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1

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the production of low-BTU gas from a coal gasification reactor for combustion before introduction to the topping cycle gas turbine (Minchener, 1990). Most low-BTU gases are heavily loaded with sulfur-containing compounds which appear to be a major problem... with direct combustion of coal and low-BTU gases (Caraway, 1995). Environmental standards require the removal of these compounds which can be expensive and hazardous when removed from coal in post-combustion processes. However, gasification of coal results...

Carney, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convert utility bills to BTUs? All fuels can be measured in terms of BTU content. Natural gas has a million BTUs per thousand cubic feet; propane - 92,000 BTUs per gallon; fuel oil - 140,000 BTUs per gallon; electricity - 3,413 BTUs per KW hour... BTU ACCOUNTING FOR INDUSTRY Robert O. Redd-CPA Seidman & Seidman Grand Rapids, Michigan Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most criti cal resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

5

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

6

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

7

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

8

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

9

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

10

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

Vallery, S. J.

11

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

12

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

13

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

14

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

15

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

17

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2011, United States Year Primary Energy Electric Power Sector h,j Retail Electricity Total Energy g,h,i Coal Coal Coke Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i,j Coking Coal Steam Coal Total Exports Imports Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste f,g Prices in Dollars per Million Btu 1970 0.45 0.36 0.38 1.27 0.93 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1975 1.65 0.90 1.03 2.37 3.47 1.18 2.60 2.05 2.96 4.65 1.93 2.94 3.35 0.24 1.50 2.19 0.97 8.61 3.33 1980 2.10 1.38 1.46 2.54 3.19 2.86 6.70 6.36 5.64 9.84 3.88 7.04 7.40 0.43 2.26 4.57 1.77 13.95 6.89 1985 2.03 1.67 1.69 2.76 2.99 4.61 7.22 5.91 6.63 9.01 4.30 R 7.62 R 7.64 0.71 2.47 4.93 1.91 19.05

18

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method for producing low and medium BTU gas from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing low and medium BTU gas from carbonizable material is described which comprises: partly devolatizing the material and forming hot incandescent coke therefrom by passing a bed of the same part way through a hot furnace chamber on a first horizontally moving grate while supplying a sub-stoichiometric quantity of air to the same and driving the reactions: C + O/sub 2/ = CO/sub 2/; 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO discharging the hot incandescent coke from the end of the first grate run onto a second horizontally moving grate run below the first grate run in the same furnace chamber so as to form a bed thereon, the bed formed on the second grate run being considerably thicker than the bed formed on the first grate run, passing the hot incandescent coke bed on the second grate run further through the furnace chamber in a substantially horizontal direction while feeding air and stream thereto so as to fully burn the coke and in ratio of steam to air driving the following reactions: 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO; C + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO; C + 2H/sub 2/O = 2H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/; CO + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ taking off the ash residue of the burned coke and taking off the gaseous products of the reactions.

Mansfield, V.; Francoeur, C.M.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Toxicological characterization of the process stream from an experimental low Btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples were obtained from selected positions in the process stream of an experimental low Btu gasifier using a five-stage multicyclone train and...Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay) and forin vit...

J. M. Benson; J. O. Hill; C. E. Mitchell…

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Mutagenicity of potential effluents from an experimental low btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential waste effluents produced by an experimental low Btu coal gasifier were assessed for mutagenic activity inSalmonella...strain TA98. Cyclone dust, tar and water effluents were mutagenic, but only followin...

J. M. Benson; C. E. Mitchell; R. E. Royer…

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

23

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

24

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

25

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

26

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

27

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

28

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

29

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

30

The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... ? Flammability limit data for three actual samples of low-BTU gas obtained from an in-situ coal gasification experiment (Heffington, 1981). The HHC are higher LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd) PAGE hydrocarbons orimarily C H and C H . ----- 34 I 2 6 3 8' TABLE 5...

Gaines, William Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

An analysis of the effect of the Multilateral Trade Negotiations (MTN) on United States agriculture with primary emphasis on the southern states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF THE MULTILATERAL TRADE NEGOTIATIONS (MTN) ON UNITED STATES AGRICULTURE WITH PRIMARY EMPHASIS ON THE SOUTHERN STATES A Thesis by YANIRA BANOS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... STATES A Thesis by YANIRA BANOS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) / (Memb er) (Member) i ( / (Head of Department) May 1981 ABSTRACT An Analysis of the Effect of the Multilateral Trade Negotiations (MTN) On United...

Banos, Yanira

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Much Energy Does Each State Produce? How Much Energy Does Each State Produce? Energy Production in Trillion Btu: 2012 Click on each state to learn more about how much energy it...

33

Rights for the voiceless : the state, civil society and primary education in rural India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When and how do public institutions work effectively on behalf of marginalized citizens? The Indian government has enacted a number of policies for universal primary education, and yet the extent and quality of implementation ...

Mangla, Akshay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Energy Resources Available to the United States, 1985 to 2000  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a point, we can substitute mon-ey in the...4 a ton, and natural gas at /$0.16 a...world petroleum and gas produc-tion has...Btu's); and Syngas he United States...Btu's. Alaskan natural gas will cost $4 to...

Earl T. Hayes

1979-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

35

State-of-the-art of furnace recuperation in the primary metals industry: technical briefing report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing and emerging recuperator technology is identified, as well as the technical and economic issues in applying such technology. An overview of recuperation and its relevance to the primary metals industry is presented. Design considerations, equipment, and energy and cost savings of five recuperator applications in the primary metals industry are examined. Three applications include a case history of a recent recuperator installation. A cost engineering analysis of recuperator technology is included to ensure that technically feasible engineering projects are also economically attractive business ventures. An overview of emerging recuperation technology is presented.

Moore, N.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Table A33. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Employment" " Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991 (Continued)" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,"Employment Size" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," ",,500,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "

37

HQ State HQ City Primary Awardee Brief Project Description Project Locations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Primary Awardee Primary Awardee Brief Project Description Project Locations Recovery Act Funding* Participant Share Total Project Value Including Cost Share Los Angeles Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Implement a smart grid demonstration at university campus properties and technology transfer laboratories to establish a fully-integrated Smart Grid system and suite of technologies as applied to demand response, conduct a comprehensive portfolio of behavioral studies, demonstrate next- generation cyber security technologies, and demonstrate the integration of substantial number of PHEVs into Smart Grid. Los Angeles, CA $60,280,000 $60,280,000 $120,560,000 Rosemead Southern California Edison Company Demonstrate an integrated, scalable model of a Smart Grid System from transmission through

38

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification-assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burns and Roe Industrial Services Corporation and Public Service Electric and Gas in association with Scientific Design Company have completed a technical and economic evaluation of coal gasification. The evaluation also addressed the regulatory, institutional, and environmental issues of coal gasification. Two uses of coal-derived medium Btu (MBU) gas were explored: (1) substitute boiler fuel for electric generation and (2) substitute fuel for industrial customers using natural gas. The summary and conclusions of his evaluation are: The Sewaren Generating Station was selected as potentially the most suitable site for the coal gasification plant. The Texaco process was selected because it offered the best combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience; in addition, it is a pressurized process which is advantageous if gas is to be supplied to industrial customers via a pipeline. Several large industrial gas customers within the vicinities of Sewaren and Hudson Generating Stations indicated that MBG would be considered as an alternate fuel provided that its use was economically justified. The capital cost estimates for a 2000 tons/day and a 1000 tons/day gasification plant installed at Sewaren Generating Station are $115.6 million and $73.8 million, in 1980 dollars, respectively. The cost of supplying MBG to industrial customers is competitive with existing pipeline natural gas on a Btu heating value basis for gasifier capacity factors of 35% or higher.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An analysis of energy use in two Texas state agencies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, electricity and natural gas prices for monthly equations; and electricity and natural gas prices, facility age, building density, and whether or not the facility has boilers, heat pumps, electrical heating, electrical chillers, or evaporative coolers...: Regression results from analysis of monthly electricity use (Btu/sq ft/month) for Texas state schools, hospitals, and centers 46 Table V-2: Regression results from analysis of monthly natural gas use (Btu/sq ft/month) for Texas state schools, hospitals...

Rothbauer, Kent Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

Table A14. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," "," (million dollars)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table A30. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" 0. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Value of" "Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," ","(million dollars)" ,,,"-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",500,"Row"," "," "," ",," "," "," "," " "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Under 20","20-49","50-99","100-249","250-499","and Over","Factors"," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," "

42

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

43

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

44

Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

d = standard deviation INTRODUCTION The United States' vast lignite reserves' energy po- tential, while not commanding the public interest as much as the more "exotic" forms of energy conversion (solar, geothermal, wave energy, etc. ), has been... viewed with in- creasing interest by the technical community. Although a tremendous amount of energy is totalled in this country' s lignite coal reserves (Texas deposits alone are estimated at 100 billion tons [1] ), the energy is low-grade; i. e...

Blacksmith, James Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Classes of compounds responsible for mutagenic and cytotoxic activity in tars and oils formed during low BTU gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI), in cooperation with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), has completed toxicity screening of vapors, liquids and solids formed during operation of an experimental pressurized, stirred-bed, coal gasifier at METC. Vapors collected from the cooled process stream on Tenax resins had no mutagenic activity in the Ames Salmonella assay. Dichloromethane extracts of liquids and solids collected from the effluent or process streams were fractionated by gel chromatography into fractions containing mostly aliphatic compounds; neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH); polar (PAH) and heterocyclic compounds; and salts. The polar fraction was partitioned into acids, bases, water soluble compounds and phenols. Bacterial mutagenic activity was highest in the basic fraction with additional activity in the neutral PAHs. Highest cytotoxicity toward both the bacteria and canine alveolar macrophages was in the phenolic fraction. Treatment of the gasifier tars by nitrosation or by acetylation to remove primary aromatic amines (PAA) reduced the bacterial mutagenicity by 50-60%, indicating that some, but not all, of the mutagenicity was due to PAA.

Henderson, R.F.; Bechtold, W.F.; Benson, J.M.; Newton, G.J.; Hanson, R.L.; Brooks, A.L.; Dutcher, J.S.; Royer, R.E.; Hobbs, C.H.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

primary substation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This one-of-a-kind reference is unmatched in the breadth and scope of its coverage and serves as the primary reference for students and professionals in computer science and communications. The Dictionary feat...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

48

Table A17. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Employment Size Categories, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,," "," Employment Size(b)" ,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",1000,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Under 50","50-99","100-249","250-499","500-999","and Over","Factors" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.6,1.5,1.5,1,0.9,0.9,0.9 , 20,"Food and Kindred Products",1193,119,207,265,285,195,122,6

49

Table E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

E6. Transportation Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2012 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation...

50

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

State Primary Standard of the Unit of Energy Flux of an Electromagnetic Field in the Range 0.3–78 GHz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the results of studies of the new measurement standards GÉT 160-00. The primary standard ... to reproduce and transfer the size of the unit of electromagnetic energy flux in the frequency range 0.3–...

S. A. Kolotygin; V. A. Tishchenko; L. N. Bryanskii

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 Biodiesel Producers and Production Capacity by State, September 2013 State Number of Producers Annual Production Capacity (million gallons per year) Alabama 3 47 Alaska - - Arizona 1 2 Arkansas 3 85 California

53

State Energy Price System: 1982 update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price System (STEPS) contains estimates of energy prices for ten major fuels (electricity, natural gas, metallurgical coal, steam coal, distillate, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene/jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas), by major end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility), and by state through 1982. Both physical unit prices and prices per million Btu are included in STEPS. Major changes in STEPS data base for 1981 and 1982 are described. The most significant changes in procedures for the updates occur in the residential sector distillate series and the residential sector kerosene series. All physical unit and Btu prices are shown with three significant digits instead of with four significant digits as shown in the original documentation. Details of these and other changes are contained in this report, along with the updated data files. 31 references, 65 tables.

Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Energy availabilities for state and local development: 1975 data volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The supply, demand, and net imports of seven fuel types of four final consuming sectors for Bureau of Economic Analysis Areas (BEAs), states, census regions, and the nation in 1975 are presented. The data are formatted to present regional energy availability from primary extraction as well as from regional transformation processes. Extensive tables depict energy balances between availability and use for each specific fuel. In keeping with the Metric Conversion Act of 1975, this volume is reported in joules rather than in Btu's. The objective of this series is to provide a consistent base of historic and projected energy information within a standard format. Such a framework should aid regional policymakers in their consideration of regional-growth issues that may be influenced by the regional energy system. For analysis of specific regions, however, this basic data should be supplemented by additional information which only the local policy analyst can bring to bear in his assessment of the energy conditions that characterize his region.

Mills, J.B.; Rice, P.L.; Vogt, D.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Current and future industrial energy service characterizations. Volume III. Energy data on 15 selected states' manufacturing subsector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An examination is made of the current and future energy demands, and uses, and cost to characterize typical applications and resulting services in the US and industrial sectors of 15 selected states. Volume III presents tables containing data on selected states' manufacturing subsector energy consumption, functional uses, and cost in 1974 and 1976. Alabama, California, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Michigan, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, West Virginia, and Wisconsin were chosen as having the greatest potential for replacing conventional fuel with solar energy. Basic data on the quantities, cost, and types of fuel and electric energy purchased by industr for heat and power were obtained from the 1974 and 1976 Annual Survey of Manufacturers. The specific indutrial energy servic cracteristics developed for each selected state include. 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electricity consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuel consumption by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (quantity and relative share); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector average cost of purchsed fuels and electricity per million Btu by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); 1974 and 1976 manufacturing subsector fuels and electric energy intensity by 2-, 3-, and 4-digit SIC and primary fuel (in 1976 dollars); manufacturing subsector average annual growth rates of (1) fuels and electricity consumption, (2) fuels and electric energy intensity, and (3) average cost of purchased fuels and electricity (1974 to 1976). Data are compiled on purchased fuels, distillate fuel oil, residual ful oil, coal, coal, and breeze, and natural gas. (MCW)

Krawiec, F.; Thomas, T.; Jackson, F.; Limaye, D.R.; Isser, S.; Karnofsky, K.; Davis, T.D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

State Volume  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss Located Within the State Located Outside of the State Total Processed Volume (million cubic feet Estimated Heat Content (billion Btu) Alabama...................... 111,656 2,614 114,270 4,476 5,810 18,610 Alaska ......................... 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 148,444 Arkansas..................... 214,868 161 215,029 237 474 977 California..................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 41,037 Colorado ..................... 493,748 1,249 494,997 16,891 23,420 63,411 Florida......................... 5,900 0 5,900 1,130 1,143 4,202 Illinois.......................... 578 0 578 63 64 271 Kansas........................ 825,825 2,731 828,556 30,617 41,115 120,221 Kentucky .....................

57

USA Energy Demand and World Markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the AEO95 model reference case scenario, the United States is projected to consume 104 quadrillion Btu of primary energy resources in 2010, 19 percent more than in 1993. Primary energy consumption includes ...

Charles E. Brown Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

59

Energy by State | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy by State Energy by State Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy by State Agency/Company /Organization: Google Sector: Energy Focus Area: Economic Development Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=djha77o4u941j_ Country: United States Web Application Link: www.google.com/publicdata/explore?ds=djha77o4u941j_ Cost: Free Northern America Energy by State Screenshot References: Public Data Explorer[1] EIA[2] Logo: Energy by State Graph energy data by state using Google's Public Data Explorer. Overview A graphing tool that displays energy data by state, using data from the United States Energy Information Administration. Exploration Categories Energy consumption (Btu) Energy expenditures (current US$)

60

Used oil disposal and recycling in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used oil represents an important energy resource, which, if properly managed and reused, could lessen US dependence on imported fuels. About 1.4 million gallons of used oil is generated annually in the United States. Of that total, about 70% is recycled: 57% is used as fuel and 12% is refined. In August 1992, the US Environmental Protection Agency adopted standards for recycling of used oil, and many states also regulate used oil (six states list used oil as hazardous waste). This report reviews the sources of used oil and methods of disposition, focusing on reprocessing and re-refining. About 83% of the recycled used oil is reprocessed for use as fuel. However, concern about the level of lead in such fuel is increasing. Re-refining used oil is an environmentally friendly process that yields higher energy savings than reprocessing; however, it is more capital-intensive. Reprocessing used oil for use as fuel yields an energy savings (over disposal) of 131,130 Btu/gal, while re-refining the oil for reuse as lube oil saves 180,000 Btu/gal, an advantage of 48,870 Btu/gal. However, further research is needed to enhance re- refining and to demonstrate the quality and competitiveness of its products.

Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Role of Emerging Technologies in Improving Energy Efficiency: Examples from the Food Processing Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

z = specific primary energy consumption of RF dryer (Btu/and specific primary energy consumption (240 Btu/lb. ) of RFenergy consumption of base technologies in 2020 (primary)

Lung, Robert Bruce; Masanet, Eric; McKane, Aimee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

World Primary Energy Overview  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Overview of Energy Production and Consumption Energy can be defined as primary energy or secondary energy depending on the intensity of use and type of fuel source. Primary energy includes forms obtained from fou...

Charles E. Brown Ph.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Primary Patient Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Primary patient data are those obtained from the original data source – all documentation in the patient' ... hospital reports, daily ward census etc. Primary data are usually detailed, poorly structu...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The computers are operated by 4 adult men. 2 The computers consume 40 percent to the amount of electrical energy they consume. Therefore, AC Outside Computer room 4000 Btu/h ( ( ) ( Q Q Q Q. Analysis The unit that will cost less during its lifetime is a better buy. The total cost of a system

Bahrami, Majid

65

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

66

METC ceramic corrosion/erosion studies: turbine-material screening tests in high-temperature, low-Btu, coal-derived-gas combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center, through its Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies, has participated in the United States Department of Energy's High-Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Ceramic Technology Readiness. The program's overall objective is to advance the turbine firing temperature to a range of 2600/sup 0/ to 3000/sup 0/F (1700 to 1922K) with a reasonable service life using coal or coal-derived fuel. The Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Studies' major objective was to conduct a screening test for several ceramic materials to assess their probability of survival in turbine applications. The materials were exposed to combustion products from low heating value coal-derived gas and air at several high temperatures and velocities. The combustion product composition and temperatures simulated actual environment that may be found in stationary power generating gas turbines except for the pressure levels. The results of approximately 1000 hours of accumulative exposure time of material at the specific test conditions are presented in this report.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Waltermire, D.M.; Hawkins, L.W.; Jarrett, T.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2a. First Use for All Purposes (Primary a  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2a. Consumption of Energy (Primary 1 Energy) for All Purposes (First Use) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,579 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 157 164 313 Textile Mills 459 377 304 314 Textile Product Mills 86 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 652 520 625 322 Paper 3,224 2,805 2,825 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 7,571 7,051 7,125 325 Chemicals 7,211 7,499 6,135 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 692 710 684 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,245 1,338 1,394

68

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

69

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

70

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind. Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net...

73

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Btu, EC is the electricity consumption of EVs in Kwh perreductions EV in electricity consumption contributedsensitive to EV electricity consumption, which,in turn,is

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The effects of a broad based energy tax on the United States economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effects of a broad based energy tax on the United States economy in general and the agricultural sectors in particular. The analytical approach used in the analysis consists of a general equilibrium model composed of fourteen producing sectors, fourteen consuming sectors, six household categories classified by income and a government. The effects of imposing a tax on natural gas, coal, and nuclear power of 25.7 cents per million Btu's and a tax on refined petroleum products of 59.9 cents per million Btu's on prices and quantities are examined. The results are revealing. For example, a Btu tax on energy imposed at the point of production will result in lower output by the producing sectors (by about $122.4 billion US), a decrease in the consumption of goods and services (by about $64.6 billion), and a reduction in welfare (by about $66.6 billion). The government would realize an increase in revenue of about $50.5 billion. In the case of the Btu tax being imposed at the point of consumption, there will be lower output by the producing sectors (by about $83.7 billion), a reduction in the consumption of goods and services (by about $48.3 billion), and a reduction in welfare (by about $49.5 billion). The government would realize an increase in revenue of $41.5 billion. The agricultural sectors would be measurably impacted. For example, if the Btu tax is imposed at the point of production, output in the program crops sector will fall (by $637 million), output in the livestock sector will decline (by $257 million), output in the all other agriculture commodities sector will be reduced (by $54 million), and output in the forestry sector will rise (by $144 million). If the Btu tax is imposed at the point of consumption, output in the program crops sector will fall (by $720 million), output in the livestock sector will decline (by $453 million), output in the all other agriculture commodities sector will be reduced (by $371 million), and output in the forestry sector will rise (by $25 million). Finally, when subjected to a sensitivity analysis, the results are reasonably robust with regard to the assumption of the values of the substitution elasticities.

Noel D. Uri; Roy Boyd

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Category:PrimarySchool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PrimarySchool PrimarySchool Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Building Type Media in category "PrimarySchool" The following 77 files are in this category, out of 77 total. SVPrimarySchool Bismarck ND Montana-Dakota Utilities Co (North Dakota).png SVPrimarySchool Bismar... 70 KB SVPrimarySchool Cedar City UT Moon Lake Electric Assn Inc (Utah).png SVPrimarySchool Cedar ... 60 KB SVPrimarySchool International Falls MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png SVPrimarySchool Intern... 86 KB SVPrimarySchool LA CA City of Los Angeles California (Utility Company).png SVPrimarySchool LA CA ... 86 KB SVPrimarySchool Memphis TN City of Memphis Tennessee (Utility Company).png SVPrimarySchool Memphi... 65 KB SVPrimarySchool Minneapolis MN Northern States Power Co (Minnesota) Excel Energy.png

76

Primary Pediatric Pulmonology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...textbooks on lung disease in children. Primary Pediatric Pulmonology is more a handbook of pediatric lung disease and focuses on evaluation and treatment of common disorders. Thus, the book is unique in concept, but does it achieve its goal? The 14 chapters are by experts in the field. The first chapter... There are at least four large, comprehensive textbooks on lung disease in children. Primary Pediatric Pulmonology is more a handbook of pediatric lung disease and focuses on evaluation and treatment of common disorders. Thus, the book is unique in concept,...

Chernick V.

2001-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

77

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

78

Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulation of turbulent jet primary breakup in Diesel engines Peng Zeng1 Marcus Herrmann and Aerospace Engineering Arizona State University "Micro-Macro Modelling and Simulation of Liquid-Vapour Flows" IRMA Strasbourg, 23.Jan.2008 #12;Introduction DNS of Primary Breakup in Diesel Injection Phase

Helluy, Philippe

79

The cost of a primary care-based childhood obesity prevention intervention  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

United States pediatric guidelines recommend that childhood obesity counseling be conducted in the primary care setting. Primary care-based interventions can be effective in improving health behaviors, but als...

Davene R Wright; Elsie M Taveras; Matthew W Gillman…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Primary Bilingual logo 02 Primary Unilingual Logo 02  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brand Visual identity guidelines #12;logos Primary Bilingual logo 02 Primary Unilingual Logo 02 Logo 08 Athletics 09 Contents brand Colours Primary + Secondary Brand Colour 10 typography 13 of pattern, gradient or image. Never treat the logo with a drop shadow. Either logo may be used on a white

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 6. Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" Energy intensity by state (2000 - 2010)" "thousand Btu per dollar of GDP" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",18.27258197,17.12573602,17.40982338,17.21199023,16.87274619,16.36600572,16.26201029,16.16667416,15.88996309,15.31511861,15.97051076,-0.1259849985,-2.302071213 "Alaska",21.74118991,20.61708506,19.78031734,20.18143227,20.28953911,21.09573287,18.72961653,17.79373817,15.85124571,14.13669694,14.24461661,-0.3448097058,-7.496573297 "Arizona",8.723022426,8.474435286,8.399371812,7.993493579,8.274516227,7.602521438,7.232690272,7.328159916,7.62679414,7.507000095,7.628169778,-0.1255129924,-1.094852647

82

XI. Index of Primary Contacts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

XI Index of Primary Contacts XI Index of Primary Contacts A Aaron, Tim . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Aceves, Salvador M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .186 Adams, Stephen. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .713 Adzic, Radoslav. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .384 Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .511 Ahmed, S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .451 Ahn, Channing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .262, 267 Alam, Mohammad S.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .509 Andersen, Cindi. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .811 Anton, Donald L.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .230, 243 Arduengo III, Anthony J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .274

83

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

84

Gene expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and expression analysis of human primary prostate epithelial and fibroblast cell cultures to an acute dose of 10cGy J. Tyson McDonald Steward St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center Abstract Primary tissue represents a better model for studies than immortalized cell lines that are adapted to culture conditions and may no longer reflect a realistic biological state. In this study, normal tissues from clinically indicated robotic-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were grossly identified, sectioned into frozen or formalin fixed samples, and processed as primary cultures. Normal epithelial and fibroblast primary cell cultures were derived from regions of normal tissue, as confirmed by analysis on adjacent tissue by hematoxylin and eosin staining, were exposed to acute

85

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Research and EPA 600/R-941209 Environmental Protection Development January 1993 Agency Washington, DC 20460 Offsite Environmental 57,,7 Monitoring Report Radiation Monitoring Around United States Nuclear Test Areas, Calendar Year 1992 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY OFFICE OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING SYSTEMS LABORATORY-LAS VEGAS P.O. BOX 93478 LAS VEGAS. NEVADA 891 93-3478 702/798-2100 Dear Reader: Since 1954, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its predecessor the U.S, Public Health Service (PHs) has conducted radiological monitoring in the offsite areas around United States nuclear test areas. The primary objective of this monitoring has been the protection of the health and safety of

86

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

87

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

88

Primary Health Faculty of Medicine,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Primary Health Care Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences Central Clinical Hospital Centre for Inflammatory Diseases School of Public Health & Preventive Medicine Australasian Disability Health Victoria School of Psychology and Psychiatry Centre for Rural Mental Health (in abeyance

Albrecht, David

89

Electricity in the United States - Energy Explained, Your Guide To  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Secondary Sources > Electricity > Electricity in the U.S. Energy Explained - Home What Is Energy? Forms of Energy Sources of Energy Laws of Energy Units and Calculators Energy Conversion Calculators British Thermal Units (Btu) Degree-Days U.S. Energy Facts State and U.S. Territory Data Use of Energy In Industry For Transportation In Homes In Commercial Buildings Efficiency and Conservation Energy and the Environment Greenhouse Gases Effect on the Climate Where Emissions Come From Outlook for Future Emissions Recycling and Energy Nonrenewable Sources Oil and Petroleum Products Refining Crude Oil Where Our Oil Comes From Imports and Exports Offshore Oil and Gas Use of Oil Prices and Outlook Oil and the Environment Gasoline Where Our Gasoline Comes From Use of Gasoline

90

Microsoft Word - NGAMaster_State_TablesNov12.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 165 3 165 Appendix B Metric and Thermal Conversion Tables Metric Conversions Table B1 presents Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States for 1999 through 2003 in metric units of measure. Volumes are shown in cubic meters instead of cubic feet. Prices are shown in dollars per thousand cubic meters instead of dollars per thousand cubic feet. The data in this table have been converted from the data that appear in Table 1 of this report. Thermal Conversions Table B2 presents the thermal (Btu) conversion factors and the converted data for natural gas supply and disposition from 1999 through 2003. A brief documentation for the thermal conversion factors follows: * Marketed Production. The conversion factor is calculated by adding the total heat content of dry

91

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1983-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Ion source with improved primary arc collimation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved negative ion source is provided in which a self-biasing, molybdenum collimator is used to define the primary electron stream arc discharge from a filament operated at a negative potential. The collimator is located between the anode and the filament. It is electrically connected to the anode by means of an appropriate size resistor such that the collimator is biased at essentially the filament voltage during operation. Initially, the full arc voltage appears across the filament to collimator until the arc discharge strikes. Then the collimator biases itself to essentially filament potential due to current flow through the resistor thus defining the primary electron stream without intercepting any appreciable arc power. The collimator aperture is slightly smaller than the anode aperture to shield the anode from the arc power, thereby preventing the exposure of the anode to the full arc power which, in the past, has caused overheating and erosion of the anode collimator during extended time pulsed-beam operation of the source. With the self-biasing collimator of this invention, the ion source may be operated from short pulse periods to steady-state without destroying the anode.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH Open Access Analysis of primary risk factors for oral cancer from select US states , Michelle Chino3 , Karl Kingsley1* Abstract Objectives: To examine the primary risk factor for oral cancer in oral cancer incidence and mortality. Methods: Population-based data on oral cancer morbidity

Ahmad, Sajjad

94

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2

95

Provides current and historical information on primary and secondary hardwood products,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Provides current and historical information on primary and secondary hardwood products, production, prices, international trade, and employment. Introduction Data contained in price data for specific subregions of the domestic hardwood market are encouraged to contact state

96

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Entergy Rhode Island State Energy LP","Natural Gas","Entergy RISE",528 2,"Manchester...

97

State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mechanistic Selection and Growth of Twinned Bicrystalline Primary Si in Near Eutectic Al-Si Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Morphological evolution and selection of angular primary silicon is investigated in near-eutectic Al-Si alloys. Angular silicon arrays are grown directionally in a Bridgman furnace at velocities in the regime of 10{sup -3} m/sec and with a temperature gradient of 7.5 x 10{sup 3} K/m. Under these conditions, the primary Si phase grows as an array of twinned bicrystalline dendrites, where the twinning gives rise to a characteristic 8-pointed star-shaped primary morphology. While this primary Si remains largely faceted at the growth front, a complex structure of coherent symmetric twin boundaries enables various adjustment mechanisms which operate to optimize the characteristic spacings within the primary array. In the work presented here, this primary silicon growth morphology is examined in detail. In particular, this thesis describes the investigation of: (1) morphological selection of the twinned bicrystalline primary starshape morphology; (2) primary array behavior, including the lateral propagation of the starshape grains and the associated evolution of a strong <100> texture; (3) the detailed structure of the 8-pointed star-shaped primary morphology, including the twin boundary configuration within the central core; (4) the mechanisms of lateral propagation and spacing adjustment during array evolution; and (5) the thermosolutal conditions (i.e. operating state) at the primary growth front, including composition and phase fraction in the vicinity of the primary tip.

Choonho Jung

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

99

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

100

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $7.51 $4.74 $3.37 -33.0 -28.8 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $21.73 $20.23 $13.30 -21.8 -34.3 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

102

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

103

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

104

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $3.97 $3.97 $4.52 6.7 13.7 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $10.21 $11.53 $11.95 8.2 3.7 Colorado Indiana $5.79 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $11.99 $12.87 W 7.3

105

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $8.16 $5.20 $3.75 -32.2 -27.9 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $23.60 $22.20 $14.77 -20.9 -33.5 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

106

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

107

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

108

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

109

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

110

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

111

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

112

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

113

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

114

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

115

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

116

Fumigation of a diesel engine with low Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 0.5 liter single-cylinder, indirect-injection diesel engine has been fumigated with producer gas. Measurements of power, efficiency, cylinder pressure, and emissions were made. At each operating condition, engine load was held constant, and the gas-to-diesel fuel ratio was increased until abnormal combustion was encountered. This determined the maximum fraction of the input energy supplied by the gas, E/sub MAX/, which was found to be dependent upon injection timing and load. At light loads, E/sub MAX/ was limited by severe efficiency loss and missfire, while at heavy loads it was limited by knock or preignition. Fumigation generally increased ignition delay and heat release rates, but peak pressures were not strongly influenced. Efficiency was slightly decreased by fumigation as were NO/sub X/ and particle emissions while CO emissions were increased.

Ahmadi, M.; Kittelson, D.B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,025 1,025 1,023 2010's 1,028 1,025 1,026 1,024...

119

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,033 1,023 1,024 2010's 1,015 1,021 1,022 1,016...

120

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,010 1,010 1,007 2010's 1,006 1,009 1,014 1,029...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,024 1,023 1,022 2010's 1,021 1,017 1,015 1,022...

122

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,024 1,024 1,025 1,027 1,026 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,025 2014 1,027 1,022 1,028 1,026 1,029 1,032 1,033...

123

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,050 1,049 1,047 1,048 1,048 1,046 1,041 1,044 1,043 1,045 1,044 2014 1,044 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,038 1,036 1,038...

124

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005...

125

Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043...

126

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025...

127

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,037 1,040 1,041 2010's 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,037...

128

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,034 1,033 1,033 1,035 1,035 1,038 1,037 1,044 1,045 1,044 1,043 1,044 2014 1,044 1,042 1,041 1,050 1,047 1,048 1,053...

129

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,064 1,062 1,046 2010's 1,044 1,047 1,032 1,028...

130

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,032 1,039 1,031 2010's 1,033 1,024 1,029 1,034...

131

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001 1,002 1,003 1,003 1,002 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,000 2014 1,002 1,004 1,001 1,002 1,001 1,001 1,001...

132

Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031...

133

Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,018...

134

Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,006 1,006 1,005 2010's 1,005 1,013 1,012...

135

Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,039 1,037 1,034 1,031 1,032 1,031 1,033 1,039 1,032 1,029 1,034 2014 1,033 1,033 1,032 1,034 1,032 1,033 1,033...

136

Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,010 1,012 1,011 1,017 1,020 1,020 1,023 1,021 1,014 1,013 1,013 2014 1,013 1,012 1,010 1,034 1,041 1,044 1,029...

137

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,052 1,059 1,044 2010's 1,045 1,038 1,043 1,046...

138

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

139

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

140

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Primary Energy Ventures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary Energy Ventures Primary Energy Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name Primary Energy Ventures Place Oak Brook, Illinois Zip 60523 Product Primary Energy Ventures is a privately held developer, owner and operator of on-site combined heat and power and recycled energy projects. References Primary Energy Ventures[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Primary Energy Ventures is a company located in Oak Brook, Illinois . References ↑ "Primary Energy Ventures" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Primary_Energy_Ventures&oldid=349951" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

142

The immunobiology of primary sclerosing cholangitis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biliary secretion of bile acids and lipids has previously1995) Biliary secretion of bile acids and lipids in primary

Aron, Jonathan H.; Bowlus, Christopher L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption, which was 101.7 quadrillion Btu in 2007, grows by 21 percent in the AEO2011 Reference case, from 94.8 quadrillion Btu in 2009 to 114.3 quadrillion Btu in 2035, to about the same level as in the AEO2010 projection in 2035. The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 84 percent of total U.S. energy demand in 2009 to 78 percent in 2035, reflecting the impacts of CAFE standards and provisions in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 (EIEA2008), Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA2007), and State legislation. Although the situation is uncertain, EIA's present view of the projected rates of technology development and market penetration of cellulosic

144

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $13.29 $12.39 $13.93 2.4 12.5 Alabama Georgia $17.62 $17.84 $20.09 6.8 12.6 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $31.79 $27.66 $24.93 -11.5 -9.9 Colorado Arizona $25.97 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $34.20 $46.22 - 35.1 Colorado Colorado $13.04 $7.72 $8.13 -21.1 5.3

145

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $14.43 $13.59 $15.46 3.5 13.8 Alabama Georgia $19.13 $19.58 $22.30 8.0 13.9 Alabama Kentucky - W - - - Alabama New Jersey W - - - - Alabama Pennsylvania - W - - - Arizona Arizona W W W W W Colorado Alabama $34.52 $30.35 $27.67 -10.5 -8.8 Colorado Arizona $28.20 W - - - Colorado Arkansas W - - - - Colorado California - $37.53 $51.30 - 36.7 Colorado Colorado $14.16 $8.47 $9.02 -20.2 6.6

146

Primary Science of Energy Student Guide (42 Activities) | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Primary Science of Energy Student Guide (42 Activities) Primary Science of Energy Student Guide (42 Activities) Information about Primary Science of Energy, 42 student activities...

147

New York State Regulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New York New York State Regulations: New York State of New York The primary responsibility for regulating oil and gas activities within New York resides with the Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation in the Division of Mineral Resources (Office of Natural Resources) of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). Other offices and divisions within the NYSDEC administer the major environmental protection laws. Contact New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Division of Mineral Resources Bureau of Oil and Gas Regulation 625 Broadway, 3rd Floor Albany, NY 12233-6500 (518) 402-8056 (phone) (518) 402-8060 (fax) Disposal Practices and Applicable Regulations Environmental conservation rules and regulations are contained in Title 6 of the Official Compilation of Codes, Rules and Regulations of the State of New York (6 NYCRR). The rules and regulations for oil, gas and solution mining are provided in 6 NYCRR Parts 550-559.

148

Evaluation of the State Energy Conservation Program from program initiation to September 1978. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Conservation Program was established in 1975 to promote energy conservation and to help states develop and implement their own conservation programs. Base (5) and supplemental (3) programs required states to implement programs including: mandatory thermal-efficiency standards and insulation requirements for new and renovated buildings; mandatory lighting efficiency standards for public buildings; mandatory standards and policies affecting the procurement practices of the state and its political subdivisions; program measures to promote the availability and use of carpools, vanpools, and public transportation; a traffic law or regulation which permits a right turn-on-red; and procedures to carry out a continuing public education effort to increase awareness of energy conservation; procedures which promote effective coordination among local, state, and Federal energy conservation programs; and procedures for carrying out energy audits on buildings and industrial plants. All 50 states and Puerto Rico, Guam, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and the District of Columbia participated in the program. The total 1980 energy savings projected by the states is about 5.9 quadrillion Btu's or about 7% of the DOE projected 1980 baseline consumption of just under 83 quads. The detailed summary is presented on the following: information the SECP evaluation; DOE response to the SECP; DOE's role in the program management process; the effectiveness of the states in managing the SECP; the status of program measure implementation; innovative state energy conservation programs; and the evaluation methodology.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

150

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

151

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel Purposes by" Nonfuel Purposes by" " Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000 ","Other(d)","Row"

152

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

153

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

154

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

155

Property:Primary Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary Organization Primary Organization Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Primary Organization Property Type Page Company Pages using the property "Primary Organization" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + Ocean Navitas + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + Resolute Marine Energy Inc + MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine + Checkmate SeaEnergy + MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy + Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd + MHK Technologies/Aquanator + Atlantis Resources Corporation + MHK Technologies/Aquantis + Ecomerit Technologies LLC see Dehlsen Associates LLC + MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing + AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia + MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 + Atlantis Resources Corporation +

156

Vapor Pressures and Heats of Vaporization of Primary Coal Tars  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

/ PC92544-18 / PC92544-18 VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS FINAL REPORT Grant Dates: August, 1992 - November, 1996 Principal Authors: Eric M. Suuberg (PI) and Vahur Oja Report Submitted: April, 1997 Revised: July, 1997 Grant Number: DE-FG22-92PC92544 Report Submitted by: ERIC M. SUUBERG DIVISION OF ENGINEERING BROWN UNIVERSITY PROVIDENCE, RI 02912 TEL. (401) 863-1420 Prepared For: U. S. DEPT. OF ENERGY FEDERAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY CENTER P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PA 15236 DR. KAMALENDU DAS, FETC, MORGANTOWN , WV TECHNICAL PROJECT OFFICER "US/DOE Patent Clearance is not required prior to the publication of this document" ii United States Government Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

157

Agenda: State, Local and Tribal Issues  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Many of the primary authorities and governance structures that exist for states, localities and tribes related to electricity infrastructure have been in place for decades. What can be learned from...

158

Information resources in state regulatory agencies-a California perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various state regulatory agencies have expressed a need for networking with information gatherers/researchers to produce a concise compilation of primary information so that the basis for regulatory standards can be scientifically referenced. California has instituted several programs to retrieve primary information, generate primary information through research, and generate unique regulatory standards by integrating the primary literature and the products of research. This paper describes these programs.

DiZio, S.M. [California Environmental Protection Agency, Sacramento (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

External (SON) - Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home Home Fact Sheets Links Contacts Primary Standards Laboratory Enter keyword below to search the PSL site: Search! The Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) develops and maintains primary standards traceable to national standards and calibrates and certifies customer reference standards. The PSL provides technical guidance, support, and consultation; develops precision measurement techniques; provides oversight, including technical surveys and measurement audits; and anticipates future measurement needs of the nuclear weapons complex and other Department of Energy programs. The PSL also helps industry, universities, and government agencies establish or verify new capabilities and products and improve measurement technology. NVLAP Accreditation NVLAP Accreditation

160

Solid-state radioluminescent compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state radioluminescent composition for light source comprises an optically clear polymer organic matrix containing tritiated organic materials and dyes capable of "red" shifting primary scintillation emissions from the polymer matrix. The tritiated organic materials are made by reducing, with tritium, an unsaturated organic compound that prior to reduction contains olefinic or alkynylic bonds.

Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Gill, John T. (Miamisburg, OH); Hawkins, Daniel B. (Fairbanks, AK); Renschler, Clifford L. (Tijeras, NM); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

External (SON) - Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) Website  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enter keyword below to search the PSL site: Search! The Primary Standards Laboratory (PSL) develops and maintains primary standards traceable to national standards and calibrates and certifies customer reference standards. The PSL provides technical guidance, support, and consultation; develops precision measurement techniques; provides oversight, including technical surveys and measurement audits; and anticipates future measurement needs of the nuclear weapons complex and other Department of Energy programs. The PSL also helps industry, universities, and government agencies establish or verify new capabilities and products and improve measurement technology. NVLAP Accreditation NVLAP Accreditation The Primary Standards Laboratory is accredited over a broad range of parameters by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) as a calibration laboratory (Lab Code 105002). This accreditation validates the high level of technical competence achieved by the laboratory and its staff.

162

The `excess' of primary cosmic ray electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the accurate cosmic ray (CR) electron and positron spectra (denoted as $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}$ and $\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$, respectively) measured by AMS-02 collaboration, the difference between the electron and positron fluxes (i.e., $\\Delta \\Phi=\\Phi_{\\rm e^{-}}-\\Phi_{\\rm e^{+}}$), dominated by the propagated primary electrons, can be reliably inferred. In the standard model, the spectrum of propagated primary CR electrons at energies $\\geq 30$ GeV softens with the increase of energy. The absence of any evidence for such a continuous spectral softening in $\\Delta \\Phi$ strongly suggests a significant `excess' of primary CR electrons and at energies of $100-400$ GeV the identified excess component has a flux comparable to that of the observed positron excess. Middle-age but `nearby' supernova remnants (e.g., Monogem and Geminga) are favored sources for such an excess.

Li, Xiang; Lu, Bo-Qiang; Dong, Tie-Kuang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Feng, Lei; Liu, Si-Ming; Chang, Jin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Laser spectroscopy of primary energy conversion in  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review is given of the current status of research on primary processes of energy conversion in photosynthesis. The structural and functional organization of photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is considered. A description is given of laser probing methods, applications of high-speed optical shutters, and picosecond spectrofluorometry involving the use of image converters. A functional scheme of primary energy conversion by Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides bacteria is given for the 10?12–10?4 sec range of time intervals. Some nonlinear processes resulting from intense excitation of the pigment apparatus of photosynthesizing organisms are considered.

V Z Pashchenko; L B Rubin

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

16 CSA News March 2013 thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

16 CSA News March 2013 E thanol from corn has been the primary biofuel for liq- uid fuels in the United States, but perennial cellulosic biofuels are on the horizon. Intensive corn production with large of nitrogen losses on large, tile-drained fields planted with perennial biofuels in the Midwest of the United

DeLucia, Evan H.

165

PRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow. Our results indicate that some aquatic ecosystem variables can return to a more natural statePRIMARY RESEARCH PAPER Short-term responses of decomposers to flow restoration in Fossil Creek projects, although numerous, rarely include complete sets of data before and after restoration

LeRoy, Carri J.

166

Qubit state guidance without feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a protocol for two-qubit state guidance that does not rely on feedback mechanisms. In our scheme, entanglement can be concentrated by arranging the interactions of the qubits with a continuous variable ancilla. By properly post-selecting the outcomes of repeated measurements of the state of the ancilla, the qubit state is driven to have a desired amount of purity and entanglement. We stress the primary role played by the first iterations of the protocol. Inefficiencies in the detection operations can be fully taken into account.

Mauro Paternostro; M. S. Kim

2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

167

Solid state electrochromic light modulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

Cogan, Stuart F. (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062); Rauh, R. David (111 Downey St., Norwood, MA 02062)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solid state electrochromic light modulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counterelectrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films.

Cogan, Stuart F. (Sudbury, MA); Rauh, R. David (Newton, MA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solid state electrochromic light modulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An all solid-state variable transmission electrochromic device has a source of charge compensating ions. An inorganic oxide counter electrode film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions increases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength is separated from a primary electrochromic film which on reduction with the accompanying insertion of the charge compensating ions decreases its transmission of light of predetermined wavelength by an insulating electrolyte film that transports the charge compensating ions. First and second electrodes are contiguous with the inorganic oxide counter electrode film and the primary electrochromic film, respectively, and separated by the three films. 4 figs.

Cogan, S.F.; Rauh, R.D.

1990-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the washability and comprehensive characterization results of 247 raw coal channel samples, including anthracite, bituminous and lignite coals, collected from the Western Region of the United States. Although the Western Region includes Alaska, coal data from this state will often be cited apart from the Western Region data from the lower United States. This is the third of a three volume report on the coals of the United States. All the data are presented in six appendices. Statistical techniques and definitions are presented in Appendix A, and a glossary of terms is presented in Appendix B. The complete washability data and an in-depth characterization of each sample are presented alphabetically by state in Appendix C. In Appendix D, a statistical evaluation is given for the composited washability data, selected chemical and physical properties, and washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. This presentation is shown by state, section, and region where four or more samples were collected. Appendix E presents coalbed codes and names for the Western Region coals. Graphical summations are presented by state, rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions, and the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. 35 figs., 3 tabs.

Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA). Coal Preparation Div.); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sulfur and ash reduction potential and selected chemical and physical properties of United States coals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the washability and comprehensive characterization of 975 raw coal channel samples collected from the Eastern, Central, and Western Regions (including Alaska) of the United States. All of this information is sorted in the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Technology Data Base. Individual reports for each region were completed previously as Volumes 1, 2, and 3 and included the detailed data for each of the 975 samples. This report is a summation of the results of those three reports on a state- and region-wide basis only, and does not include the data for individual samples, but only includes the composite data for each state and region. Graphical summations are presented by state, section or rank, and region showing the effects of crushing on impurity reductions and showing the distribution of raw and clean coal samples meeting various levels of SO{sub 2} emissions. The statistical evaluations in the Appendices present the composited washability data of 1.30, 1.40, and 1.60 specific gravities of separation, the selected chemical and physical properties, and the composited washability data interpolated at various levels of Btu recovery. 13 refs., 93 figs., 9 tabs.

Cavallaro, J.A.; Deurbrouck, A.W.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Fuchs, W. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA)); Jacobsen, P.S. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Energy Plan to State Energy Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Energy Plan The Virginia Energy Plan assesses the commonwealth's primary energy sources and recommends actions to meet the following goals: make Virginia the energy capital of the East Coast by expanding traditional and alternative

173

Drying and recycling of primary sludge at Champion International  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Champion International Corp.'s Hamilton, OH, mill uses a triple pass rotary dryer to dry primary sludge to a nominal 85% total solids content. The sludge can be recycled and used in the manufacture of such products as paperboard or portland cement. A state of the art landfill was constructed in Reily township in 1990. This landfill is licensed to receive the papermaking waste and boiler ash from the mill. It is the goal of the environmental department of the mill only to use this facility as an absolute emergency backup to the recycling options available to the mill for these two waste streams. At the time of the writing of this article, no waste had been taken to this new landfill.

Hardesty, K.L.; Beer, E.H. (Champion International Corp., Hamilton, OH (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Primary flight computers for the Boeing 777  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper follows one on the Boeing 777 primary flight computers, which was presented at ERA's 1992 Avionics Conference. The current paper focuses on the system requirements software implementation, and operational consequences of a fault-tolerant system. Beginning with the reasons for fly-by-wire, the paper goes on to describe the overall architecture of the Boeing 777 primary flight computer system. Particular emphasis is placed on the control modes and the way in which envelope protection functions are implemented. After a brief description of the hardware, the paper describes the software life-cycle process, including design, coding and test, highlighting the way in which the integrity of the software has been achieved. The fault-tolerant aspects of the design, and the advantages that these provide to operators, conclude the paper

J.D. Aplin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

Earl, James A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park MD (United States)

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Primary coal crushers grow to meet demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mine operators look for more throughput with less fines generation in primary crushers (defined here as single role crushers and two stage crushers). The article gives advice on crusher selection and application. Some factors dictating selection include the desired product size, capacity, Hard Grove grindability index, percentage of rock to be freed and hardness of that rock. The hardness of coal probably has greatest impact on product fineness. 2 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Fiscor, S.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

REPOSITORY SURFACE FACILITIES PRIMARY SYSTEM CRANE DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to compile crane design data for the mechanical primary structures, systems, and components (SSCs) required for the repository Waste Handling Building (WHB) and Carrier Preparation Building (CPB). The work presented in this document has been prepared in accordance with Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management approved program document AP-3.12Q, Calculations. This calculation has been developed to supplement information previously prepared using the development plan for ''WHB/WTB Space Program Analysis for Site Recommendation'' (Reference 5), which concentrates on the primary, primary support, facility support, and miscellaneous building support areas located in the WHB and Waste Treatment Building (WTB). The development plan was completed in accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning''. The work in this calculation is a continuance of the work described in the previous development plan; therefore, in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', a new Technical Work Plan is not required.

K. Schwartztrauber

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

179

 

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8) 8) June 2010 State Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates 1970 Through 2008 2008 Price and Expenditure Summary Tables Table S1a. Energy Price Estimates by Source, 2008 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Electric Power Sector g,h Retail Electricity Total Energy g,i Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass Total g,h,i Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and

180

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 - 2010) kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al a bama 57.9 57.6 57.3 57.0 56.3 57.2 57.5 58.1 55.9 51.3 53.9 -6.9% -4.0 Al a s ka 59.7 59.0 59.4 59.4 60.3 60.2 61.3 60.9 60.6 60.1 60.4 1.1% 0.6 Ari zona 55.0 56.0 54.8 55.8 56.2 57.0 57.9 56.9 56.0 54.6 55.0 0.1% 0.1 Arka nsa s 56.8 56.3 54.4 54.6 55.1 55.4 55.2 54.8 55.6 54.3 55.5 -2.3% -1.3 Ca l i forni a 52.8 54.0 53.9 53.4 53.6 53.0 53.1 54.1 54.2 53.7 52.9 0.2% 0.1 Col ora do 69.1 68.8 69.4 68.4 68.9 68.5 68.6 67.5 66.5 65.8 66.5 -3.7% -2.6 Connecti cut 49.9 51.8 50.9 50.8 50.4 51.4 49.4 49.3 49.6 47.2 47.2 -5.5% -2.8 Del a wa re 69.6 68.3 67.5 69.1 69.4 69.9 69.5 70.0 69.1 65.2 64.0 -8.1% -5.6 Di s tri ct of Col umbi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Effects of Protonation State on a Tyrosine-Histidine Bioinspired...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a redox mediator between the photo-oxidized primary donor (P680*+) and the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex, the protonation states involved in the course of the reaction...

182

SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION...DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION...that any relationship of these variations to solar phenomena arose through in- direct processes...

J. A. Simpson

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Property:News/PrimaryLocation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PrimaryLocation Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Page. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NewsPrimaryLocation&oldid285888"...

184

Blindow, I., A. Hargeby, J. Meyercordt, and H. Schubert. Primary ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Primary production in two shallow lakes with contrasting plant form dominance: ... J. Meyercordt ..... Fisheries Research Board) and September 2005 (T.

2006-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

185

A study of English primary care trusts Research report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Setting priorities in health A study of English primary care trusts Research report Suzanne priorities in health: a study of English primary care trusts Contents List of figures and tables 4 Glossary 6 priorities in health: a study of English primary care trusts 3. Priority setting: the national picture 21

Birmingham, University of

186

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Information Systems for Primary Health Care: Thinking About Participation Elaine Byrne in supporting primary health care functioning, the design, development and implementation of these systems information systems, human rights 1. Introduction: Primary health care is a crucial element of national health

Sahay, Sundeep

187

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Jean Carletta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communication and Effectiveness in Primary Health Care Teams Jean Carletta Human Communication.Carletta@edinburgh.ac.uk ABSTRACT Primary health care team members need to communicate effectively with each other in order of cross-disciplinary team meetings, we describe communication in primary health care teams, explore

Carletta, Jean

188

The Clinical Differentiation of Primary Gout from Primary Renal Disease in Patients with Both Gout and Renal Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Renal disease is a well recognized complication of primary gout but it is less well recognized that ... patients with primary renal disease may also develop gout. Chronic lead nephropathy is the best recognized ....

B. T. Emmerson; P. J. Stride; Gail Williams

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- I - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency

190

Volume State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22 22 Volume State State or Country From/To Receipts/ Imports From Deliveries/ Exports To Net a Alabama Florida .................................................................. 0 722,558 -722,558 Georgia................................................................. 0 1,352,308 -1,352,308 Gulf of Mexico....................................................... 123,132 0 123,132 Mississippi ............................................................ 2,758,595 0 2,758,595 Tennessee............................................................ 1,744 764,749 -763,005 Total..................................................................... 2,883,471 2,839,615 43,856

191

Secondary emission electron gun using external primaries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron gun for generating an electron beam is provided, which includes a secondary emitter. The secondary emitter includes a non-contaminating negative-electron-affinity (NEA) material and emitting surface. The gun includes an accelerating region which accelerates the secondaries from the emitting surface. The secondaries are emitted in response to a primary beam generated external to the accelerating region. The accelerating region may include a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity, and the gun may be operated in a continuous wave (CW) mode. The secondary emitter includes hydrogenated diamond. A uniform electrically conductive layer is superposed on the emitter to replenish the extracted current, preventing charging of the emitter. An encapsulated secondary emission enhanced cathode device, useful in a superconducting RF cavity, includes a housing for maintaining vacuum, a cathode, e.g., a photocathode, and the non-contaminating NEA secondary emitter with the uniform electrically conductive layer superposed thereon.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY); Ben-Zvi, Ilan (Setauket, NY); Kewisch, Jorg (Wading River, NY); Chang, Xiangyun (Middle Island, NY)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

Secondary emission electron gun using external primaries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electron gun for generating an electron beam is provided, which includes a secondary emitter. The secondary emitter includes a non-contaminating negative-electron-affinity (NEA) material and emitting surface. The gun includes an accelerating region which accelerates the secondaries from the emitting surface. The secondaries are emitted in response to a primary beam generated external to the accelerating region. The accelerating region may include a superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavity, and the gun may be operated in a continuous wave (CW) mode. The secondary emitter includes hydrogenated diamond. A uniform electrically conductive layer is superposed on the emitter to replenish the extracted current, preventing charging of the emitter. An encapsulated secondary emission enhanced cathode device, useful in a superconducting RF cavity, includes a housing for maintaining vacuum, a cathode, e.g., a photocathode, and the non-contaminating NEA secondary emitter with the uniform electrically conductive layer superposed thereon.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY); Ben-Zvi, Ilan (Setauket, NY)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

California's Proposition 16 June 2010 Primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of city ownership of electric companies versus state regulation of privately owned monopoly utilities Constitution to require the support of 2/3 of the voters in a local election before a local government could affect electric service from municipal utilities, irrigation districts, community choice aggregators

Kammen, Daniel M.

194

Small (5 million Btu/h) and large (300 million Btu/h) thermal test rigs for coal and coal slurry burner development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NEI International Combustion Ltd. of Derby, England, now operates two thermal test rigs for the development of burners capable of handling coal-water slurries (CWS). A general description of the large rig and its capacity was given. Also, the necessary conversions of the equipment to handle CWS were described. Information on the properties of the CWS was included. This consisted of chemical analysis of the parent coal and the slurry, sieve analysis of a dry sample, and viscosity versus temperature data of the CWS. The process of design development of the burner was outlined. Ten illustrations were presented, including schematic diagrams of equipment and graphs of data.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.; Hufton, P.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BP Energy Company BP Energy Company OE Docket No. EA- 3 14 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-3 14 February 22,2007 BP Energy Company Order No. EA-314 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(Q of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 l(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.S24a(e)) . On May 22,2006, BP Energy Company (BP Energy) applied to DOE for an authorization to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. BP Energy proposes to purchase surplus electric energy from electric utilities and other suppliers within the United States and to export that energy to ~Mexico. The cnergy

196

State Summaries  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

46. 46. Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

197

Agency Bureau Primary Activity Code Secondary Activity Code  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ENCLOSURE 1 ENCLOSURE 1 Agency Bureau Primary Activity Code Secondary Activity Code Additional Activity Code Description of Activity Competed Type of Competition Location (State) # of FTE in study # of Bids Received Start Date (Day/Mo/Yr) End Date (Day/Mo/Yr) Expected Phase-In Completion Date (Day/Mo/Yr) Actual Phase- In Completion Date (Day/Mo/Yr) Source Selection Strategy Used Winning Provider FY 2006 Costs Total Cost All Years Estimated Savings Period of Est. Savings (Performance Period--in years) Annualized Savings Actual Savings (if available) Saving Methodology: Calculation / Proxy Quantifiable Description of Improvements in Service or Performance (if appropriate) 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.628 FY 2007 FIXED COSTS*

198

Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary anthropogenic1 sources and sinks of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Executive Summary An emissions inventory that identifies and quantifies a country's primary emission sources and greenhouse gases to climate change. In 1992, the United States signed and ratified and make available...national inventories of anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks

Little, John B.

199

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

200

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

202

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

203

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

204

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

205

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 685 5.0 5,918 13.8 Coal 1,669 12.2 8,306 19.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,942 14.2 659 1.5 Natural Gas 6,063 44.3 25,582 59.8 Other 1 3 * 771 1.8 Other Renewable1 304 2.2 1,274 3.0 Petroleum 3,031 22.1 296 0.7 Total 13,697 100.0 42,805 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

206

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

207

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Nuclear Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary Energy Source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,924 6.6 23,936 10.4 Coal 9,975 16.9 59,897 26.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 55 0.1 177 0.1 Natural Gas 31,563 53.4 128,634 56.1 Other1 544 0.9 2,842 1.2 Other Renewable1 1,053 1.8 4,487 2.0 Petroleum 12,033 20.3 9,122 4.0 Total 59,147 100.0 229,096 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

208

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

209

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

210

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

211

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

212

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

213

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

214

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

215

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

216

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina Nuclear Profile 2010 North Carolina profile North Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,958 17.9 40,740 31.7 Coal 12,766 46.1 71,951 55.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,042 7.4 4,757 3.7 Natural Gas 6,742 24.4 8,447 6.6 Other 1 50 0.2 407 0.3 Other Renewable1 543 2.0 2,083 1.6 Petroleum 573 2.1 293 0.2 Total 27,674 100.0 128,678 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

217

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Nuclear Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile New Hampshire total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,247 29.8 10,910 49.2 Coal 546 13.1 3,083 13.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 489 11.7 1,478 6.7 Natural Gas 1,215 29.1 5,365 24.2 Other 1 - - 57 0.3 Other Renewable1 182 4.4 1,232 5.6 Petroleum 501 12.0 72 0.3 Total 4,180 100.0 22,196 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

218

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia Nuclear Profile 2010 Georgia profile Georgia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,061 11.1 33,512 24.6 Coal 13,230 36.1 73,298 54.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,851 10.5 3,044 2.7 Natural Gas 12,668 34.6 23,884 15.9 Other 1 - - 18 * Other Renewable1 637 1.7 3,181 2.2 Petroleum 2,189 6.0 641 0.5 Total 36,636 100.0 128,698 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

219

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Nuclear Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,947 13.2 29,625 26.6 Coal 11,531 38.7 65,604 58.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,109 7.1 228 0.2 Natural Gas 11,033 37.0 12,249 11.0 Other 1 - - 631 0.6 Other Renewable1 571 1.9 2,832 2.5 Petroleum 640 2.1 382 0.3 Total 29,831 100.0 111,551 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

220

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas profile Texas profile Texas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6 1,262 0.3 Natural Gas 69,291 64.0 186,882 45.4 Other 1 477 0.4 3,630 0.9 Other Renewable1 10,295 9.5 27,705 6.7 Petroleum 204 0.2 708 0.2 Total 108,258 100.0 411,695 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (nw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand nwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,142 8.0 18,639 18.1 Coal 3,417 12.8 23,924 23.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 192 0.7 1,109 1.1 Natural Gas 19,574 73.2 51,344 49.9 Other 1 213 0.8 2,120 2.1 Other Renewable1 325 1.2 2,468 2.4 Petroleum 881 3.3 3,281 3.2 Total 26,744 100.0 102,885 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

222

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

223

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 11,441 25.9 96,190 47.8 Coal 15,551 35.2 93,611 46.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 34 0.1 119 0.1 Natural Gas 13,771 31.2 5,724 2.8 Other 1 145 0.3 461 0.2 Other Renewable1 2,078 4.7 5,138 2.6 Petroleum 1,106 2.5 110 0.1 Total 44,127 100.0 201,352 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

224

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

225

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 601 4.1 4,451 7.7 Coal 6,956 47.7 41,283 71.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 144 1.0 948 1.6 Natural Gas 2,299 15.8 1,312 2.3 Other Renewable1 3,584 24.6 9,360 16.3 Petroleum 1,007 6.9 154 .0.3 Total 14,592 100.0 57,509 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

226

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Nuclear Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,549 10.8 13,478 25.1 Coal 4,789 32.5 28,083 52.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 193 1.3 840 1.6 Natural Gas 4,936 33.5 4,341 8.1 Other 1 13 0.1 258 0.5 Other Renewable1 2,395 16.3 6,640 12.4 Petroleum 795 5.4 31 0.1 Total 14,715 100.0 53,670 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

227

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

228

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

229

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Nuclear Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,251 8.0 9,643 17.7 Coal 2,526 16.1 13,629 25.0 Natural Gas 11,640 74.2 29,619 54.4 Other 1 4 * 10 * Other Renewable1 235 1.5 1,504 2.8 Petroleum 35 0.2 18 0.1 Total 15,691 100.0 54,487 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

230

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont profile Vermont profile Vermont total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 620 55.0 4,782 72.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 324 28.7 1,347 20.3 Natural Gas - - 4 0.1 Other Renewable1 84 7.5 482 7.3 Petroleum 100 8.9 5 0.1 Total 1,128 100.0 6,620 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding. Other Renewable: Wood, black liquor, other wood waste, biogenic municipal solid waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, other biomass, geothermal, solar thermal, photovoltaic energy, and wind.

231

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State ttal (percent) Nuclear 1,835 11.5 15,023 24.6 Coal 4,535 28.4 28,152 46.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,369 8.6 3,658 6.0 Natural Gas 7,894 49.4 12,469 20.4 Other 1 - - 28 * Other Renewable1 326 2.0 1,624 2.7 Petroleum 22 0.1 45 0.1 Total 15,981 100.0 61,000 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

232

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

233

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 9,540 20.9 77,828 33.9 Coal 18,481 40.6 110,369 48.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,268 5.0 1,624 0.7 Natural Gas 9,415 20.7 33,718 14.7 Other 1 100 0.2 1,396 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,237 2.7 4,245 1.8 Petroleum 4,534 9.9 571 0.2 Total 45,575 100.0 229,752 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

234

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee profile Tennessee profile Tennessee total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,401 15.9 27,739 33.7 Coal 8,805 41.1 43,670 53.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,277 20.0 7,416 9.0 Natural Gas 4,655 21.7 2,302 2.8 Other 1 - - 16 * Other Renewable1 222 1.0 988 1.2 Petroleum 58 0.3 217 0.3 Total 21,417 100.0 82,349 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

235

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Nuclear Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,134 6.5 15,805 11.0 Coal 21,360 64.6 117,828 82.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 101 0.3 429 0.3 Natural Gas 8,203 24.8 7,128 5.0 Other 1 123 0.4 266 0.2 Other Renewable1 130 0.4 700 0.5 Petroleum 1,019 3.1 1,442 1.0 Total 33,071 100.0 143,598 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

236

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Nuclear Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,937 14.9 31,200 27.9 Coal 6,233 23.6 43,644 39.1 Hydro and Pumped Storage 2,937 11.1 6,831 6.1 Natural Gas 13,012 49.3 29,676 26.6 Other 1 - - 15 * Other Renewable1 181 0.7 319 0.3 Petroleum 93 0.4 66 0.1 Total 26,392 100.0 111,751 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

237

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia profile Virginia profile Virginia total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 3,501 14.5 26,572 36.4 Coal 5,868 24.3 25,459 34.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,107 17.0 10 * Natural Gas 7,581 31.4 16,999 23.3 Other 1 - - 414 0.6 Other Renewable1 621 2.6 2,220 3.0 Petroleum 2,432 10.1 1,293 1.8 Total 24,109 100.0 72,966 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

238

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

239

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Nuclear Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,160 9.2 9,556 19.9 Coal 5,179 41.3 32,505 67.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3 * 13 * Natural Gas 4,573 36.5 2,287 4.8 Other Renewable1 1,079 8.6 3,459 7.2 Petroleum 550 4.4 103 0.2 Total 12,543 100.0 47,924 100 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

240

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Nuclear Profile 2010 New Jersey profile New Jersey total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,108 22.3 32,771 49.9 Coal 2,036 11.1 6,418 9.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 404 2.2 -176 -0.3 Natural Gas 10,244 55.6 24,902 37.9 Other 1 56 0.3 682 1.0 Other Renewable1 226 1.2 850 1.3 Petroleum 1,351 7.3 235 0.4 Total 18,424 100.0 65,682 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

242

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

243

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Nuclear Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,043 15.6 37,941 24.9 Coal 11,441 35.3 63,050 41.4 Hydro and Pumped Storage 3,272 10.1 8,704 5.7 Natural Gas 11,936 36.8 39,235 25.8 Other1 100 0.3 643 0.4 Other Renewable1 583 1.8 2,377 1.6 Petroleum 43 0.1 200 0.1 Total 32,417 100.0 152,151 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

244

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Nuclear Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,190 5.5 8,996 9.7 Coal 12,070 55.5 75,047 81.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 1,221 5.6 2,427 2.6 Natural Gas 5,579 25.7 4,690 5.1 Other 1 - - 39 * Other Renewable1 466 2.1 988 1.1 Petroleum 1,212 5.6 126 0.1 Total 21,739 100.0 92,313 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

245

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California Nuclear Profile 2010 California profile California total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,390 6.5 32,201 15.8 Coal 374 0.6 2,100 1.0 Hydro and Pumped Storage 13,954 20.7 33,260 16.3 Natural Gas 41,370 61.4 107,522 52.7 Other 1 220 0.3 2,534 1.2 Other Renewable1 6,319 9.4 25,450 12.5 Petroleum 701 1.0 1,059 0.5 Total 63,328 100.0 204,126 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

246

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Nuclear Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (Percent) Nuclear 1,705 13.6 13,994 32.1 Coal 4,886 39.0 23,668 54.3 Hydro and Pumped Storage 590 4.7 1,667 3.8 Natural Gas 2,041 16.3 2,897 6.6 Other 1 152 1.2 485 1.1 Other Renewable1 209 1.7 574 1.3 Petroleum 2,933 23.4 322 0.7 Total 12,516 100.0 43,607 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

247

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington profile Washington profile Washington total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,097 3.6 9,241 8.9 Coal 1,340 4.4 8,527 8.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 21,495 70.5 68,342 66.0 Natural Gas 3,828 12.6 10,359 10.0 Other 1 - - 354 0.3 Other Renewable1 2,703 8.9 6,617 6.4 Petroleum 15 * 32 * Total 30,478 100.0 103,473 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. * = Absolute percentage less than 0.05.

248

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Nuclear Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 2,103 25.4 16,750 50.2 Coal 564 6.8 2,604 7.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 151 1.8 400 1.2 Natural Gas 2,292 27.7 11,716 35.1 Other 1 27 0.3 730 2.2 Other Renewable1 159 1.9 740 2.2 Petroleum 2,989 36.1 409 1.2 Total 8,284 100.0 33,350 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

249

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina profile South Carolina profile South Carolina total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 6,486 27.0 51,988 49.9 Coal 7,230 30.1 37,671 36.2 Hydro and Pumped Storage 4,006 16.7 1,442 1.4 Natural Gas 5,308 22.1 10,927 10.5 Other 1 - - 61 0.1 Other Renewable1 284 1.2 1,873 1.8 Petroleum 670 2.8 191 0.2 Total 23,982 100.0 104,153 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. - = No data reported.

250

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile York Nuclear Profile 2010 New York profile New York total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 5,271 13.4 41,870 30.6 Coal 2,781 7.1 13,583 9.9 Hydro and Pumped Storage 5,714 14.5 24,942 18.2 Natural Gas 17,407 44.2 48,916 35.7 Other 1 45 0.1 832 0.6 Other Renewable1 1,719 4.4 4,815 3.5 Petroleum 6,421 16.3 2,005 1.5 Total 39,357 100.0 136,962 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable.

251

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Nuclear Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,245 15.8 11,054 30.2 Coal 3,932 50.0 23,368 63.8 Hydro and Pumped Storage 278 3.5 1,314 3.6 Natural Gas 1,864 23.5 375 1.0 Other Renewable1 165 2.1 493 1.3 Petroleum 387 4.9 31 0.1 Total 7,857 100.0 36,630 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

252

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin profile Wisconsin profile Wisconsin total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw) Share of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 1,584 8.9 13,281 20.7 Coal 8,063 45.2 40,169 62.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 492 2.8 2,112 3.3 Natural Gas 6,110 34.3 5,497 8.5 Other 1 21 0.1 63 0.1 Other Renewable1 775 4.3 2,474 3.8 Petroleum 790 4.4 718 1.1 Total 17,836 100.0 64,314 100.0 1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; however, all Municipal Solid Waste summer capacity is classified as Renewable. Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

253

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

254

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

255

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9" 9" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

256

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

257

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

258

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

259

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

260

Generating Unit Retirements in the United States by State, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Month of Retirement","Year of Retirement"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Commercial and Industrial Equipment Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler Size 300-500 (kBtu/h): $800; $2900 Boiler Size 500-700 (kBtu/h): $1400; $3600 Boiler Size 700-900 (kBtu/h): $2000; $4200 Boiler Size 900-1100 (kBtu/h): $2600; $4800 Boiler Size 1100-1300 (kBtu/h): $3200; $5400 Boiler Size 1300-1500 (kBtu/h): $3800; $6000 Boiler Size 1500-1700 (kBtu/h): $4400; $6600 Boiler Size 1700-2000 (kBtu/h): $5200; $7400

262

Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Primary Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for the treatment of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, 60 patients with liver-confined HCC were treated with SBRT at the Indiana University Simon Cancer Center: 36 Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) Class A and 24 CTP Class B. The median number of fractions, dose per fraction, and total dose, was 3, 14 Gy, and 44 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class A cirrhosis and 5, 8 Gy, and 40 Gy, respectively, for those with CTP Class B. Treatment was delivered via 6 to 12 beams and in nearly all cases was prescribed to the 80% isodose line. The records of all patients were reviewed, and treatment response was scored according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.1. Toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. Local control (LC), time to progression (TTP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) were calculated according to the method of Kaplan and Meier. Results: The median follow-up time was 27 months, and the median tumor diameter was 3.2 cm. The 2-year LC, PFS, and OS were 90%, 48%, and 67%, respectively, with median TTP of 47.8 months. Subsequently, 23 patients underwent transplant, with a median time to transplant of 7 months. There were no {>=}Grade 3 nonhematologic toxicities. Thirteen percent of patients experienced an increase in hematologic/hepatic dysfunction greater than 1 grade, and 20% experienced progression in CTP class within 3 months of treatment. Conclusions: SBRT is a safe, effective, noninvasive option for patients with HCC {<=}6 cm. As such, SBRT should be considered when bridging to transplant or as definitive therapy for those ineligible for transplant.

Andolino, David L., E-mail: dandolin@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Johnson, Cynthia S. [Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Maluccio, Mary [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Kwo, Paul [Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Tector, A. Joseph [Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Zook, Jennifer; Johnstone, Peter A.S.; Cardenes, Higinia R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

INTO Colorado State University, Academic Advisor: Short Description Position Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTO Colorado State University, Academic Advisor: Short Description Position Description INTO Colorado State University (INTO CSU) seeks one full-time, 12-month academic advisor who will advise INTO CSU students. The primary responsibility of the academic advisor is to promote and facilitate

Stephens, Graeme L.

264

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WASHINGTON, TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1983 @nngmeional Ruord United States of America .__ -- . . ,- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9@ CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmgton, D C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $xX Congresstonal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Government Prlnhng 0ffv.X 375 SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' C.QNGRESSIONAL RECORD - HOUSE June 28, 1983 H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOUND. Mr. W~.XMAN. Mr. OBERSTAR, Mr. BEDELL. Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB, Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL; Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JACT. Mr. TRAKLER, and Mr. Vxrrro. H. Con. Res. 107: Mr. KASICH. Mr. AUCOIN. Mr. CARPER, and Mr. SIZHFIJER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH. Mr. LANTOS.

265

United States  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ongrees;ional Record ongrees;ional Record United States of America __._ -.. I. :- PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 9tth CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION United States Government Printing Office SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS Washmcqton. Cl C 20402 OFFICIAL BUSINESS Penalty Ior pwate use. $300 Congressmal Record (USPS 087-390) Postage and Fees Pad U S Governme3n:jPnntmg OfIce SECOND CLASS NEWSPAPER H.4578 ' June 28, 1983 -: I H.J. Res. 273: Mr. BOLAND, Mr. WA-. Mr. OBERSTAFC, M' r. BEDELL, Mr. BONER of Tennessee, Mr. OWENS. Mr. DAUB. Mr. CONTE. Mr. RAHALL,. Mr. GRAY, Mr. VANDER JAGT. Mr. TRAKLER. and Mr. VENTO. H. Con. Res. iO7: Mr. KASICH. Mr. ALCOIN. Mr. CARPER. and Mr. SCHEUER. H. Con. Res. 118: Mr. FISH, Mr. LANTOS. Mr. KILDEE. Mr. SOLARZ Mr. Bmrr, Mr. BELWLL, Mr. RANG~L, Mr. DYMALLY. Mr.

266

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

E-T Global Energy, LLC E-T Global Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-381 Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-381 June 10, 2011 I. BACKGROUND E-T Global Energy, LLC Order No. EA-381 Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department ofEnergy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7151(b), 7172(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) ofthe Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) 1 * On May 10,2011, DOE received an application from E-T Global Energy, LLC (E-T Global) for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico for five years as a power marketer using existing international transmission facilities. E-

267

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Bangor Hydro-Electric Company OE Docket No. PP-89-1 Amendment to Presidential Permit Order No. PP-89-1 December 30,2005 PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT AMENDMENT Bangor Hydro-Electric Company Order No. PP-89-1 I. BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for implementing Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038, which requires the issuance of a Presidential permit by DOE before electric trans~nission facilities may be constructed, operated, maintained, or connected at the borders of the United States. DOE may issue such a permit if it determines that the permit is in the public interest and after obtaining favorable recommendations from the U.S. Departments of State and Defense. On December 16, 1988, Bangor Hydro-Electric Company (BHE) applied to DOE

268

Intense steady state electron beam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An intense, steady state, low emittance electron beam generator is formed by operating a hollow cathode discharge plasma source at critical levels in combination with an extraction electrode and a target electrode that are operable to extract a beam of fast primary electrons from the plasma source through a negatively biased grid that is critically operated to repel bulk electrons toward the plasma source while allowing the fast primary electrons to move toward the target in the desired beam that can be successfully transported for relatively large distances, such as one or more meters away from the plasma source.

Hershcovitch, Ady (Mount Sinai, NY); Kovarik, Vincent J. (Bohemia, NY); Prelec, Krsto (Setauket, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

HQ State HQ City Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Participant Participant Share Total Project Value Including Cost Share AZ Fort Defiance Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Company Smart Grid Workforce Training (Topic B) Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Smart Grid Workforce Training Program - Develop a workforce that is well-trained and committed to the mission of modernizing NTUA's distribution services, including an expeditious and well-built smart grid system. The training program is designed to maximize employment opportunities for citizens of the Navajo Nation located on the reservation. Arizona New Mexico $704,486 $704,486 $1,408,972 $704,486 $704,486 $1,408,972 Glendale Glendale Community College Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs (Topic A) Southern California Utility Initiative - Expand training curricula and

270

HQ State HQ City Name of Primary Selectee Project Type Project Title and Brief Project Description  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total Project Value Total Project Value Including Cost Share AZ Fort Defiance Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Company Smart Grid Workforce Training (Topic B) Navajo Tribal Utility Authority Smart Grid Workforce Training Program - Develop a workforce that is well-trained and committed to the mission of modernizing NTUA's distribution services, including an expeditious and well- built smart grid system. The training program is designed to maximize employment opportunities for citizens of the Navajo Nation located on the reservation. Arizona New Mexico $704,486 $1,408,971 $704,486 $1,408,971 Glendale Glendale Community College Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs (Topic A) Southern California Utility Initiative - Expand training curricula and programs in the Southern California region. The project will raise awareness and

271

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Quantification of net primary production of Chinese  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Quantification of net primary production of Chinese forest ecosystems with spatial Abstract Net primary production (NPP) of terrestrial ecosystems provides food, fiber, construction materials, and energy to humans. Its demand is likely to increase substantially in this century due

Zhang, Tonglin

272

Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

HCTT CHE

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

BOOK REVIEW Gernot Renger (ed): Primary processes of photosynthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOOK REVIEW Gernot Renger (ed): Primary processes of photosynthesis: principles and apparatus Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009 The book Primary Processes of Photosynthesis: Principles of photosynthesis research, was published in 2008 in the Comprehensive Series in Photochemistry and Photobiology

Govindjee "Gov"

274

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CC-1-I Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to public bodies and cooperatives served through the facilities of Carolina Power & Light Company, Western Division (hereinafter called the Customers). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy available from the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Cheatham, Old Hickory, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereinafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and sold in wholesale quantities. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

275

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TexMex Energy, LLC TexMex Energy, LLC OE Docket No. EA-294-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Mexico Order No. EA-294-A February 22, 2007 TexMex Energy, LLC Order No. EA-294-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign count~y are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 301(b) and 402(f) of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 71 72(f)) and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.824a(e)) . On August 25,2004, DOE issued Order No. EA-294 authorizing TexMex Energy LLC (TexMex) to transmit electric energy fiom the United States to Mexico as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 25, 2006. On September 8, 2006, TexMex applied to renew the electricity export authority

276

United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

United States United States Coal ................................................ 4,367 4,077 4,747 4,181 4,473 4,125 4,983 4,330 4,414 4,003 4,796 4,178 4,344 4,479 4,348 Natural Gas .................................... 2,802 2,843 3,694 2,863 2,713 2,880 3,636 2,707 2,792 2,972 3,815 2,849 3,052 2,986 3,109 Petroleum (a) .................................. 74 73 81 67 73 70 75 66 75 70 76 66 74 71 71 Other Gases ................................... 32 33 36 32 32 34 37 33 33 35 39 34 33 34 35 Nuclear ........................................... 2,176 2,044 2,257 2,170 2,106 2,037 2,167 2,010 2,144 2,074 2,206 2,055 2,162 2,080 2,120 Renewable Energy Sources: Conventional Hydropower ........... 736 886 716 633 765 887 708 646 767 919 729 659 742 751 768 Wind ............................................ 491 520 353 449 477 521 379 475

277

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tenaslta Power Services Co. Tenaslta Power Services Co. OE Docket No. EA-243-A Order Authorizing Electricity Exports to Canada Order No. EA-243-A March 1,2007 Tenaska Power Services Co. Order No. EA-243-A I. BACKGROUND Exports of elcctricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated by the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to sections 30 I(b) and 402(f) of the Departrncnt of' Energy Organizatio~l Act (42 U, S.C. 7 15 1 (b), 7 1 72Cf)) and rcquirc authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) ( Z 6 U. s.c.824a(e)j1. On August 16,2001, DOE issued Order No. EA-243 authorizing Tenaska Power Scrvices Co. (Tenaska) to transmit electric cncrgy from the United States to Canada as a power marketer. That authority expired on August 16,2003. On August 14,2006, Teilaska applied to renew the electricity export authority

278

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 7 percent in the AEO2013 Reference case, from 98 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 104 quadrillion Btu in 2035-2.5 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2012-and continues to grow at a rate of 0.6 percent per year, reaching about 108 quadrillion Btu in 2040 (Figure 7). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82 percent in 2011 to 78 percent in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels falls, largely as a result of the incorporation of new fuel efficiency standards for LDVs. figure dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in 2040, and its share of

279

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption by Primary Fuel Consumption by Primary Fuel Total primary energy consumption grows by 12% in the AEO2014 Reference case, from 95 quadrillion Btu in 2012 to 106 quadrillion Btu in 2040-1.3 quadrillion Btu less than in AEO2013 (Figure 8). The fossil fuel share of energy consumption falls from 82% in 2012 to 80% in 2040, as consumption of petroleum-based liquid fuels declines, largely as a result of slower growth in VMT and increased vehicle efficiency. figure dataTotal U.S. consumption of petroleum and other liquids, which was 35.9 quadrillion Btu (18.5 MMbbl/d) in 2012, increases to 36.9 quadrillion Btu (19.5 MMbbl/d) in 2018, then declines to 35.4 quadrillion Btu (18.7 MMbbl/d) in 2034 and remains at that level through 2040. Total consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases slightly through 2022 and then

280

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTV-1-H Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and TVA. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating current at a frequency of approximately 60 hertz at the outgoing terminals of the Cumberland

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule CTVI-1-A Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to customers (hereinafter called the Customer) who are or were formerly in the Tennessee Valley Authority (hereinafter called TVA) service area. Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric capacity and energy generated at the Dale Hollow, Center Hill, Wolf Creek, Old Hickory, Cheatham, Barkley, J. Percy Priest, and Cordell Hull Projects (all of such projects being hereafter called collectively the "Cumberland Projects") and the Laurel Project sold under agreement between the Department of Energy and the Customer. Character of Service: The electric capacity and energy supplied hereunder will be three-phase alternating

282

UNITED STATES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG f).~<~~ \--\c :y-,ai F p"- KG WASHINOTDN 28.0. C. ' -lr ' \ ' ' --- ".I ?--" ' z I. .~;-4.' J frr*o& 2 ii, - - -4 70-147 LRL:JCD JAN !! 8 1958 Oregon Metallurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albany, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very 33uly yours, r:; I,;, ll)~gQ""d".- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended Distribution: bRO0 Attn: Dr. H.M.Roth DFMusser NMM MMMann INS JCRyan FIN (2) HSteele LRL SRGustavson LRL Document room Formal file Suppl. file Br & Div rf's ' .b liwwArry s/VW- ' q+ ' yj/ 2; 2-' , COP' 1 J JAM01958 -- UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

283

United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

United States Department of Energy Southeastern Power Administration Wholesale Power Rate Schedule JW-2-F Availability: This rate schedule shall be available to the Florida Power Corporation (or Progress Energy Florida, hereinafter called the Company). Applicability: This rate schedule shall be applicable to electric energy generated at the Jim Woodruff Project (hereinafter called the Project) and sold to the Company in wholesale quantities. Points of Delivery: Power sold to the Company by the Government will be delivered at the connection of the Company's transmission system with the Project bus. Character of Service: Electric power delivered to the Company will be three-phase alternating current at a nominal frequency of 60 cycles per second.

284

Medicare's Chronic Care Management Payment — Payment Reform for Primary Care  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...efforts to reform U.S. health care delivery focus on creating a high-performing primary care system that improves value through increased emphasis on access, prevention, and care coordination. Reformers recognize that the fee-for-service system, which restricts payments for primary care to office-based... In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services will introduce a non–visit-based payment for chronic care management. The new policy reflects an investment in primary care that may contribute to the development of a value-oriented health system.

Edwards S.T.; Landon B.E.

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

285

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

286

Primary aluminum production : climate policy, emissions and costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate policy regarding perfluorocarbons (PFCs) may have a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates an integrated analysis of the effectiveness and likely ...

Harnisch, Jochen.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.

287

Microsoft Word - state_analysis_2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Table 6. Energy-intensity by state (2000 - 2010) thousand Btu per dollar of GDP Change 2000 to 2010 State 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Absolute Al aba ma 18.3 17.1 17.4 17.2 16.9 16.4 16.3 16.2 15.9 15.3 16.0 -12.6% -2.3 Al as ka 21.7 20.6 19.8 20.2 20.3 21.1 18.7 17.8 15.9 14.1 14.2 -34.5% -7.5 Ari zona 8.7 8.5 8.4 8.0 8.3 7.6 7.2 7.3 7.6 7.5 7.6 -12.6% -1.1 Arkans a s 14.4 14.2 14.0 13.6 13.1 12.2 12.3 12.6 12.5 12.4 13.0 -9.9% -1.4 Ca l i forni a 4.9 4.9 4.8 4.7 4.5 4.3 4.3 4.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 -17.8% -0.9 Col orado 6.3 6.7 6.4 6.4 6.5 6.4 6.3 6.4 6.3 6.1 6.2 -1.8% -0.1 Connecti cut 4.6 4.3 4.3 4.5 4.5 4.3 4.1 3.9 3.8 3.9 3.7 -19.9% -0.9 Del a wa re 5.0 4.7 4.8 4.6 4.4 4.4 4.1 4.3 4.3 3.3 3.3 -34.6% -1.7 Di s tri ct of Col umbi a 1.0 0.9 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 -39.4% -0.4 Fl ori da 6.9 6.6 6.6 6.4 6.3 6.0 5.9 5.8 5.8 5.8 6.1 -11.4% -0.8

288

Primary feather molt of juvenile mourning doves in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRIMARY FEATHER MOLT OF JUVENILE MOURNING DOVES IN TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL EUGENE MORROW Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983... Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences PRIMARY FEATHER MOLT OF JUVENILE MOURNING DOVES IN TEXAS A Thesis by MICHAEL EUGENE MORROW Approved as to style and content by: Nova J. Silvy (Chairman of Committee) Wallace G. Klussmann (Head...

Morrow, Michael Eugene

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)...

290

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy...

291

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Nuclear Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer capacity (mw)...

292

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Nuclear Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

293

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Nuclear Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana total electric power industry, summer capacity and net generation, by energy source, 2010 Primary energy source Summer...

294

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERCSPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity...

295

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative IGBP-DIS Global Primary Production Data Initiative The GPPDI Workshop was held in Cincinnati, U.S.A., December 1996 (Olson et al., 1997). Summary (September 1996) by Dick Olson and Steve Prince from Global Change Newsletter No. 27; International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme: A Study of Global Change (IGBP) of the International Council of Scientific Unions Global modelling and monitoring of net primary production (NPP) is being given high priority in IGBP owing to increasing concern over issues such as the consequences of perturbations in the carbon cycle, the impacts of global land-use change, global climate change, and global food security. Significant advances have been made in process modelling and in the use of remote sensing to monitor global vegetation. The advances in modelling and remote sensing of NPP have highlighted the lack of readily available, reliable information from field studies with which to parameterise and validate the models. The Global Primary Production Data Initiative (GPPDI) is intended to remedy this problem by identifying existing field data sets of primary production and associated environmental data. The programme is using data sets for representative sites, and extrapolating or regionalising the better data sets to grid cells sizes of up to 0.5º x 0.5º. Emphasis is on variables needed to parameterise and validate primary production models, including above and below ground NPP, standing crop, LAI, climate data, site data and landscape variability.

296

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will expedite accurate financial accounting. Industrial endusers will benefit through continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use. To meet this need, Sandia has developed a natural gas heating value monitoring instrument using existing and modified microfabricated components. The instrument consists of a silicon micro-fabricated gas chromatography column in conjunction with a catalytic micro-calorimeter sensor. A reference thermal conductivity sensor provides diagnostics and surety. This combination allows for continuous calorimetric determination with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This system will find application at remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. Microfabrication techniques will allow the analytical components to be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost.

Einfeld, Wayne; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Moorman, Matthew Wallace

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sulfidation-oxidation of advanced metallic materials in simulated low-Btu coal-gasifier environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of structural alloys in complex multicomponent gas environments is of considerable interest for their effective utilization in coal conversion schemes. Little understanding...

T. C. Tiearney Jr.; K. Natesan

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy Policy: Independence by 1985 My Be Unreachable Without Btu Tax  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...domestic oil production and the diffi-culties...Countries (OPEC). The decontrol...the Earth Day move-ment...indeed-high enough per-haps to...about by OPEC in late 1973 and early...of oil a day less than...18 miles per gallon by...of oil a day (mbd...consumption in 1973. The added...domestic production of energy...

LUTHER J. CARTER

1976-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...:F.~:brP'RQJ~:Cr::::::::: ::: :::] by LONE STAR GAS COMPANY JIM PHILLIPS, P.E., CEM IEQUIPMENT D A T Ai IENERGY DAT Ai KW Gas Rate: $4.86 per MCFGenerator Size: 5"00 Coqen Rate: $3.00 Iper MCF Recoverable Heat: 4.3' MMBH I _ Fuel Consumption: 8.0 MCFH Electric Rate $6.80 per...

Phillips, J. N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural gas from shale formation – The evolution, evidences and challenges of shale gas revolution in United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Extraction of natural gas from shale rock in the United States (US) is one of the landmark events in the 21st century. The combination of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing can extract huge quantities of natural gas from impermeable shale formations, which were previously thought to be either impossible or uneconomic to produce. This review offers a comprehensive insight into US shale gas opportunities, appraising the evolution, evidence and the challenges of shale gas production in the US. The history of US shale gas in this article is divided into three periods and based on the change of oil price (i.e., the period before the 1970s oil crisis, the period from 1970s to 2000, and the period since 2000), the US has moved from being one of the world's biggest importers of gas to being self-sufficient in less than a decade, with the shale gas production increasing 12-fold (from 2000 to 2010). The US domestic natural gas price hit a 10-year low in 2012. The US domestic natural gas price in the first half of 2012 was about $2 per million British Thermal Unit (BTU), compared with Brent crude, the world benchmark price for oil, now about $ 80–100/barrel, or $14–17 per million BTU. Partly due to an increase in gas-fired power generation in response to low gas prices, US carbon emissions from fossil-fuel combustion fell by 430 million ton CO2 – more than any other country – between 2006 and 2011. Shale gas also stimulated economic growth, creating 600,000 new jobs in the US by 2010. However, the US shale gas revolution would be curbed, if the environmental risks posed by hydraulic fracturing are not managed effectively. The hydraulic fracturing is water intensive, and can cause pollution in the marine environment, with implications for long-term environmental sustainability in several ways. Also, large amounts of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, can be emitted during the shale gas exploration and production. Hydraulic fracturing also may induce earthquakes. These environmental risks need to be managed by good practices which is not being applied by all the producers in all the locations. Enforcing stronger regulations are necessary to minimize risk to the environment and on human health. Robust regulatory oversight can however increase the cost of extraction, but stringent regulations can foster an historic opportunity to provide cheaper and cleaner gas to meet the consumer demand, as well as to usher in the future growth of the industry.

Qiang Wang; Xi Chen; Awadhesh N. Jha; Howard Rogers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Selected chemistry of primary producers, primary consumers and suspended matter from Corpus Christi Bay and the northwest Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, suspended matter (suspended sediment) samples were vacuum filtered using 0. 4 p, 47 mi. llimeter diameter Nucleopore membrane filters. All samples were subsequently washed with deionized water (to remove dissolved solids) and dried at 60 C. Once dry...SELECTED CHEMISTRY OF PRIMARY PRODUCERS, PRIMARY CONSUMERS AND SUSPENDED MATTER FROM CORPUS CHRISTI BAY AND THE NORTHWEST GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis ROBERT RUSSELL SIMS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

Sims, Robert Russell

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

State of Connecticut Connecticut State Library  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State of Connecticut Connecticut State Library Office of the Public Records Administrator www, and §7-109 of the General Statutes of Connecticut (CGS). Definitions "Agency" means a state agency administered by the Connecticut State Library as referred to in CGS §11-8. "Public record" means any recorded

Holsinger, Kent

304

State-Machine Replication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State-Machine Replication #12;The Problem Clients Server #12;The Problem Clients Server #12;The (state machine) #12;The Solution 1. Make server deterministic (state machine) State machine #12;The Solution 1. Make server deterministic (state machine) 2. Replicate server State machines #12;The Solution 1

Venkataramani, Arun

305

Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L.von 2. The EV primary energy consumption relative to that~ Fig. 3. The EV primary energy consumption relative to thatVehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum

Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

307

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species Liquids: Reactivity of Primary Species James F. Wishart In "Ionic Liquids as Green Solvents: Progress and Prospects" Rogers, R. D. and Seddon, K. R. , Eds.; ACS Symp. Ser. 856, Ch. 31, pp. 381-395, American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 2003. (ISBN 0-84123-856-1) [Information about the book] Abstract: An understanding of the radiation chemistry of ionic liquids is important for development of their applications in radioactive material processing and for the application of pulse radiolysis techniques to the general study of chemical reactivity in ionic liquids. The distribution of primary radiolytic species and their reactivities determine the yields of ultimate products and the radiation stability of a particular ionic liquid. This chapter introduces some principles of radiation chemistry and the

308

Hepatic resection for primary and secondary neoplasms of the liver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fifty consecutive major hepatic resections were performed for primary and secondary malignant neoplasms of the liver. There were 7 children and 9 adults with primary neoplasms and 34 patients with secondary neoplasms. The mortality rate was 0 percent and the morbidity rate, 14 percent. Postoperative morbidity correlated with operative blood loss. The 5 year survival rates for children and adults with primary neoplasms were 42 percent and 22 percent, respectively, and the 5 year survival rate for adults with secondary neoplasms was 15 percent. Factors such as disease-free interval, number of metastases, and stage of metastases did not influence the postoperative survival rate. Also, there was no difference in survival rate between patients whose metastases were resected by lobectomy or segmentectomy and those whose metastases were resected by wedge resection.

Rodney F. Pommier; Eugene A. Woltering; John R. Campbell; William S. Fletcher

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oregon State University OSU Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OSU Direct Drive Power Generation Buoys Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description When the coil experiences a changing magnetic field created by the heaving magnets voltage is generated Technology Dimensions

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - australian primary care Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 1 2011 Australian Competitive Grants Register (ACGR) COMMONWEALTH Summary: Primary Health Care Research Institute Centres of Research Excellence in Primary Care NEW 2011......

311

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

312

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 FY 2007 Federal Building Energy Use Shares, by Fuel Type and Agency Site Primary | Primary | FY 2007 Fuel Type Percent Percent | Agency Percent | (1015 Btu) Electricity 49.4%...

313

New Jersey Industrial Energy Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

452.1 trillion British thermal units (Btu). As part of an initiative to reduce the energy intensity of the American manufacturing sector, the United States Department of...

314

State of the State's Rural Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of health status, health behavior, or health- care access and Oklahomans do not compare favorablyState of the State's Rural Health 2007 Edition Produced by OSU Center for Rural Health ASnapshotof-4391 January 1, 2007 Dear Reader: Welcome to the Oklahoma State University Center for Rural Health's inaugural

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

315

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 xix Energy Perspectives 18.97 in 1970 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to fill the gap. In 2007, net imported energy accounted for 29 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2000) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

316

Word Pro - Perspectives.lwp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Review 2009 Annual Energy Review 2009 xix 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Quadrillion Btu The United States was self-sufficient in energy until the late 1950s when energy consumption began to outpace domestic production. At that point, the Nation began to import more energy to meet its needs. In 2009, net imported energy accounted for 24 percent of all energy consumed. Figure 1. Primary Energy Overview Energy Perspectives Overview Exports Production Imports Consumption 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 0 5 10 15 20 25 Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dolla Figure 3. Energy Use per Dollar of Gross Domestic Product After 1970, the amount of energy consumed to produce a dollar's worth of the Nation's output of goods and services trended down. The decline resulted from efficiency improvements and structural changes in the econ-

317

Material balance in atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion of North Dakota lignite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cyclone/fabric filter system limited particulate emissions to extremely low levels of only 0.00026 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu to 0.00040 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu. Emissions, in the flue gas, of trace and minor elements were very low when compared to a well controlled conventional boiler and to environmental goals. The majority of the trace and minor elements left the FBC system in the primary cyclone catch and the bed drain. Emissions in the flue gas of many trace and minor elements were less than 0.1 percent of the total input to the FBC system. Trace and minor element material balance in FBC systems can be difficult to close unless problems with changes in bed inventory are minimized by long periods of steady state operation.

Hall, R.R.; McCabe, M.M.; McGrath, D.; Sears, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Ohio State University South Campus High Rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Ohio State University South Campus High Rise Building & Utility Assessment Page 4.1 STRUCTURAL Campus High Rise Building & Utility Assessment Page 4.2 STRUCTURAL CONSTRAINTS The primary structural High Rise Building & Utility Assessment Page 4.3 CONNECTOR BUILDING The connector building discussed

319

Nozick's minimal state?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In his book, Anarchy , State, and Utopia, Robert Nozick argues that the only state that can be justified is the minimal state, a state limited to providing protection for all its citizens. Nozick explains how a minimal state could naturally develop...

Russell, Darrell James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

320

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings Life Cycle Analysis and Energy Conservation Standards for State Buildings < Back Eligibility Institutional Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Ohio State Architect's Office In 1995 Ohio passed legislation requiring that all state agencies perform life-cycle cost analyses prior to the construction of new buildings, and energy consumption analyses prior to new leases. Both analyses are to be primary considerations in either building design or leasing decisions. The

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Quantum harmonic oscillator state synthesis by reservoir engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The robust generation of quantum states in the presence of decoherence is a primary challenge for explorations of quantum mechanics at larger scales. Using the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion, we utilize reservoir engineering to generate squeezed, coherent and displaced-squeezed states as steady states in the presence of noise. We verify the created state by generating two-state correlated spin-motion Rabi oscillations resulting in high contrast measurements. For both cooling and measurement, we use spin-oscillator couplings that provide transitions between oscillator states in an engineered Fock state basis. Our approach should facilitate studies of entanglement, quantum computation, and open-system quantum simulations in a wide range of physical systems.

D. Kienzler; H. -Y. Lo; B. Keitch; L. de Clercq; F. Leupold; F. Lindenfelser; M. Marinelli; V. Negnevitsky; J. P. Home

2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Quantum harmonic oscillator state synthesis by reservoir engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The robust generation of quantum states in the presence of decoherence is a primary challenge for explorations of quantum mechanics at larger scales. Using the mechanical motion of a single trapped ion, we utilize reservoir engineering to generate squeezed, coherent and displaced-squeezed states as steady states in the presence of noise. We verify the created state by generating two-state correlated spin-motion Rabi oscillations resulting in high contrast measurements. For both cooling and measurement, we use spin-oscillator couplings that provide transitions between oscillator states in an engineered Fock state basis. Our approach should facilitate studies of entanglement, quantum computation, and open-system quantum simulations in a wide range of physical systems.

D. Kienzler; H. -Y. Lo; B. Keitch; L. de Clercq; F. Leupold; F. Lindenfelser; M. Marinelli; V. Negnevitsky; J. P. Home

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

323

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Susceptibility to ATP depletion of primary proximal tubular cell subjected to ATP depletion using antimycin A. Results: Surprisingly, there was no difference in the amount, Viability, Survival, Apoptosis knockout mice, shRNA, ATP depletion, Metabolic stress, Antimycin Background

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Equity markets and economic development: Does the primary market matter?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the secondary market transactions. In addition, from a macroeconomics perspectivea transaction on a stockEquity markets and economic development: Does the primary market matter? Andriansyaha,b,*and George and secondary equity markets in economic growth. In contrast to standard literature consideringsecondary market

325

Life-Cycle Methods for Comparing Primary and Rechargeable Batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If battery materials are recycled, the recovered metals may be used in the production of new batteries, or they may be used for another secondary application. ... fuels ... The converted fuel equivalent demand is about 49 times less for rechargeable batteries than for primary ones. ...

Rebecca L. Lankey; Francis C. McMichael

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

326

Assessing the Influence of Secondary Organic versus Primary Carbonaceous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIT research centers: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center for Energy and improve public understanding of global environment and energy challenges, thereby contributing to informedAssessing the Influence of Secondary Organic versus Primary Carbonaceous Aerosols on Long

327

Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 Introduction Radiation is the primary energy source and the ultimate energy sink for the Earth in the Earth's atmosphere and can be used for the evaluation and improvement of models designed for weather. Also, an example of measurement quality control is given. Then it is shown how the calibration

Haak, Hein

328

Heavy Primary Cosmic Rays at Geomagnetic Latitude of 41°N  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report includes the results from 9 balloon flights at geomagnetic latitude 41°N of altitude range from 70 000 to 100 000 feet. Only primaries of Z>~10 are considered. 2410 tracks are involved, in Ilford G-5 and G-0 emulsion exposures. Given are the charge spectra, flux, mean free paths, and angular distributions.

O. B. Young and H. Y. Chen

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Unsolved problems in the study of primary reactions in  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is made of some problems involving electron transport to the oxidized photoactive pigments in photosynthesis. Electron donors for chlorophyll a+ may be H2O or X(HCO3?). On the basis of published experimental data, it is concluded that the primary electron donor is most likely the compound X(HCO3?).

H Metzner

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

statistics (Georgia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Natural gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 38,488 7 Electric Utilities 29,293 3...

331

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,520 6 Electric Utilities 10,739 26...

332

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Natural Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,781 49 Electric Utilities 8 50 Independent...

333

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,837 14...

334

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electricity Profile 2012 Table 1. 2012 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,587...

335

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alabama Table 1. 2012 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 32,547 9 Electric...

336

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MROWECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,057 45 Electric Utilities 3,428 36 Independent...

337

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRORFCSERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,146 5 Electric Utilities 5,274 34...

338

EXPERIMENT AND NEURAL NETWORK MODEL OF PRIMARY FRAGMENTATION OF OIL SHALE IN FLUIDIZED BED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the fluidized bed temperature is an important factor of primary fragmentation of oil shale, and

Zhigang Cui; Xiangxin Han; Xiumin Jiang; Jianguo Liu

339

Modeling Fossil Energy Demands of Primary Nonferrous Metal Production: The Case of Copper  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modeling Fossil Energy Demands of Primary Nonferrous Metal Production: The Case of Copper ... Alumbrera (Argentina) ...

Pilar Swart; Jo Dewulf

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Primary productivity demands of global fishing fleets Reg Watson1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary productivity demands of global fishing fleets Reg Watson1,2 , Dirk Zeller1 & Daniel Pauly1 production driven by solar energy. Primary production required (PPR) esti- mates how much primary production. Pauly. 2013. Primary productivity demands of global fisheries. Fish and Fisheries. #12;Introduction

Pauly, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Interactions between MUR10/CesA7-Dependent Secondary Cellulose Biosynthesis and Primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these processes are interrelated. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MUR10 gene is required for normal primary

Pauly, Markus

342

Generalized coherent states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the coherent state of the harmonic oscillator, the probability density is that of the ground state subjected to an oscillation along a classical trajectory. Senitzky and others pointed out that there are states of the harmonic oscillator corresponding to an identical oscillatory displacement of the probability density of any energy eigenstate. These generalizations of the coherent state are rarely discussed, yet they furnish an interesting set of quantum states of light that combine features of number states and coherent states. Here we give an elementary account of the quantum optics of generalized coherent states.

T. G. Philbin

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

343

States & Emerging Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States & Emerging Energy Technologies August 15, 2013 DOE's State and Local Technical Assistance Program 2 DOE's Technical Assistance Program * Strategic Energy Planning * Program...

344

WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V. [SRC RF TRINITI, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow Reg. (Russian Federation); Ugryumov, A.V. [JSC TVEL, 119017, 24/26 Bolshaya Ordynka st., Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Energy conservation in the primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary aluminum and chlor-alkali industries together use nearly 13% of the electrical energy consumed by US industry. As part of its mission to promote energy conservation in basic US industries, the DOE surveys the present technological status of the major electrochemical industries and evaluates promising technological innovations that may lead to reduced energy requirements. This study provides technical and economic analyses in support of a government program of research and development in advanced electrolytic technology. This program is intended to supplement the development efforts directed toward energy savings by private industry. Sections II and III of this report cover aluminum and chlorine production processes only, since these two industries represent over 90% of the electrical energy requirements of all electrolytic industries in the United States. Section IV examines barriers to accelerated research and development by the electrolytic industries, and makes suggestions for government actions to overcome these barriers.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Qutrit Magic State Distillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magic state distillation (MSD) is a purification protocol that plays a central role in fault tolerant quantum computation. Repeated iteration of the steps of a MSD protocol, generates pure single non-stabilizer states, or magic states, from multiple copies of a mixed resource state using stabilizer operations only. Thus mixed resource states promote the stabilizer operations to full universality. Magic state distillation was introduced for qubit-based quantum computation, but little has been known concerning MSD in higher dimensional qudit-based computation. Here, we describe a general approach for studying MSD in higher dimensions. We use it to investigate the features of a qutrit MSD protocol based on the 5-qutrit stabilizer code. We show that this protocol distills non-stabilizer magic states, and identify two types of states, that are attractors of this iteration map. Finally, we show how these states may be converted, via stabilizer circuits alone, into a state suitable for state injected implementation ...

Anwar, Hussain; Browne, Dan E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Simulation of primary fuel atomization processes at subcritical pressures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents results from an LDRD project for the first-principles simulation of the early stages of spray formation (primary atomization). The first part describes a Cartesian embedded-wall method for the calculation of flow internal to a real injector in a fully coupled primary calculation. The second part describes the extension to an all-velocity formulation by introducing a momentum-conservative semi-Lagrangian advection and by adding a compressible term in the Poisson's equation. Accompanying the description of the new algorithms are verification tests for simple two-phase problems in the presence of a solid interface; a validation study for a scaled-up multi-hole Diesel injector; and demonstration calculations for the closing and opening transients of a single-hole injector and for the high-pressure injection of liquid fuel at supersonic velocity.

Arienti, Marco

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EBR-II Primary Tank Wash-Water Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EBR-II reactor at Idaho National Laboratory was a liquid sodium metal cooled reactor that operated for 30 years. It was shut down in 1994; the fuel was removed by 1996; and the bulk of sodium metal coolant was removed from the reactor by 2001. Approximately 1100 kg of residual sodium remained in the primary system after draining the bulk sodium. To stabilize the remaining sodium, both the primary and secondary systems were treated with a purge of moist carbon dioxide. Most of the residual sodium reacted with the carbon dioxide and water vapor to form a passivation layer of primarily sodium bicarbonate. The passivation treatment was stopped in 2005 and the primary system is maintained under a blanket of dry carbon dioxide. Approximately 670 kg of sodium metal remains in the primary system in locations that were inaccessible to passivation treatment or in pools of sodium that were too deep for complete penetration of the passivation treatment. The EBR-II reactor was permitted by the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) in 2002 under a RCRA permit that requires removal of all remaining sodium in the primary and secondary systems by 2022. The proposed baseline closure method would remove the large components from the primary tank, fill the primary system with water, react the remaining sodium with the water and dissolve the reaction products in the wash water. This method would generate a minimum of 100,000 gallons of caustic, liquid, low level radioactive, hazardous waste water that must be disposed of in a permitted facility. On February 19-20, 2008, a workshop was held in Idaho Falls, Idaho, to look at alternatives that could meet the RCRA permit clean closure requirements and minimize the quantity of hazardous waste generated by the cleanup process. The workshop convened a panel of national and international sodium cleanup specialists, subject matter experts from the INL, and the EBR-II Wash Water Project team that organized the workshop. The workshop was conducted by a trained facilitator using Value Engineering techniques to elicit the most technically sound solutions from the workshop participants. The path forward includes developing the OBA into a well engineered solution for achieving RCRA clean closure of the EBR-II Primary Reactor Tank system. Several high level tasks are also part of the path forward such as reassigning responsibility of the cleanup project to a dedicated project team that is funded by the DOE Office of Environmental Management, and making it a priority so that adequate funding is available to complete the project. Based on the experience of the sodium cleanup specialists, negotiations with the DEQ will be necessary to determine a risk-based de minimus quantity for acceptable amount of sodium that can be left in the reactor systems after cleanup has been completed.

Demmer, R. L.; Heintzelman, J. B.; Merservey, R. H.; Squires, L. N.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Vacuum pyrolysis of bark residues and primary sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Black spruce bark residues and primary sludges derived from the operation of the Daishowa pulp and paper plant in Quebec City, PQ, were processed by vacuum pyrolysis in a laboratory-scale batch reactor. The pyrolysis oil, water, charcoal, and gas were recovered and analyzed. The bark residues yielded 30.6% oil and 34.1% charcoal, and the primary sludges gave 40.1% oil and 30.1% charcoal on a feedstock air-dry basis. The oil phases recovered from the two pyrolysis experiments were fractionated into eight fractions; they were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both pyrolysis oil samples had a high content of phenolic compounds. These oils contained various fine chemicals that have possible commercial potential. Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, as well as long- and short-chain carboxylic acids, are also present in both pyrolysis oils.

Pakdel, H.; Couture, G.; Roy, C. (Univ. Laval, Ste-Foy, Quebec (Canada))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic primary production in a high-CO2 world Etienne Low-De´carie, Gregor F. Fussmann, and Graham-Penfield, Montreal, QC, H3A 1B1, Canada Here, we provide a review of the direct effect of increas- ing CO2 on aquatic: the assessment of theories about limitation of productivity and the integration of CO2 into the co

Fussman, Gregor

351

DETECTION OF THE COMPRESSED PRIMARY STELLAR WIND IN {eta} CARINAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of three Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph spectroscopic mappings, spaced approximately one year apart, reveal three partial arcs in [Fe II] and [Ni II] emissions moving outward from {eta} Carinae. We identify these arcs with the shell-like structures, seen in the three-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, formed by compression of the primary wind by the secondary wind during periastron passages.

Teodoro, M.; Madura, T. I.; Gull, T. R. [Astrophysics Science Division, Code 667, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Corcoran, M. F.; Hamaguchi, K., E-mail: mairan.teodoro@nasa.gov [CRESST and X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 662, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 State Opportunities for Action: Update of States' CHP Activities (ACEEE), October 2003 This...

353

Commercial Reference Building: Primary School | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Primary School Primary School Dataset Summary Description Commercial reference buildings provide complete descriptions for whole building energy analysis using EnergyPlus simulation software. Included here is data pertaining to the reference building type Primary School for each of the 16 climate zones, and each of three construction categories: new construction, post-1980 construction existing buildings, pre-1980 construction existing buildings.The dataset includes four key components: building summary, zone summary, location summary and a picture. Building summary includes details about: form, fabric, and HVAC. Zone summary includes details such as: area, volume, lighting, and occupants for all types of zones in the building. Location summary includes key building information as it pertains to each climate zone, including: fabric and HVAC details, utility costs, energy end use, and peak energy demand.In total, DOE developed 16 reference building types that represent approximately 70% of commercial buildings in the U.S.; for each type, building models are available for the three categories. The commercial reference buildings (formerly known as commercial building benchmark models) were developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in conjunction with three of its national laboratories.Additional data is available directly from DOE's Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) Website, including EnergyPlus software input files (.idf) and results of the EnergyPlus simulations (.html).

354

Doorway states and billiards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Whenever a distinct state is immersed in a sea of complicated and dense states, the strength of the distinct state, which we refer to as a doorway, is distributed in their neighboring states. We analyze this mechanism for 2-D billiards with different geometries. One of them is symmetric and integrable, another is symmetric but chaotic, and the third has a capricious form. The fact that the doorway-state mechanism is valid for such highly diverse cases, proves that it is robust.

Franco-Villafane, J. A.; Mendez-Sanchez, R. A. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca Mor. (Mexico); Flores, J. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Centro Internacional de Ciencias, A. C., P.O. Box 6-101 C.P. 62131 Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico); Mateos, J. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Novaro, O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Seligman, T. H. [Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 48-3, 62251 Cuernavaca Mor. (Mexico); Centro Internacional de Ciencias, A. C., P.O. Box 6-101 C.P. 62131 Cuernavaca, Mor. (Mexico)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

355

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University _______________ 1.1 Page 1 Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado that same year as Colorado's land-grant college under the Morrill Act of 1862. The Morrill Act provided

Stephens, Graeme L.

356

Colorado State University Colorado State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado State University Colorado State University In 1870, the Territorial Council and House of Representatives of the Territory of Colorado created the Colorado Agricultural College. When the Territory became. The College admitted its first students in 1879 and received designation that same year as Colorado's land

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

357

STATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5.4, 25402.8 and 25910. II. HISTORY OF THE PROCEEDING To develop the 2013 Standards, the Energy CommissionSTATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION ) 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency ) Docket No. 12-BSTD-1 Standards Rulemaking Proceeding ) California Code

358

STATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. HISTORY OF THE PROCEEDING To develop the 2013 Standards, the Energy Commission conducted an open, transpaSTATE OF CALIFORNIA STATE ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION ) 2013 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency) Docket No. 12-BSTD-1 Standards Rulemaking Proceeding ) Order No. 12

359

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

3 3 Commercial Delivered and Primary Energy Consumption Intensities, by Year Percent Delivered Energy Consumption Primary Energy Consumption Floorspace Post-2000 Total Consumption per Total Consumption per (million SF) Floorspace (1) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) (10^15 Btu) SF (thousand Btu/SF) 1980 50.9 N.A. 5.99 117.7 10.57 207.7 1990 64.3 N.A. 6.74 104.8 13.30 207.0 2000 (2) 68.5 N.A. 8.20 119.7 17.15 250.3 2010 81.1 26% 8.74 107.7 18.22 224.6 2015 84.1 34% 8.88 105.5 18.19 216.2 2020 89.1 43% 9.02 101.2 19.15 214.9 2025 93.9 52% 9.56 101.8 20.06 213.6 2030 98.2 60% 9.96 101.5 20.92 213.1 2035 103.0 68% 10.38 100.8 21.78 211.4 Note(s): Source(s): EIA, State Energy Consumption Database, June 2011 for 1980-2009; DOE for 1980 floorspace; EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 1994, Jan. 1994, Table A5, p. 62 for 1990 floorspace; EIA, AEO 2003, Jan. 2003, Table A5, p. 127 for 2000 floorspace; and EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release, Jan. 2012,

360

NW Natural (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NW Natural (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NW Natural (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program NW Natural (Gas) - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Other Manufacturing Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom: $1/annual therm saved Program Info Funding Source Energy Trust of Oregon State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount HVAC Unit Heater: $1.50/kBtu Furnace: $3/kBtu/hr Radiant Heating (Non-Modulating): $6.50/kBtu/hr Radiant Heating (Modulating): $10/kBtu/hr Tank Water Heater: 2.50/kBtu/hr Tankless/Instantaneous Water Heater: $2.00/kBtu/hr

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Primary productivity and trace-metal contamination measurements from a clean rosette system versus ultra-clean Go-Flo bottles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Primary productivity rates, measured during the 1992 United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS) Equatorial Pacific (EqPac) process study with a new Trace-Metal clean rosette system (TM rosette) designed to be trace-metal clean, agreed within 5% with those determined using ultra-clean procedures that were previously shown to be trace-metal clean. The TM rosette system did not inhibit phytoplankton primary productivity rates. Using the TM rosette system, there was no contamination of Co, Ni, Cu, Cd or Pb, and only slight contamination of Fe and Zn, relative to ultra-clean collection. However, the slight contaminations were below levels that affect primary productivity rates. Therefore, systematic phytoplankton inhibition by trace-metal contamination appears to have been successfully eliminated with water collected using the TM rosette system.

Marta P. Sanderson; Craig N. Hunter; Steve E. Fitzwater; R.Michael Gordon; Richard T. Barber

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NPO Qualifying Officials Primary Functional Area* Qualifying Official  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NPO Qualifying Officials NPO Qualifying Officials Primary Functional Area* Qualifying Official Aviation Safety Officer/ Aviation Manager Richard Caummisar Chemical Processing Jim Goss, Ken Ivey Civil/Structural Engineering Dale Christensen Conduct of Maintenance Any Qualified Facility Representative, Carlos Alvarado, Earl Burkholder, Terrv Zimmennan Construction Management and Engineering Anna Beard, Terry Zimmennan, Dale Christenson, Don Peters Construction Project/Safety Richard Caummisar, Terry Zimmerman, Susan Morris Criticality Safety Roy Hedtke, Ed Kendall Deactivation and Decommission Catherine Schidel Explosives Safety Program Scott Wood Electrical Systems Scott Doleml, Roger Kulavich, Steve Wellbaum .Emergency Management Rodney Barnes Environmental Management Areas Susan Morris. Craig Snider, Jim Donnelly

363

CDKN2A Mutations in Multiple Primary Melanomas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gift from S. Hollenberg) to yield the plasmid pBTM116/CDK4. The pBTM116/CDK4 plasmid was introduced into L40 Saccharomyces cerevisiae through lithium acetate transformation. Colonies were selected on Trp(-) medium, transformed with pVP16/p16 plasmids containing either the wild-type or variant CDKN2A... Some patients with cancer have one or more subsequent primary tumors of the same histologic subtype. This phenomenon can be explained by the long-term exposure of a particular tissue to a carcinogen (“field cancerization”), the growth of micrometastatic ...

Monzon J.; Liu L.; Brill H.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

364

Environmental State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biology Water Science Nursery Management Plant Breeding Biofuel Feedstocks OUR DEPARTMENT The PLANT specialties, including plant breeding, genetic engineering, sustainable agriculture, ornamental production State University is the only land-grant, Hispanic serving university in the contiguous United States

365

A new approach for optimal sizing of battery energy storage system for primary frequency control of islanded Microgrid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a method for determining optimal size of a battery energy storage system (BESS) for primary frequency control of a Microgrid. A Microgrid is assumed to be portion of a low voltage distribution feeder including sources such as microturbine, diesel generator, fuel cell and photovoltaic system with slow response for frequency control. A BESS due to its very fast dynamic response can play an important role in restoring balance between supply and demand. In this paper, overloading capacity of the BESS is employed for fast handling of the primary frequency control of a MG. To achieve this purpose, by considering overloading characteristics and limitations of the state of charge (SOC) of battery, a control scheme of dc/ac converter for the BESS is developed. Based on this scheme, overloading capacity of the BESS and its permissible duration for participating in primary frequency control is determined. Simulation studies are carried out using PSCAD/EMTDC software package to evaluate the performance of the proposed control scheme.

Mohammad Reza Aghamohammadi; Hajar Abdolahinia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

367

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)"

368

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

369

" Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 4 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

370

States & Emerging Energy Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

371

AASG STATE GDR  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003198MLTPL00 AASG State Geothermal Data Repository for the National Geothermal Data System.  http://repository.stategeothermaldata.org/repository/ 

372

AASG State Geological Survey  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.Contributions to the NGDSAASG State Geological Survey

373

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for From the Research Project State Report forState Report forState Report forState Report for Washington University In cooperation with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife FINAL REPORT April 2011

374

Microsoft Word - CR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost Savings Amount Custom Fields Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost Savings Amount Custom Fields Background On August 29 th , 2013 the...

375

Towards achieving the full potential of primary care in cancer prevention.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of primary care cancer prevention service and science then explore approaches that could help primary care achieve its full...have identified external resources such as care management that can support cancer screening working in parallel...

Allen J. Dietrich

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Building Evalution Tools to Assess the Usability of Primary Care Clinics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of primary care practices, the architectural design of primary care clinics needs to address these changes to satisfy both patients and staff, and to improve efficiency and outcomes of care. There is limited literature on the design usability (efficiency...

Hussain, Tahseen 1986-

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

377

Understanding how primary care physicians work with personality disorder patients: a qualitative approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of the present study was to begin to develop an understanding of how primary care resident physicians work with patients with personality disorder-type characteristics and processes. Participants include fifteen primary care resident...

Deegear, James Otis

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Genomic medicine in primary care: Texas physicians' adoption of an innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New applications of genomic medicine stemming from the Human Genome Project are predicted to become routine components of primary care. Primary care physicians (PCPs) will increasingly become responsible for screening patients for inherited...

Suther, Sandra Gayle

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Black brane steady states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We follow the evolution of an asymptotically AdS black brane with a fixed temperature gradient at spatial infinity until a steady state is formed. The resulting energy density and energy flux of the steady state in the boundary theory are compared to a conjecture on the behavior of steady states in conformal field theories. Very good agreement is found.

Amado, Irene

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

State Contracting and Procurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Illustrated User Manual #12;2 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4/23/09 Copyright © 2008 RFP Depot, LLC dba Bid@bidsync.com Website: http://www.bidsync.com #12;3 State Contracting and Procurement Registration System (SCPRS) Rev. 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Sustainability Cal State Fullerton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Study Group October 28, 2008 #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from the Sustainability Initiative Safety Sally Yassine Contracts & Procurement #12;Sustainability at Cal State Fullerton A Report from

de Lijser, Peter

382

The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of male cancer deaths in the United States. However, the full range of prostate cancer genomic alterations is incompletely characterized. Here we present the complete sequence ...

Carter, Scott Lambert

383

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 Btu/KWh, 10,173 Btu/KWh, and 9,919 Btu/KWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-846, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys, 1998, 2002, and 2006. and Monthly Energy Review November 2005, and September 2009 DOE/EIA-0035(2005, 2009),Table A6. MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14

384

Video Object Segmentation through Spatially Accurate and Temporally Dense Extraction of Primary Object Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video Object Segmentation through Spatially Accurate and Temporally Dense Extraction of Primary primary object segments in videos in the `object proposal' domain. The extracted primary object regions are then used to build object models for optimized video segmentation. The proposed approach has several

Wu, Shin-Tson

385

Impact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the satellite- based estimates of PAR for modelling terrestrial primary productivity. 1. Introduction The global energy is referred to as net primary production (NPP). For terrestrial ecosystems GPP and NPP are givenImpact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity RACHEL T. PINKER

Montana, University of

386

Investing in Primary Health Care Achieving better health care in the community  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investing in Primary Health Care Achieving better health care in the community #12;Images by Nasir, Nueld Department of Primary Care Health Sciences Oxford has been responsible for some of the world and medical professionals. Primary Health Care provides the first point of contact in most health care systems

Oxford, University of

387

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

388

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solid-State Lighting Search Solid-State Lighting Search Search Help Solid-State Lighting HOME ABOUT THE PROGRAM R&D PROJECTS MARKET-BASED PROGRAMS SSL BASICS INFORMATION RESOURCES FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES EERE » Building Technologies Office » Solid-State Lighting Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on AddThis.com... Pause/Resume Photo of a large room with people standing around poster boards.

389

Carbon Emissions: Petroleum Refining Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Petroleum Refining Industry Petroleum Refining Industry Carbon Emissions in the Petroleum Refining Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 2911) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 79.9 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.5% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 16.5 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 6,263 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 28.9% Nonfuel Use of Energy Sources: 3,110 trillion Btu (49.7%) -- Naphthas and Other Oils: 1,328 trillion Btu -- Asphalt and Road Oil: 1,224 trillion Btu -- Lubricants: 416 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 12.75 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey", "Monthly Refinery Report" for 1994, and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998.

390

State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review State and Local Code Implementation: State Energy Officials - 2014 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Chris Wagner, National Association of...

391

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

392

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09" 09" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

393

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

394

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

395

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

396

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

397

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

398

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

399

ORNL DAAC, Net Primary Productivity Data, Feb. 5, 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compilation Available Compilation Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a Net Primary Productivity (NPP) compilation that brings together individual detailed site NPP data from the ORNL DAAC holdings in a form that is especially useful for comparative study and ecosystem modeling. "NPP Multi-Biome: Grassland, Boreal Forest, and Tropical Forest Sites, 1939-1996" offers NPP estimates, vegetation type, and climate information for 53 sites in the ORNL DAAC archive. Selection of the sites was originally based on the availability of consistent NPP and biomass data from the literature. The data set encompasses 34 grasslands, 14 tropical forest sites, and 5 boreal forest sites. Half of the sites include estimates of belowground NPP. Visit the NPP project page to access the NPP data and documentation

400

Thermal characteristics of a classical solar telescope primary mirror  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed thermal and structural analysis of a 2m class solar telescope mirror which is subjected to a varying heat load at an observatory site. A 3-dimensional heat transfer model of the mirror takes into account the heating caused by a smooth and gradual increase of the solar flux during the day-time observations and cooling resulting from the exponentially decaying ambient temperature at night. The thermal and structural response of two competing materials for optical telescopes, namely Silicon Carbide -best known for excellent heat conductivity and Zerodur -preferred for its extremely low coefficient of thermal expansion, is investigated in detail. The insight gained from these simulations will provide a valuable input for devising an efficient and stable thermal control system for the primary mirror.

Banyal, Ravinder K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observer's sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Sereno, Mauro; De Luca, Fabiana [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Primary caustics and critical points behind a Kerr black hole  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The primary optical caustic surface behind a Kerr black hole is a four-cusped tube displaced from the line of sight. We derive the caustic surface in the nearly asymptotic region far from the black hole through a Taylor expansion of the lightlike geodesics up to and including fourth-order terms in m/b and a/b, where m is the black hole mass, a the spin, and b the impact parameter. The corresponding critical locus in the observer’s sky is elliptical and a pointlike source inside the caustics will be imaged as an Einstein cross. With regard to lensing near critical points, a Kerr lens is analogous to a circular lens perturbed by a dipole and a quadrupole potential. The caustic structure of the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center could be probed by lensing of low mass x-ray binaries in the galactic inner regions or by hot spots in the accretion disk.

Mauro Sereno and Fabiana De Luca

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

403

Preoperational test report, primary ventilation condenser cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This represents the preoperational test report for the Primary Ventilation Condenser Cooling System, Project W-030. Project W-030 provides a ventilation upgrade for the four Aging Waste Facility tanks. The system uses a closed chilled water piping loop to provide offgas effluent cooling for tanks AY101, AY102, AZ1O1, AZ102; the offgas is cooled from a nominal 100 F to 40 F. Resulting condensation removes tritiated vapor from the exhaust stack stream. The piping system includes a package outdoor air-cooled water chiller with parallel redundant circulating pumps; the condenser coil is located inside a shielded ventilation equipment cell. The tests verify correct system operation and correct indications displayed by the central Monitor and Control System.

Clifton, F.T.

1997-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of the magnesium primary production technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At current production levels, direct energy savings achievable in primary magnesium production are 1.2 milliquads of energy per annum. Were magnesium to penetrate the automotive market to an average level of 50 pounds per vehicle, the resultant energy savings at the production stage would be somewhat larger, but the resulting savings in gasoline would conserve an estimated 325 milliquads of energy per year. The principal barrier to more widespread use of magnesium in the immediate future is its price. A price reduction of magnesium of 10% would lead to widespread conversion of aluminum die and permanent mold castings to magnesium. This report addresses the technology of electrolytic and thermic magnesium production and the economics of expanded magnesium production and use.

Flemings, M.C.; Kenney, G.B.; Sadoway, D.R.; Clark, J.P.; Szekely, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Spectrophotometric analysis of the primary component of V 380 Cyg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The curve-of-growth method and spectrograms obtained with the 6-m telescope were used to determine the parameters of the atmosphere of the primary component of the close binary system V 380 Cyg: T/sub e/ = 22,500/sup 0/K, log g = 3.4, V/sub t/ = 3.28 km/sec. The value of log g is confirmed by comparison of the observed profiles and the equivalent widths of the hydrogen lines with the theoretical results. The method of model atmospheres was used to determine the chemical composition. For the majority of elements, excesses of the abundances from 0.2 to 1.0 in the logarithm of the number of atoms were found; the helium abundance was found to be two times greater than the solar abundance, the calcium abundance 0.3 dex less than the solar value.

Leushin, V.V.; Topil'skaya, G.P.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

Kish, Joseph R. [Paprican; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Singbeil, Douglas [Paprican; Willoughby, Adam W [ORNL; Longmire, Hu Foster [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Development and Verification for the Control Method Using Surplus Pressure of Primary Pumps in Chiller Plant Systems for Air Conditioning which Adopts Primary/Secondary Piping Systems PPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(chiller side) and secondary flow loop (load side). It is a huge energy loss, because the primary pumps use their head to lead much flow to the decoupler. Therefore, we have developed new control method using surplus pressure of the primary pump to reduce...

Matsushita, N.; Fujimura, M.; Sumiyoshi, D.; Akashi, Y.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

States States Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

409

Alabama State Regulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations » Alabama State Regulations: Alabama State of Alabama The State Oil and Gas Board of Alabama, under the direction of the State Geologist and Oil and Gas Supervisor, is responsible for the regulation of oil and gas operations. The Board is divided into two administrative regions-north and south. The Board has broad authority in Alabama's oil and gas conservation statutes to promulgate and enforce rules and regulations to ensure the conservation and proper development of Alabama's petroleum resources. A major duty of the Board is to prevent pollution of fresh water supplies by oil, gas, salt water, or other contaminants resulting from oil and gas operations. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) administers the major federal environmental protection laws through regulations governing air pollution, water quality and supply, solid and hazardous waste management.

410

Pennsylvania State University | .EDUconnections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Old Main, Credit: George Chriss Research Research at Penn State Capabilities and Projects Institutes of Energy and the Environment Huck Institutes of Life Sciences Materials Research Institute Eberly College of Science Alternative Energy Research Research Publications Faculty Expertise Database Research News DOE Research Results Penn State Commencement 2012 United States Secretary of Energy Dr. Steven Chu was the commencement speaker at Penn State's Eberly College of Science 2012 spring graduation ceremony held May 5 at the Bryce Jordan Center on the University Park campus. Read more. Search this site: Search Over the past ten years, more than 28,000 graduate degrees were conferred by Penn State, including over 6,300 doctoral degrees. Resources About Penn State

411

Constitution The primary goal of the Wayne State University Chapter of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) is to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Society (BMES) is to promote biomedical engineering knowledge and its utilization and to serve all students interested in biomedical engineering by assisting in their academic, professional, and social the profession of biomedical engineering though the organized effort of this group in study, research

Berdichevsky, Victor

412

Ecosystem Variability and Estuarine Fisheries: A Synthesis Primary Investigators: Stuart A. Ludsin -Ohio State University and Stephen B. Brandt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suitability for striped bass also was low deep-water habitat, relative to shallow-water habitat, in mid web site) project (funded as part of the National Science Foundation's Land Margin Ecosystem (LMER-oxygen zone as refuge. This phenomenon was particularly evident in the deep, mid-region of the Bay, where

413

S75JULY 2010STATE OFTHE CLIMATE IN 2009 | biospheric (i.e., terrestrial and aquatic) net primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, these estimates suggest that the annual rate of ocean carbon storage has grown every year since the late 1700s, how- ever, the rate of increase in ocean carbon storage has not been able to keep pace of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Another key factor is the decreasing ability of the seawater to store the CO2

Maritorena, Stéphane

414

Design and Management of Colorado Landscapes Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate education, research,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and Management of Colorado Landscapes Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus of Colorado landscapes, serve as the primary provider of new management talent for Colorado's green industry, be recognized as the primary source of knowledge for Colorado's landscape industries, and be recognized

415

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

41 41 Table E1. Estimated Primary Energy Consumption in the United States, Selected Years, 1635-1945 (Quadrillion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Electricity Net Imports Total Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Total Wood 1 1635 NA - - - - NA - - (s) (s) - - (s) 1645 NA - - - - NA - - 0.001 0.001 - - 0.001 1655 NA - - - - NA - - .002 .002 - - .002 1665 NA - - - - NA - - .005 .005 - - .005 1675 NA - - - - NA - - .007 .007 - - .007 1685 NA - - - - NA - - .009 .009 - - .009 1695 NA - - - - NA - - .014 .014 - - .014 1705 NA - - - - NA - - .022 .022 - - .022 1715 NA - - - - NA - - .037 .037 - - .037

416

Proton-Neutron Final-State Interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reactions p(d,2p)n and d(p,2p)n were studied at a proton bombarding energy of 16.0 MeV and deuteron bombarding energies of 16.0 and 10.0 MeV. The protons were detected in coincidence with solid-state detectors at angles that allow strong enhancement of the p-n final-state interaction. The coincidence resolving time was sharpened by using time-energy correlation techniques that utilize an on-line SDS-910 computer. The data were analyzed using the "data-simulation technique." A simple theory, which, apart from normalization, contained three adjustable parameters, was found to produce satisfactory fits. In this theory, the final-state interactions are accounted for by assuming additive enhancements for each pair of final-state particles and each spin state. The primary interaction is approximated by the sum of a constant amplitude plus the spectator-effect amplitude. The widths of the final-state interaction peaks are in good agreement with Watson theory using the known singlet p-n scattering length anps of —23.69 F. The most accurately determined scattering length was extracted from the 16-MeV p+d data and was anps=-23.8±0.5 F. This agreement indicates that interference effects are not important in this reaction at center-of-mass energies above a few MeV if coincidence techniques are employed. With similar methods, a comparative study of the n+d reaction in order to measure the singlet n-n scattering length should be fruitful.

D. P. BOYD; P. F. DONOVAN; J. F. MOLLENAUER

1969-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

State & Regional Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Bioenergy Technologies Office partners with the National Biomass State and Regional Partnerships' five regional organizations that provide leadership in their regions with regard to policies...

418

State Gasoline Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS HUMANISTIC STUDIES Vol. III March 15, 192S No. 4 State Gasoline Taxes BY KDMUNI) IV LKAENKI), A. B., A, M. Instructor in Economics and Commerce The Unlvmity of Kansas PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY l... vast sums of money, Oregon was the first state to adopt a tax on gasoline to provide revenue for building and maintaining roads. Since this adoption in 1919, many states have passed laws provid ing for gasoline taxes until now forty-four states...

Learned, Edmund Philip

1925-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

State Energy Strategic Planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) presentation at a TAP webinar held on April 3, 2013 and dealing with state energy strategic planning.

420

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid-State Lighting Videos to Solid-State Lighting Videos to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Videos on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Solid-State Lighting Videos On this page you can access DOE Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Program videos. Photo of a museum art gallery with LED lights in track fixtures overhead. The City of Los Angeles LED Streetlight Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the About the Program Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Contacts on AddThis.com... Contacts Partnerships Solid-State Lighting Contacts For information about Solid-State Lighting, contact James Brodrick Lighting Program Manager Building Technologies Office U.S. Department of Energy

422

State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012 State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2012 This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department...

423

Valuing ecosystem services: A shadow price for net primary production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States c Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston 2007 We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed

Myneni, Ranga B.

424

Scaling Up Primary Health Services in Rural India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is also a member of the UN Millennium Project. Ravindra H. Dholakia is Professor of Economics of federal and state governments should rise from the 2004/05 level of 0.9 percent of GDP (federal government of roughly 4-fold in UP and 3-fold in MP from their current levels. On the national level, real public

425

An Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling; global energy minimum; bacteriorhodopsin; protonation state; pH titration; X-DEE; dead of lowest free energy is the most prob- able and thus of primary interest in structural research. ProteinsAn Extended Dead-End Elimination Algorithm to Determine Gap-Free Lists of Low Energy States EDDA

Ullmann, G. Matthias

426

A comparative study of the primary tax rebate system in South Africa in relation to Brazil and Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The South African primary rebate is governed by Section 6 of the Income Tax Act (58 of 1962). This primary tax rebate entitles taxpayers to… (more)

Candiotes, Alexander George

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Jump to: navigation, search Name Washington State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation Short Name DAHP Address 1063 South Capitol Way, Suite 106 Place Olympia, Washington Zip 98504 Phone number 360-586-3065 Website http://www.dahp.wa.gov/ References DAHP Website[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation is Washington's primary agency for historic preservation. This agency oversees the procedures for cultural resource discovery. References ↑ "DAHP Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Washington_State_Department_of_Archaeology_and_Historic_Preservation&oldid=694965"

428

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohio State University Metallurgical  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ohio State University Metallurgical Ohio State University Metallurgical Engineering Experiment Station -OH 0-05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY, METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION (OH.0-05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Columbus , Ohio OH.0-05-1 Evaluation Year: 1986 OH.0-05-2 Site Operations: Ohio State ordered 130 grams of uranium from the AEC. This commercial supply order was filled by Fernald. OH.0-05-1 OH.0-05-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - AEC/NRC licensed operation OH.0-05-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium OH.0-05-1 OH.0-05-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP - Referred to NRC

429

State Energy Production Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State Energy Data System State Energy Data System Production Estimates Technical Notes For 1960-2011 Estimates Table of Contents Section 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 Section 2. Coal ............................................................................................................................... 5 Section 3. Crude Oil ....................................................................................................................... 7 Section 4. Natural Gas (Marketed Production) .............................................................................. 9 Section 5. Renewable Energy and Nuclear Energy ..................................................................... 13

430

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in wildlife management from the University of New Hampshire in 1988. She joined the Intermountain Research Station in 1993 after working for the States of New Hampshire and Wyoming on projects involving wetlandUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Intermountain Research Station General

431

EIA - State Nuclear Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State total (percent) Net generation (thousand mwh) Share of State total (percent) Nuclear 4,966 4.6 41,335 10.0 Coal 22,335 20.6 150,173 36.5 Hydro and Pumped Storage 689 0.6...

432

Rydberg states of HD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The triplet nf Rydberg states of HD with n=9–17, L=3, v=1, and R=1,3 have been observed and identified with the laser–molecular-beam method. A 20-eV electron beam excites a collimated HD beam to the metastable 2p ?3 state. Two counterpropagating cw single-frequency laser beams excite the metastable molecule first to the intermediate 3d ?3 state, then to a triplet nf Rydberg state. The transition frequencies between the 3d and nf states have been measured to an accuracy of 0.02 cm-1. The long-range model gives the transition frequencies to an accuracy of approximately 0.1 cm-1. Using these energy-level measurements, the ionization potential of the metastable state has been determined to be 27 460.98(30) cm-1 and the energy difference between the triplet metastable and the singlet ground state has been determined to be 97 105.50(30) cm-1. In addition, the linewidths of the triplet Rydberg states have been measured, giving the autoionization rates.

Sander H. Kim and Eric Mazur

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Compatibility of quantum states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a measure of compatibility between quantum states--the likelihood that two density matrices describe the same object. Our measure is motivated by two elementary requirements, which lead to a natural definition. We list some properties of this measure, and discuss its relation to the problem of combining two observers' states of knowledge.

Poulin, David; Blume-Kohout, Robin [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS-B210, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Compatibility of quantum states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a measure of compatibility between quantum states—the likelihood that two density matrices describe the same object. Our measure is motivated by two elementary requirements, which lead to a natural definition. We list some properties of this measure, and discuss its relation to the problem of combining two observers’ states of knowledge.

David Poulin and Robin Blume-Kohout

2003-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hills National Forest uses such a habitat capability model (HABCAP), but its accuracy is largely unknown, Wildlife Biologist with Black Hills National Forest, Custer, SD 2 South Dakota State UniversityUnited States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment

436

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid-State Lighting Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Past Conferences Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Solid-State Lighting Manufacturing Workshop Nearly 200 lighting industry leaders, chip makers, fixture and component

437

FY 2009 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper State Index Page Number FY 2009 Congressional Budget 1/30/2008 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 9:01:45AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2007 Appropriation FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Request State Table 1 1 $27,588

438

FY 2005 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Office of Management, Budget Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Preliminary Preliminary Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2004 State Tables State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Preliminary Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number

439

FY 2010 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request State Tables Preliminary The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper State Index Page Number FY 2010 Congressional Budget 5/4/2009 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 2:13:22PM Page 1 of 2 FY 2008 Appropriation FY 2009 Appropriation FY 2010 Request State Table 1 1 $46,946 $48,781 $38,844 Alabama 2 $6,569

440

FY 2006 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO February 2005 State Tables Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number FY 2006 Congressional Budget 1/27/2005 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 3:32:58PM Page 1 of 2 FY 2004 Comp/Approp FY 2005 Comp/Approp FY 2006 Request State Table

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

state | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state state Dataset Summary Description The Alabama State Oil and Gas Board publishes well record permits to the public as they are approved. This dataset is comprised of 50 recent well record permits from 2/9/11 - 3/18/11. The dataset lists the well name, county, operator, field, and date approved, among other fields. State's make oil and gas data publicly available for a range of topics. Source Geological Survey of Alabama Date Released February 09th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated March 18th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords Alabama board gas oil state well records Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Well records 2/9/11 - 3/18/11 (xls, 28.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License

442

FY 2008 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Table State Table Preliminary Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Table Preliminary Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, uses of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. State Index Page Number FY 2008 Congressional Budget 2/1/2007 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 6:53:08AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2006 Appropriation FY 2007 Request FY 2008 Request State Table 1 1 $28,332 $30,341

443

Buildings Energy Data Book: 4.1 Federal Buildings Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

444

--No Title--  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

1 FY 2007 Federal Primary Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Buildings and Facilities 0.88 VehiclesEquipment 0.69 (mostly jet fuel and diesel) Total Federal Government...

445

Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at www.eere.energy.govindustry. A-1 APPENDIX A DATA TABLES A-2 TABLE 1-A TOTAL PRIMARY ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY FEDERAL AGENCIES (In Billions of Btu, with Conversions to Millions...

446

Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

at www.eere.energy.govindustry. 15 APPENDIX A DATA TABLES A-1 TABLE 1-A TOTAL PRIMARY ENERGY CONSUMPTION BY FEDERAL AGENCIES (In Billions of Btu, with Conversions to Millions...

447

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 8 Total 9,10 Distillate...

448

Primary Versus Secondary Leptons in the EGRET SNR's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The EGRET supernova remnants (SNR's) are all expanding into nearby dense molecular clouds, powering a shock at the interface where protons and electrons accelerate to relativistic energies. A viable mechanism for the emission of gamma$-rays in these sources is the decay of neutral pions created in collisions between the relativistic hadrons and protons in the ambient medium. But neutral pion decay alone cannot reproduce the whole high-energy spectrum, particularly below 100 MeV. A pion-decay scenario thus requires a lepton population to "fill in" the lower part of the spectrum via bremsstrahlung emission. This population, however, is constrained by the SNR radio spectrum. Taking our cue from the behavior of Sgr A East, an energetic EGRET SNR at the Galactic center, we here examine the role played in these sources by secondary leptons--electrons and positrons produced in proton-proton scattering events and the ensuing particle cascades. We show that while secondary leptons cannot account for the gamma-rays below 100 MeV, they can account for the hard radio spectra observed from the EGRET SNR's. Thus, it appears that both primary and secondary leptons may be important contributors to the overall broadband emission from these sources, but if so, must radiate most of their energy in different parts of the SNR-cloud environment. We show that shock acceleration in dense cores being overtaken by the expanding SNR shell can naturally lead to such a scenario.

Marco Fatuzzo; Fulvio Melia

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Effects of Nonaqueous Electrolytes on Primary Li-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of nonaqueous electrolytes on the performance of primary Li-air batteries operated in dry air environment have been investigated. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between Li anode and water during the discharge process. The polarity of aprotic solvents outweighs the viscosity, ion conductivity and oxygen solubility on the performance of Li-air batteries once these latter properties attain certain reasonable level, because the solvent polarity significantly affects the number of tri-phase regions formed by oxygen, electrolyte, and active carbons (with catalyst) in the air electrode. The most feasible electrolyte formulation is the system of LiTFSI in PC/EC mixtures, whose performance is relatively insensitive to PC/EC ratio and salt concentration. The quantity of such electrolyte added to a Li-air cell has notably effects on the discharge performance of the Li-air battery as well, and a maximum in capacity is observed as a function of electrolyte amount. The coordination effect from the additives or co-solvents [tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and crown ethers in this study] also greatly affects the discharge performance of a Li-air battery.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lighting Lighting Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Solid-State Lighting on AddThis.com... Pause/Resume Photo of a large room with people standing around poster boards. Register Now for DOE's 11th Annual SSL R&D Workshop January 28-30, join other SSL R&D professionals from industry, government, and academia to learn, share, and shape the future of lighting.

451

The state road map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past year, electric industry restructuring has become a hot issue in virtually every state - not only those with high retail rates. So far this year, retail access legislation has been introduced in 23 states, and study bills have been introduced in another nine. Several of these states have already taken action. Oklahoma enacted the Electric Restructuring Act of 1997 in late April, mandating retail choice of generation suppliers by 2002, and legislatures in Maryland, Utah, Arkansas and Idaho adopted study bills. On the regulatory front, formal and substantive commission proceedings are moving forward in well over half the states. State legislatures and regulatory commissions around the country are keenly focused on those states which already enacted retail access legislation and are now slogging through the details of implementation. Even with new laws in place, heated debates on the issues surrounding both deregulation of generation and the evolution of the retail energy service market continue, and delays are possible. Retail energy service companies could begin competing for up to 20 million retail customers next year in Massachusetts, California, New Hampshire and Rhode Island, along with a significant number of new pilot-program customers in Pennsylvania and New York. This article gives a brief progress report on the states closest to retail choice.

Simon, K.M.; Vavro, S.L.; Shapiro, D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

New State Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.-State-Funded Buildings ?TAC Rules: ?19.31/?19.32/?19.33/?19.34 ? Chapter 388-TX Health & Safety Code ?Texas Building Energy Performance Stds. ?TAC Rules: ?19.53 ? IECC-IRC 2012 ? SECO Resources ?Q&A 2 CATEE-Dallas 11-09-2011 Texas Design Standards... Chapter 447.004-TX Gov. Code ? State that SECO shall establish and publish mandatory energy and water conservation design standards for each new state building or major renovation project ? SECO shall define ?major renovation project? and shall...

Lopez, F. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

454

Volatility-- a statistical comparison between the secondary and primary home markets : the lower Cape's volatility and average return compared to three Boston area primary markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis attempts to analyze the long-standing perception that the secondary home market, homes built in and around vacation areas, is more volatile than the primary home market. For the first time, this study measures ...

Knight, Craig, 1971-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"Bath County","Pumped Storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003 2,"North...

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced geothermal primary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science, Alethea Steingisser Summary: energy and hydropower. The primary use of geothermal resources is for space heating; 87% of Iceland's 280... remaining after...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - affairs primary care Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Affairs Supervisor *** Dual Reporting to primary faculty and MSO Intake Advisor Student Affairs Officer I... Fiscal Affairs Manager Senior Administrative Analyst Tim...

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - adult primary sensory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2002 Sage Publications Summary: in spinal sensory pathways. References Agrawal SG, Evans RH. 1986. The primary afferent depolarizing action... -8584 Sensory information...

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic primary diamines Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Davis Collection: Biotechnology 56 Production of 11C-Labeled Summary: Carbon Monoxide - For preparation of 11C-labeled primary amides or hydrazides The method is...

460

Microsoft Word - 911146_0_SSC-15 Primary Circuit and BOP Inst...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SERVICES FOR THE NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT (NGNP) WITH HYDROGEN PRODUCTION Test Plan for Primary Circuit and Balance of Plant Instrumentation Prepared by General...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" ,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer Capacity (MW)" 1,"PPL Susquehanna","Nuclear","PPL Susquehanna LLC",2520 2,"FirstEnergy Bruce...

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - attending primary care Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Boston University Family Medicine Summary: disease and providing quality health care on the primary level. The Department of Family Medicine... visit: http:...

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - assist primary care Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Boston University Family Medicine Summary: disease and providing quality health care on the primary level. The Department of Family Medicine... visit: http:...

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysing primary health Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nonprofits January 7, 2011 Summary: (UW-CNP), in partnership with The Wisconsin Primary Health Care Association (WPHCA), and the Wisconsin... , or the Community Health Center...

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - attending public primary Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Medicine is a holistic specialty that attends... disease and providing quality health care on the primary level. The Department of Family Medicine... visit: http:www.bu.edu...

466

E-Print Network 3.0 - aliphatic primary amines Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aliphatic primary amines Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ELSEVIER Marine Chemistry 51 (1995) 45-54 Aliphatic amines in Chesapeake Bay sediments Summary: ELSEVIER...

467

Carbon dioxide emissions and net primary production of Russian terrestrial ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Determination of the C balance is of considerable importance when forecasting climate and environmental changes. Soil respiration and biological productivity of ecosystems (net primary production; NPP) are th...

V. N. Kudeyarov; I. N. Kurganova

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute primary cutaneous Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: acute primary cutaneous Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 JOURNAL OF NEUROTRAUMA Volume 19, Number 12, 2002 Summary: cutaneous stimulation in and...

469

California State Regulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California California State Regulations: California State of California The California Department of Conservation's Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resources oversees the drilling, operation, maintenance, and plugging and abandonment of oil, natural gas, and geothermal wells. The regulatory program emphasizes the development of oil, natural gas, and geothermal resources in the state through sound engineering practices that protect the environment, prevent pollution, and ensure public safety. Other agencies that may be involved in the regulation of drilling wastes include the State Water Resources Control Board and appropriate Regional Water Quality Control Boards, the California Integrated Waste Management Board, the California Air Resources Board and appropriate Air Quality Management Districts or Air Pollution Control Districts, and the Department of Toxic Substances Control.

470

FY 2011 State Table  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

State Tables State Tables Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0054 March 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer State Tables Printed with soy ink on recycled paper The numbers depicted in this document represent the gross level of DOE budget authority for the years displayed. The figures include both the discretionary and mandatory funding in the budget. They do not consider revenues/receipts, use of prior year balances, deferrals, rescissions, or other adjustments appropriated as offsets to the DOE appropriations by the Congress. Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request DOE/CF-0054 State Index Page Number FY 2011 Congressional Budget 1/29/2010 Department Of Energy (Dollars In Thousands) 6:34:40AM Page 1 of 2 FY 2009 Appropriation

471

Kansas State Regulations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kansas Kansas State Regulations: Kansas State of Kansas The Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) Conservation Division regulates oil and gas operations and protects correlative rights and environmental resources. Otherwise, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) administers the major environmental protection laws. Contact Kansas Corporation Commission (Main Office) 1500 S.W. Arrowhead Road Topeka, KS 66604-2425 (785) 271-3100 (phone) (785) 271-3354 (fax) Conservation Division Finney State Office Building 130 South Market, Room 2078 Wichita, KS 67202-3802 (316) 337-6200 (phone) (316) 337-6211 (fax) Kansas Department of Health and Environment Charles Curtis State Office Building 1000 S.W. Jackson Topeka, KS 66612 (785) 296-1500 (phone) (785) 368-6368 (fax)

472

United States Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a typical wind energy production facility, the results warrant further research on the use of acoustic;1 INTRODUCTION Over the past decade, wind energy production capacity in the United States has increased

473

State and Local Incentives  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help you make energy efficiency improvements in your commercial building, your state and/or local community might offer incentives or have special programs. See the following resources for more...

474

State Energy Production Estimates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Energy Production Estimates 1960 Through 2012 2012 Summary Tables Table P1. Energy Production Estimates in Physical Units, 2012 Alabama 19,455 215,710 9,525 0 Alaska 2,052...

475

State Nuclear Profiles 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State Nuclear Profiles 2010 State Nuclear Profiles 2010 April 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Nuclear Profiles 2010 i Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Renewables and Uranium Statistics Team, Office of Electricity,

476

United States of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings Research Station. 130 p. Declinesinhabitatofgreatersage, grazing practices, changes in wildfire regimes, increased spread of invasive species, gas and oil

477

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) Western Interstate Nuclear Compact State Nuclear Policy (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arizona Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Western Interstate Energy Board Legislation authorizes states' entrance into the Western Interstate Nuclear Compact, which aims to undertake the cooperation of participating states in

478

Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) Southern States Energy Compact (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Southern States Energy Board

479

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines, the premixed burn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, they must understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF) n-heptane and iso-octane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine like conditions in a high-pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments, and comparisons of experimentally measured and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690-1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed model.

Callahan, C V; Curran, H J; Dryer, F L; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Empowering Consumers and the ) Request for Information Empowering Consumers and the ) Request for Information Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party ) Use and Privacy ) COMMENTS BY THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE UTILITY CONSUMER ADVOCATES NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE UTILITY CONSUMER ADVOCATES 8380 Colesville Road, Suite 101 Silver Spring, MD 20910 Phone (301) 589-6313 Fax (301) 589-6380 July 12, 2010 i i TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction ......................................................................................................................................2 Comments ........................................................................................................................................7 1. Who owns energy consumption data? .................................................................................7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state primary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Solid state switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid state switch, with reverse conducting thyristors, is designed to operate at 20 kV hold-off voltage, 1500 A peak, 1.0 .mu.s pulsewidth, and 4500 pps, to replace thyratrons. The solid state switch is more reliable, more economical, and more easily repaired. The switch includes a stack of circuit card assemblies, a magnetic assist and a trigger chassis. Each circuit card assembly contains a reverse conducting thyristor, a resistor capacitor network, and triggering circuitry.

Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Dreifuerst, Gary R. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

HOW THE LEED VENTILATION CREDIT IMPACTS ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF GSHP SYSTEMS A CASE STUDY FOR PRIMARY SCHOOLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on the impacts of increased outdoor air (OA) ventilation on the performance of ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems that heat and cool typical primary schools. Four locations Phoenix, Miami, Seattle, and Chicago are selected in this study to represent different climate zones in the United States. eQUEST, an integrated building and HVAC system energy analysis program, is used to simulate a typical primary school and the GSHP system at the four locations with minimum and 30% more than minimum OA ventilation. The simulation results show that, without an energy recovery ventilator, the 30% more OA ventilation results in an 8.0 13.3% increase in total GSHP system energy consumption at the four locations. The peak heating and cooling loads increase by 20.2 30% and 14.9 18.4%, respectively, at the four locations. The load imbalance of the ground heat exchanger is increased in hot climates but reduced in mild and cold climates.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

484

Biological removal of organic constituents in quench waters from high-Btu coal-gasification pilot plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were initiated to assess the efficiency of bench-scale, activated-sludge treatment for removal of organic constituents from coal-gasification process effluents. Samples of pilot-plant, raw-gas quench waters were obtained from the HYGAS process of the Institute of Gas Technology and from the slagging, fixed-bed (SFB) process of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center. The types of coal employed were Bituminous Illinois No. 6 for the HYGAS and Indian Head lignite for the SFB process. These pilot-plant quench waters, while not strictly representative of commercial condensates, were considered useful to evaluate the efficiency of biological oxidation for the removal of organics. Biological-reactor influent and effluent samples were extracted using a methylene chloride pH-fractionation method into acid, base, and neutral fractions, which were analyzed by capillary-column gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry. Influent acid fractions of both HYGAS and SFB condensates showed that nearly 99% of extractable and chromatographable organic material comprised phenol and alkylated phenols. Activated-sludge treatment removed these compounds almost completely. Removal efficiency of base-fraction organics was generally good, except for certain alkylated pyridines. Removal of neutral-fraction organics was also good, except for certain alkylated benzenes, certain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and certain cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, especially at low influent concentrations.

Stamoudis, V C; Luthy, R G

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Probability of economic success for Netherlands dairy farmers moving operations to the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S., California State University, Fresno Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. James W. Richardson Dairy producers in the Netherlands are struggling to stay in business due to increased environmental legislation, population density, intensity of farming systems..., costs of production and quota restrictions. One option available to Netherlands dairy farmers is to liquidate the value of their assets, put the money into an international bank, and buy an established dairy farm in the United States. The primary...

Duncan, Anthony Ray

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

486

Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

487

State of the States 2010: Fuel Cells in America | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

States 2010: Fuel Cells in America State of the States 2010: Fuel Cells in America This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's...

488

Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanisms of Homogeneous Nucleation of Polymers of Sickle Cell Anemia Hemoglobin in Deoxy State, TX 77204-4004, USA The primary pathogenic event of sickle cell anemia is the polymerization reserved. Keywords: sickle cell anemia; hemoglobin S polymerization; fiber nucleation; homogeneous

Vekilov, Peter

489

Spectrum auction with interference constraint for cognitive radio networks with multiple primary and secondary users  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectrum auction with interference constraint for cognitive radio networks with multiple primary shown the benefits of cognitive radio technologies to improve the flexibility and efficiency of spectrum (SUs) to share the available spectrum of licensed primary users (PUs) fairly and efficiently, subject

Coupechoux, Marceau

490

Long-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biogas production was produced from primary sludge and quantified. Total energy production in MFCs could: Microbial fuel cell Primary sludge Digested sludge Energy Biogas a b s t r a c t The long-term performance. Digested sludge can be further composted for agriculture uses, and biogas can be con- verted

491

ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OG 6.3-3 ENERGY SPECTRUM OF PRIMARY COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 1017 EV OBTAINED USING AKENO 20 KM2 ARRAY M, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152, Japan . Institute of High Energy Physics, Academia Sinica these showers, 60 of them are initiated by primaries with energies larger than 1019 eV. The energy spectrum

492

Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa #12;160 #12;161 Annual variation in primary moult parameters in Cape Weavers, Southern Masked Weavers and Southern Red Bishops in the Western Cape, South Africa Abstract Duration of primary moult was similar in Cape Weavers and Southern Red Bishops (96 days

de Villiers, Marienne

493

Employment Forecasts for Ohio's Primary Metals Manufacturing and Administrative and Support Services Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that are outperforming the industry average. Additional research shows that the industry is reactive to manufacturingEmployment Forecasts for Ohio's Primary Metals Manufacturing and Administrative and Support, the primary metals manufacturing industry (NAICS 331000) employment in Ohio is forecasted to decline by 21

Illinois at Chicago, University of

494

Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response to a wide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 Rat injury model under controlled field-relevant primary blast conditions: Acute response.edu Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury, Primary Blast, Mortality, Cellular Membrane Permeability, Lung Injury the risk of sustaining blast induced injury by military personnel and civilians. The blast injury

Farritor, Shane

495

A SOCIAL CHOICE APPROACH TO PRIMARY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: THE RUBBER TREE CASE IN AFRICA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

who have had a relatively stable situation over the last decade. Natural rubber production is nowadaysA SOCIAL CHOICE APPROACH TO PRIMARY RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: THE RUBBER TREE CASE IN AFRICA MOUSSA approach to a decision making problem related to the management of a primary resource, namely the rubber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

496

Distributed processing and internet technology to solve challenges of primary healthcare in india  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

National Reproductive and Child Health program, focused on Mother and Child Health, part of Millennium Developmental Goals, is being implemented through Primary Health Centers of the Public Healthcare System. The health record generated through community ... Keywords: internet technology, mHEALTH-PHC, mobile phone, primary healthcare

Arun Pande; Sanjay Kimbahune; Nandini Bondale; Ratnendra Shinde; Sunita Shanbhag

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Coupling Metabolite Flux to Transcriptomics: Insights Into the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Primary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primary Productivity by the Hydrothermal Vent Tubeworm Ridgeia piscesae SPENCER V. NYHOLM1 , JULIE-2020 Abstract. Deep-sea hydrothermal vents host highly pro- ductive ecosystems. Many of these communities that provide the hosts with their primary nutritional needs. Rates of carbon fixation by these symbioses

Girguis, Peter R.

498

Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Optics Performance Study of the Primary Mirror of the Gemini Telescopes Project Myung K. Cho Optical Sciences Center in the University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721 and Gemini Telescopes Project P. O. Box 26732 Tucson, AZ 85726­6732 Gemini Preprint #9 #12; Active optics performance study of the primary

499

Intrinsic Primary and Secondary Hydrogen Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alanine Racemase from Global Analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intrinsic Primary and Secondary Hydrogen Kinetic Isotope Effects for Alanine Racemase from Global of the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effects, the lower boundary on the energy of the quinonoid intermediate, making alanine racemase an attractive target for antibacterials. Global analysis of protiated

Toney, Michael

500

Immunotherapy for Primary Brain Tumors: No Longer a Matter of Privilege  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...editorial CCR Focus Immunotherapy for Primary Brain Tumors: No Longer a Matter of Privilege...confines of the toxicity-averse normal brain. This review highlights the caveats and challenges to immunotherapy for primary brain tumors, as well as reviewing modalities...

Peter E. Fecci; Amy B. Heimberger; John H. Sampson

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z