic Responses from the ER-6-1 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2005-06-01

    This report documents the interpretation and analysis of the hydraulic data collected for the Fiscal Year (FY) 2004 Multiple-Well Aquifer Test-Tracer Test (MWAT-TT) conducted at the ER-6-1 Well Cluster in Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 97, on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The MWAT-TT was performed to investigate CAU-scale groundwater flow and transport processes related to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the NTS through the Lower Carbonate Aquifer (LCA) Hydrostratigraphic Unit (HSU). The ER-6-1 MWAT-TT was planned and executed by contractor participants for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project of the Environmental Restoration (ER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Participants included Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), the Environmental Engineering Services Contractor; Bechtel Nevada (BN); the Desert Research Institute (DRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center. The SNJV team consists of the S.M. Stoller Corporation, Navarro Research and Engineering, Battelle Memorial Institute, INTERA Inc., and Weston Solutions, Inc. The MWAT-TT was implemented according to the ''Underground Test Area Project, ER-6-1 Multi-Well Aquifer Test - Tracer Test Plan'' (SNJV, 2004a) issued in April 2004. The objective of the aquifer test was to determine flow processes and local hydraulic properties for the LCA through long-term constant-rate pumping at the well cluster. This objective was to be achieved in conjunction with detailed sampling of the composite tracer breakthrough at the pumping well, as well as with depth-specific sampling and logging at multiple wells, to provide information for the depth-discrete analysis of formation hydraulic properties, particularly with regard to fracture properties.

  4. CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Valencia, G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the T odd correlations induced by CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at both production and decay level in the process gg{yields}tt{yields}(b{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}})(b{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). We consider several counting asymmetries at the parton level and find the ones with the most sensitivity to each of these anomalous couplings at the LHC.

  5. PURADYN Oil Bypass Filtration System Evaluation Test Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies & Infrastructure Department PURADYN OIL BYPASS FILTRATION SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST PLAN October 2002 Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Supervisor (Thomas) Date Reviewed: INEEL Bus & Heavy Equipment Foreman (Murdock) Date Reviewed: INEEL Fleet Maintenance Department Manager (Bullock) Date Approved: INEEL Central/Idaho Falls Facilities Director (Winn) Date Reviewed: INEEL Test Engineer (Zirker) Date Reviewed: INEEL Project Manager (Francfort) Date Approved: INEEL TT&I

  6. DOE/EIA-0202(84/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections February 1984 Published: March 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- .iort- iort- lort- <ort- ort Tt- .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term Term .-Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  7. DOE/EIA-0202(84/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook pn Quarterly Projections August 1984 Published: September 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t- jrt .ort lort .iort .iort iort iort iort ort Tt jm .erm -Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  8. DOE/EIA-0202(84/4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections October 1984 Published: November 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort lort iort lort \ort ort Tt .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term xrm nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  9. DOE/EIA-0202(85/1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections January 1985 Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort lort lort nort lort *.ort ort Tt .m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  10. DOE/EIA-0202(85/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1985 Published: August 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D C t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort iort iort '.ort ort Tt .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  12. Crystal structure studies of NADP{sup +} dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus exhibiting a novel terminal domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, S.M.; Pampa, K.J.; Manjula, M.; Abdoh, M.M.M.; Kunishima, Naoki; Lokanath, N.K.

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We determined the structure of isocitrate dehydrogenase with citrate and cofactor. • The structure reveals a unique novel terminal domain involved in dimerization. • Clasp domain shows significant difference, and catalytic residues are conserved. • Oligomerization of the enzyme is quantized with subunit-subunit interactions. • Novel domain of this enzyme is classified as subfamily of the type IV. - Abstract: NADP{sup +} dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is an enzyme catalyzing oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate into oxalosuccinate (intermediate) and finally the product α-ketoglutarate. The crystal structure of Thermus thermophilus isocitrate dehydrogenase (TtIDH) ternary complex with citrate and cofactor NADP{sup +} was determined using X-ray diffraction method to a resolution of 1.80 Å. The overall fold of this protein was resolved into large domain, small domain and a clasp domain. The monomeric structure reveals a novel terminal domain involved in dimerization, very unique and novel domain when compared to other IDH’s. And, small domain and clasp domain showing significant differences when compared to other IDH’s of the same sub-family. The structure of TtIDH reveals the absence of helix at the clasp domain, which is mainly involved in oligomerization in other IDH’s. Also, helices/beta sheets are absent in the small domain, when compared to other IDH’s of the same sub family. The overall TtIDH structure exhibits closed conformation with catalytic triad residues, Tyr144-Asp248-Lys191 are conserved. Oligomerization of the protein is quantized using interface area and subunit–subunit interactions between protomers. Overall, the TtIDH structure with novel terminal domain may be categorized as a first structure of subfamily of type IV.

  13. ACIM-~ NY.49

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' h:. ,,, ,_" , ACIM-~ NY.49 .,. i MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE FE: __~-tt_c~7' e_-_~-~------- --------- "%Kf-- ---- ---i------- Current: ~~~~~~--------__---_______ xf yee, date contacted- IVPE OF OPERATION f- ------------- Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process z Theoretical Studies Sample 84 Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage a Facility Type 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Fat a Other

  14. Mr. John E. Kieling, Bureau Chief Hazardous Waste Bureau

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Protection Division New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Building 1 Santa Fe, NM 87508-6303 New Mexico Environment Department Harold Runnels Bu ildi ng 1190 Saint Francis Drive, PO Box 5496 Santa Fe, NM 87502-5469 Subject: Fifth Supplement to the Report of Implementation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Facility Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Contingency Plan on April 11, 2014 Dear Mr. Kieling and Ms. Roberts: On April11 , 2014, the Department of

  15. Intermolecular C?H bond activation of benzene and pyridines by a vanadium(III) alkylidene including a stepwise conversion of benzene to a vanadium-benzyne complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andino, Jos G.; Kilgore, Uriah J.; Pink, Maren; Ozarowski, Andrew; Krzystek, J.; Telser, Joshua; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Mindiola, Daniel J.

    2012-01-20

    Breaking of the carbon-hydrogen bond of benzene and pyridine is observed with (PNP)V(CH{sub 2}tBu){sub 2} (1), and in the case of benzene, the formation of an intermediate benzyne complex (C) is proposed, and indirect proof of its intermediacy is provided by identification of (PNP)VO({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) in combination with DFT calculations.

  16. Nuclear Data Sheets for A = 68

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental results from the various reaction and radioactive decay studies leading to nuclides in the A = 68 mass chain have been reviewed. Nuclides ranging from Cr (Z = 24) to Br (Z = 35) are included. For these nuclei, level and decay schemes, as well as tables of nuclear properties, are given. This work supersedes the previous evaluation of the data on these nuclides (2002Bu29).

  17. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1996-04-18

    This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

  18. BandelierDirections2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a r k i n g M E R G E T o T o w n s it e D ia m o n d D ri v e To Sa n ta Fe T o J e m e z M ts . Co mm ut er Bu s Dr op Of f P a r k i n g M E R G E M E R G E T o T o w n s i t e ...

  19. Utility: Order (2016-CE-42007) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CE-42007) Utility: Order (2016-CE-42007) January 5, 2016 DOE ordered Utility Refrigerator to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Utility had failed to certify that certain models of commercial refrigerator equipment comply with the applicable energy conservation standards. The Order adopted a Compromise Agreement, which reflected settlement terms between DOE and Utility. Utility: Order (2016-CE-42007) (22.13 KB) More Documents & Publications Utility: Proposed Penalty (2016-CE-42007) Bu

  20. CX-008990: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    990: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008990: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Prototype Development and Evaluation of Self-Cleaning Concentrated Solar Power Collectors and Receivers CX(s) Applied: B3.6, B5.17 Date: 08/06/2012 Location(s): Massachusetts Offices(s): Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to provide federal funding to the Trustees of Boston University (BU) to conduct research and development activities that advance prototype development

  1. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Bureau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Bu il ding 1 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505-6303 JUL 0 5 2011 Subject: Notification of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Permit Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is a Class 1 Permit Modification Notification 1 0: * Update Emergency Coordinator list We certify under penalty of law that this document and the enclosure were prepared under our direction or supervision in

  2. Recent Results in the Top Quark Sector from the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2015-04-10

    In these proceedings, I review recent measurements in the top quark sector in pp-bar collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider using the D0 detector. I will present the differential measurement of the tt-bar production cross section and the Tevatron combination of inclusive tt-bar cross section measurements; the first evidence of the production of single top quarks in the s-channel by D0 and the observation in combination with CDF. Furthermore, I will review the measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry in tt-bar events, and conclude with the world’s most precise single measurement of the top quark mass, which is a fundamental parameter of the standard model, and present the Tevatron combination, which is the world’s most precise determination of the top quark mass, with a relative precision of 0.37%.

  3. Measurement of the differential cross section for top quark pair production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-20

    The normalized differential cross section for top quark pair (tt¯) production is measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV at the CERN LHC using the CMS detector in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7fb–1. The measurements are performed in the lepton+jets (e/μ +jets) and in the dilepton (e+e, μ+μ, and e±μ) decay channels. The tt¯ cross section is measured as a function of the kinematic properties of the charged leptons, the jets associated to b quarks, the top quarks, and the tt¯ system. The data are compared with several predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamic up to approximate next-to-next-to-leading-order precision. Furthermore, no significant deviations are observed relative to the standard model predictions.

  4. Towards the Top with D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deliot, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The plan of this manuscript follows my research path over the past 10 years: the muon identification and common analysis tools at DØ, the measurement of the inclusive production of W boson decaying into muon and top quark studies. In the first section, I describe my work about muon identification, certification of the standard muon identification criteria, measurement of the muon selection efficiency and about the development of common analysis format and tools. In the second section, I explain how these efficiency measurements can be used to measure the inclusive W boson production cross section in the muon channel. The W ! μν cross section measurement can be seen as a standard candle to establish several analysis pieces that have to be put in place to perform more complex measurements like top quark analyses. In the last section I introduce more extensively the top quark physics at the Tevatron and describe in more details the main analyses in the dilepton channel I was involved in: the measurement of the tt inclusive cross section in the dilepton channel as well as the ratio of cross sections, the measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel, the extraction of the mass from the tt cross section and the Tevatron top quark mass combination. Before concluding, I finish the section with the description of the latest results on the tt charge asymmetry both at the Tevatron and at the LHC.

  5. Characterization of the resistance to PWSCC of hydraulic tube- tubesheet expansions. [Primary water stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gold, R.E.; Economy, G.; Jacko, R.J.; Harrod, D.L.

    1992-07-01

    The resistance to primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of hydraulically expanded Alloy 600 steam generator tubing, manufactured by the Westinghouse Specialty Metals Division, was evaluated under highly accelerated conditions in a 400{degrees}C steam test environment. These evaluations included microstructural characterizations of all test materials, screening tests with highly stressed reverse U-bends (RUBs), and the testing of internally pressurized hydraulic expansion tube-in-collar mockups. Eighteen heats of archived tubing from an operating nuclear power plant were evaluated; included were heats of Alloy 600 in both the mill annealed (A600 MA) and thermally treated (A600 TT) conditions. Other heats of archived A600 TT tubing, and reference laboratory heats with known corrosion resistance, were also included in various portions of this investigation. Hydraulically expanded mockups of A600 T-F tubing exhibit high resistance to PWSCC in the aggressive steam test environment. Some of the archived A600 MA heats, however, possess low resistance to PWSCC. Shot peening of the ID surfaces of tubes of these latter heats prior to testing was effective in precluding the occurrence of PWSCC. Archived heats of Model F (or F-type replacement) A600 TT steam generator tubing typically exhibit carbide morphologies and distributions consistent with high resistance to PWSCC. These data are in agreement with the performance to date of operating Model F steam generators.

  6. Lead-induced stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 and 690 in high temperature water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, T.; Senjuh, T.; Aoki, K.; Shigemitsu, T.; Kishi, Y.

    1992-12-31

    Lead is one of the potential contributing impurities to the degradation of PWR steam generator tubing. Recent laboratory testing has shown that lead is a corrosive material for Alloy 600 steam generator tubing. However, it is still unknown how lead influences the corrosion of steam generator tubing, including the effect of lead concentration, solution pH, stress level and material characteristics. In this study, two kinds of experiments were performed. One was to investigate the thin film characteristic and selectively dissolved base metal elements of Alloy 600MA in high temperature solutions of different lead concentrations and pH. The other investigated the dependency of degradation of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT on lead concentration and stress level in mild acidic environment, at 340{degrees}C for 2500 hrs. It was firstly demonstrated that lead-enhanced selective dissolution of nickel from alloy base metal, as a result of electrochemical reaction between lead and nickel, might cause the initiation and propagation of corrosion. Secondly, we showed that Alloy 690TT, generally very corrosion resistant material, also suffered from Pb-induced corrosion. The difference of the lead-induced stress corrosion morphology of Alloy 600MA and Alloy 690TT was also clarified.

  7. Production and decays of the light pseudoscalar boson {eta} at the CERN LHC in the simplest little Higgs model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung Kingman; Yan Qishu; Song, Jeonghyeon; Tseng Poyan

    2008-09-01

    In many extensions of the standard model, the Higgs sector often contains an additional pseudoscalar boson. A good example is the SU(3) simplest little Higgs model, which accommodates a light pseudoscalar boson {eta} with quite different characteristics from those in other multi-Higgs-doublet models. We study various phenomenological signatures of the {eta} at the CERN LHC. In particular, we calculate in details both production and decays in the Drell-Yan type channel qq{yields}Z/Z{sup '}{yields}h{eta}, and in the associated production with a tt pair, gg(qq){yields}tt{eta}. We emphasize the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decay mode of the {eta} boson when its mass is below the bb threshold. We show that tt{eta} production is in fact large enough to give a sizable number of events while suppressing the backgrounds. We also comment on the direct gluon fusion process and the indirect decay from the heavy T quark (T{yields}t{eta})

  8. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2009-04-28

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  9. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H.; Todd, Terry A.; Riddle, Catherine L.; Law, Jack D.; Peterman, Dean R.; Mincher, Bruce J.; McGrath, Christopher A.; Baker, John D.

    2007-11-06

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  10. Metformin suppresses CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Do, Minh Truong; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Tran, Thi Thu Phuong; Khanal, Tilak; Choi, Jae Ho; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2014-10-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1B1 by environmental xenobiotic chemicals or endogenous ligands through the activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes related to cancer, such as transformation and tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the effects of the anti-diabetes drug metformin on expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and inducible conditions. Our results indicated that metformin down-regulated the expression of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 in breast cancer cells under constitutive and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced conditions. Down-regulation of AhR expression was required for metformin-mediated decreases in CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression, and the metformin-mediated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 reduction is irrelevant to estrogen receptor α (ERα) signaling. Furthermore, we found that metformin markedly down-regulated Sp1 protein levels in breast cancer cells. The use of genetic and pharmacological tools revealed that metformin-mediated down-regulation of AhR expression was mediated through the reduction of Sp1 protein. Metformin inhibited endogenous AhR ligand-induced CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression by suppressing tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) expression in MCF-7 cells. Finally, metformin inhibits TDO expression through a down-regulation of Sp1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels. Our findings demonstrate that metformin reduces CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression in breast cancer cells by down-regulating AhR signaling. Metformin would be able to act as a potential chemopreventive agent against CYP1A1 and CYP1B1-mediated carcinogenesis and development of cancer. - Graphical abstract: Schematic of the CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 gene regulation by metformin. - Highlights: • Metformin inhibits CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 expression. • Metformin down-regulates the AhR signaling. • Metformin reduces Sp1 protein expression. • Metformin suppresses TDO expression.

  11. Influence of Oxygen and pH on the Selective Oxidation of Ethanol on Pd Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbitts, David D.; Neurock, Matthew

    2013-03-01

    The selective oxidation of ethanol on supported Pd is catalytically promoted by the presence of hydroxide species on the Pd surface as well as in solution. These hydroxide intermediates act as Brønsted bases which readily abstract protons from the hydroxyl groups of adsorbed or solution-phase alcohols. The C1AH bond of the resulting alkoxide is subsequently activated on the metal surface via hydride elimination to form acetaldehyde. Surface and solution-phase hydroxide intermediates can also readily react with the acetaldehyde via nucleophilic addition to form a germinal diol intermediate, which subsequently undergoes a second C1AH bond activation on Pd to form acetic acid. The role of O2 is to remove the electrons produced in the oxidation reaction via the oxygen reduction reaction over Pd. The reduction reaction also regenerates the hydroxide intermediates and removes adsorbed hydrogen that is produced during the oxidation.

  12. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance of SubstitutedLiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2007-11-28

    A complete series of LiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) materials have been synthesized and investigated as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. When cycled between 2.0 and 4.3 V vs. Li/Li+ at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, stable capacities of ~;;160 mAh/g for y=0 to ~;;110 mAh/g for y=0.2 are achieved. Upon increasing the current density, it is found that all materials containing aluminum show reduced polarization and improved rate performance. The optimal performance at all current densities was found for the compound with y=0.05. The effect of aluminumsubstitution on the crystal structure of the host is discussed.

  13. Mixed ether electrolytes for secondary lithium batteries with improved low temperature performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, K.M.; Pasquariello, D.M.; Martin, F.J.

    1986-04-01

    Tetrahydrofuran (THF): 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran (2Me-THF)/LiAsF/sub 6/ mixed solutions, despite their lower conductivity, have allowed significantly better low temperature performance in Li/TiS/sub 2/ cells than have THF/LiAsF/sub 6/, /sup 13/C NMR data suggest that this may be related to the structurally disordered Li/sup +/-solvates that exist in the mixed ether solutions. High cycling efficiencies for the Li electrode in THF:2Me-THF/LiAsF/sub 6/ solutions have been achieved by the use of 2Me-F as an additive. A 5 Ah capacity Li/TiS/sub 2/ cell has been cycled more than 100 times at 100, depth-of-discharge, with the cell capacity remaining at over 3 Ah at the 100th cycle.

  14. (Competitive ion kinetics in director mass spectrometric organic speciation). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sieck, L.W.

    1986-01-01

    Essentially all of the completed/in progress studies during the last reporting period have involved the NBS pulsed electron beam high pressure mass spectrometer. Three distinct areas of research are recognizable; (1) determinations of binding energies and entropies for association and cluster ions, which is accomplished by measuring the temperature dependence of the equilibrium A/sup +/ or A/sup -/ + B in equilibrium A/sup +/.B or A/sup -/.B, (2) measurement of unimolecular rate constants for the thermal decomposition (pyrolysis of protonated organic molecules, and (3) evaluation of proton affinities and gas phase acidities via measurement of variable-temperature equilibria of the type AH/sup +/ + B in equilibrium BH/sup +/ + A and A/sup -/ + BH in equilibrium AH + B/sup -/. The various systems and classes of molecules chosen for study were those deemed most likely to provide fundamental new information on ion kinetics, ionic stabilities and ionic reaction mechanisms.

  15. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  16. Chemically Bonded Phosphorus/Graphene Hybrid as a High Performance Anode for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail; Hu, Shilin; Yi, Ran; Tang, Duihai; Walter, Timothy; Regula, Michael; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Xiaolin; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Wang, Donghai

    2014-11-12

    Room temperature sodium-ion batteries are of great interest for high-energy-density energy storage systems because of low-cost, natural abundance of sodium. Here, we report a novel graphene nanosheets-wrapped phosphorus composite as an anode for high performance sodium-ion batteries though a facile ball-milling of red phosphorus and graphene nanosheets. Not only can the graphene nanosheets significantly improve the electrical conductivity, but they also serve as a buffer layer to accommodate the large volume change of phosphorus in the charge-discharge process. As a result, the graphene wrapped phosphorus composite anode delivers a high reversible capacity of 2077 mAh/g with excellent cycling stability (1700 mAh/g after 60 cycles) and high Coulombic efficiency (>98%). This simple synthesis approach and unique nanostructure can potentially extend to other electrode materials with unstable solid electrolyte interphases in sodium-ion batteries.

  17. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  18. Anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial ferrimagnetic anti-perovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Zhou, W. Q.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-08-07

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The introduction of Dy changes the AHE dramatically, even changes its sign, while the variations in magnetization are negligible. Two sign reversals of the AHE (negative-positive-negative) are ascribed to the variation of charge carriers as a result of Fermi surface reconstruction. We further demonstrate that the AHE current J{sub AH} is dissipationless (independent of the scattering rate), by confirming that anomalous Hall conductivity, σ{sub AH}, is proportional to the carrier density n at 5 K. Our study may provide a route to further utilize antiperovskite manganese nitrides in spintronics.

  19. Anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys: Effects of spin orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, L.; Gao, W. B.; Zhou, S. M.; Shi, Z.; He, P.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2013-12-28

    For disordered ternary Fe{sub 0.5}(Pd{sub 1−x}Pt{sub x}){sub 0.5} alloy films, the anomalous Hall effect obeys the conventional scaling law ρ{sub AH}=aρ{sub xx}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} with the longitudinal resistivity ρ{sub xx} and anomalous Hall resistivity ρ{sub AH}. Contributed by the intrinsic term and the extrinsic side-jump one, the scattering-independent anomalous Hall conductivity b increases with increasing Pt/Pd concentration. In contrast, the skew scattering parameter a is mainly influenced by the residual resistivity. The present results will facilitate the theoretical studies of the anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys.

  20. Contaminant exposure and associated biological effects in juvenile chinook salmon (oncorhynchus tshawytscha) from urban and nonurban estuaries of puget sound. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varanasi, U.; Casillas, E.; Arkoosh, M.R.; Hom, T.; Misitano, D.A.

    1993-04-01

    The report presents and interprets the results of chemical, biochemical, and biological studies on juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) outmigrating from urban and nonurban estuaries of Puget Sound, Washington. These studies were conducted between 1989 and 1991. The objective of these studies was to determine the degree of chemical exposure to juvenile chinook salmon as they migrate through urban-associated compared to nonurban estuaries and to evaluate the effects of chemical contaminant exposure on these animals. The chemical indicators of contaminant exposure include levels of hepatic polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and biliary levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs), which are semiquantitative measures of exposure to aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs). Stomach contents of juvenile salmon were also analyzed for selected AHs and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHs) to assess the importance of diet as a possible route of uptake of xenobiotics from polluted estuaries.

  1. Crosslinked polymer gel electrolytes based on polyethylene glycol methacrylate and ionic liquid for lithium battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Chen; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Dai, Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Gel polymer electrolytes were synthesized by copolymerization polyethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate with polyethylene glycol dimethacrylate in the presence of a room temperature ionic liquid, methylpropylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (MPPY TFSI). The physical properties of gel polymer electrolytes were characterized by thermal analysis, impedance spectroscopy, and electrochemical tests. The ionic conductivities of the gel polymer electrolytes increased linearly with the amount of MPPY TFSI and were mainly attributed to the increased ion mobility as evidenced by the decreased glass transition temperatures. Li||LiFePO4 cells were assembled using the gel polymer electrolytes containing 80 wt% MPPY TFSI via an in situ polymerization method. A reversible cell capacity of 90 mAh g 1 was maintained under the current density of C/10 at room temperature, which was increased to 130 mAh g 1 by using a thinner membrane and cycling at 50 C.

  2. Box Canyon Model Watershed Project : Annual Report 1997/1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    1998-01-01

    In 1997, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) initiated the Box Canyon Watershed Project. This project will concentrate on watershed protection and enhancement from an upland perspective and will complement current instream restoration efforts implemented through the Kalispel Resident Fish Project. Primary focus of this project is the Cee Cee Ah Creek watershed due to its proximity to the Reservation, importance as a traditional fishery, and potential for bull trout and west-slope cutthroat trout recovery.

  3. Research Highlights - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Highlights August 25, 2016, Research Highlights The Lightest Organic Radical Cation for Charge Storage in Redox Flow Batteries By systematically shedding molecular fragments of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene that are considered important for radical cation steric stabilization, we discovered a minimalistic structure that retains long-term stability in its oxidized form and exhibits the intrinsic capacity of 161 mAh/g. Read More August 20, 2016, Research Highlights

  4. Applicability of Density Functional Theory in Reproducing Accurate Vibrational Spectra of Surface Bound Species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Atanassov, Plamen; Kiefer, Boris; Garzon, Fernando; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-10-05

    The structural equilibrium parameters, the adsorption energies, and the vibrational frequencies of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom adsorbed on the (111) surface of rhodium have been investigated using different generalized-gradient approximation (GGA), nonlocal correlation, meta-GGA, and hybrid functionals, namely, Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof (PBE), Revised-RPBE, vdW-DF, Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria functional (TPSS), and Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE06) functional in the plane wave formalism. Among the five tested functionals, nonlocal vdW-DF and meta-GGA TPSS functionals are most successful in describing energetics of dinitrogen physisorption to the Rh(111) surface, while the PBE functional provides the correct chemisorption energy for the hydrogen atom. It was also found that TPSS functional produces the best vibrational spectra of the nitrogen molecule and the hydrogen atom on rhodium within the harmonic formalism with the error of 22.62 and 21.1% for the NAN stretching and RhAH stretching frequency. Thus, TPSS functional was proposed as a method of choice for obtaining vibrational spectra of low weight adsorbates on metallic surfaces within the harmonic approximation. At the anharmonic level, by decoupling the RhAH and NAN stretching modes from the bulk phonons and by solving one- and two-dimensional Schrodinger equation associated with the RhAH, RhAN, and NAN potential energy we calculated the anharmonic correction for NAN and RhAH stretching modes as 231 cm21 and 277 cm21 at PBE level. Anharmonic vibrational frequencies calculated with the use of the hybrid HSE06 function are in best agreement with available experiments.

  5. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mentors Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email 2016: Mentors Bob Robey Bob Robey XCP-2: EULERIAN CODES Bob Robey is a Research Scientist in the Eulerian Applications group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is the

  6. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email 2016: Students Peter Ahrens Peter Ahrens Electrical Engineering & Computer Science BS UC Berkeley Jenniffer Estrada Jenniffer Estrada Computer Science MS Youngstown

  7. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Guide to Los Alamos Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email Guide to Los Alamos During your 10-week internship, we hope you have the opportunity to explore and enjoy Los Alamos and the surrounding area. Here are some

  8. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recommended Reading & Resources Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nickole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email Recommended Reading & References The Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship covers a broad range of topics that you may not have

  9. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  10. Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LaboratoryNational Security Education Center Menu About Seminar Series Summer Schools Workshops Viz Collab IS&T Projects NSEC » Information Science and Technology Institute (ISTI) » Summer School Programs » Parallel Computing Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creates next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Contacts Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff

  11. The first Fe-based Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kan, W. H.; Huq, A.; Manthiram, A.

    2015-05-15

    We report the synthesis, structure, and electrochemistry of the first Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19. The Fe-based cathode has a reversible capacity of ca. 70 mAh g-1; ca. 1.7 Na+ ions per formula can be inserted/extracted at an average voltage of 2.5 V versus Na+/Na.

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pollution from a Megacity in the Amazon: the Case of Manaus, Brazil PI Contact: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Martin ST, P Artaxo, L Machado, AO Manzi, RA Souza, C Schumacher, J Wang, MO Andreae, HJ Barbosa, J Fan, G Fisch, AH Goldstein, A Guenther, JL Jimenez, U Poschl, MA Silva Dias, J Smith, and M Wendisch. 2016. "Introduction:

  13. Modified Electrochemical Properties of Organic Quinoxaline via Electrolyte

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions in Propylene Carbonate - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 4, 2015, Research Highlights Modified Electrochemical Properties of Organic Quinoxaline via Electrolyte Interactions in Propylene Carbonate Theoretical gravimetric capacity of quinoxaline : 410 mAh/g Solubility > 5M in carbonate solvents Scientific Achievement Quinoxalines are highly sensitive to solvent and electrolyte interactions. For example, bare quinoxaline is active in acetonitrile at DFT-predicted

  14. Molecular-Confinement of Polysulfide within HybridElectrodes for High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Loading in Lithium Sulfur Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research February 19, 2015, Research Highlights Molecular-Confinement of Polysulfide within HybridElectrodes for High Mass Loading in Lithium Sulfur Batteries (Top) Nitrogen doping effectively attracts and stabilizes sulfur radicals generated during the electrochemical process. (Bottom) A high areal capacity of ca. 2.5 mAh/cm2 with capacity retention of 81.6% over 100 cycles. Scientific Achievement N-doped carbon

  15. Battery availability for near-term (1998) electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burke, A.F.

    1991-06-01

    Battery Requirements were determined for a wide spectrum of electric vehicles ranging from 2-passenger sports cars and microvans to full-size vans with a payload of 500 kg. All the vehicles utilize ac, high voltage (340--360 V) powertrains and have acceleration performance (0--80 km/h in less than 15 seconds) expected to be the norm in 1988 electric vehicles. Battery packs were configured for each of the vehicles using families of sealed lead-acid and nickel-cadmium modules which are either presently available in limited quantities or are being developed by battery companies which market a similar battery technology. It was found that the battery families available encompass the Ah cell sizes required for the various vehicles and that they could be packaged in the space available in each vehicle. The acceleration performance and range of the vehicles were calculated using the SIMPLEV simulation program. The results showed that all the vehicles had the required acceleration characteristics and ranges between 80--160 km (50--100 miles) with the ranges using nickel-cadmium batteries being 40--60% greater than those using lead-acid batteries. Significant changes in the design of electric vehicles over the last fifteen years are noted. These changes make the design of the batteries more difficult by increasing the peak power density required from about 60 W/kg to 100--150 W/kg and by reducing the Ah cell size needed from about 150 Ah to 30--70 Ah. Both of these changes in battery specifications increase the difficulty of achieving low $/kWh cost and long cycle life. This true for both lead-acid and nickel-cadmium batteries. 25 refs., 6 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Surviving Operation Desert Storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vice, J. )

    1992-08-01

    The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

  17. Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 25, 2016, Research Highlights The Lightest Organic Radical Cation for Charge Storage in Redox Flow Batteries By systematically shedding molecular fragments of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-bis(2-methoxyethoxy)benzene that are considered important for radical cation steric stabilization, we discovered a minimalistic structure that retains long-term stability in its oxidized form and exhibits the intrinsic capacity of 161 mAh/g. Read More August 24, 2016, Videos Sparingly Solvating Electrolytes

  18. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectronmore » spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.« less

  19. 2015 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D One dimensional 3D Three dimensional A/C Air-Conditioning ABR Advanced Battery Research AC Alternating current ACE Advanced combustion engine ACEC Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control ADP Advanced drying process AEC Automotive Electronics Council AEC Advanced Engine Combustion AFCI Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFDC Alternative Fuels Data Center AFR Air to fuel ratio AFV Alternative fuel vehicle Ah Ampere-hour AKI Anti-knock index Al Aluminum ALD Atomic Layer Deposition AlF 3 Aluminum

  20. iuv62d0.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . ". .. -.. LBL--22392 DE87 003546 -..-__ The Hydrogen Bubble Chamber and the Strange Resonances Luis W. Ah@l&Z Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California Berkeley, California 94720 June 1985 DISCLAIMER . This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the Unit~Shtes bvernment noranyagency thermf, norany of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi-

  1. Journal articles published by Ames Laboratory interns | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal articles published by Ames Laboratory interns 2015 Ludovico G. Tulli, Wenjie Wang, William R. Lindemann (2010), Ivan Kuzmenko, Wolfgang Meier ,David Vaknin, and Patrick Shahgaldian, "Interfacial Binding of Divalent Cations to Calixarene-Based Langmuir Monolayers," Langmuir, Article ASAP DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00262, Publication Date (Web): February 20, 2015. Anup D. Sharma, Pavel A. Brodskiy (2010, 2011 SULI), Emma M. Petersen (2013 SULI), Melih Dagdeviren, Eun-Ah Ye,

  2. Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to Apply Apply for the Parallel Computing Summer Research Internship Creating next-generation leaders in HPC research and applications development Program Co-Lead Robert (Bob) Robey Email Program Co-Lead Gabriel Rockefeller Email Program Co-Lead Hai Ah Nam Email Professional Staff Assistant Nicole Aguilar Garcia (505) 665-3048 Email Current application deadline is February 5, 2016 with notification by early March 2016. Who can apply? Upper division undergraduate students and early graduate

  3. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  4. Combined application of normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to determining the group composition of aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belous, E.F.; Lanin, S.N.; Nikitin, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    The quality and working characteristics of motor fuels essentially depend on the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs). Therefore, the development of procedures for the group determination of aromatic hydrocarbons is an important and topical problem in the processing and quality control of petroleum products. The aim of this work was to improve the group separation and quantitative determination of monocyclic and bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAH and BAH) in light-end products.

  5. Effects of Mg doping on the remarkably enhanced electrochemical performance of Na3V2(PO4)3 cathode materials for sodium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hui; Yu, Xiqian; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Wu, Chuan; Liu, Liang-Yu; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites with different Mg2+ doping contents (x=0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.07 and 0.1) were prepared by a facile sol-gel method. The doping effects on the crystal structure were investigated by XRD, XPS and EXAFS. The results show that low dose doping Mg2+ does not alter the structure of the material, and magnesium is successfully substituted for vanadium site. The Mg doped Na3V2-xMgx(PO4)3/C composites exhibit significant improvements on the electrochemistry performances in terms of the rate capability and cycle performance, especially for the Na3V1.95Mg0.05(PO4)3/C. For example, when the current density increased from 1 C to 30 C, the specific capacity only decreased from 112.5 mAh g-1 to 94.2 mAh g-1 showing very good rate capability. Moreover, even cycling at a high rate of 20 C, an excellent capacity retention of 81% is maintained from the initial value of 106.4 mAh g-1 to 86.2 mAh g-1 at the 50th cycle. Enhanced rate capability and cycle performance can be attributed to the optimized particle size, structural stability and enhanced ionic and electronic conductivity induced by Mg doping.

  6. HEALXH AND SAFEIY RFSEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HEALXH AND SAFEIY RFSEARCH DIVISION Waste Management Research and Development Programs (Activity No. AH 10 05 00 0; NEAHC01) RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFTHE FORMER AEROPROJECTS, FACILITY, WEST cI%mER, PENNSYL.VANIA W. D. Cottrell and R. F. Carrier Date published - October 1990 Investigation Team R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager W. D. Cottrell - NSRAP Project Director Suwey Team Members J. A Roberts* J. L. Quillent l Bechtel National, Inc tNuclear Fuel Services, Inc Work

  7. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered core–shell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolongedmore » 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.« less

  8. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered core–shell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolonged 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.

  9. Action of hexachlorobenzene on tumor growth and metastasis in different experimental models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pontillo, Carolina Andrea; Rojas, Paola; Chiappini, Florencia; Sequeira, Gonzalo; Cocca, Claudia; Crocci, Mximo; Colombo, Lucas; Lanari, Claudia; and others

    2013-05-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is a widespread organochlorine pesticide, considered a possible human carcinogen. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We have found that HCB activates c-Src/HER1/STAT5b and HER1/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and cell migration, in an AhR-dependent manner in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the effect of HCB (0.005, 0.05, 0.5, 5 ?M) on cell invasion and metalloproteases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activation in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, we examined in vivo the effect of HCB (0.3, 3, 30 mg/kg b.w.) on tumor growth, MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and metastasis using MDA-MB-231 xenografts and two syngeneic mouse breast cancer models (spontaneous metastasis using C4-HI and lung experimental metastasis using LM3). Our results show that HCB (5 ?M) enhances MMP2 expression, as well as cell invasion, through AhR, c-Src/HER1 pathway and MMPs. Moreover, HCB increases MMP9 expression, secretion and activity through a HER1 and AhR-dependent mechanism, in MDA-MB-231 cells. HCB (0.3 and 3 mg/kg b.w.) enhances subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. In vivo, using MDA-MB-231 model, the pesticide (0.3, 3 and 30 mg/kg b.w.) activated c-Src, HER1, STAT5b, and ERK1/2 signaling pathways and increased MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels. Furthermore, we observed that HCB stimulated lung metastasis regardless the tumor hormone-receptor status. Our findings suggest that HCB may be a risk factor for human breast cancer progression. - Highlights: ? HCB enhances MMP2 and MMP9 expression and cell invasion in MDA-MB-231, in vitro. ? HCB-effects are mediated through AhR, HER1 and/or c-Src. ? HCB increases subcutaneous tumor growth in MDA-MB-231 and C4-HI in vivo models. ? HCB activates c-Src/HER1 pathway and increases MMPs levels in MDA-MB-231 tumors. ? HCB stimulates lung metastasis in C4-HI and LM3 in vivo models.

  10. Controlled Synthesis of Polyenes by Catalytic Methods. Progress Report, December 1, 1989 -- November 30, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Schrock, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    A more direct approach to polyenes by the direct polymerization of acetylenes has been achieved. We were able to show that polymerization of acetylene itself can be controlled with a well- characterized alkylidene catalyst, but only if a base such as quinuclidine is present in order to slow down the rate of propagation relative to initiation. (Quinuclidine may also stabilize vinylalkylidene intermediates formed in the reaction). Unfortunately, living polyenes were no more stable than isolated polyenes, and so this approach had its limitations. Direct polymerization of acetylene by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)(O-t-Bu){sub 2} was more successful, but inherent polyene instability was still a problem. The most important result of the past grant period is the finding that dipropargyl derivatives (HC=CCH{sub 2}XCH{sub 2}C=CH; X = CH{sub 2}, C(CO{sub 2}R){sub 2}, SiR{sub 2}, etc.), which have been reported to be cyclopolymerized by various classical catalysts by as yet unknown mechanisms, are polymerized by Mo(CH-t-Bu)(NAr)[OCMe(CF{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2} in dimethoxyethane. We speculate that intramolecular formation of a five-membered ring in the product of {alpha} addition is fast enough to yield another terminal alkylidene on the time scale of the polymerization reaction, while a six-membered ring is formed in a reaction involving a more reaction terminal alkylidene. Either intermediate alkylidene, but most likely the terminal alkylidene, could react with additional monomer to lead to growth of a chain having dangling triple bonds that eventually could be employed to form crosslinks.

  11. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  12. Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Potential Problems for Photovoltaic Packaging: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ethylene-Vinyl Acetate Potential Problems for Photovoltaic Packaging Preprint M.D. Kempe, G.J. Jorgensen, K.M. Terwilliger, T.J. McMahon, and C.E. Kennedy National Renewable Energy Laboratory T.T. Borek Sandia National Laboratories Presented at the 2006 IEEE 4 th World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion (WCPEC-4) Waikoloa, Hawaii May 7-12, 2006 Conference Paper NREL/CP-520-39915 May 2006 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute

  13. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  14. REPLY TO AITN Of.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .. Departm&t of ' h mehloraricjum~ iii /II 1 DATE: FEB 6 1991 . ,! '!/ l!I REPLY TO AITN Of. EM-421 (W. A. Williams, FTS 233-5439) -cI: Wrnlum Cleanup Mdellnes for the Elra Gate, Tennessee, FUSRAP.Site Ill III Y0: Lester K. Ptlce, Ofrector former Sites Restoration Dlvlsion ,( III Oak Ridge Dperations Office . t/t 4 This $s in response to your request for uranium cleanup guidelines for the I 1 Elra Gate site. Vour staff recommended a cleanup guIdetIne of 35 Ill picoCurles per grm (pCi/g) of

  15. Appendix E Technical Memorandum Regarding Instrumentation and Monitoring

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 3801 Automation Way Suite 100 Fort Collins CO 80525 Tel 970.223.9600 Fax 970.223.7171 www.tetratech.com Technical Memorandum To: Mr. Rick DiSalvo From: Lance Heyer, EI Thomas A. Chapel, PE Company: S. M. Stoller Corporation Date: March 30, 2012 Re: Instrumentation and Monitoring, Rocky Flats OLF Tt Project #: 114-181750 Introduction This technical memorandum provides a summary and evaluation of data collected from inclinometer and piezometer instrumentation at the Rocky Flats Original Landfill

  16. I PHAEi:'I:. REM E :ACTO N

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PHAEi:'I:. REM E :ACTO N *S0= =F* ltw :::.: .:- :.i.- * :: ..: ** :::::::::::::::::: I. .'Sl4.l . g .... 1/X's~~~ ::i':-:i::11:!:i':' :o::: : :::: ::::::. :. : * , :! ::: If'000;St;:ffULHS 0-;0y~Ar 0 PtS'tltl05 i; t 000; H~~i; 0 t~t < The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) was established by the U.S. Department of Energy to undertake national and international programs in science and engineering education, training and management systems, energy and environment systems, and

  17. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  18. Statistical anisotropies in gravitational waves in solid inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Wang, Yi E-mail: emami@ipm.ir E-mail: yw366@cam.ac.uk

    2014-09-01

    Solid inflation can support a long period of anisotropic inflation. We calculate the statistical anisotropies in the scalar and tensor power spectra and their cross-correlation in anisotropic solid inflation. The tensor-scalar cross-correlation can either be positive or negative, which impacts the statistical anisotropies of the TT and TB spectra in CMB map more significantly compared with the tensor self-correlation. The tensor power spectrum contains potentially comparable contributions from quadrupole and octopole angular patterns, which is different from the power spectra of scalar, the cross-correlation or the scalar bispectrum, where the quadrupole type statistical anisotropy dominates over octopole.

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 10_OGREN_ARM_AWG_IAP_200703.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In-situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) * Objectives - obtain aerosol climatology aloft - determine relevance of surface climatology to vertical column * Measurements Li ht b ti tt i d - Light absorption, scattering, and hemispheric backscattering - RH-dependence of scattering - Temperature and RH Cessna 172XP 3/2000 - 6/2005 Temperature and RH - Flask samples for trace gases (CO 2 ) * Flights - 9 levels 0 5-3 7 km asl (172XP) - 9 levels, 0.5-3.7 km asl (172XP) - 12 levels, 0.5-4.6 km asl (206) -

  20. DOE/EIA-0202|83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    |83/2Q)-1 Short-Term Energy Outlook Volume 1-Quarterly Projections May 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort iort iort lOrt iort '.ort- ort Tt . m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term -Term -Term nergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  1. Sandia National Laboratories Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supplier Quality Requirements for Build to Print Hardware Purchases Subject: First Release:SNL-5-2002, Issue A, 05/16/02 Revised this 18th day'ofNovember, 2004 as F-42(QP-28)04* . Revised By: 11)' I(.~ 't:t' AntOnIO J. ~ora, 14133 14133 Manager ~ c-. m I ~~ <.:-, lL 10252 Manager? \"\\_- - II - 2.3 - 0 'i ~e~7 1 025 8 Manager$::~ R (/.tff7 J Frank A. Villareal Approved By: * The revision of the document in effect at tlte tinre of award of Purchase Order of Subcontract unless otherwise

  2. DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Analysis Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy - Washington, DC January 25, 2006 F FI IN NA AL L A AT TT TE EN ND DE EE ES S L LI IS ST T Name Company E-mail Rajesh Ahluwalia Argonne National Laboratory walia@anl.gov Arlene Anderson U.S. DOE-HFCIT Arlene.anderson@hq.doe.gov Jim Campbell Air Liquide Jim.Campbell@airliquide.com Ed Casey ConocoPhillips ed.casey@ConocoPhillips.com Tan-Ping Chen Nexant tpchen@nexant.com Keith Cole General Motors keith.cole@gm.com Peter Devlin U.S. DOE-HFCIT peter.devlin@ee.doe.gov Karl

  3. Qi Xu | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2 QUARTER SH OR T-T ER M EN ER GY OU TL OO K QUAR TERL Y PROJ ECTIO NS ENERGY INFORMA TION ADMINIST RATION May 1991 This publication may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. Purchasing in formation for this or other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the Government Printing Office or ElA's National Energy Information Center. Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the Center by mail, telephone,

  4. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  5. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$ production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  6. Departtient,of Endrgy

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Departtient,of Endrgy ' . :. WaShingtm; DC 20585 ,; .' I .,~. ' . ' . / . . . .; ' ~- FEB Xl995 ., Mr..William P. Dornsife :.'. ..I Bureau'of Radiation Protectibn Pennsjlvania Department of : '~ ., .Environmental Resources, 400 Market Street, 13th Floor ,HatriSburg; ,PennsyJvania 17101' ; 1 .I Dear Hr. Dornsife: ,,'.:' ', I ; )~' ,,: I Secretary of Evergy Hazel O"Leary.has announced a new appr6ac :.the Department of En@rgy (DOE) ahd,its communications'with.tt support of'this initiative, ,we

  7. FROti:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    p.1, , 1' 3 ' - j ttEMORANDUtl TO: FILE - FJ+u? /WI - /3 DATE 2 /I/ / 9 / ----------^--______ FROti: D. s-f&J ---------------- SUBJECT: SITE NAME: --_-__----__-_--- _____ &----w' I+& - f*/crq ALTERNATE A t=l r---i ted ____ NAME: -----------__-________ CITY: ~+ZZL------ _______ STATE: ------ ff+$- OWNER(S) --y;;g-- && - /??#A~ ------------------------ Current: &v CA-J--;cJ Owner contacted ~--yes 0 noi -.-------me-we------- if yes, date contacted _ //t*/4/ -e-----N------

  8. L

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    c. : -* :. : 1 : : ; : s ' ;: ..:, --A,, -... ! : ' Q "3 _, ' ;' ,Z .2 , ., .- -2 ' 1 ' \A ' ., 3 \ * .' >,-' ;;' ;x., -.; t 1 ' .L i ' iq. ) :p 22T*+g~;s~ .r(,, , ~~::---y-~' -' --, ) ,;*; -,:;' L;e.-:.:.: ..,. >,.*L<seT,, :' .5 -1,; JI I,' ' <> ' I. ..; -_ : ,... :,-.;i __. PRODUCTXIN PJZPORT "* *_ ' L T I R(.XJXXG OF TT~C l!ftN D X m X3AZ~IEX INGCt.fS. A T * 2lI,mG~~-LuDL~~~ sTl2zEL coRPoR:!'"I9~~- -_. . _.. ,. .: ii .- _, . :. GN Ofiicial CkuiFcr??bn. d t!+

  9. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTION KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Guenther, Ph.D.

    2003-01-28

    SRI has completed the NBFZ test program, made modification to the experimental furnace for the HPBO test. The NBFZ datasets provide the information NEA needs to simulate the combustion and fuel-N conversion with detailed chemical reaction mechanisms. BU has determined a linear swell of 1.55 corresponding to a volumetric increase of a factor of 3.7 and a decrease in char density by the same factor. These results are highly significant, and indicate significantly faster burnout at elevated pressure due to the low char density and large diameter.

  10. Highly efficient greenish-blue platinum-based phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes on a high triplet energy platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y. L. Gong, S. White, R.; Lu, Z. H.; Wang, X.; Wang, S.; Yang, C.

    2014-04-28

    We have demonstrated high-efficiency greenish-blue phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs) based on a dimesitylboryl-functionalized C^N chelate Pt(II) phosphor, Pt(m-Bptrz)(t-Bu-pytrz-Me). Using a high triplet energy platform and optimized double emissive zone device architecture results in greenish-blue PHOLEDs that exhibit an external quantum efficiency of 24.0% and a power efficiency of 55.8?lm/W. This record high performance is comparable with that of the state-of-the-art Ir-based sky-blue organic light-emitting diodes.

  11. A=18C (1972AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2AJ02) (Not illuatrated) 18C is particle stable. Therefore its atomic mass excess, M - A, must be < 29.84 MeV [16C + 2n] (1970WA1G). 18C has been observed in the bombardment of 232Th by 122 MeV 18O ions (1969AR13, 1970AR1D) and in the 3 GeV proton bombardment of Au (1970RA1A). See also (1960ZE03, 1968PO04, 1971BU1E

  12. 18N

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1964CH19: 18N; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1982OL01: 18N; measured Eγ, Iγ, T1/2; deduced log ft. 18O deduced levels, β-branches. 1989ZH04: 18N(β-); measured absolute β-decay branching ratios; deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller matrix elements. 18O(α) [from 18N β-decay]; measured total β-delayed α-yield. 18O deduced possible new levels. 1993BU21: 18N(β-); measured β-delayed Eα, Iα. 1991RE02, 1993REZX, 1994RE1R: 18N(β-n);

  13. 18Ne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ne β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1954GO17: 18Ne. 1961BU05: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1961EC02: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963FR10: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1965FR09: 18Ne; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968GO05: 18Ne; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Iβ, log ft. 18F deduced levels, branching ratios. 1970AL11: 18Ne; measured T1/2; deduced log ft, β-branching. 1970AS06,

  14. Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W aste Bu reau New Mexico Environment Department 2905 Rodeo Park Drive East, Buitding 1 San ta Fe. New Mexico 87505-6303 FEB 1 3 20j~ Subject: Notification of Cla ss 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF De ar Mr. Kieling : Enclosed is the Class 1 Permit Modification Notification listed below: * Change in th e Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office Manager We certify under penalty of law that this document and th e enclos ure were prepared

  15. QER- Comment of Mike Gray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The biggest issue with wind energy in ND is the Transmission System. There was a proposal recently by Clean Line Energy This type of forward thinking would allow wind energy to go forward.... The other huge issue is the blockade that the fossil fuel industry has placed on Master Limited Partnerships in 1978!! If the Master Limited Partner Parity Act is passed THAT WOULD BE A GAME CHANGER!! ( this is sponsored bu Senator Coons From DE) Call me directly..... You can also aske Heidi Heitkamp about me.... Mike Gray

  16. BIG RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    RU N INDIANA LAKESHORE RUN E LUMBER CIT Y WARSAW JOHNST OWN BU RNSIDE MILLSTONE FROSTBUR G JUN EAU PLU MVILLE CHERRY HILL KAN E BOSWELL MAR ION CENT ER CREEKSIDE SALTSBUR G POINT N BLAIR SVILL E COU NCIL RU N SIGEL LEWISVILLE BEAR C REEK AR MBRUST OHIOPYLE HALLT ON BR OOKVILLE MAR KTON NOL O RAT HMEL COR SICA MAR CHAND SMIC KSBU RG HOWE APOLLO SEVEN SPRIN GS YAT ESBORO MCNEES LUCIND A GEORGE PIN EY LEEPER TIMBLIN WILL ET FERGUSON CLIMAX PANIC DAVY HILL TIDIOUT E GRAMPIAN SLIGO ROC KVI LLE

  17. LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON

  18. Venture Capital Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venture Capital Finance DOE Biomass Conference July 2014 Priced Out of Oil ... Into What? Energy Source Commodity Price Sun: $0 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $10/bbl = $1.6 / GJ (late 1990s) Coal: $3 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (N America) $3 - 4 / GJ Biomass (15 GJ/dt) $60-100/dt = $4 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (ex N America) $10 - 15 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $100/bbl = $16 / GJ Corn $4-7/bu= $10 - 20 / GJ 2 * Higher oil prices create a disruptive opportunity for lower cost feedstocks * North American shale gas is a

  19. L AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L _ AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 25 7 See Block 16C 6 . 1SSUED BY CODE 0500 8 NNSA/ Oa kridge Site Office u.s. De pa rtment of Energ y NNSA/ Y-12 S it e Offic e P. O. Box 2 05 0 Bu ilding 97 0 4- 2 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8 . NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county. state and ZIP Code) ABCOCK & WILCOX TECHNICAL B A t t n: W ILLIE J. W I LSON PO BOX 2009 SERVICES Y- 12 , LLC ,1 . CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I

  20. A=18Ne (1983AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    83AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 18Ne) GENERAL: See also (1978AJ03) and Table 18.21 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980ZH01). Electromagnetic transitions: (1977HA1Z, 1979SA31, 1982LA26). Special states: (1977HE18, 1978KR1G, 1979DA15, 1979SA31, 1980OK01, 1982ZH1D). Astrophysical questions: (1978WO1E). Complex reactions involving 18Ne: (1979HE1D). Pion-induced capture and reactions (See also reaction 6.): (1977PE12, 1977SP1B, 1978BU09,

  1. A=9C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 9C) GENERAL: (See also (1979AJ01) for other references in this category and for some reactions on which no new work has been done.) and Table 9.12 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9C: (1981MO20). Reactions involing pions: (1979AS01, 1979NA1E, 1980BU15, 1983HU02). Other topics: (1979BE1H, 1979LA06, 1982NG01). Mass of 9C: The recent Q0 value for the 12C(3He, 6He)9C reaction (see reaction 3)

  2. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top-Antitop Quark Events and Search for Top Squark Pair Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV Using the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-04-08

    A measurement of spin correlation in tt¯ production is presented using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb⁻¹. The correlation between the top and antitop quark spins is extracted from dilepton tt¯ events by using the difference in the azimuthal angle between the two charged leptons in the laboratory frame. In the helicity basis the measured degree of correlation corresponds to Ahelicity=0.38±0.04, in agreement with the standard model prediction. A search is performed for pair production of topmore » squarks with masses close to the top quark mass decaying to predominantly right-handed top quarks and a light neutralino, the lightest supersymmetric particle. Top squarks with masses between the top quark mass and 191 GeV are excluded at the 95% confidence level.« less

  3. Recherche du boson de Higgs dans l'état final dimuonique et étude de l'asymétrie de production de la paire top antitop avec l'expérience DO auprès du Tevatron; Higgs boson search in the dimuonique final state and study of the top pair antitop production asymmetry with the DO experiment at the Tevatron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauré, Alexandre

    2014-06-03

    Two high energy particle physics analyses are presented in this PhD report using events with two leptons oppositely charged and with missing transverse energy. These events are selected using 9.7 fb-1 of total pp collisions data collected with the DØ detector at the TeVatron at √s=1.96 TeV.The first analysis is the research of the Higgs boson decaying in the H→WW→μνμν channel. No significant excess above the background prediction is observed.Upper limits on Higgs boson production cross-section are computed in the standard model framework but also in the 4th generation of fermions and in the fermiophobic coupling to Higgs boson hypotheses. In order to validate the research methodology, the W boson pair production cross-section is measured.The second analysis is the measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry of the tt pair production. This is the first measurement in the dileptonic channel at DØ experiment. In this context, a new tt pair kinematic reconstruction is used (matrix element method) to give a raw measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry. Thanks to a dedicated calibration method, we give a final measurement of AFB=18.0 ± 6.0 (stat) ± 3.3 (syst).

  4. Top quark physics at the Tevatron results and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Sliwa

    2002-10-16

    The methodology of CDF and D0 top quark analyses and their underlying assumptions are summarized. The CDF and D0 top mass averages, obtained from measurements in several channels and based on about 100 pb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected by each experiment in Run-I, are: M{sub t} = 176.1 {+-} 4.0(stat) {+-} 5.1(syst) GeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub t} = 172.1 {+-} 5.2(stat) {+-} 4.9(syst) Gev/C{sup 2}, respectively. The combined Tevatron measurement of the top quark mass is M{sub t} = 174.3 {+-} 3.2(stat) {+-} 4.0(syst) GeV/c{sup 2}. The CDF measurement of the t{bar t} cross section (assuming M{sub t} = 175 GeV/c{sup 2}) is {sigma}{sub tt} = 6.5 {+-} {sub 1.4}{sup 1.6} pb, and the D0 value (assuming M{sub t} = 172.1 GeV/c{sup 2}) is {sigma}{sub tt} = 5.9 {+-} 1.7 pb. In anticipation of much larger statistics, prospects for top physics in Tevatron Run-II are summarized. The fact that top quark analyses are among the best windows to physics beyond the Standard Model is emphasized.

  5. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  6. Experiments and Modeling of High Altitude Chemical Agent Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakafuji, G.; Greenman, R.; Theofanous, T.

    2002-07-08

    Using ASCA data, we find, contrary to other researchers using ROSAT data, that the X-ray spectra of the VY Scl stars TT Ari and KR Aur are poorly fit by an absorbed blackbody model but are well fit by an absorbed thermal plasma model. The different conclusions about the nature of the X-ray spectrum of KR Aur may be due to differences in the accretion rate, since this Star was in a high optical state during the ROSAT observation, but in an intermediate optical state during the ASCA observation. TT Ari, on the other hand, was in a high optical state during both observations, so directly contradicts the hypothesis that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their high optical states are blackbodies. Instead, based on theoretical expectations and the ASCA, Chandra, and XMM spectra of other nonmagnetic cataclysmic variables, we believe that the X-ray spectra of VY Sol stars in their low and high optical states are due to hot thermal plasma in the boundary layer between the accretion disk and the surface of the white dwarf, and appeal to the acquisition of Chandra and XMM grating spectra to test this prediction.

  7. Effect of lithium hydroxide on primary water stress corrosion cracking of Alloy 600 tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacko, R. )

    1991-09-01

    Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) studies were performed on Alloy 600 in simulated PWR high lithium primary water. Tests were conducted at 330{degree}C with Li concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM in solutions containing boric acid and dissolved hydrogen. Highly stressed, Alloy 600 reverse U-bend specimens (RUBs) were predominantly used for tests. Both mill-annealed (MA) and thermally treated (TT) Alloy 600 were tested. The large number of specimens tested allowed the use of rigorous statistical techniques to interpret the variability of PWSCC performance. Results of tests of MA 600 RUBs at 2 stress levels show no effect of chemistry on the time to initiate PWSCC cracks over the range from 0.7 to 3.5 ppM Li. However, results for TT 600 RUBs and in MA 600 RUBs at a third stress level show the tendency for a shorter time to initiate PWSCC cracks at a Li concentration of 3.5 ppM. Analysis suggests that certain Alloy 600 components may experience an increase in PWSCC by using the higher LI content primary water due to a subtle influence of chemistry on PWSCC. 5 refs. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION AND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRA ESTIMATION USING LINEAR COMBINATION OF WMAP 5 YEAR MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samal, Pramoda Kumar; Jain, Pankaj; Saha, Rajib; Prunet, Simon; Souradeep, Tarun

    2010-05-01

    We estimate cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization and temperature power spectra using Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 5 year foreground contaminated maps. The power spectrum is estimated by using a model-independent method, which does not utilize directly the diffuse foreground templates nor the detector noise model. The method essentially consists of two steps: (1) removal of diffuse foregrounds contamination by making linear combination of individual maps in harmonic space and (2) cross-correlation of foreground cleaned maps to minimize detector noise bias. For the temperature power spectrum we also estimate and subtract residual unresolved point source contamination in the cross-power spectrum using the point source model provided by the WMAP science team. Our TT, TE, and EE power spectra are in good agreement with the published results of the WMAP science team. We perform detailed numerical simulations to test for bias in our procedure. We find that the bias is small in almost all cases. A negative bias at low l in TT power spectrum has been pointed out in an earlier publication. We find that the bias-corrected quadrupole power (l(l + 1)C{sub l} /2{pi}) is 532 {mu}K{sup 2}, approximately 2.5 times the estimate (213.4 {mu}K{sup 2}) made by the WMAP team.

  9. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Anastassov, A; Amidei, D; Antos, J; Annovi, A

    2013-07-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt? events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp? collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with ?s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt? decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included in the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 2.4 (stat) 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.

  10. Top-pair forward-backward asymmetry beyond next-to-leading order

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, Valentin; Neubert, Matthias; Pecjak, Ben D.; Ferroglia, Andrea; Yang Lilin

    2011-10-01

    We make use of recent results in effective theory and higher-order perturbative calculations to improve the theoretical predictions of the QCD contribution to the top-quark pair production forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron. In particular, we supplement the fixed-order next-to-leading order calculation with higher-order corrections from soft-gluon resummation at next-to next-to-leading order accuracy performed in two different kinematic schemes, which allows us to make improved predictions for the asymmetry in the pp and tt rest frames as a function of the rapidity and invariant mass of the tt pair. Furthermore, we provide binned results which can be compared with the recent measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry in events with a large pair invariant mass or rapidity difference. Finally, we calculate at NLO+NNLL order the top-quark charge asymmetry at the LHC as a function of a lower rapidity cutoff for the top and antitop quarks.

  11. Top-quark mass measurement using events with missing transverse energy and jets at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-30

    We present a measurement of the top-quark mass with tt̄ events using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.7 fb -1 of pp̄ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with √s = 1.96 TeV and collected by the CDF II Detector. We select events having no identified charged leptons, large missing transverse energy, and four, five, or six jets with at least one jet containing a secondary vertex consistent with the decay of a b quark. This analysis considers events from the semileptonic tt̄ decay channel, including events that contain tau leptons, which are usually not included inmore » the top-quark mass measurements. The measurement uses as kinematic variables the invariant mass of two jets consistent with the mass of the W boson, and the invariant masses of two different three-jet combinations. We fit the data to signal templates of varying top-quark masses and background templates, and measure a top-quark mass of Mtop = 172.3 ± 2.4 (stat) ± 1.0 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  12. Inclusive and differential measurements of the $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ charge asymmetry in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    The tt charge asymmetry is measured in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The data, collected with the CMS experiment at the LHC, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 . Selected events contain an electron or a muon and four or more jets, where at least one jet is identified as originating from b-quark hadronization. The inclusive charge asymmetry is found to be 0.0010 0.0068 (stat) 0.0037 (syst). In addition, differential charge asymmetries as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum, and invariant mass of the tt system are studied. For the first time at the LHC, our measurements are also performed in a reduced fiducial phase space of top quark pair production, with an integrated result of -0.0035 0.0072 (stat) 0.0031 (syst). Additionally, all measurements are consistent within two standard deviations with zero asymmetry as well as with the predictions of the standard model.

  13. Spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO₃

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, J.-Q.; Zhou, J.-S.; Cheng, J. G.; Goodenough, J. B.; Ren, Y.; Llobet, A.; McQueeney, R. J.

    2011-12-02

    The spin and orbital ordering in Y1-xLaxVO₃ (0.30 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) has been studied to map out the phase diagram over the whole doping range 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. The phase diagram is compared with that for RVO₃ (R = rare earth or Y) perovskites without A-site variance. For x > 0.20, no long-range orbital ordering was observed above the magnetic ordering temperature TN; the magnetic order is accompanied by a lattice anomaly at a Tt ≤ TN as in LaVO₃. The magnetic ordering below Tt ≤ TN is G type in the compositional range 0.20 ≤ xmore » ≤ 0.40 and C type in the range 0.738 ≤ x ≤ 1.0. Magnetization and neutron powder diffraction measurements point to the coexistence below TN of the two magnetic phases in the compositional range 0.4 < x < 0.738. Samples in the compositional range 0.20 < x ≤ 1.0 are characterized by an additional suppression of a glasslike thermal conductivity in the temperature interval TN < T < T* and a change in the slope of 1/χ(T). We argue that T* represents a temperature below which spin and orbital fluctuations couple together via λL∙S.« less

  14. A study of the {sup 16}O (e, e'p) reaction at deep missing energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilanga Liyanage

    1999-02-01

    The {sup 16}O(e,e'p)#8; reaction was studied in the #6;first physics experiment performed at Jefferson lab Hall A. In the quasielastic region cross sections were measured for both quasi#11;parallel and perpendicular kinematics at q = 1000 MeV and #2;{omega} = 445#14;#14;#15; MeV. From the data acquired in quasi#11;parallel kinematics#4; longitudinal and transverse response functions#4; R{sub L} and R{sub T} were separated for E{sub miss} < 60 MeV. The perpendicular kinematics data were used to extract R{sub LT}, #4; R{sub T},#4; and R{sub L#16;} + V{sub TT}/V{sub L}R{sub TT} response functions for the same E{sub miss} range and for P{sub miss} < 310 MeV#18;c. The {sub 16}O(#7;e,#4;e'p)#8; cross section was measured in the dip region at q = 1026 MeV and #2; {omega} = 586#12;#15;#19;#2; MeV for 10 MeV <#3; E{sub miss} < 320 MeV. This thesis presents the results for the missing energy continuum (#7;E{sub miss}>25#4; #3;#15; MeV)#8; from this experiment.

  15. Long Length Contaminated Equipment Retrieval System Receiver Trailer and Transport Trailer Operations and Maintenance Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE, R.N.

    2000-05-01

    A system to accommodate the removal of long-length contaminated equipment (LLCE) from Hanford underground radioactive waste storage tanks was designed, procured, and demonstrated, via a project activity during the 1990s. The system is the Long Length Contaminated Equipment Removal System (LLCERS). LLCERS will be maintained and operated by Tank Farms Engineering and Operations organizations and other varied projects having a need for the system. The responsibility for the operation and maintenance of the LLCERS Receiver Trailer (RT) and Transport Trailer (TT) resides with the RPP Characterization Project Operations organization. The purpose of this document is to provide vendor supplied operating and maintenance (O & M) information for the RT and TT in a readily retrievable form. This information is provided this way instead of in a vendor information (VI) file to maintain configuration control of the operations baseline as described in RPP-6085, ''Configuration Management Plan for Long Length Contaminated Equipment Receiver and Transport Trailers''. Additional Operations Baseline documents are identified in RPP-6085.

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying into b b ¯ $$$ b\\overline{b} $$$ produced in association with top quarks decaying hadronically in pp collisions at s = 8 $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abraham, N. L.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, a search for Higgs boson production in association with a pair of top quarks (tt¯H) is performed, where the Higgs boson decays to bb¯ , and both top quarks decay hadronically. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb –1 of pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The search selects events with at least six energetic jets and uses a boosted decision tree algorithm to discriminate between signal and Standard Model background. The dominant multijet background is estimated using a dedicated data-driven technique.more » For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, an upper limit of 6.4 (5.4) times the Standard Model cross section is observed (expected) at 95% confidence level. The best-fit value for the signal strength is μ = 1.6 ± 2.6 times the Standard Model expectation for mH = 125 GeV. Combining all tt¯H searches carried out by ATLAS at √s = 8 and 7 TeV, an observed (expected) upper limit of 3.1 (1.4) times the Standard Model expectation is obtained at 95% confidence level, with a signal strength μ = 1.7 ± 0.8.« less

  17. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS SEPARATION OF CESIUM AND STRONTIUM FROM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd; R. Scott Herbst; David H. Meikrantz; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson

    2005-02-01

    Two new solvent extraction technologies have been recently developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel, following dissolution in nitric acid. The first process utilizes a solvent consisting of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol extractants in a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone diluent. Recent improvements to the process include development of a new, non-nitroaromatic diluent and development of new stripping reagents, including a regenerable strip reagent that can be recovered and recycled. This new strip reagent reduces product volume by a factor of 20, over the baseline process. Countercurrent flowsheet tests on simulated spent nuclear fuel feed streams have been performed with both cesium and strontium removal efficiencies of greater than 99 %. The second process developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4',4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. A solvent composition has been developed that enables both elements to be removed together and, in fact, a synergistic effect was observed with strontium distributions in the combined solvent that are much higher that in the strontium extraction (SREX) process. Initial laboratory test results of the new combined cesium and strontium extraction process indicate good extraction and stripping performance.

  18. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grégory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-β-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(μ-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that ismore » not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the δ-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.« less

  19. Simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel using the fission-product extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, J.D.; Peterman, D.R.; Riddle, C.L.; Meikrantz, D.A.; Todd, T.A.

    2008-07-01

    The Fission-Product Extraction (FPEX) Process is being developed as part of the United States Department of Energy Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) for the simultaneous separation of cesium and strontium from spent LWR fuel. Separation of the Cs and Sr will reduce the short-term heat load in a geological repository and, when combined with the separation of Am and Cm, could increase the capacity of the geological repository by a factor of approximately 100. The FPEX process is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-di-(t-butyl-dicyclohexano)- 18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and calix[4]arene-bis-(t-octyl-benzo-crown-6 ) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium, and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. Results of flowsheet testing of the FPEX process with simulated and actual spent-nuclear-fuel feed solution in centrifugal contactors are detailed. Removal efficiencies, co-extraction of metals, and process hydrodynamic performance ar e discussed along with recommendations for future flowsheet testing with actual spent nuclear fuel. Recent advances in the evaluation of alternative calixarenes with increased solubility and stability are also detailed. (authors)

  20. Electron localization in a mixed-valence diniobium benzene complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianetti, Thomas L.; Nocton, Grgory; Minasian, Stefan G.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Shuh, David K.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Bergman, Robert G.; Arnold, John

    2014-11-11

    Reaction of the neutral diniobium benzene complex {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)} (BDI = N,N'-diisopropylbenzene-?-diketiminate) with Ag[B(C6F5)4] results in a single electron oxidation to produce a cationic diniobium arene complex, {[Nb(BDI)NtBu]2(?-C6H6)}{B(C6F5)4}. Investigation of the solid state and solution phase structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction, cyclic voltammetry, magnetic susceptibility, and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy indicates that the oxidation results in an asymmetric molecule with two chemically inequivalent Nb atoms. Further characterization using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, UV-visible, Nb L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and EPR spectroscopies supports assignment of a diniobium complex, in which one Nb atom carries a single unpaired electron that is not largely delocalized on the second Nb atom. During the oxidative transformation, one electron is removed from the ?-bonding HOMO, which causes a destabilization of the molecule and formation of an asymmetric product. Subsequent reactivity studies indicate that the oxidized product allows access to metal-based chemistry with substrates that did not exhibit reactivity with the starting neutral complex.

  1. Assessment of the Electrohol process to manufacture acetaldehyde from ethanol electrogeneratively. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevino, A.A.

    1985-04-10

    Preliminary process economics data for the electrogenerative process to manufacture acetaldehyde from ethanol were generated based on patent information. The technology was assessed in four alternative processing options. The Electrohol process is viable in the US only if integrated to the production of 190 pf ethanol from corn in a large scale unit. To be competitive, the Electrohol process must show yields in excess of 93%. Its attractiveness depends on corn prices remaining under $2.90/bu and DDG selling for more than $132/T. A corn price of $2.00/bu is needed to make a farm-size corn-based processing alternative competitive. A plant based on the fermentation of molasses proved too expensive under the US economic assumptions. The Electrohol technology based on purchased ethanol cannot compete with the existing ethylene-based process under current conditions. To become attractive, the Electrohol process must have access to cheap ethanol ($1.43/gal). The zero electricity generation mode is the most attractive mode of operation for the Electrohol technology in the US. The penalty for low levels of generation (0.130 kwh/kg AcH) is, however, negligible. The optimum operating mode in W. Europe is the generation of 0.312 kwh/kg AcH. In Japan, the low generation level is perferred (0.130 kwh/kg AcH). In general, higher energy prices improve the competitiveness of the Electrohol processing alternatives.

  2. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzl, Vladimir; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2012-07-16

    A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

  3. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svard, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-03-04

    Here, previous simulation studies of Differential Die–Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetricallymore » burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs.« less

  4. Technical Cross-Cutting Issues for the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative's Spent Fuel Nondestructive Assay Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin, S. J.; Menlove, H. O.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Blanc, P.; Burr, T.; Evans, L. G.; Favalli, A.; Fensin, M. L.; Freeman, C. R.; Galloway, J.; Gerhart, J.; Rajasingam, A.; Rauch, E.; Sandoval, N. P.; Trellue, H.; Ulrich, T. J.; Conlin, J. L.; Croft, S.; Hendricks, John; Henzl, V.; Henzlova, D.; Eigenbrodt, J. M.; Koehler, W. E.; Lee, D. W.; Lee, T. H.; Lafleur, A. M.; Schear, M. A.; Humphrey, M. A.; Smith, Leon E.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Campbell, Luke W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Shaver, Mark W.; Misner, Alex C.; Amber, S. D.; Ludewigt, Bernhard A.; Quiter, B.; Solodov, Alexander; Charlton, W.; Stafford, A.; Romano, C.; Cheatham, J.; Ehinger, Michael; Thompson, S. J.; Chichester, David; Sterbentz, James; Hu, Jianwei; Hunt, A.; Mozin, Vladimir V.; Richard, J. G.

    2012-03-01

    Ever since there has been spent fuel (SF), researchers have made nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of that fuel to learn about its content. In general these measurements have focused on the simplest signatures (passive photon and total neutron emission) and the analysis has often focused on diversion detection and on determining properties such as burnup (BU) and cooling time (CT). Because of shortcomings in current analysis methods, inspectorates and policy makers are interested in improving the state-of-the-art in SF NDA. For this reason the U.S. Department of Energy, through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), targeted the determination of elemental Pu mass in SF as a technical goal. As part of this research effort, 14 nondestructive assay techniques were studied . This wide range of techniques was selected to allow flexibility for the various needs of the safeguards inspectorates and to prepare for the likely integration of one or more techniques having complementary features. In the course of researching this broad range of NDA techniques, several cross-cutting issues were. This paper will describe some common issues and insights. In particular we will describe the following: (1) the role of neutron absorbers with emphasis on how these absorbers vary in SF as a function of initial enrichment, BU and CT; (2) the need to partition the measured signal among different isotopic sources; and (3) the importance of the “first generation” concept which indicates the spatial location from which the signal originates as well as the isotopic origins.

  5. Mixed N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Bis(oxazolinyl)borato Rhodium and Iridium Complexes in Photochemical and Thermal Oxidative Addition Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Songchen; Manna, Kuntal; Ellern, Arkady; Sadow, Aaron D

    2014-12-08

    In order to facilitate oxidative addition chemistry of fac-coordinated rhodium(I) and iridium(I) compounds, carbenebis(oxazolinyl)phenylborate proligands have been synthesized and reacted with organometallic precursors. Two proligands, PhB(OxMe2)2(ImtBuH) (H[1]; OxMe2 = 4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazoline; ImtBuH = 1-tert-butylimidazole) and PhB(OxMe2)2(ImMesH) (H[2]; ImMesH = 1-mesitylimidazole), are deprotonated with potassium benzyl to generate K[1] and K[2], and these potassium compounds serve as reagents for the synthesis of a series of rhodium and iridium complexes. Cyclooctadiene and dicarbonyl compounds {PhB(OxMe2)2ImtBu}Rh(?4-C8H12) (3), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(?4-C8H12) (4), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Rh(CO)2 (5), {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(?4-C8H12) (6), and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}Ir(CO)2 (7) are synthesized along with ToMM(?4-C8H12) (M = Rh (8); M = Ir (9); ToM = tris(4,4-dimethyl-2-oxazolinyl)phenylborate). The spectroscopic and structural properties and reactivity of this series of compounds show electronic and steric effects of substituents on the imidazole (tert-butyl vs mesityl), effects of replacing an oxazoline in ToM with a carbene donor, and the influence of the donor ligand (CO vs C8H12). The reactions of K[2] and [M(?-Cl)(?2-C8H14)2]2 (M = Rh, Ir) provide {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}Rh(?-H)(?-Cl)Rh(?2-C8H14)2 (10) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(?3-C8H13) (11). In the former compound, a spontaneous oxidative addition of a mesityl ortho-methyl to give a mixed-valent dirhodium species is observed, while the iridium compound forms a monometallic allyl hydride. Photochemical reactions of dicarbonyl compounds 5 and 7 result in CH bond oxidative addition providing the compounds {?4-PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes?CH2}RhH(CO) (12) and {PhB(OxMe2)2ImMes}IrH(Ph)CO (13). In 12, oxidative addition results in cyclometalation of the mesityl ortho-methyl similar to 10, whereas the iridium compound reacts with the benzene solvent to give a rare crystallographically characterized cis-[Ir](H)(Ph) complex

  6. New High-Energy Nanofiber Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xiangwu; Fedkiw, Peter; Khan, Saad; Huang, Alex; Fan, Jiang

    2013-11-15

    The overall goal of the proposed work was to use electrospinning technology to integrate dissimilar materials (lithium alloy and carbon) into novel composite nanofiber anodes, which simultaneously had high energy density, reduced cost, and improved abuse tolerance. The nanofiber structure allowed the anodes to withstand repeated cycles of expansion and contraction. These composite nanofibers were electrospun into nonwoven fabrics with thickness of 50 μm or more, and then directly used as anodes in a lithium-ion battery. This eliminated the presence of non-active materials (e.g., conducting carbon black and polymer binder) and resulted in high energy and power densities. The nonwoven anode structure also provided a large electrode-electrolyte interface and, hence, high rate capacity and good lowtemperature performance capability. Following are detailed objectives for three proposed project periods. • During the first six months: Obtain anodes capable of initial specific capacities of 650 mAh/g and achieve ~50 full charge/discharge cycles in small laboratory scale cells (50 to 100 mAh) at the 1C rate with less than 20 percent capacity fade; • In the middle of project period: Assemble, cycle, and evaluate 18650 cells using proposed anode materials, and demonstrate practical and useful cycle life (750 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade) in 18650 cells with at least twice improvement in the specific capacity than that of conventional graphite electrodes; • At the end of project period: Deliver 18650 cells containing proposed anode materials, and achieve specific capacities greater than 1200 mAh/g and cycle life longer than 5000 cycles of ~70% state of charge swing with less than 20% capacity fade.

  7. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  8. The role of alumina on performance of alkali-activated slag paste exposed to 50 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jambunathan, N.; Sanjayan, J.G.; Pan, Z.; Li, G.; Liu, Y.; Korayem, A.H.; Duan, W.H.; Collins, F.

    2013-12-15

    The strength and microstructural evolution of two alkali-activated slags, with distinct alumina content, exposed to 50 °C have been investigated. These two slags are ground-granulated blast furnace slag (containing 13% (wt.) alumina) and phosphorous slag (containing 3% (wt.) alumina). They were hydrated in the presence of a combination of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solution at different ratios. The microstructure of the resultant slag pastes was assessed by X-ray diffraction, differential thermogravimetric analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The results obtained from these techniques reveal the presence of hexagonal hydrates: CAH{sub 10} and C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} in all alkali-activated ground-granulated blast-furnace slag pastes (AAGBS). These hydrates are not observed in pastes formed by alkali-activated ground phosphorous slag (AAGPS). Upon exposure to 50 °C, the aforementioned hydration products of AAGBS pastes convert to C{sub 3}AH{sub 6}, leading to a rapid deterioration in the strength of the paste. In contrast, no strength loss was detected in AAGPS pastes following exposure to 50 °C. -- Highlights: •Strength of alkali-activated slag (AAS) pastes after exposure to 50 °C is studied. •AAS pastes with high alumina content lose strength after the exposure. •C{sub 4}AH{sub 13} and CAH{sub 10} form in these AAS pastes. •Conversion of these calcium alumina hydrates is associated with the strength loss. •AAS pastes with low alumina content maintain its strength after the exposure.

  9. Fabrication of free-standing NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoarrays via a facile modified hydrothermal synthesis method and their applications for lithium ion batteries and high-rate alkaline batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Qingyun Zhang, Xiangyang; Shen, Youming

    2015-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal-synthesized NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays exhibit porous structure and high capacity as well as good cycling life for lithium ion batteries and alkaline batteries. - Highlights: • Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays are prepared by a hydrothermal method. • NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show high capacity and good cycling life. • Porous nanoflake arrays structure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. - Abstract: Self-supported NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays on nickel foam are prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. The obtained NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflakes with thicknesses of ∼25 nm grow vertically to the nickel foam substrate and form an interconnected porous network with pore diameters of 50–500 nm. As anode material of LIBs, the NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoflake arrays show a high initial coulombic efficiency of 76%, as well as good cycling stability with a capacity of 880 mAh g{sup −1} at 0.5 A g{sup −1}, and 523 mAh g{sup −1} at 1.5 A g{sup −1} after 50 cycles. As the cathode of alkaline batteries, a high capacity of 95 mAh g{sup −1} is achieved at 2 A g{sup −1} and 94% retention is maintained after 10,000 cycles. The superior electrochemical performance is mainly due to the unique nanoflake arrays structure with large surface area and shorter diffusion length for mass and charge transport.

  10. Net-structured Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array with enhanced electrochemical performance toward lithium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y.X.; Liu, X.Y.; Xia, X.H.; Xiong, Q.Q.; Wang, X.L.; Gu, C.D.; Tu, J.P.

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array on nickel foam was synthesized by hydrothermal method, followed by magnetron sputtering of a carbon layer. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array electrode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 1340.4 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C. After 100 cycles, the capacity retention of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C is 88.8% of its initial discharge capacity. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the porous nanosheet array and the thin carbon layer coated on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets. - Abstract: Freestanding Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array growing directly on nickel foam substrate was synthesized using a hydrothermal approach, followed by a direct current magnetron sputtering of a thin carbon layer. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets with thicknesses of 1020 nm are interconnected with each other, forming a highly open net-structure. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/C nanosheet array electrode delivers an initial discharge capacity of 1340.4 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C, and maintains a high specific capacity of 912.1 mAh g{sup ?1} at room temperature and can still remain 88.8% of its initial discharge capacity at 55 C at 1 C after 100 cycles. The enhanced electrochemical performances are attributed to the porous nanosheet array and the thin carbon layer coated on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosheets, which cannot only facilitate Li{sup +} and electron transportation in the electrode, but also improve its structure stability during cycling.

  11. NREL Engineers Look for a Cool Way to Make AC Units an Affordable Snap -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Feature | NREL Engineers Look for a Cool Way to Make AC Units an Affordable Snap June 21, 2016 Two men shown on opposite sides of a wall installing the EcoSnap-AC Heat Pump System NREL engineers Chuck Booten and Jon Winkler installing the components of the EcoSnap-AC. Photo by Dennis Schroeder Engineers Chuck Booten and Jon Winkler experienced their first "Ah-ha!" moment together about three years ago as they were testing window air conditioners for an Energy Department

  12. Electrochemistry of KC{sub 8} in lithium-containing electrolytes and its use in lithium-ion cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossici, R.; Berrettoni, M.; Rosolen, M.; Marassi, R.; Scrosati, B.

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of KC{sub 8} in a lithium-containing ethylene carbonate-dimethylcarbonate electrolyte has been studied. The results show that upon oxidation KC{sub 8} irreversibly releases potassium ions and that during the following cathodic cycle, the residual graphite intercalates lithium reversibly and with fast rate up to a LiC{sub 6} composition. The results also show that a KC{sub 8} electrode can be used in lithium-ion cells in combination with partially lithiated or even with lithium-free cathodes. The maximum capacities (referred to the anode) that may be achieved are 372 and 279 mAh/g, respectively.

  13. Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

    2010-01-01

    Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

  14. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE, . . . . . ..-..__. _ --.-.__.. .-..I............ !..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Q~~~ds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel&~ will be require& In : 'ri~ofthehereiabefor6notedeopreodo~ of puriata~tio.aadap :, Iv ve unbntend you vi11 not obj.& to:tha aoe " ai spoh +ant+lea of the mirloua real&es ,, ', ',"" ': ., .,.. i. : /~. ,".. .I,: /, . . ' .* ,; ., ,' ,:.' . .-;. ,-Y .b4 P-0 : ,.

  15. PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' PLEAEERUSH ANALYTICAL DA-~-A SHEET ' ANALYTICAL DEPT. - HEALTH AhD SAFETY DlVlSlON 1956 Industrial Hygiene or Medical Dept. 1. H.#~~Sample Nos. 3 --Date Collected~~by-CESS-.Route to CBS LocationTITANIUM Type of Sample airnalyzed for F Alpham Remarks NIAGARA pALI+S* N.Y. U Beta Bldg. 103 - furnace room - -NO, Ra Oil PH Be Th Sample No. Hour Sample Description I I I--- R ) T 1 Q I I I 7392 1100 GA Induction furnace area duri-nn ----l----- mDeriod;.02; 151 .3 while furnace was charged with UOT_-

  16. Our People - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2016 JCAP AH Group Photo.jpg Our people Who We Are Overview Achievements Our People Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Our people ©bobpaz.com0071.JPG ©bobpaz.com0071.JPG ©bobpaz.com0070.JPG ©bobpaz.com0070.JPG ©bobpaz.com0137.JPG

  17. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  18. Overview of the RFX fusion science program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 (2011) 094023 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0029-5515/51/9/094023 Overview of the RFX fusion science program P. Martin 1 , J. Adamek 2 , P. Agostinetti 1 , M. Agostini 1 , A. Alfier 1 , C. Angioni 3 , V. Antoni 1 , L. Apolloni 1 , F. Auriemma 1 , O. Barana 1 , S. Barison 4 , M. Baruzzo 1 , P. Bettini 1 , M. Boldrin 1 , T. Bolzonella 1 , D. Bonfiglio 1 , F. Bonomo 1 , A.H. Boozer 5,6 , M. Brombin 1 , J. Brotankova 2 , A. Buffa 1 , A. Canton 1 , S. Cappello 1 , L. Carraro 1 , R. Cavazzana 1 , M. Cavinato

  19. Extending cost–benefit analysis for the sustainability impact of inter-urban Intelligent Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolosz, Ben Grant-Muller, Susan

    2015-01-15

    The paper reports research involving three cost–benefit analyses performed on different ITS schemes (Active Traffic Management, Intelligent Speed Adaptation and the Automated Highway System) on one of the UK's busiest highways — the M42. The environmental scope of the assets involved is widened to take into account the possibility of new technology linked by ICT and located within multiple spatial regions. The areas focused on in the study were data centre energy emissions, the embedded emissions of the road-side infrastructure, vehicle tailpipe emissions, additional hardware required by the vehicles (if applicable) and safety, and all aspects of sustainability. Dual discounting is applied which aims to provide a separate discount rate for environmental elements. For ATM, despite the energy costs of the data centre, the initial implementation costs and mitigation costs of its embedded emissions, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved, although the scheme becomes less effective later on its lifecycle due to rising costs of energy. ISA and AHS generate a negative result, mainly due to the cost of getting the vehicle on the road. In order to negate these costs, the pricing of the vehicle should be scaled depending upon the technology that is outfitted. Retrofitting on vehicles without the technology should be paid for by the driver. ATM will offset greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over a 25 year lifespan. This reduction has taken into account the expected improvement in vehicle technology. AHS is anticipated to save 280 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 15 years of operational usage. However, this offset is largely dependent on assumptions such as the level of market penetration. - Highlights: • Three cost–benefit analyses are applied to inter-urban intelligent transport. • For ATM, a high cost–benefit ratio of 5.89 is achieved. • ATM offsets greenhouse gas emissions by 99 kt of CO{sub 2} equivalency over 25 years.

  20. The first Fe-based Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, W. H.; Huq, A.; Manthiram, A.

    2015-05-15

    We report the synthesis, structure, and electrochemistry of the first Na+-ion cathode with two distinct types of polyanions: Fe3P5SiO19. The Fe-based cathode has a reversible capacity of ca. 70 mAh g-1; ca. 1.7 Na+ ions per formula can be inserted/extracted at an average voltage of 2.5 V versus Na+/Na.

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isoprene Photochemistry over the Amazon Rainforest PI Contact: Martin, S. T., Harvard University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Liu Y, J Brito, MR Dorris, JC Rivera-Rios, R Seco, KH Bates, P Artaxo, S Duvoisin JR, FN Keutsch, S Kim, AH Goldstein, AB Guenther, AO Manzi, RA Souza, SR Springston, TB Watson, KA McKinney, and ST Martin. 2016. "Isoprene photochemistry over the Amazon rainforest." Proceedings of the National

  2. Using Intel®VTune’ Amplifier XE to Tune Software on Knights Landing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KNL is a highly-parallel architecture with large vector units. To get the most performance out of this platform, it is imperative to take advantage of these strengths. 6 7 Most screenshots in this presentation were taken from Intel® VTune(tm) Amplifier XE 2016 Update 4. This is the first public version with KNL support. Screenshots from different versions of the tool may have minor differences. 8 Results will be created in a directory named r###ah, r###ge, or r###macc Results can be viewed from

  3. Silicon-Copper Helical Arrays for New Generation Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polat, B. D.; Keles, O; Amine, K

    2015-09-22

    The helical array (with 10 atom % Cu) exhibits 3130 mAh g–1 with 83% columbic efficiency and retains 83% of its initial discharge capacity after 100th cycle. Homogeneously distributed interspaces between the helical arrays accommodate high volumetric changes upon cycling and copper atoms form a conductive network to buffer the mechanical stress generated in the electrode while minimizing electrochemical agglomeration of Si. Also, ion assistance is believed to enhance the density of the helices at the bottom thus increasing the adhesion

  4. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Feb 25 2013 Description / Specification Vehicle Configuration Series PHEV Traction Motor UQM 145 kW / single-speed gearbox APU UQM 145 kW / 5.3L gasoline engine Battery Pack Manufacturer EnerDel Model Type I EV Pack (A306) Chemistry Li-ion Cathode Mixed Oxide (Modified NMC) Anode Amorphous Hard Carbon Configuration 4 parallel strings of 96 cells Rated Capacity (Ah) 70 Nominal Voltage (V) 345 Pack mass (kg) 285 Cooling Type Passive (sealed enclosure) ESS Reference Performance Testing Results

  5. Electric Drive and Advanced Battery and Components Testbed (EDAB)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 2012 through June 6 2013 Description / Specification Vehicle Configuration Series PHEV Traction Motor UQM 145 kW / single-speed gearbox APU UQM 145 kW / 5.3L gasoline engine Battery Pack Manufacturer EnerDel Model Type I EV Pack (A306) Chemistry Li-ion Cathode Mixed Oxide (Modified NMC) Anode Amorphous Hard Carbon Configuration 4 parallel strings of 96 cells Rated Capacity (Ah) 70 Nominal Voltage (V) 345 Pack mass (kg) 285 Cooling Type Passive (sealed enclosure) ESS Reference Performance

  6. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.

  7. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2015-12-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  8. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2015-12-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  9. Scaling Relationships for Adsorption Energies of C2 Hydrocarbons on Transition Metal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G

    2011-08-18

    Using density functional theory calculations we show that the adsorption energies for C{sub 2}H{sub x}-type adsorbates on transition metal surfaces scale with each other according to a simple bond order conservation model. This observation generalizes some recently recognized adsorption energy scaling laws for AH{sub x}-type adsorbates to unsaturated hydrocarbons and establishes a coherent simplified description of saturated as well as unsaturated hydrocarbons adsorbed on transition metal surfaces. A number of potential applications are discussed. We apply the model to the dehydrogenation of ethane over pure transition metal catalysts. Comparison with the corresponding full density functional theory calculations shows excellent agreement.

  10. All-or-none suppression of B cell terminal differentiation by environmental contaminant 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qiang; Kline, Douglas E.; Bhattacharya, Sudin; Crawford, Robert B.; Conolly, Rory B.; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2013-04-01

    Many environmental contaminants can disrupt the adaptive immune response. Exposure to the ubiquitous aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and other agonists suppresses the antibody response. The underlying pathway mechanism by which TCDD alters B cell function is not well understood. The present study investigated the mechanism of AhR-mediated pathways and mode of suppression by which TCDD perturbs terminal differentiation of B cells to plasma cells and thereby impairs antibody production. An integrated approach combining computational pathway modeling and in vitro assays with primary mouse B cells activated by lipopolysaccharide was employed. We demonstrated that suppression of the IgM response by TCDD occurs in an all-or-none (binary) rather than graded mode: i.e., it reduces the number of IgM-secreting cells in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting the IgM content in individual plasma cells. The mathematical model of the gene regulatory circuit underpinning B cell differentiation revealed that two previously identified AhR-regulated pathways, inhibition of signaling protein AP-1 and activation of transcription factor Bach2, could account for the all-or-none mode of suppression. Both pathways disrupt the operation of a bistable-switch circuit that contains transcription factors Bcl6, Prdm1, Pax5, and Bach2 and regulates B cell fate. The model further predicted that by transcriptionally activating Bach2, TCDD might delay B cell differentiation and increase the likelihood of isotype switching, thereby altering the antibody repertoire. In conclusion, the present study revealed the mode and specific pathway mechanisms by which the environmental immunosuppressant TCDD suppresses B cell differentiation. - Highlights: ? TCDD suppresses B cell differentiation stimulated by LPS in an all-or-none mode. ? TCDD reduces the fraction of IgM-secreting cells, not the IgM level in those cells. ? A mathematical model

  11. Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping Post-Holiday Holiday Shopping January 10, 2012 - 4:31pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ah, January. It's still cold and it's still dark all the time, but now all the cheerful Christmas lights have come down so there's nothing to break up the monotony. What's there to do? Well, while it's a little late now, you might want to go do some post-holiday holiday shopping. Yes, I know. That sounds insane. Everyone is thoroughly

  12. NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    61- NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661 This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. AH telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office McPherson Square Bookstore 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)376-5055 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S.

  13. Microsoft Word - 1Q10Web Update, 7-15-10.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 SRR-ESH-2010-00055 Revision 1 August 13, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,571 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 134 kgals Vault 4, Cell F c)

  14. Microsoft Word - 2Q09Web1, 10-28-09.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 SRR-ESH-2009-00042 Revision 1 November 13, 2009 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 2,619 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 1,365 kgals Vault 4, Cell K c)

  15. Microsoft Word - 2Q10Web Rev 1, 10-25-10.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 SRR-ESH-2010-00093 Revision 1 November 12, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,843 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 386 kgals Vault 4, Cells F,

  16. Microsoft Word - 3Q07Web.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2007 SRS-REG-2007-00033 November 6, 2007 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 100 kilogallons (kgals) For period 3/5/07 - 9/30/07 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 226 kgals, Vault 4, Cell E Vault 4, Cell L For

  17. Microsoft Word - 4Q09Web Update, 4-15-10.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 SRR-ESH-2010-00009 Revision 1 May 14, 2010 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 3,477 kgals Vault 4 b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period Not Applicable 702 kgals Vault 4, Cell F c)

  18. 1Q08Web.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarter 2008 ESH-WPG-2008-00044 May 6, 2008 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information *This value is corrected to include the contribution of the Y-90/Ba-137m daughter products which were inadvertently omitted from the 3Q and 4Q 2007 reports. The increase in curies as a result of this correction is 3.5 kCi. Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed

  19. 1Q09Web.docm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Quarter 2009 LWO-DWP-2009-00025 May 14, 2009 Page 1 of 6 Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information Permit Condition Requirement Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date 1,805 kilogallons (kgals) b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and vault location (cell identity) for the reporting period 631 kgals, Vault 4, Cells D, K c) Cumulative process volume of saltstone

  20. TP14AppABC.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Day 3 Range and Charge Schedule Page 2 of 2 24 Segment Number % of TP4 Range Distance Required (miles) Segment Speed (mph) Initial SOC Time Start Time End Miles Driven Final SOC kWh Used Charge Number Initial Battery Temp Charge Time Start Charge Time End Energy Returned (Ah/kWh) Final Battery Temp 1 80% 60 2 60% 45 3 60% 60 4 80% 45 5 40% 60 6 30% 45 7 50% 60 8 30% 45 9 40% 60 10 60% 45 11 40% 60 12 50% 45 13 30% 60 14 30% 45 TOTALS AVG's Completed By: (Printed Name) (Signature ) (Date)