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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objectives to: A. Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition. B. Determine emissions characteristics including NO, NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents, and C. Operate with at least two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions. As a result of this program: 1. GE Engineering is now confident that the syngas fuels produced by all currently--viable coal gasifiers can be accommodated by the GE advanced (``F`` Technology) combustion system, and 2. For proposed syngas fuels with varying amounts of steam, nitrogen or CO{sub 2} diluent, the combustion and emissions characteristics can be reasonably estimated without undertaking expensive new screening tests for each different fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Belisle, F.H.; Maxwell, G.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Georgia Total s - - - s Georgia Truck s - - - s Indiana Total - 72 - - 72 Indiana Railroad - 72 - - 72 Tennessee Total - - 7 - 7 Tennessee Truck - - 7 - 7 Origin State Total 1,896

16

By Coal Origin State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Florida Total - - 15 - 15 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Total 196 - 15 - 211 Georgia Railroad 189 - 1 - 190 Georgia Truck

17

By Coal Destination State  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 7,906 821 1,242 - 9,969 Alabama Railroad 3,604 49 285 - 3,938 Alabama River 3,979 - - - 3,979 Alabama Truck 322 773 957 - 2,051 Colorado Total 2,113 - - - 2,113 Colorado Railroad 2,113 - - - 2,113 Illinois Total 336 - - - 336 Illinois River 336 - - - 336 Indiana Total 1,076

18

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Colorado Railroad 575 - - - 575 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 241 - - - 241 Kentucky Railroad 827 - 12 - 839 Kentucky (East) Railroad 76 - - - 76 Kentucky (West) Railroad

19

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Colorado Railroad 514 - - - 514 Illinois River 99 - - - 99 Indiana River 172 - - - 172 Kentucky Railroad 635 - 11 - 647 Kentucky (East) Railroad 45 - - - 45 Kentucky (West)

20

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Colorado Railroad 385 - - - 385 Illinois River 15 - - - 15 Indiana Railroad 1 - - - 1 Indiana River 350 - - - 350 Indiana Total 351 - - - 351 Kentucky Railroad 682 - 2 - 685 Kentucky (East)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2010 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Colorado Railroad 640 - - - 640 Illinois River 123 - - - 123 Indiana River 312 - - - 312 Kentucky Railroad 622 - 36 - 658 Kentucky (East) Railroad 96 - 36 - 132 Kentucky (West)

22

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 2nd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,896 182 327 - 2,405 Alabama Railroad 1,192 2 74 - 1,268 Alabama River 655 - - - 655 Alabama Truck 50 180 253 - 482 Colorado Total 468 - - - 468 Colorado Railroad 468 - - - 468 Illinois Total 90 - 26 - 116 Illinois River 90 - 26 - 116 Indiana Total 181 - - - 181 Indiana River 181 -

23

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Colorado Total 82 - - - 82 Colorado Railroad 82 - - - 82 Illinois Total 149 - 14 - 163 Illinois Railroad 44 - - - 44 Illinois River 105 - 14 - 119 Indiana Total 99 - - - 99

24

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 1st Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 600 - - - 600 Illinois River 203 - 13 - 217 Indiana River 180 - - - 180 Kentucky Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Kentucky (West) Railroad 465 - 10 - 475 Utah Railroad 18 - - -

25

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 4th Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,486 155 328 - 1,970 Alabama Railroad 1,020 - 75 - 1,095 Alabama River 417 - - - 417 Alabama Truck 49 155 253 - 458 Colorado Total 195 - - - 195 Colorado Railroad 195 - - - 195 Illinois Total 127 - 18 - 145 Illinois Railroad 20 - - - 20 Illinois River 107 - 18 - 125 Indiana Total

26

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2012 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,407 184 231 - 1,822 Alabama Railroad 801 9 49 - 859 Alabama River 519 - - - 519 Alabama Truck 87 175 182 - 444 Georgia Total s - s - s Georgia Truck s - s - s Indiana Total - 98 - - 98 Indiana Railroad - 98 - - 98 Kentucky Total - - 12 - 12 Kentucky Truck - - 12 - 12 Ohio Total - 30 - - 30 Ohio

27

By Coal Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table DS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by destination State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Colorado Total 621 2 - - 623 Colorado Railroad 621 2 - - 623 Illinois Total 113 - 11 - 123 Illinois River 113 - 11 - 123 Indiana Total 265 - - - 265 Indiana Railroad

28

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 2nd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 2nd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 914 12 66 - 992 Alabama River 949 - - - 949 Alabama Truck 78 189 237 - 504 Alabama Total 1,941 201 303 - 2,445 Georgia Railroad 23 - - - 23 Georgia Truck s - - - s Georgia Total 23 - - - 23 Indiana Railroad - 115 - - 115 Indiana Truck - 71 - - 71 Indiana Total - 186 - - 186 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Tennessee Truck

29

State coal profiles, January 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of State Coal Profiles is to provide basic information about the deposits, production, and use of coal in each of the 27 States with coal production in 1992. Although considerable information on coal has been published on a national level, there is a lack of a uniform overview for the individual States. This report is intended to help fill that gap and also to serve as a framework for more detailed studies. While focusing on coal output, State Coal Profiles shows that the coal-producing States are major users of coal, together accounting for about three-fourths of total US coal consumption in 1992. Each coal-producing State is profiled with a description of its coal deposits and a discussion of the development of its coal industry. Estimates of coal reserves in 1992 are categorized by mining method and sulfur content. Trends, patterns, and other information concerning production, number of mines, miners, productivity, mine price of coal, disposition, and consumption of coal are detailed in statistical tables for selected years from 1980 through 1992. In addition, coal`s contribution to the State`s estimated total energy consumption is given for 1991, the latest year for which data are available. A US summary of all data is provided for comparing individual States with the Nation as a whole. Sources of information are given at the end of the tables.

1994-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 839 11 83 - 933 Alabama River 1,347 - - - 1,347 Alabama Truck 118 216 236 - 571 Alabama Total 2,304 227 320 - 2,850 Georgia Railroad 9 - - - 9 Georgia Truck 7 - 5 - 12 Georgia Total 16 - 5 - 21 Indiana Railroad - 126 - - 126 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,320 353 325 - 2,998 Railroad 848 137 83 - 1,068

31

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 4th Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 4th Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 944 16 77 - 1,037 Alabama River 781 - - - 781 Alabama Truck 77 224 220 - 521 Alabama Total 1,802 240 298 - 2,340 Florida Railroad - - 11 - 11 Georgia Railroad 52 - - - 52 Georgia Truck s - 5 - 5 Georgia Total 52 - 5 - 57 Indiana Railroad - 65 - - 65 Origin State Total 1,855 304 313 - 2,472 Railroad 996 81 89 - 1,165

32

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2010 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2010 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 907 10 59 - 975 Alabama River 903 - - - 903 Alabama Truck 150 144 253 - 546 Alabama Total 1,960 153 311 - 2,424 Florida Truck - - 3 - 3 Georgia Railroad 105 - 1 - 106 Georgia Truck s - 4 - 4 Georgia Total 105 - 5 - 110 Indiana Railroad - 106 - - 106 Tennessee Railroad - - 1 - 1 Origin State Total 2,065 259 321 - 2,644

33

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 3rd Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 3rd Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Total 1,942 160 335 - 2,437 Alabama Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 Alabama River 741 - - - 741 Alabama Truck 52 160 278 - 490 Georgia Total s - 3 - 3 Georgia Truck s - 3 - 3 Ohio Total - 3 - - 3 Ohio River - 3 - - 3 Origin State Total 1,942 163 338 - 2,443 Railroad 1,149 - 57 - 1,206 River 741 3 - - 745 Truck 52 160

34

By Coal Origin State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Distribution Report 1st Quarter 2011 Alabama ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Table OS-1. Domestic coal distribution, by origin State, 1st Quarter 2011 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke) Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 1,040 18 80 - 1,138 Alabama River 668 - - - 668 Alabama Truck 52 164 223 - 438 Alabama Total 1,760 181 303 - 2,244 Georgia Truck s - 2 - 2 Indiana Railroad - 148 - - 148 Ohio Railroad - 25 - - 25 Ohio River - 18 - - 18 Ohio Total - 43 - - 43 Origin State Total 1,760 373 305 - 2,438 Railroad 1,040 191 80 - 1,311 River

35

Weekly Coal Production by State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly Coal Production Weekly Coal Production Data for week ended: December 14, 2013 | Release date: December 19, 2013 | Next release date: December 30, 2013 For the week ended December 14, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 3.1% higher than last week's estimate and 2.9% lower than the production estimate in the comparable week in 2012 Coal production east of the Mississippi River totaled 8.2 mmst Coal production west of the Mississippi River totaled 10.8 mmst U.S. year-to-date coal production totaled 957.1 mmst, 1.9% lower than the comparable year-to-date coal production in 2012 EIA revises its weekly estimates of state-level coal production using Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) quarterly coal production data.

36

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Table 6. Coal production and number of mines by State and coal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing State and...

38

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

39

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

40

EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Origin State Glossary Home > Coal> Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State Release Date: January 2006 Next Release Date: 2006...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

International Energy Outlook 1999 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

coal.jpg (1776 bytes) coal.jpg (1776 bytes) CoalÂ’s share of world energy consumption falls slightly in the IEO99 forecast. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia, but it is projected to lose market share to natural gas in some other areas of the world. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1996. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union. In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 30

43

International Energy Outlook 2000 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, Although coal use is expected to be displaced by natural gas in some parts of the world, only a slight drop in its share of total energy consumption is projected by 2020. Coal continues to dominate many national fuel markets in developing Asia. Historically, trends in coal consumption have varied considerably by region. Despite declines in some regions, world coal consumption has increased from 84 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) in 1985 to 93 quadrillion Btu in 1997. Regions that have seen increases in coal consumption include the United States, Japan, and developing Asia. Declines have occurred in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the countries of the former Soviet Union (FSU). In Western Europe, coal consumption declined by 33 percent between 1985 and 1997, displaced in considerable measure by

44

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

46

The Btu tax is dead, long live the Btu tax  

SciTech Connect

The energy industry is powerful. That is the only explanation for its ability to jettison a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration's proposed deficit reduction package, the Btu tax plan, expected to raise about $71.5 billion over a five-year period. Clinton had proposed a broad-based energy tax of 25.7 cents per million Btus, and a surcharge of 34.2 cents on petroleum products, to be phased in over three years starting July 1, 1994. House Democrats went along, agreeing to impose a tax of 26.8 cents per million Btus, along with the 34.2-cent petroleum surcharge, both effective July 1, 1994. But something happened on the way to the Senate. Their version of the deficit reduction package contains no broad-based energy tax. It does, however, include a 4.3 cents/gallon fuel tax. Clinton had backed down, and House Democrats were left feeling abandoned and angry. What happened has as much to do with politics-particularly the fourth branch of government, lobbyists-as with a President who wants to try to please everyone. It turns out that almost every lawmaker or lobbyist who sought an exemption from the Btu tax, in areas as diverse as farming or ship and jet fuel used in international commercial transportation, managed to get it without giving up much in return. In the end, the Btu tax was so riddled with exemptions that its effectiveness as a revenue-raiser was in doubt. Meanwhile, it turns out that the Btu tax is not dead. According to Budget Director Leon Panetta, the Administration has not given up on the Btu tax and will fight for it when the reconciliation bill goes to a joint House-Senate conference.

Burkhart, L.A.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 2008 Final May 2010 2008 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-exporting State. This Final 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the Preliminary 2008 Coal Distribution Report - Annual. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report contains actual annual data instead of imputed data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the

48

Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 16. Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012 (million short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Coal-Producing State Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines Average Recovery Percentage

49

Lighting practices in coal mines of the United States  

SciTech Connect

Existing conditions of underground lighting in coal mines and attitude of coal-mining States toward mine lighting are discussed as expressed in coal-mine regulations. Types of lamps available are listed. Ways of obtaining better illumination with present lighting equipment are suggested.

Hooker, A.B.; Owings, C.W.

1938-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation Home > Coal > Annual Coal Distribution > Coal Origin Map > Domestic Distribution by Origin: Alaska Data For: 2002...

51

What is the role of coal in the United States? | U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Recent coal articles; Fuel Competition in Power Generation; Quarterly Coal Report; Energy Explained: Coal; Energy Explained: Electricity in the United States;

52

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils, the inability to utilize caking coals, and the inability to accept coal fines. Mansfield Carbon Products, Inc., a subsidiary of A.T. Massey Coal Company, has developed an atmospheric pressure, two-stage process that eliminates these three problems.

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EIA Data: 2011 United States Coal Supply, Disposition, and Price...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon EIA Data: 2011 United States Coal Supply, Disposition, and Price Dataset Summary Description This dataset is the 2011...

54

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Which states produce the most coal? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Which states produce the most coal? The five largest coal producing states, with production in million short tons, and share of total U.S. coal production, for 2012:

56

EIA Data: 2011 United States Coal Supply, Disposition, and Price...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: 2011 United States Coal Supply, Disposition, and Price This...

57

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

58

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated April 28, 2004) Spot coal prices in the East rose steadily since Labor Day 2003, with rapid escalations ...

59

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 26) The average spot prices for reported coal purchases rose once again ...

60

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation. Solid-state NMR characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study clearly demonstrated the usefulness of liquid- and solid-state {sup 13}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR for the examination of process-derived materials from direct coal liquefaction. The techniques can provide data not directly obtainable by other methods to examine the saturation of aromatic rings and to determine the modes of hydrogen utilization during coal liquefaction. In addition, these methods can be used to infer the extent of condensation and retrograde reactions occurring in the direct coal liquefaction process. Five NMR techniques were employed. Solid-state {sup 13}C-NMR measurements were made using the Cross Polarization Magic Angle Spinning (CP/MAS) and Single Pulse (SP) techniques. Solid-state {sup 1}H-NMR measurements were made using the technique of Combined Rotation and Multiple-Pulse spectroscopy (CRAMPS). Conventional liquid-state {sup 12}C- and {sup 1}H-NMR techniques were employed as appropriate. Interpretation of the NMR data, once obtained, is relatively straightforward. Combined with other information, such as elemental analyses and process conversion data, the NMR data prove to be a powerful tool for the examination of direct coal liquefaction process-derived material. Further development and more wide-spread application of this analytical method as a process development tool is justified on the basis of these results.

Miknis, F.P. [Western Research Inst., Laramie, WY (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons) " " Coal-Exporting State and Destination ",,"Metallurgical ","Steam ","Total "," " "Alabama ",,3977,"-",3977," " ," Argentina ",225,"-",225," " ," Belgium ",437,"-",437," " ," Brazil ",1468,"-",1468," " ," Bulgaria ",75,"-",75," " ," Egypt ",363,"-",363," " ," Germany ",71,"-",71," " ," Italy ",61,"-",61," " ," Netherlands ",219,"-",219," " ," Spain ",415,"-",415," " ," Turkey ",362,"-",362," "

62

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated August 12) According to Platts Coal Outlook’s Weekly Price Survey (August 11), the ...

63

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices and Earnings (updated September 2) The average spot prices for coal traded last week were relatively ...

64

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q2 by Origin State: Alabama Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Florida Railroad - - 8 - 8 Georgia Railroad 118 - - - 118 Georgia Truck s - 15 - 15 Georgia Total 118 - 15 - 133 Indiana Railroad - 83 - - 83 Indiana Truck 17 34 - - 50 Indiana Total 17 116 - - 133 Kentucky Railroad 83 - - - 83 Pennsylvania Railroad 95 - - - 95 Origin State Total 2,197 212 285 - 2,695 Railroad 1,171 95 40 - 1,305 River 855 - - - 855 Truck 171 118 245 - 534 2 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alaska

65

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Final May 2010 2008 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal...

66

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

67

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

68

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 64 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Arkansas Railroad - 6 - - 6 Colorado Railroad 279 - - - 279 Illinois Railroad 11 - - - 11 Illinois River 109 - - - 109 Illinois Total 119 - - - 119 Indiana River 197 - - - 197 Kentucky Railroad 442 - 28 - 471 Kentucky Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky Total 442 - 31 - 473 Kentucky (East) Railroad 357 - 28 - 385 Kentucky (East) Truck - - 2 - 2 Kentucky (East)

70

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

61 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Origin State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 875 12 33 - 920 Alabama River 855 - - - 855 Alabama Truck 155 84 230 - 469 Alabama Total 1,885 96 263 - 2,244 Colorado Railroad 123 - - - 123 Illinois River 145 - - - 145 Indiana River 246 - - - 246 Indiana Truck 37 - - - 37 Indiana Total 283 - - - 283 Kentucky Railroad 426 - 30 - 457 Kentucky (East) Railroad 172 - 30 - 202 Kentucky (West) Railroad 255 - - - 255 Oklahoma Railroad - 6 - - 6 Utah Railroad 30 - - - 30 Virginia Railroad - 14 - - 14 West Virginia Railroad - 75 - -

71

Coal....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE EIA WEEKLY COAL ... Coal Prices and Earnings (updated July 7, 2004) In the trading week ended July 2, the average spot coal prices tracked by EIA were mixed.

72

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "(Thousand Short Tons)" "Coal-Exporting State and Destination ",,"Metallurgical ","Steam ","Total " "Alabama ",,5156,"-",5156 ,"Argentina ",345,"-",345 ,"Belgium ",387,"-",387 ,"Brazil ",1825,"-",1825 ,"Bulgaria ",363,"-",363 ,"Egypt ",477,"-",477 ,"Germany ",167,"-",167 ,"Italy ",87,"-",87 ,"Netherlands ",399,"-",399 ,"Spain ",198,"-",198 ,"Turkey ",551,"-",551 ,"United Kingdom ",359,"-",359 "Kentucky ",,1449,"-",1449 ,"Canada ",566,"-",566

73

Survey of the State-of-the-Art of Coal Handling During Freezing Weather  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a state-of-the-art review of coal-handling procedures and programs used by electric utilities, coal mines, and coal transfer stations during periods of freezing weather. The use of freeze-conditioning agents to reduce coal-handling problems is discussed, as well as the relative efficacy of various nonchemical techniques. Guidelines for handling frozen coal that reflect typical problems and solutions are given.

1981-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

74

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the United States--FischerTropsch Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the United States--Fischer­Tropsch Synthesis Tad W The United States has the world�s largest coal reserves and Montana the highest potential for mega-mine development. Consequently, a large-scale effort to convert coal to liquids (CTL) has been proposed to create

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

75

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

76

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

77

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

78

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

79

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

80

U.S. Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin Domestic and Foreign Coal Distribution by State of Origin ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2010 Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin, 2010 (thousand short tons) Coal Exports Coal Origin State and Region Domestic Distribution By Coal Mines By Brokers & Traders* Total Exports Total Distribution Alabama 10,679.56 9,223.70 408.00 9,631.70 20,311.26 Alaska 920.68 1,080.60 88.05 1,168.65 2,089.33 Arizona 7,761.18 - - - 7,761.18 Arkansas 0.43 - - - 0.43 Colorado 21,831.81 748.98 1,446.25 2,195.23 24,027.04 Illinois 33,176.21 2,505.51

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of annual summaries on minable coal in the United States, pursuant to the power plant and industrial fuel use act. The demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980 by area, rank, and potential method of mining is given. Reserve data are given by state and by type of coal (anthracite, bithiminous, subbituminous, and lignite). An introduction, summary, and a glossary of selected coal classification terms is also included. The appendix provides the demonstrated reserve base adjustments and related notions by state. References are also included. Coal reserves for 1979 are given for comparison. 7 figures, 6 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

State options for low-carbon coal policy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing state-level interest in the USA in accelerating the development of low-carbon coal technologies, including carbon capture and storage (CCS). Many states have adopted greenhouse gas emission targets and made commitments to low-carbon energy, and believe that these polices will result in job creation, air quality improvements, and reliable low-cost energy supplies. This paper provides an overview of options for states to encourage the deployment of carbon capture and sequestration. It describes actions (including legislation, regulations, and incentives) throughout the country. It also reviews in greater detail the range of policies available to state Public Utility Commissions for advancing deployment of CCS. Many states are adopting meaningful incentives for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants, and, as a handful of states are beginning to demonstrate, a number of these incentives can apply to CCS as well. States also have a number of authorities relevant to advancement of clean coal power, particularly within the domain of state public utility commissions (PUCs). State commissions have a wide array of policy options available to them in pursuing this goal, and will play a crucial role in determining the speed and effectiveness with which such technologies are deployed. States also enjoy major advantages, such as their direct jurisdiction over many critical power plant issues (including siting and retail ratemaking) that federal agencies do not possess. Regardless of the final form of federal greenhouse gas rules, states have the chance to gain experience as first movers and policy innovators, and will play an important role in shaping a low-carbon future. Although national policy is essential, a proactive approach by state policymakers and regulators to drive CCS can reduce future compliance costs, speed the required technological developments, and pave the way for future national policy.

Richard Cowart; Shanna Vale; Joshua Bushinsky; Pat Hogan

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fact book: synthetic pipeline gas from coal. 1982 update  

SciTech Connect

This book illustrates the major advantages of synthetic pipeline gas from coal. Progress on many of the coal gasification projects envisioned over the past decade has been thwarted by regulatory, permitting, and financing delays. The rationale for developing a synthetic pipeline gas industry remains as strong as ever from the nation's viewpoint, and the pioneer US commercial scale high-Btu coal gasification plant is now under construction-the Great Plains coal gasification plant in North Dakota. Also, the US Synthetic Fuels Corporation is now operational and can move forward to provide the guarantees which are necessary to overcome the financial barriers to a commercial synfuels capability in the United States. Compared to other principal means of utilizing America's vast coal reserves, coal gasification uses coal and land more efficiently, uses less water, emits less air pollutants, requires less capital and results in a lower cost of energy to consumers. (DP)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q1 by Origin State: Alabama Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 / 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q1 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants Excluding Coke Commercial & Institutional Total Alabama Railroad 950 4 84 - 1,038 Alabama River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Alabama Truck 37 170 249 - 456 Alabama Total 2,096 174 333 - 2,603 Florida Railroad - - 22 - 22 Georgia Railroad 45 - - - 45 Georgia Truck s - 20 - 21 Georgia Total 45 - 20 - 65 Hawaii Ocean Vessel s - - - s Indiana Railroad - 78 - - 78 Indiana Truck - 32 - - 32 Indiana Total - 110 - - 110 South Carolina Truck - - 2 - 2 Tennessee Truck - - 1 - 1 Texas Railroad 72 - - - 72 Origin State Total 2,213 284 378 - 2,875 Ocean Vessel s - - - s Railroad 1,066 82 106 - 1,255 River 1,110 - - - 1,110 Truck 37 202 272 - 511 2 / 58

85

POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies - froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 24, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO{sub 2} per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO{sub 2} emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gasifier feed - Tailor-made from Illinois coals  

SciTech Connect

The main purpose of this project is to produce a feedstock from preparation plant fines from an illinois coal that is ideal for a slurry fed, slagging, entrained-flow coal gasifier. The high sulfur content and high Btu value of Illinois coals are particularly advantageous in such a gasifier; preliminary calculations indicate that the increased cost of removing sulfur from the gas from a high sulfur coal is more than offset by the increased revenue from the sale of the elemental sulfur; additionally the high Btu Illinois coal concentrates more energy into the slurry of a given coal to water ratio. The Btu is higher not only because of the higher Btu value of the coal but also because Illinois coal requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal, i.e., as little as 30--35% water may be used for Illinois coal as compared to approximately 45% for most western coals.

Ehrlinger, H.P. III (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Lytle, J.; Frost, R.R.; Lizzio, A.; Kohlenberger, L.; Brewer, K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States) DESTEC Energy (United States) Williams Technology, (United States) Illinois Coal Association (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CE to do 150-MW coal-gas-retrofit design study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion Engineering (CE) has a $5 million DOE contract to design a coal gasifier that will convert eastern coal into a fuel gas and replace the oil and gas now burned in a Gulf States Utility unit. A pilot unit which has been converting Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal into 110-Btu fuel gas will be scaled up. The company will also begin testing four other coal types. CE finds that retrofitting an air-blown atmospheric pressure system is cost-effective, but warns that the costs of a large-scale intergrated plant are still speculative. (DCK)

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal.

Netzel, D.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rock, Mineral, Coal, Oil, and Gas Resources on State Lands (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter authorizes and regulates prospecting permits and mining leases for the exploration and development of rock, mineral, oil, coal, and gas resources on state lands.

91

EIA - Future role of the United States in world coal trade  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Future role of the United States in world coal trade Future role of the United States in world coal trade International Energy Outlook 2010 Future role of the United States in world coal trade U.S. coal exports increased each year from 2002 to 2008 at an average annual rate of 12.8 percent, to 82 million tons in 2008. Some analysts have viewed the sharp increase in U.S. exports as an indication of the growing importance of the United States as a world coal supplier. There has also been speculation that China's growing demand for coal will support this trend in the future. However, U.S. coal is a relatively high-cost supply source when shipped to Asian markets, and in the long term U.S. coal will be competing in the Chinese market with lower cost suppliers, notably Australia and Indonesia among others. U.S. exports compete most strongly in European markets and then only when less expensive options are unavailable. In IEO2010, the United States remains a marginal coal supplier over the long term, responding to short-term disruptions or spikes in demand rather than significantly expanding its market share of world coal trade.

92

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 43. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change New England Btu 13,323 13,196 13,391 13,253 13,339 -0.6 Sulfur 0.84 0.89 0.72 0.87 0.72 20.3 Ash 5.95 5.81 5.93 5.87 6.09 -3.6 Maine Btu w w w w w w Sulfur w w w w w w Ash w w w w w w Massachusetts Btu 13,503 13,570 13,592 13,535 13,516 0.1 Sulfur 0.78 0.78 0.75 0.78 0.73 7.7 Ash 5.89 5.55 5.66

93

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 3 Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade

94

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

95

Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 29 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumptiona

96

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal 101 Lesson 1: Cleaning Up Coal Clean Coal COAL is our most abundant fossil fuel. The United States has more coal than the rest of the world has oil. There is still...

99

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 93. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 94. U.S. coal production, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Western Coal Production Continues To Increase Through 2030 In the AEO2008 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at existing plants and construction of a few new coal-fired plants lead to annual production increases that average 0.3 percent per year from 2006 to 2015, when total production is 24.5 quadrillion Btu. In the absence of restrictions on CO2 emissions, the growth in coal production

100

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Coal Production  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Production Coal Production Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Coal Production Figure 78. Coal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 79. U.S. coal production in four cases, 2007, 2015, and 2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 80. Average minemouth coal prices by regionCoal production by region, 1970-2030 (quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Total Coal Production Increases at a Slower Rate Than in the Past In the AEO2009 reference case, increasing coal use for electricity generation at both new and existing plants and the startup of several CTL

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Revised market guide for coal exports from the United States  

SciTech Connect

The world market for steam coal is assessed. In recent years, much has changed in the world coal markets and in the expected opportunities for coal exports from the US. As an example, the overseas steam coal exports climbed from about 2 million tons in 1979 to about 35 million tons in 1981. Since then the overseas steam coal exports have fallen to 27 million tons in 1982 and to 17 million tons in 1983. In addition, metallurgical coal exports to overseas customers dropped from 60 million tons in 1982 to 43 million tons in 1983. This market guide is divided into four sections: Section one contains a review of the most frequently asked questions by individuals interested in the overseas coal markets and the role of US producers in this market; Section two contains an overview of the market for US steam and metallurgical coal exports, including forecasts of import demands, potential US market share, and the factors affecting this market share; Section three contains an outline of the current structure of the steam coal export trade in the US and the potential developments that will influence its future, and Section four contains a review of the important data on the nature of the energy-using industries, utilities and power plants, cement plants, coal quality requirements, and ports of the major steam and metallurgical coal importing countries. 14 figures, 45 tables.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

103

Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United States of America.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Monitoring Coal Bed Methane Production: A Case Study from the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, United The growing significance of the Powder River Basin's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) to United States domestic energy approximates 6% above the coal as well as inside the coal layer. This difference can be attributed primarily

Harris, Jerry M.

104

Coal-to-liquids bill introduced in the Senate  

SciTech Connect

Of immense importance to the coal industry is the announcement, on 7 June 2006 by US Senators Barack Obama (D-IL) and Jim Bunning (R-KY) of S.3325, the 'Coal-to-Liquid Fund Promotion Act of 2006'. This legislation creates tax incentives for coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies and construction of CTL plants. If passed, this will create the infrastructure needed to make CTL a viable energy resource throughout America. The article gives comment and background to this proposed legislation. Illinois Basin coal is well suited for CTL because of its high Btu content. If Sasol constructs a proposed plant in Illinois it would increase coal production in the state by 10 mt. 1 fig.

Buchsbaum, L.

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Using Echo State Networks for Anomaly Detection in Underground Coal Mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the problem of identifying anomalies in monitoring critical gas concentrations using a sensor network in an underground coal mine. In this domain, one of the main problems is a provision of mine specific anomaly detection, with cyclical ... Keywords: sensor networks, anomaly detection, recurrent neural networks, echo state networks, bayesian networks, coal mines

Oliver Obst; X. Rosalind Wang; Mikhail Prokopenko

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Report to the United States Congress clean coal technology export markets and financing mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

This report responds to a Congressional Conference Report that requests that $625,000 in funding provided will be used by the Department to identify potential markets for clean coal technologies in developing countries and countries with economies in transition from nonmarket economies and to identify existing, or new, financial mechanisms or financial support to be provided by the Federal government that will enhance the ability of US industry to participate in these markets. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects world coal consumption to increase by 30 percent between 1990 and 2010, from 5.1 to 6.5 billion short tons. Five regions stand out as major foreign markets for the export of US clean coal technologies: China; The Pacific Rim (other than China); South Asia (primarily India); Transitional Economies (Central Europe and the Newly Independent States); and Other Markets (the Americas and Southern Africa). Nearly two-thirds of the expected worldwide growth in coal utilization will occur in China, one quarter in the United States. EIA forecasts nearly a billion tons per year of additional coal consumption in China between 1990 and 2010, a virtual doubling of that country`s coal consumption. A 30-percent increase in coal consumption is projected in other developing countries over that same period. This increase in coal consumption will be accompanied by an increase in demand for technologies for burning coal cost-effectively, efficiently and cleanly. In the Pacific Rim and South Asia, rapid economic growth coupled with substantial indigenous coal supplies combine to create a large potential market for CCTS. In Central Europe and the Newly Independent States, the challenge will be to correct the damage of decades of environmental neglect without adding to already-considerable economic disruption. Though the situation varies, all these countries share the basic need to use indigenous low-quality coal cleanly and efficiently.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

109

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949–2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949–2012

110

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal; Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

For the research program reported here, different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. In an effort to understand the mechanism of water for enhancing coal liquefaction yield, the reactions of D{sub 2}O with the molecular constituents of coal during coal liquefaction are being investigated. This study involves the use of solution-state deuterium NMR, as well as, conventional solution-state {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the coal, and the coal liquids and residue from a coal liquefaction process. These D{sub 2}O transfer reactions will be conducted on coals which have been dried by various methods and rehydrated using D{sub 2}O and by successive exchange of H{sub 2}O associated with the coals with D{sub 2}O. The drying methods include thermal, microwave, and chemical dehydration of the coal. The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction, and to conduct D{sub 2}O exchange studies to ascertain the role of water in coal liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to measure the volumetric swelling ratio for thermally- and microwave-dried coals and (2) to conduct preliminary experiments concerning the exchange of water in coal with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O).

Netzel, D.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

Weekly Coal Production by State - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended October 12, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 18.9 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 6.7 percent higher than ...

112

Coal reserves in the United States and around the world  

SciTech Connect

There is an urgent need to examine the role that coal might play in meeting world energy needs during the next 20 years. Oil from the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) can no longer be relied upon to provide expanding supplies of energy, even with rapidly rising prices. Neither can nuclear energy be planned on for rapid expansion worldwide until present uncertainties about it are resolved. Yet, the world`s energy needs will continue to grow, even with vigorous energy conservation programs and with optimistic rates of expansion in the use of solar energy. Coal already supplies 25% of the world`s energy, its reserves are vast, and it is relatively inexpensive. This study, with the aid of reports from the World Coal Study (WOCOL) examines the needs for coal on a global scale, its availability past and present, and its future prospects.

Jubert, K.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Weekly Coal Production by State - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For the week ended November 02, 2013: U.S. coal production totaled approximately 19.3 million short tons (mmst) This production estimate is 0.1 percent higher than ...

114

A portfolio approach to energy governance : state management of China's coal and electric power supply industries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses the extent to which China's central state devolved ownership and investment levels in its energy sector to other actors during the modern reform period (1978- 2008). The project focused on China's coal ...

Cunningham, Edward A., IV (Edward Albert)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

"1. Sherburne County","Coal","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",2275  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "1. Sherburne County","Coal","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",2275 "2. Prairie Island","Nuclear","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",1040 "3. Clay Boswell","Coal","Minnesota Power Inc",924 "4. Monticello","Nuclear","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",554 "5. Lakefield Junction","Gas","Great River Energy",517 "6. Allen S King","Coal","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",510 "7. High Bridge","Gas","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",488 "8. Black Dog","Coal","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",484

116

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

117

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of ...

118

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

119

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

120

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 10. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB dat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, STB data" ,,"Real Dollars per Ton",,,,,,,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Basin","Destination State",2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,," 2001-2009"," 2008-2009" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," W"," $16.45"," $14.29"," W"," -"," W"," W"," -",," -"," -" "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," $21.45"," W"," W"," W"," W"," $28.57"," W"," W"," W",," W"," W"

122

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2008 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 65 percent and international coal trade increases by 53 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2005 to 29 percent in 2030. Figure 46. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 47. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 48. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2005, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

123

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 5 - Coal In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent from 2004 to 2030, international coal trade increases by 44 percent from 2005 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 26 percent in 2004 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 54. World Coal Consumption by Region, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 55. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2004, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data In the IEO2007 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 74 percent over the projection period, from 114.4 quadrillion Btu in 2004 to

124

Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Volume 2. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate. The appendices to the report provide a detailed description of the entire DRB process for each state.

Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Steady-state model for estimating gas production from underground coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pseudo-one-dimensional channel model has been developed to estimate gas production from underground coal gasification. The model incorporates a zero-dimensional steady-state cavity growth submodel and models mass transfer from the bulk gas to the coal wall using a correlation for natural convection. Simulations with the model reveal that the gas calorific value is sensitive to coal reactivity and the exposed reactive surface area per unit volume in the channel. A comparison of model results with several small-scale field trials conducted at Centralia in the U.S.A. show that the model can make good predictions of the gas production and composition under a range of different operating conditions, including operation with air and steam/oxygen mixtures. Further work is required to determine whether the model formulation is also suitable for simulating large-scale underground coal gasification field trials.

Greg Perkins; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 44. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division and State 1 April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 Pennsylvania Btu 12,906 12,815 11,709 12,844 12,440 3.2 Sulfur 1.03 0.92 0.99 0.96 0.97 -1.0 Ash 8.94 8.62 10.00 8.72 9.11 -4.3 East North Central

127

Residential coal use: 1982 international solid fuel trade show and conference Atlantic City, New Jersey. [USA; 1974; By state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's anthracite and residential coal programs are described. The residential coal effort is an outgrowth and extension of the anthracite program, which has been, and continues to be, involved in promoting increased production and use of anthracite and the restoration of anthracite as a viable economic alternative to soft coals and to imported oil and gas now supplying the Northeast. Since anthracite is a preferred fuel for residential heating, residential coal issues comprise an important part of our anthracite activities. We have commenced a study of residential coal utilization including: overview of the residential coal market; market potential for residential coal use; analysis of the state of technology, economics, constraints to increased use of coal and coal-based fuels in residential markets, and identification of research and development activities which would serve to increase the market potential for coal-fired residential systems. A considerable amount of information is given in this report on residential coal furnaces and coal usage in 1974, prices of heating oils and coal, methods of comparing these fuels (economics), air pollution, safety, wood and wood furnaces, regulations, etc.

Pell, J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma, 1960 - 2011 1960 33.9 902.0 1,118.9 0.0 NA 17.8 17.8 2,072.6 1961 26.1 976.9 1,119.9 0.0 NA 20.2 20 ...

130

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 589.7 1,771.0 (s) NA 270.2 270.2 2,630.9 1961 0.0 633.8 1,737.7 0.1 NA 248.2 ...

131

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.0 5.0 5.0 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.1 5.1 5.1

132

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas, 1960 - 2011 1960 26.4 6,610.7 5,379.4 0.0 NA 50.2 50.2 12,066.6 1961 26.5 6,690.2 5,447.3 0.0 NA 52.0 ...

133

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana, 1960 - 2011 1960 346.3 0.3 69.9 0.0 NA 24.6 24.6 441.1 1961 336.7 0.4 66.7 0.0 NA 24.2 24.2 428.0

134

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 190.5 190.5 190.5 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 188.9 188.9 188.9

135

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 36.2 36.2 36.7 1961 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 35.1 35.1 35.5

136

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the United States-Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States has the world's largest coal reserves and Montana the highest potential for mega-mine development. Consequently, a large-scale effort to convert coal to liquids (CTL) has been proposed to create a major source of domestic transportation fuels from coal, and some prominent Montanans want to be at the center of that effort. We calculate that the energy efficiency of the best existing Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process applied to average coal in Montana is less than 1/2 of the corresponding efficiency of an average crude oil refining process. The resulting CO{sub 2} emissions are 20 times (2000%) higher for CTL than for conventional petroleum products. One barrel of the FT fuel requires roughly 800 kg of coal and 800 kg of water. The minimum energy cost of subsurface CO{sub 2} sequestration would be at least 40% of the FT fuel energy, essentially halving energy efficiency of the process. We argue therefore that CTL conversion is not the most valuable use for the coal, nor will it ever be, as long as it is economical to use natural gas for electric power generation. This finding results from the low efficiency inherent in FT synthesis, and is independent of the monumental FT plant construction costs, mine construction costs, acute lack of water, and the associated environmental impacts for Montana.

Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu; Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Coal  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 4 - Coal In the IEO2009 reference case, world coal consumption increases by 49 percent from 2006 to 2030, and coalÂ’s share of world energy consumption increases from 27 percent in 2006 to 28 percent in 2030. Figure 42. World Coal Consumption by Country Grouping, 1980-2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 43. Coal Share of World Energy Consumption by Sector, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Percent). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 44. OECD Coal Consumption by Region, 1980, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (Quadrillion Btu). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

138

Coal development in the Northern Great Plains: the impact of revenues of state and local governments. Agricultural economic report (final)  

SciTech Connect

Development of Northern Great Plains coal resources will create new demands for state and local government services. This study reports detailed estimates of the state and local taxes that would be paid by three different sized coal mines and their employees in Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wyoming.

Stinson, T.F.; Voelker, S.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

State Energy Price System: 1982 update  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Price System (STEPS) contains estimates of energy prices for ten major fuels (electricity, natural gas, metallurgical coal, steam coal, distillate, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene/jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas), by major end-use sectors (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility), and by state through 1982. Both physical unit prices and prices per million Btu are included in STEPS. Major changes in STEPS data base for 1981 and 1982 are described. The most significant changes in procedures for the updates occur in the residential sector distillate series and the residential sector kerosene series. All physical unit and Btu prices are shown with three significant digits instead of with four significant digits as shown in the original documentation. Details of these and other changes are contained in this report, along with the updated data files. 31 references, 65 tables.

Imhoff, K.L.; Fang, J.M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 23. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012 (short tons produced per employee hour) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Mine Production Range (thousand short tons) Coal-Producing State, Region 1 and Mine Type Above 1,000 Above 500 to 1,000 Above 200 to 500 Above 100 to 200 Above 50 to 100 Above 10 to 50 10 or Under Total 2 Alabama 1.69 2.50 1.95 1.72 1.83 0.69 0.55 1.68 Underground 1.73 - - - 1.08 0.31 - 1.64 Surface 1.36 2.50 1.95 1.72 2.11 1.19 0.55 1.75 Alaska 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Surface 5.98 - - - - - - 5.98 Arizona 7.38 - - - - - - 7.38 Surface

143

Coal sector profile  

SciTech Connect

Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

144

NETL: Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Sources Coal-Fired Power Plants (CFPPs) Where is the coal in the United States? Coal Across the U.S. The U.S. contains coal resources in various places. The coal occurs...

145

Subbituminous and bituminous coal dominate U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While almost all coal consumed in the United States is used to generate electricity (90% in 2010), coal is not entirely homogeneous. Coal is ...

146

State-of-the-Practice Liners and Caps for Coal Combustion Product Management Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 40% of the coal combustion products (CCPs) generated in the United States are beneficially reused in applications such as concrete products, road construction, and wallboard, with the remaining volume managed in landfills and ponds. Most new management units since 1994 have been lined landfills; pending federal regulations are expected to accelerate that trend.The objective of this report is to provide environmental managers with an overview of the state of the practice for ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Coal Severance Tax (North Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Coal Severance Tax is imposed on all coal severed for sale or industrial purposes, except coal used for heating buildings in the state, coal used by the state or any political subdivision of...

148

Table 11b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001...

149

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development Projects Aimed at Advancing State-of-the-Art Carbon Capture from Coal Power Plants Selected for Further Development August 15, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Four projects aimed at reducing the energy and cost penalties of advanced carbon capture systems applied to power plants have been selected for further development by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy (FE). Valued at approximately $67 million (including $15 million in non-federal cost sharing) over four years, the overall goal of the research is to develop carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation technologies that can achieve at least 90 percent CO2 removal at no more than a 35 percent

150

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

151

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

152

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

153

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 PM)" 4 PM)" "United States" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",145,145,141,139,136,132,129,127,125,122,120,123,125,128,136,154,169,177,207,221,227 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",10465,10378,10395,10315,10338,10248,10263,10275,10241,10163,10115,10200,10168,10137,10074,10107,10063,10028,9947,9902,9843 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.35,1.3,1.29,1.18,1.17,1.08,1.1,1.11,1.06,1.01,0.93,0.89,0.94,0.97,0.97,0.98,0.97,0.96,0.97,1.01,1.04 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",335,253,251,237,242,257,303,273,202,236,418,369,334,433,429,644,623,717,1087,702,954 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",149536,150093,150293,149983,149324,149371,149367,149838,149736,149407,149857,147857,147902,147086,147286,146481,143883,144545,142205,141321,140598

154

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program was to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. During this study, one plant coal and three blend samples were prepared as 100% plant coal, 90% plant coal/10% fines, 85% plant coal/15% fines, and 80% plant coal /20% fines with a particle size distribution of 70% passing through {minus}200 mesh size. The plant coal and recovered coal fines were obtained from the Randolph Preparation Plant of Peabody Coal Co., Marissa, IL. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace was used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace was used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Combustion emissions of these samples were determined in the down-fired combustor, while relative ignition temperatures were determined in the drop tube furnace. Chemical composition of ashes were analyzed to establish a correlation with their respective ash fusion temperatures. Overall study of these samples suggested that the blended samples had combustion properties similar to the original plant coal. In other words, flames were stable under identical firing rates of approximately 200,000 Btu`s/hr and 25% excess air. CO, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub x}, were similar to each other and within the experimental error. Combustion efficiency of 99{sup +}% was achievable. Ash chemical analysis of each sample revealed that slagging and fouling should not be different from each other.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coal industry annual 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States.This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 24 million short tons for 1996. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Coal Industry Annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. Consumption for nonutility power producers not included in this report is estimated to be 21 million short tons for 1995.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Nomogram calculates power plant coal use  

SciTech Connect

The number of tons of coal burned annually by a generating unit can be calculated by the following formula: Q = 43.8 (MW) (HR) (CF/HV)/10/sup 6/ where: Q = Annual usage, million tons MW = Unit capacity, MW HR = Unit heat rate, Btu/kWh CF = Annual unit capacity factor, % HV = Heating value of coal, Btu/lb The nomogram solves this equation and permits annual coal usage to be estimated quickly for various combinations of the other variables. The nomogram also can be used in reverse to determine such things as the annual capacity factor that a certain coal usage could sustain. Example: An 840-MW unit has an average heat rate of 10,000 Btu/kWh and burns coal with a heating value of 8600 Btu/lb. The annual capacity factor is 60%. Calculate the annual coal usage. Solution: (A) Align 840 on MW scale with 8600 on HV scale and mark intersection with CF scale; (B) align this marked point with 10,000 on HR scale and mark intersection with Reference Line; (C) align this point with 60 on CF scale and extend to Q scale. Read answer as approximately 2.6 million tons/year.

McAlister, J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. In addition, the report

160

Coal industry annual 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Southern States Energy Board  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plants * 350 to 450 Mw e Plant Size * > 90% CO 2 Removal * 80% Capacity Factor * Coal Price 1.2410 6 Btu S. Forbes, SSEB, 11503 Separation and Capture Highlights Many...

162

State energy price and expenditure report, 1986  

SciTech Connect

The average price paid for energy in the United States in 1986 was $7.19 per million Btu, down significantly from the 1985 average of $8.42 per million Btu. While total energy consumption increased slightly to 74.3 quadrillion Btu from 1985 to 1986, expenditures fell from $445 billion to $381 billion. Energy expenditures per capita in 1986 were $1578, down significantly from the 1985 rate. In 1986, consumers used only 94 percent as much energy per person as they had in 1970, but they spent 3.9 times as much money per person on energy as they had in 1970. By state, energy expenditures per capita in 1986 ranged from the lowest rate of $1277 in New York to the highest of $3108 in Alaska. Of the major energy sources, electricity registered the highest price per million Btu ($19.00), followed by petroleum ($5.63), natural gas ($3.97), coal ($1.62), and nuclear fuel ($0.70). The price of electricity is relatively high because of significant costs for converting energy from various forms (e.g., fossil fuels, nuclear fuel, hydroelectric energy, and geothermal energy) into electricity, and additional, somewhat smaller costs for transmitting and distributing electricity to end users. In addition, electricity is a premium form of energy because of its flexibility and clean nature at energy consumers' sites.

Not Available

1988-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

163

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

164

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels

165

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

166

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Production: Trade: Stock Change and Other 8: Consumption: Fossil Fuels 2

167

Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports

168

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

169

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F17: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric ...

170

Table F18: Coal Price and Expenditure Estimates and Imports ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table F18: Coal Price and Expenditure Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2011 State Coal Coal Coke Prices Expenditures Prices ...

171

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 PM)" 8 PM)" "Alaska" "Fuel, Quality",1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",203,141,148 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",8698,8520,8278 " Average sulfur Content (percent)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",0.33,0.5,0.71

172

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2011 By Coal Destination State ...

173

Emissions Resulting from the Full-Scale Cofiring of Pelletized Refuse-Derived Fuel and Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Full-scale cofiring tests of binder-enhanced pellets of densified, refuse-derived fuel (dRDF) and high-sulfur coal were conducted during June and July of 1987 in Boiler #5 at Argonne National Laboratory. These tests were conducted with industry, state, and municipality participation both in critiquing the test plan and in witnessing the actual test runs. Approximately 600 tons of dRDF containing 0%, 4%, or 8% binder were blended with high-sulfur coal at levels of up to 30%, based on the BTU content. This paper describes the dRDF/coal cofiring tests, the emissions and ash samples that were taken, the analyses that were conducted on these samples, preliminary test results, and future research plans.

Ohlsson, O. O.; Daugherty, K.; Venables, B.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Coal industry annual 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal Industry Annual 1993 replaces the publication Coal Production (DOE/FIA-0125). This report presents additional tables and expanded versions of tables previously presented in Coal Production, including production, number of mines, Productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. This report also presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, coal quality, and emissions for a wide audience including the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In addition, Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report does not include coal consumption data for nonutility Power Producers who are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. This consumption is estimated to be 5 million short tons in 1993.

Not Available

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Combustion characterization of the blend of plant coal and recovered coal fines. [Quarterly] technical report, March 1, 1992--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this proposed research program is to determine the combustion characteristics of the blend derived from mixing a plant coal and recovered and clean coal fines from the pond. One plant coal and three blend samples will be prepared and utilized. The blend samples will be of a mixture of 90% plant coal + 10% fines, 85% plant coal + 15% fines, 80% plant coal + 20% fines having particle size distribution of 70% passing through -200 mesh size. These samples` combustion behavior will be examined in two different furnaces at Penn State University, i.e., a down-fired furnace and a drop-tube furnace. The down-fired furnace win be used mainly to measure the emissions and ash deposition study, while the drop tube furnace will be used to determine burning profile, combustion efficiency, etc. The burning profile of the plant coal and the three blends was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. Results indicated slower burning of the blends due to low volatile matter and oxidized coal particles. Ash fusing temperatures of the samples were determined using ASTM procedure. Preliminary combustion evaluation of the samples (100% plant coal, 80% plant coal/20% recovered coal fines) indicated that the flame was stable at 100,000-200,000 Btu/hr firing rate. Carbon conversion efficiency of 85 to 90% was recorded using the Ash Tracer technique. Tests are continuing to determine the operating boundaries for these blends while measuring the emissions of SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, CO and O{sub 2}, maintaining a stable flame.

Singh, S. [SS Energy Environmental International, Inc., Rockford, IL (United States); Scaroni, A.; Miller, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Combustion Lab.; Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Documentation of the demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States. Final report, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document the methodologies used to develop the 1979 Demonstrated Reserve Base (DRB) of coal. All primary source documents used to prepare the 1979 DRB were reviewed. Using the methodologies and documentation found in the 1979 DRB published report as a guide, each of the state-level published reserve estimates were re-derived. In those cases where the estimates could not be reproduced, EIA personnel from the Eastern and Western Energy Data Offices were consulted and the differences, for the most part, were resolved. Throughout this report an attempt was made to describe the information flow that was an integral part of the DRB development. Particular attention and emphasis was given to those instances where deviations from standard, published EIA procedures were used to derive the DRB estimates. The main body of this report summarizes the methodological procedures used to develop each state reserve estimate.

Herhal, A J; Britton, S G; Minnucci, C A

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Determination of Autoignition and Flame Speed Characteristics of Coal Gases Having Medium Heating Values  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of clean, medium-Btu coal-derived gas offers a way of generating electric power from domestic coal without the sulfur oxide emissions of direct coal combustion. This initial testing yielded data on the spontaneous ignition and turbulent flame speed behavior of such gases that will be valuable for the development of low-NOx combustion systems.

1985-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

178

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 11B. Process development studies. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; alternative engineering studies; also Kentucky vs Wyoming coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the course of the Tri-State/Fluor Management Meeting held in Irvine on October 1, 1981, Fluor was requested to prepare additional process alternate studies. Discussions held on October 2 resulted in the definition of the eight cases described in this report. The scope for these eight cases were reviewed and approved during a meeting held in Houston on October 12. During the October 12 meeting Tri-State requested the preparation of an additional four cases reflecting the use of a typical Powder River basin coal. Cases 9 thru 12 issued with Revision 1 of this report reflect results of this work.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Program Info State...

180

"State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " P2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, 2011 " "State","Fossil Fuels",,,,,,"Nuclear Electric Power",,"Renewable Energy",,,,,,"Total Energy Production" ,"Coal a",,"Natural Gas b",,"Crude Oil c",,,,"Biofuels d",,"Other e",,"Total" ,"Trillion Btu" "Alabama",468.671,,226.821,,48.569,,411.822,,0,,245.307,,245.307,,1401.191 "Alaska",33.524,,404.72,,1188.008,,0,,0,,15.68,,15.68,,1641.933 "Arizona",174.841,,0.171,,0.215,,327.292,,7.784,,107.433,,115.217,,617.734 "Arkansas",2.985,,1090.87,,34.087,,148.531,,0,,113.532,,113.532,,1390.004 "California",0,,279.71,,1123.408,,383.644,,25.004,,812.786,,837.791,,2624.553

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2009 Final February 2011 2 Overview of 2009 Coal Distribution Tables Introduction The Coal Distribution Report - Annual provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing State. This Final 2009 Coal Distribution Report - Annual, supersedes the data contained in the four Quarterly Coal Distribution Reports previously issued for 2009. This report relies on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys

182

Near-term implications of a ban on new coal-fired power plants in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large numbers of proposed new coal power generators in the United States have been cancelled, and some states have prohibited new coal power generators. We examine the effects on the U.S. electric power system of banning the construction of coal-fired electricity generators, which has been proposed as a means to reduce U.S. CO{sub 2} emissions. The model simulates load growth, resource planning, and economic dispatch of the Midwest Independent Transmission System Operator (ISO), Inc., Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT), and PJM under a ban on new coal generation and uses an economic dispatch model to calculate the resulting changes in dispatch order, CO{sub 2} emissions, and fuel use under three near-term (until 2030) future electric power sector scenarios. A national ban on new coal-fired power plants does not lead to CO{sub 2} reductions of the scale required under proposed federal legislation such as Lieberman-Warner but would greatly increase the fraction of time when natural gas sets the price of electricity, even with aggressive wind and demand response policies. 50 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Jay Apt [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal 101 Lesson 2: The Clean Coal Technology Program The Clean Coal Technology Program began in 1985 when the United States and Canada decided that something had to be done about the "acid rain" that was believed to be damaging rivers, lakes, forests, and buildings in both countries. Since many of the pollutants that formed "acid rain" were coming from big coal-burning power plants in the United States, the U.S. Government took the lead in finding a solution. One of the steps taken by the U.S. Department of Energy was to create a partnership program between the Government, several States, and private companies to test new methods developed by scientists to make coal burning much cleaner. This became the "Clean Coal Technology Program."

184

Coal Gasification Report.indb  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Booz Allen Hamilton Booz Allen Hamilton Final Report, September 3, 2004 list of acronyms List of Acronyms AEO Annual Energy Outlook ASU Air Separation Unit BACT Best Available Control Technology BTU British Thermal Unit CCPI Clean Coal Power Initiative CFB Circulating Fluidized Bed CO Carbon Monoxide CO 2 Carbon Dioxide COE Cost of Electricity Co-Op Co-Operative CRS Congressional Research Service DG Distributed Generation

185

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, June 1--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One area for improvement in the economics of coal liquefaction is coal drying, particularly for the lower rank coals. However, there is considerable evidence to show that drying has a detrimental effect on the liquefaction behavior of coals. Regarding the liquefaction of coal, there does not appear to have been any systematic study of the methods of coal drying on coal structure and the role water plays in enhancing or lessening coal reactivity toward liquefaction. To conduct this study two coals, the North Dakota Beulah Zap lignite and the Utah Blind Canyon coals were chosen. These coals represent a low and high rank coal, respectively. In addition, the Beulah Zap lignite has a high moisture content whereas the Blind Canyon coal (hvA) bituminous has a very low moisture content. The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to measure the volumetric swelling ratio for initial and chemically-dried coals and (2) to conduct preliminary experiments concerning the exchange of water in coal with deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O).

Netzel, D.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

EIA -Quarterly Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Distribution Coal Distribution Home > Coal> Quarterly Coal Distribution Back Issues Quarterly Coal Distribution Archives Release Date: June 27, 2013 Next Release Date: September 2013 The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed quarterly data on U.S. domestic coal distribution by coal origin, coal destination, mode of transportation and consuming sector. All data are preliminary and superseded by the final Coal Distribution - Annual Report. Year/Quarters By origin State By destination State Report Data File Report Data File 2009 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf October-December pdf xls pdf 2010 January-March pdf xls pdf xls April-June pdf xls pdf xls July-September pdf xls pdf xls

187

1994 Washington State directory of Biomass Energy Facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth edition of the Washington Directory of Biomass Energy Facilities, the first edition was published in 1987. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of and basic information about known biomass producers and users within the state to help demonstrate the importance of biomass energy in fueling our state`s energy needs. In 1992 (latest statistical year), estimates show that the industrial sector in Washington consumed nearly 128 trillion Btu of electricity, nearly 49.5 trillion Btu of petroleum, over 82.2 trillion Btu of natural gas, and over 4.2 trillion Btu of coal. Facilities listed in this directory generated approximately 114 trillion Btu of biomass energy - 93 trillion were consumed from waste wood and spent chemicals. In the total industrial energy picture, wood residues and chemical cooking liquors placed second only to electricity. This directory is divided into four main sections biogas production, biomass combustion, ethanol production, and solid fuel processing facilities. Each section contains maps and tables summarizing the information for each type of biomass. Provided in the back of the directory for reference are a conversion table, a table of abbreviations, a glossary, and an index. Chapter 1 deals with biogas production from both landfills and sewage treatment plants in the state. Biogas produced from garbage and sewage can be scrubbed and used to generate electricity. At the present time, biogas collected at landfills is being flared on-site, however four landfills are investigating the feasibility of gas recovery for energy. Landfill biogas accounted for approximately 6 percent of the total biomass reported. Sewage treatment biogas accounted for 0.6 percent. Biogas generated from sewage treatment plants is primarily used for space and process heat, only one facility presently scrubs and sells methane. Together, landfill and sewage treatment plant biogas represented over 6.6 percent of the total biomass reported.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

189

Method of operating a coal gasifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating an entrained flow coal gasifier which comprises the steps of firing coal at two levels in a combustion zone with near stoichiometric air, removing molten ash from the combustion zone, conveying combustion products upwardly from the combustion zone through a reduction zone, injecting additional coal into the combustion products in the reduction zone and gasifying at least a portion of the coal to form low BTU gas, conveying the gas to a point of use, including also reducing gasifier output by modifying the ratio of air to coal supplied to the upper level of the combustion zone so that the ratio becomes increasingly substoichiometric thereby extending the gasification of coal from the reduction zone into the upper level of the combustion zone, and maintaining the lower level of coal in the combustion zone at near stoichiometric conditions so as to provide sufficient heat to maintain effective slagging conditions.

Blaskowski, Henry J. (West Simsbury, CT)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 12, July--September 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The goals for emissions and plant efficiency are: NO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; SO{sub x} emissions not greater than 0.1 lb/million Btu; particulate emissions not greater than 0.01 lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency (HHV basis) not less than 42%. Other goals include: improved ash disposability and reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. The final deliverables are a design data base that will allow future coal-fired power plants to meet the stated objectives, and a preliminary design of a Commercial Generation Unit. The work in Phase I covered a 24- month period and included system analysis, RD&T Plan formulation, component definition, and preliminary Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) design. Phase II will cover a 15-month period and will include preliminary Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) design and subsystem testing. Phase III will cover a 9-month period and will produce a revised CGU design and a revised POCTF design, cost estimate and a test plan. Phase IV, the final Phase, will cover a 36- month period and will include POCTF detailed design, construction, testing, and evaluation.

NONE

1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

figure data Figure 7 shows the percent change in average real rates for those state-to-state ... Estimated transportation rates for coal delivered to electric ...

192

Virginia Center for Coal+Energy Research VirginiaPolytechnicInstituteandStateUniversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

established a reliable set of benchmarks for Virginia's coal, gas and oil, and electricity industries. Future. Assessment of Virginia Coalfield Region Capability to Support an Electric Power Generation Industry. Carl E- sponded well to the changing chal- lenges faced by Virginia's coal and en- ergy industries. The center

193

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... • Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

194

Laboratory study for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

Substantial progress has been made in the development of the Gravimelt Process for removal of organic sulfur from coal. Three reactors have been fabricated for both material balance studies of the desulfurization of coal with caustic and examination of the behavior of model organic and inorganic sulfur-containing compounds with the same mixture. Model organic sulfur conpounds have been procured and samples of Kentucky No. 9 coal enriched in mineral matter and samples enriched in organic matter have been prepared by float sink techniques for use in determining mechanism and products of the desulfurization reactions. Initial experimentation has been aimed at determining the fate of sulfur removed from coal and obtaining semi-quantitative information for future material balance studies. These studies show near 90% of the sulfur content of the Kentucky No. 9 coal was removed and approximately 3/4 of this removed sulfur was found by chemical analysis to be in the caustic phase. It was further determined that approximately 1% of the coal organic matter dissolves into the caustic phase. These results indicate rough material flows and show that material balance measurements are feasible. A preliminary conceptual engineering design for a full scale Gravimelt coal desulfurization plant was prepared in order to guide future laboratory efforts toward obtaining key engineering data. The engineering study indicates that the Gravimelt Process can be designed utilizing state of the art equipment and that likely energy recovery is approximately 90%. It is estimated that coal desulfurization costs will be in the range of $20 per ton of coal produced, or $.70/10/sup 6/ Btu, in 1980 dollars.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

HS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Coal Fossil Energy Study Guide: Coal Coal is the most plentiful fuel in the fossil family. The United States has more coal reserves than any other country in the world. In fact, one-fourth of all known coal in the world is in the United States, with large deposits located in 38 states. The United States has almost as much energ y in coal that can be mined as the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. TYPES OF COAL Coal is a black rock made up of large amounts of carbon. Like all fossil fuels, coal can be burned to release energy. Coal contains elements such as hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen; has various amounts of minerals; and is itself considered to be a mineral of organic origin. Due to the variety of materials buried over time in the

196

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction, and to conduct D{sub 2}O exchange studies to ascertain the role of water in coal liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to train students in the operation of the coal liquefaction reactor, gas analysis, extraction of the coal residue and coal liquids, and to calculate the percent conversion from the coal liquefaction data; and (2) to implement the changes in the coal liquefaction experimental procedure.

Netzel, D.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Coal Council American Coal Council 2004 Spring Coal Forum Dallas, Texas May 17-19, 2004 Thomas J. Feeley, III Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Presentation Outline * Background * Power plant-water issues * DOE/NETL R&D program * Conclusion/future plans ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Global Water Availability Ocean 97% Fresh Water 2.5% 0 20 40 60 80 100 Ice Groundwater Lakes and Rivers ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Three Things Power Plants Require 1) Access to transmission lines 2) Available fuel, e.g., coal or natural gas 3) Water ACC Spring Coal Forum, 2004 Freshwater Withdrawals and Consumption Mgal / Day Irrigation 81,300 Irrigation 81,300 Thermoelectric 3,310 Consumption Sources: "Estimated Use of Water in the United States in 1995," USGS Circular 1200, 1998

198

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA...

199

State energy price and expenditure report 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average price paid by US consumers for energy in 1984 was $8.43 per million Btu, down 0.5% from the 1983 average price of $8.47 per million Btu. While the average price changed very little, total expenditures rose 5% from $418 billion in 1983 to $438 billion in 1984 due to increased energy consumption. By energy source, prices showed the most change in petroleum and electricity: the average price paid for petroleum products fell from $7.79 per million Btu in 1983 to $7.62 per million Btu in 1984, and the average price paid for electricity increased from $18.62 per million Btu in 1983 to $19.29 per million Btu in 1984. Expenditures in 1984 hit record high levels for coal, natural gas, nuclear fuel, and electricity, but were 16% below the 1981 peak for petroleum.

Not Available

1986-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

200

Low temperature steam-coal gasification catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Shrinking domestic supplies and larger dependence on foreign sources have made an assortment of fossil fuels attractive as possible energy sources. The high sulfur and mineral coals of Illinois would be an ideal candidate as possible gasification feedstock. Large reserves of coal as fossil fuel source and a projected shortage of natural gas (methane) in the US, have made development of technology for commercial production of high Btu pipeline gases from coal of interest. Several coal gasification processes exist, but incentives remain for the development of processes that would significantly increase efficiency and lower cost. A major problem in coal/char gasification is the heat required which make the process energy intensive. Hence, there is a need for an efficient and thermally neutral gasification process. Results are described for the gasification of an Illinois No. 6 coal with transition metal catalysts and added potassium hydroxide.

Hippo, E.J.; Tandon, D. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Computerized coal-quality prediction from digital geophysical logs  

SciTech Connect

A digital suite of geophysical logs, including gamma-ray, resistivity and gamma-gamma density, were used to develop and test a method for predicting coal quality parameters for the Wyodak coal in the Powder River basin of Wyoming. The method was developed by plotting the average of various log response increments (obtained from the contractor's 9-track digital tapes) versus the analytically determined ash, moisture, and Btu/lb for the same intervals of the coal seam. Standard curve-fitting techniques were then employed to determine which log response parameter most accurately predicted the various quality parameters. A computer program was written that reads 9-track, digital, log tapes and determines the coal quality parameters based on the relationships between log response and analytical values. The computer program was written in Fortran 77 for a VAX 11/780 minicomputer. The program was designed to run interactively with user-determined options depending on which geophysical logs were available. Preliminary results have been very encouraging to date with predicted versus analytically determined parameters being estimated to an accuracy of +/-300 Btu/lb (with the average being +/-150 Btu/lb), +/-2% ash and +/-3% moisture. This compares to ASTM lab-to-lab analytical standards of +/-100 Btu/lb, +/-0.7% ash, and +/-0.5% moisture. This prediction methods is applicable to coals from other basins and offers promise as a cost saving tool for exploration and production uses.

Nations, D.L.; Tabet, D.E.; Gerould, C.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

MS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL America has more coal than any other fossil fuel resource. Th e United States also has more coal reserves than any other single country in the world. In fact, 1/4 of all the known coal in the world is in the United States. Th e United States has more energy in coal that can be mined than the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. Currently, coal is mined in 25 of the 50 states. Coal is used primarily in the United States to generate electricity. In fact, it is burned in power plants to produce nearly half of the electricity we use. A stove uses about half a ton of coal a year. A water heater uses about two tons of coal a year. And a refrigerator, that's another half-ton a year. Even though you

203

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may impact coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying are being investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction. The objectives for this quarterly report period were to (1) determine the kinetics of chemical dehydration of coals, (2) measure the volumetric, swelling ratio for initial and dried coals, and (3) determine the coal liquefaction yield for dried coals.

Netzel, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive capacity of coal mines by State, 2011, 2010 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 11. Productive capacity of coal...

205

Combustion kinetics of coal chars in oxygen-enriched ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... oil re- covery or coal-bed methane applications [1 ... eastern United States bituminous coal blend provided ... These coals were ground and sieved into a ...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

O A Section 2. Coal - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal Consumption Physical Units Coal in the United States is mostly consumed by the electric power sector. Data are collected by the ...

207

Analysis of Michigan, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Texas coals  

SciTech Connect

Report gives analytical data that show composition and quality of coal, including lignite, by states. Coal fields, mining methods, and production, distribution, and use of coal are discussed.

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

209

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

current Coal Distribution Report current Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: November 7, 2012 | Next Release Date: November 2013 | full report Archive Domestic coal distribution by origin State, destination State, consumer category, method of transportation; foreign coal distribution by major coal-exporting state and method of transportation; and domestic and foreign coal distribution by origin state. Year Domestic and foreign distribution of U.S. coal by State of origin Foreign distribution of U.S. coal by major coal-exporting States and destination Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by origin State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1 Domestic distribution of U.S. coal by destination State, consumer, destination and method of transportation1

210

Coal production 1989  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1989 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, reserves, and stocks to a wide audience including Congress, federal and state agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. 7 figs., 43 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reactions, and to determine the mechanism by which water may enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmospheres and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objective for this quarterly report were (1) to determine the limit of detection of water by NMR, (2) to determine the reproducibility of the NMR integration method using the Lab Cal {sup {trademark}} PC software, (3) to determine the amount of water in standard solutions, and (4) to determine the amount of water in a coal sample. The studies performed this last quarter have shown that the {sup 1}H NMR method for determining water in a coal sample via the reaction with 2,2-dimethoxypropane will be suitable for determining the water content in coals. The method should be most suitable for coals having low moisture content; that is, those coals which have been subjected to other drying techniques. 9 refs., 1 tab.

Netzel, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity and CO 2 from coal with commercially readyHong B, Slatick E. Carbon dioxide emission factors for coal.EIA Quarterly Coal Report January–April 1994:1–8. 1994. DOE/

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

"2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "1. Comanche","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",1426 "2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969 "4. Cherokee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",717 "5. Rawhide","Coal","Platte River Power Authority",666 "6. Rocky Mountain Energy Center","Gas","Rocky Mountain Energy Ctr LLC",601 "7. Pawnee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",505 "8. Front Range Power Project","Gas","Colorado Springs City of",462 "9. Hayden","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",446

215

Natural Gas Processing Plants in the United States: 2010 Update / National  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

National Overview National Overview Btu Content The natural gas received and transported by the major intrastate and interstate mainline transmission systems must be within a specific energy (Btu) content range. Generally, the acceptable Btu content is 1,035 Btu per cubic foot, with an acceptable deviation of +/-50 Btu. However, when natural gas is extracted, its Btu content can be very different from acceptable pipeline specifications. The Btu content of natural gas extracted varies depending on the presence of water, NGLs, as well as CO2, nitrogen, helium, and others. Significant amounts of NGLs in natural gas is generally associated with higher Btu values. Consistent with this, Btu values reported by plants in Texas and other Gulf of Mexico States are comparatively high (Table 3). On

216

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Maine" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",241,237,262,266,327,319,367,506,619 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",13138,13124,12854,12823,12784,13171,12979,12779,13011 " Average sulfur Content (percent)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",0.71,0.69,0.77,0.78,0.7,0.65,0.72,0.82,0.72

217

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State: Jet Fuel a: Consumption : Prices : Expenditures: Thousand Barrels: Trillion Btu: Dollars per Million Btu: Million Dollars: Alabama: 2,355: 13.4: 22.77: 304.0 ...

218

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

219

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 - 2011 1960 796.6 36.9 31.3 0.0 NA 37.0 37.0 901.9 1961 756.0 37.3 32.7 0.0 NA 36.4 36.4 862.4

220

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coal Development (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section provides for the development of newly-discovered coal veins in the state, and county aid for such development.

222

Focus on Alaska's coal '80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the broad headings of: Northern Alaskan coals; Beluga-Yentna coal field; resource development and utilization; transportation and economics; coal mining methods and regulations; and, federal and state policies concerning coal development. There is also a panel discussion, and luncheon and banquet speeches. 36 papers have been abstracted separately.

Rao, P.D.; Wolff, E.N. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from United States of America) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

224

PAHs underfoot: contaminated dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement is widespread in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reported in 2005 that runoff from parking lots treated with coal-tar-based sealcoat was a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to streams in Austin, Texas. Here we present new data from nine U.S. cities that show nationwide patterns in concentrations of {Sigma}PAHs associated with sealcoat. Dust was swept from parking lots in six cities in the central and eastern U.S., where coal-tar-based sealcoat dominates use, and three cities in the western U.S., where asphalt-based sealcoat dominates use. For six central and eastern cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are 2200 and 27 mg/kg, respectively. For three western cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are similar and very low (2.1 and 0.8 mg/kg, respectively). Lakes in the central and eastern cities where pavement was sampled have bottom sediments with higher PAH concentrations than do those in the western cities relative to degree of urbanization. Bottom-sediment PAH assemblages are similar to those of sealcoated pavement dust regionally, implicating coal-tar-based sealcoat as a PAH source to the central and eastern lakes. Concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement and adjacent soils greatly exceed generic soil screening levels, suggesting that research on human-health risk is warranted. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Peter C. Van Metre; Barbara J. Mahler; Jennifer T. Wilson [U.S. Geological Survey, Austin, TX (USA)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

EIA - Electricity Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table C.1 Average Heat Content of Fossil-Fuel Receipts, July 2013: Census Division and State Coal (Million Btu per Ton) Petroleum Liquids (Million Btu per Barrel)

226

Overview of coal conversion  

SciTech Connect

The structure of coal and the processes of coal gasification and coal liquefaction are reviewed. While coal conversion technology is not likely to provide a significant amount of synthetic fuel within the next several years, there is a clear interest both in government and private sectors in the development of this technology to hedge against ever-diminishing petroleum supplies, especially from foreign sources. It is evident from this rather cursory survey that there is some old technology that is highly reliable; new technology is being developed but is not ready for commercialization at the present state of development. The area of coal conversion is ripe for exploration both on the applied and basic research levels. A great deal more must be understood about the reactions of coal, the reactions of coal products, and the physics and chemistry involved in the various stages of coal conversion processes in order to make this technology economically viable.

Clark, B.R.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coal Production 1992  

SciTech Connect

Coal Production 1992 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, the number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. In 1992, there were 3,439 active coal mining operations made up of all mines, preparation plants, and refuse operations. The data in Table 1 cover the 2,746 mines that produced coal, regardless of the amount of production, except for bituminous refuse mines. Tables 2 through 33 include data from the 2,852 mining operations that produced, processed, or prepared 10 thousand or more short tons of coal during the period, except for bituminous refuse, and includes preparation plants with 5 thousand or more employee hours. These mining operations accounted for over 99 percent of total US coal production and represented 83 percent of all US coal mining operations in 1992.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6 Coal price (2005$) $1.29/MMBTU 93.8 kg CO 2 /MMBTU coal COsales $0.05/kWh price (2005$) Coal type Illinois no.coal-to- electricity ef?ciency is 37%, carbon capture is 91%, and the electricity price

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 12. Fluor project status. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document and summarize activities associated with Fluor's efforts on the Tri-State Synfuels Project. The proposed facility was to be coal-to-transport fuels facility located in Henderson, Kentucky. Tri-State Synfuels Company was participating in the project as a partner of the US Department of Energy per terms of a Cooperative Agreement resulting from DOE's synfuel's program solicitation. Fluor's initial work plan called for preliminary engineering and procurement services to the point of commitment for construction for a Sasol Fischer-Tropsch plant. Work proceeded as planned until October 1981 when results of alternative coal-to-methanol studies revealed the economic disadvantage of the Synthol design for US markets. A number of alternative process studies followed to determine the best process configuration. In January 1982 Tri-State officially announced a change from Synthol to a Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) design basis. Further evaluation and cost estimates for the MTG facility eventually led to the conclusion that, given the depressed economic outlook for alternative fuels development, the project should be terminated. Official announcement of cancellation was made on April 13, 1982. At the time of project cancellation, Fluor had completed significant portions of the preliminary engineering effort. Included in this report are descriptions and summaries of Fluor's work during this project. In addition location of key project data and materials is identified and status reports for each operation are presented.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal or coal refuse, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and Cofiring Alternatives. The major emphasis of work during this reporting period was to assess the types and quantities of potential feedstocks and collect samples of them for analysis. Approximately twenty different biomass, animal waste, and other wastes were collected and analyzed.

Bruce G. Miller; Curtis Jawdy

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources (Redirected from USA) Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA

232

United States: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States: Energy Resources United States: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Click on a state to view that state's page. Country Profile Name United States Population Unavailable GDP Unavailable Energy Consumption 99.53 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code US 3-letter ISO code USA Numeric ISO code 840 UN Region[1] Northern America OpenEI Resources Energy Maps 1143 view Tools 94 view Programs 25 view Energy Organizations 8947 view Research Institutions 128 view References CIA World Factbook, Appendix D[2] Energy Resources Resource Value Units Rank Period Source Wind Potential 2,237,435 Area(km²) Class 3-7 Wind at 50m 3 1990 NREL Solar Potential 24,557,081,451 MWh/year 6 2008 NREL Coal Reserves 260,551.00 Million Short Tons 1 2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves 6,928,000,000,000 Cubic Meters (cu m) 6 2010 CIA World Factbook

233

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sustainable Coal Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Coal Use Sustainable Coal Use Coal is a vital energy resource, not only for the United States, but also for many developed and developing economies around the world....

236

Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reaction, and to determine the mechanism by which water any enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmosphere and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to hire a student to help on the program, (2) to define the coals to be investigated and acquire the samples, (3) to order the necessary reagents and supplies, and (4) to conduct preliminary experiments for determining quantitatively using 2,2{prime}-dimethoxypropane and {sup 1}H NMR.

Netzel, D.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, September 1--November 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this study are to develop an NMR method for measuring the water in coal, to measure the changes in coal structure that occur during coal drying, to determine what effect water has on retrograde/condensation reaction, and to determine the mechanism by which water any enhance coal reactivity toward liquefaction. Different methods of drying will be investigated to determine if drying can be accomplished without destroying coal reactivity toward liquefaction, thereby making coal drying an attractive and economical method for coal pretreatment. Coal drying methods will include thermal drying under different atmosphere and temperatures, drying with microwave radiation, and low-temperature chemical dehydration. The objectives for this quarterly report period were (1) to hire a student to help on the program, (2) to define the coals to be investigated and acquire the samples, (3) to order the necessary reagents and supplies, and (4) to conduct preliminary experiments for determining quantitatively using 2,2{prime}-dimethoxypropane and {sup 1}H NMR.

Netzel, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

238

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

239

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

240

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

242

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather than air) is used for gasification, the resulting medium Btu gas could be economically transported by pipeline from the gasification sites to the Gulf coast. Technical, environmental, and economic aspects of implementing this technology are discussed.

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal  

SciTech Connect

The results of measuring the change in moisture content of the Eagle Butte and Usebelli coals as a function of time are shown in Figure 1. As expected, the measured moisture content increases with time and reaches a maximum after about 8 hours. Two different types of sorbed water are removed sequentially. Free or surface sorbed water is rapidly removed followed by the water in the micropores of the coal as the reagents migrate into the pore structure. There appears to be an induction period of about 4 hours for the Eagle Butte coal before the moisture content increases more rapidly with time due to the reactions of the more tightly bound or pore'' water with the reagents. The chemical drying experiment was repeated twice for the Usebelli coal. In the first experiment, aliquots of the reaction mixture were removed sequentially, and in the second experiment separate coal samples were prepared and allowed to stand until the appropriate time for the NMR spectrum to be acquired. Excellent reproducibility was obtained. Both cools were thermally dried by heating to 110[degrees]C for 1 hour. The moisture content was determined by weight loss. Using the thermal drying method, the Eagle Butte coal had a moisture content of 16.6 wt % and the Usebelli coal a moisture content of 14.1 wt %. These values are near the moisture content of coal as determined by chemical drying.

Netzel, D.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

The use of solid-state NMR techniques for the analysis of water in coal and the effect of different coal drying techniques on the structure and reactivity of coal. Quarterly report, June 1, 1992--August 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The results of measuring the change in moisture content of the Eagle Butte and Usebelli coals as a function of time are shown in Figure 1. As expected, the measured moisture content increases with time and reaches a maximum after about 8 hours. Two different types of sorbed water are removed sequentially. Free or surface sorbed water is rapidly removed followed by the water in the micropores of the coal as the reagents migrate into the pore structure. There appears to be an induction period of about 4 hours for the Eagle Butte coal before the moisture content increases more rapidly with time due to the reactions of the more ``tightly bound or ``pore`` water with the reagents. The chemical drying experiment was repeated twice for the Usebelli coal. In the first experiment, aliquots of the reaction mixture were removed sequentially, and in the second experiment separate coal samples were prepared and allowed to stand until the appropriate time for the NMR spectrum to be acquired. Excellent reproducibility was obtained. Both cools were thermally dried by heating to 110{degrees}C for 1 hour. The moisture content was determined by weight loss. Using the thermal drying method, the Eagle Butte coal had a moisture content of 16.6 wt % and the Usebelli coal a moisture content of 14.1 wt %. These values are near the moisture content of coal as determined by chemical drying.

Netzel, D.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

U.S. Coal Reserves  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

U.S. Coal Reserves presents detailed estimates of U.S. coal reserves by State, as well as descriptions of the data, methods, and assumptions used to develop such estimates.

Information Center

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

247

Montana Coal Mining Code (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Labor and Industry is authorized to adopt rules pertaining to safety standards for all coal mines in the state. The Code requires coal mine operators to make an accurate map or...

248

Coal gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard series of two staged gas generators (GG) has been developed in the United States for producing gas with a combustion heat from 4,700 to 7,600 kilojoules per cubic meter from coal (U). The diameter of the gas generators is from 1.4 to 3.65 meters and the thermal capacity based on purified cold gas is from 12.5 to 89 million kilojoules per hour. Certain standard sized gas generators have undergone experimental industrial tests which showed that it is most expedient to feed the coal into the gas generators pneumatically. This reduces the dimensions of the charging device, makes it possible to use more common grades of structural steels and reduces the cost of the gas. A double valve reliably prevents ejections of the gasification product and promotes the best distribution of the coal in the gas generator. The gas generators may successfully operate on high moisture (up to 36 percent) brown coal. Blasting with oxygen enriched to 38 percent made it possible to produce a gas with a combustion heat of 9,350 kilojoules per cubic meter. This supports a combustion temperature of 1,700C.

Rainey, D.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Method for increasing the calorific value of gas produced by the in situ combustion of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to the production of relatively high Btu gas by the in situ combustion of subterranean coal. The coal bed is penetrated with a horizontally-extending borehole and combustion is initiated in the coal bed contiguous to the borehole. The absolute pressure within the resulting combustion zone is then regulated at a desired value near the pore pressure within the coal bed so that selected quantities of water naturally present in the coal will flow into the combustion zone to effect a hydrogen and carbon monoxide-producing steam-carbon reaction with the hot carbon in the combustion zone for increasing the calorific value of the product gas.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

How clean is coal : coal power plant ash pond regulations compared to nuclear reactor decommissioning standards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal power is the prominent source of energy in the United States (U.S.) and around the world. The byproducts of coal power contain many of… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Corn/coal fuel characterization study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory analyses and tests were conducted to determine the suitability of shelled corn as a potential supplemental fuel for pulverized coal fired utility boilers. The analyses and tests used were those routinely used for the characterization of coal. The data indicated very high volatility and very low ash. Corn by itself would not be a suitable fuel for conventional boilers, primarily because of the severe fouling and slagging potential of corn ash. Blends of corn and coal minimized the fouling and slagging problems. The blend samples contained 10% corn by BTU or 14% by weight. Approximately 1.05 pounds of this blend would provide the heat equivalent of one pound of coal. The additional fuel input would place an additional load on fuel handling and preparation equipment, but the decrease in ash quantity would reduce the load on ash handling and particulate-type flue gas clean-up equipment. (JSR)

Cioffi, P. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4Q 2009 4Q 2009 April 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 4Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by transportation mode. The data sources beginning with the 2008 Coal Distribution Report

253

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Origin State, Origin State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

254

Coal Distribution Database, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination State, Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation 3Q 2009 February 2010 Quarterly Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources 3Q 2009 In keeping with EIA's efforts to increase the timeliness of its reports, this Quarterly Coal Distribution Report is a preliminary report, based on the most current data available from EIA's various monthly, quarterly and annual surveys of the coal industry and electric power generation industry. The final report will rely on the receipt of annual data to replace the imputed monthly data for smaller electric generation plants that are excluded from the monthly filing requirement, and final data for all other respondents. The Coal Distribution Report traces coal from the origin State to the destination State by

255

Renewable wood fuel: Fuel feed system for a pulverized coal boiler. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates a pilot test program conducted by New York State Gas & Electric Corporation to evaluate the feasibility of co-firing a pulverized coal plant with renewable wood fuels. The goal was to establish that such a co-firing system can reduce air emissions while maintaining good operational procedures and cost controls. The test fuel feed system employed at Greenidge Station`s Boiler 6 was shown to be effective in feeding wood products. Emission results were promising and an economic analysis indicates that it will be beneficial to pursue further refinements to the equipment and systems. The report recommends further evaluation of the generation and emission impacts using woods of varied moisture contents and at varied Btu input rates to determine if a drying system would be a cost-effective option.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Formation of CoAl2O4 nanoparticles via low-temperature solid-state reaction of fine gibbsite and cobalt precursor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) was synthesized by the solid-state reaction method with cobalt chloride hexahydrate (CoCl2 ? 6H2O) as the source of Co and gibbsite (Al(OH)3) as the ...

Natpakan Srisawad, Wasu Chaitree, Okorn Mekasuwandumrong, Piyasan Praserthdam, Joongjai Panpranot

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2006 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2006 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2006. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

258

U.S. Coal Supply and Demand: 2007 Review  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article provides and overview of the year 2007 in the coal industry and covers coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, and delivered coal prices. It provides a detailed regional and State level coal production and national coal consumption along with industry developments that occurred in 2007. A brief discussion of coal-synfuel plants is included

Fred Freme

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Permits handbook for coal development  

SciTech Connect

This coal permits handbook was prepared for Region VIII comprised of the states of Colorado, Utah, Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The first part of the handbook provides the background and overview of information on coal with emphasis on federal and state regulatory authority and includes a status report on litigation affecting the coal industry. A discussion on specific analyses of the majority of environmental permits required to operate and develop coal mines comprises the second part of the book. Significant supportive information including the content of state regulations and standards, sample forms, guidelines, and a discussion of coal severance taxation are included on the appendices. (BLM)

Wayman, C.H.; Genasci, G.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of the world's energy does the United States use? In 2010, world total primary energy consumption was 511 quadrillion Btu. The United States' primary energy ...

262

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give the reader knowledge into utility marketing strategies, rates, and services. Although water is a utility service, this paper will concern itself with the energy utilities, gas and electric. Commonality and diversity exist in the strategies and rates of the gas and electric utilities. Both provide services at no charge which make energy operation for their customers easier, safer and more economical. It is important to become familiar with utility strategies, rates, and services because energy knowledge helps your business operate at the lowest energy cost ($/BTU).

Phillips, J. N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on completing the biofuel characterization and the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

SciTech Connect

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives. During this reporting period, work focused on completing the biofuel characterization and the design of the conceptual fluidized bed system.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

Development and testing of a high efficiency advanced coal combustor: Phase 3 industrial boiler retrofit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Economics and/or political intervention may one day dictate the conversion from oil or natural gas to coal in boilers that were originally designed to burn oil or gas. In recognition of this future possibility the US Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technical Center (DOE-FETC) supported a program led by ABB Power Plant Laboratories with support from the Energy and Fuels Research Center of Penn State University with the goal of demonstrating the technical and economic feasibility of retrofitting a gas/oil designed boiler to burn micronized coal. In support of the overall goal the following specific objectives were targeted: develop a coal handling/preparation system that can meet the technical and operational requirements for retrofitting microfine coal on a boiler designed for burning oil or natural gas; maintain boiler thermal performance in accordance with specifications when burning oil or natural gas; maintain NOx emissions at or below 0.6 lb NO{sub 2} per million Btu; achieve combustion efficiencies of 98% or higher; and determine economic payback periods as a function of key variables.

Patel, R.L.; Thornock, D.E.; Miller, B.G.; Scaroni, A.W.; McGowan, J.G.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz

2002-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

267

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels. The objective of the project is being accomplished using a team that includes personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute and the Office of Physical Plant, Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc., and Cofiring Alternatives.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke; Joseph J. Battista

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Coal News and Markets - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal News and Markets Coal News and Markets Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 24, 2013 "Coal News and Markets Report" summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAPP), Northern Appalachia (NAPP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Powder River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. The report includes data on average weekly coal commodity spot prices, total monthly coal production, eastern monthly coal production, electric power sector coal stocks, and average cost of metallurgical coal at coke plants and export docks. The historical data for coal commodity spot market prices are proprietary and not available for public release. Average weekly coal commodity spot prices (dollars per short ton)

270

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is performing a feasibility analysis on installing a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler and ceramic filter emission control device at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring multiple biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. Penn State currently operates an aging stoker-fired steam plant at its University Park campus and has spent considerable resources over the last ten to fifteen years investigating boiler replacements and performing life extension studies. This effort, in combination with a variety of agricultural and other wastes generated at the agricultural-based university and the surrounding rural community, has led Penn State to assemble a team of fluidized bed and cofiring experts to assess the feasibility of installing a CFB boiler for cofiring biomass and other wastes along with coal-based fuels.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; Douglas Donovan; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Dale Lamke

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

271

All Price Tables.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8. Coal and Retail Electricity Prices and Expenditures, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Retail Electricity Prices Expenditures Prices Expenditures State Dollars per Million Btu...

272

Economics of gas from coal  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with three questions: What does gas from coal cost and what affects this cost; How do different approaches and processes compare; and How near to competitive cost-levels is present-day technology. Discussion covers production of both substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium calorific gas (MCG: 10-16 MJ/Nm3 or 250-400 Btu/SCF). Conclusions are that SNG from low-cost U.S. coal and West German brown coal are, on the basis of mature technology and Government rates-of-return, roughly competitive with gas imports into the U.S. and Europe respectively. Similarly MCG from second-generation gasifiers is competitive with gas-oil or No. 2 heating oil in Europe, North America and Japan. However, capital costs form about half total gas costs at 10 percent rate-of-return, so that the competitiveness of gas from coal is sensitive to capital costs: this is the area of greatest uncertainty.

Teper, M.; Hemming, D.F.; Ulrich, W.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. A successful conclusion of the program will enable further component development work and full-scale system demonstrations of this potentially important technology. This paper covers the work on fuel processor rig testing completed in FY92.

Greenhalgh, M.L.; Wen, C.S.; Smith, L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Flue Gas Cleanup at Temperatures about 1400 C for a Coal Fired Combined Cycle Power Plant: State and Perspectives in the Pressurized Pulverized Coal Combustion (PPCC) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PPCC technology, a combined cycle, requires comprehensive cleaning of the flue gases because coal contains a large variety of minerals and other substances. This would lead to fast destruction of the gas turbine blades due to erosion and corrosion. The present specifications of the turbine manufacturers for the required flue gas quality are at a maximum particulate content of 5 mg/m3 s.t.p., diameter of Kraftwerke GmbH, SaarEnergie GmbH, Siemens AG, and Steag AG.

Foerster, M.E.C.; Oeking, K.; Hannes, K.

2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " "State / Region ","Domestic ","Foreign ","Total "," " "Alabama ",14828,4508,19336," " "Alaska ",825,698,1524," " "Arizona ",13143,"-",13143," " "Arkansas ",13,"-",13," " "Colorado ",32427,894,33321," " "Illinois ",33997,285,34283," " "Indiana ",36714,"-",36714," " "Kansas ",176,"-",176," " "Kentucky Total ",131546,2821,134367," " " East ",107000,2707,109706," " " West ",24547,114,24660," " "Louisiana ",3746,"-",3746," "

277

Current and future use of coal in the Northeast. [60 refs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the problems of and potential for coal utilization in the Northeast region (defined as New England, New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia are discussed. Coal utilization in the Northeast now occurs mainly in Pennsylvania, where coal is used extensively for steel manufacturing and electricity generation. Elsewhere in the region, coal use is limited for the most part to electric power generation, and increased future reliance on coal is likely to be associated principally with this use. At present, oil supplies most of the energy used to generate electricity in the Northeast. Recent trends in national and regional coal use are reviewed, and an overview of potential options for and constraints on future coal use are presented. The outlook for future coal supplies in the region for the reference years 1985 and 2000 is discussed. Supply estimates are shown tabularly. Regional availability of low-sulfur coal will depend on interregional economic factors as well as on technical constraints and public policy. The transportation system of the Northeast coals also constrain coal use. The potential demand for coal by electric utilities in the region is considered. Three coal demand scenarios are developed for 1985. The role of coal-derived synthetic fuels in the energy future of the Northeast is discussed. For the most part, processes producing low-Btu gas, high-Btu gas, and synthetic liquids from coal will contribute to the energy supply of the Northeast indirectly by augmenting national supplies of gas, oil, and electricity. In 1985, synthetic fuels production is likely to be small; by 2000, more substantial contributions could be available if a national policy for rapid coal synthetics development was pursued.

Edelston, B.S.; Rubin, E.S.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Coal technology program. Progress report, September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A successful hydrocarbonization experiment at 300 psi of hydrogen and approximately 1050/sup 0/F was completed with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been chemically pretreated with aqueous CaO and NaOH. In pressurized carbonization, one successful experiment at approximately 1100/sup 0/F and 415 psi of methane was completed with vacuum distillation residue from the H-Coal process. In the thick section pressure vessel work, procedures are being developed with the DATA TRAK heat treating facility to allow preparation of relatively large heat treated samples of 2 /sup 1///sub 4/ Cr-1 Mo steel. In the Gas-Fired Potassium Boiler Project, the potassium system installation was completed, the fill and drain tank was filled with potassium, and the checkout of the instruments and controls was nearly completed. The Coal-Fired Alkali Metal Power System Design Study was completed and a draft report describing the design was issued. Cesium was selected as the working fluid for the topping cycle. For the reference design, the furnace operated at atmospheric pressure and the cycle conditions for the power conversion systems were 1500/sup 0/F (1089 K) to 900/sup 0/F (756 K) for the topping cycle and 2400 psi (16.5 MPa)/1000/sup 0/F (811 K)/1000/sup 0/F (811 K) to 1 /sup 1///sub 2/ in. Hg (5079 Pa) for the steam system. ORNL was requested by DOE to develop a program for testing coal feeders currently under development. Work was continued on process modeling, the preparation of a Synthetic Fuels Research Digest, a survey of industrial coal conversion equipment capabilities, and studies of flash hydropyrolysis, hot gas purification processes, processes for heat recovery, and hydrogen production by the steam/molten iron process. Process and program analysis studies were continued on low-Btu gasification, direct combustion, advanced power conversion systems, liquefaction, high-Btu gasification, in-situ gasification, and coal beneficiation.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 (Thousand Short Tons) " "State / Region ","Domestic ","Foreign ","Total "," " "Alabama",18367,3744,22111," " "Alaska",957,546,1502," " "Arizona",13041,"-",13041," " "Colorado",37396,1239,38635," " "Illinois ",30611,440,31051," " "Indiana",34630,227,34857," " "Kansas",72,"-",72," " "Kentucky Total ",109413,3004,112417," " " Eastern ",87402,2816,90218," " " Western ",22011,188,22199," " "Louisiana",3889,"-",3889," " "Maryland",4502,1068,5571," "

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 (Thousand Short Tons)" " State / Region"," Domestic"," Foreign"," Total " "Alabama ",15552,3425,18977," " "Alaska ",847,311,1158," " "Arizona ",12971,"-",12971," " "Arkansas ",12,"-",12," " "Colorado ",33904,843,34748," " "Illinois ",32719,21,32740," " "Indiana ",35391,"-",35391," " "Kansas ",205,"-",205," " "Kentucky Total ",123129,791,123920," " " East ",98492,791,99284," " " West ",24636,"-",24636," " "Louisiana ",3810,"-",3810," "

282

Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 " 3 " "(Thousand Short Tons) " "State / Region ","Domestic","Foreign","Total" "Alabama ",16639,3902,20541 "Alaska ",856,232,1088 "Arizona ",12093,"-",12093 "Arkansas ",6,"-",6 "Colorado ",34997,898,35895 "Illinois ",31751,55,31806 "Indiana ",35350,"-",35350 "Kansas ",154,"-",154 "Kentucky Total ",113241,906,114146 "East ",92391,890,93282 "West ",20849,15,20865 "Louisiana ",3959,"-",3959 "Maryland ",4955,596,5551 "Mississippi ",3739,"-",3739 "Missouri ",345,"-",345 "Montana ",36181,541,36721

283

The evolution of NOx control policy for coal-fired power plants in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) contribute to formation of particulate matter and ozone, and also to acidification of the environment. The electricity sector is responsible for about 20% of NOx emissions in the United States, and the sector has been the target of both prescriptive (command-and-control) and flexible (cap-and-trade) approaches to regulation. The paper summarises the major NOx control policies affecting this sector in the USA, and provides some perspectives as to their effectiveness. While both prescriptive and flexible approaches continue to play an important role, significant new proposals have wholly embraced a cap-and-trade approach. 20 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Dallas Burtraw; David A. Evans

2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

State-of-the-art study of resource characterization and planning for underground coal mining. Final technical report as of June 30, 1980  

SciTech Connect

With the rapid developments taking place in coal mining technology and due to high investment costs, optimization of the structure of underground coal mines is crucial to the success of the mining project. The structure of a mine, once it is developed, cannot be readily changed and has a decisive influence on the productivity, safety, economics, and production capacity of the mine. The Department of Energy desires to ensure that the resource characterization and planning activity for underground coal mining will focus on those areas that offer the most promise of being advanced. Thus, this project was undertaken by Management Engineers Incorporated to determine the status in all aspects of the resource characterization and planning activities for underground coal mining as presently performed in the industry. The study team conducted a comprehensive computerized literature search and reviewed the results. From this a selection of the particularly relevant sources were annotated and a reference list was prepared, catalogued by resource characterization and mine planning activity. From this data, and discussions with industry representatives, academia, and research groups, private and federal, an assessment and evaluation was made of the state-of-the-art of each element in the resource characterization and mine planning process. The results of this analysis lead to the identifcation of areas requiring research and, specifically, those areas where DOE research efforts may be focused.

Walton, D.; Ingham, W.; Kauffman, P.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology Methodology EIA uses the confidential version of the STB Waybill data, which includes actual revenue for shipments that originate and terminate at specific locations. The STB Waybill data are a sample of all rail shipments. EIA's 2011 report describes the sampling procedure. EIA aggregates the confidential STB data to three different levels: national, coal-producing basin to state, and state to state. EIA applies STB withholding rules to the aggregated data to identify records that must be suppressed to protect business-sensitive data. Also, EIA adds additional location fields to the STB data, identifying the mine from which the coal originates, the power plant that receives the coal, and, in some cases, an intermediate delivery location where coal is terminated by the initial carrier but then

286

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and number of mines by State, County, and mine type, 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 2. Coal production...

287

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most of the electricity in the United States is produced using steam ... This report provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal ...

288

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004. [12] Parks K. GIS-based infrastructure modeling, 2010–information systems (GIS). Washington, DC: National Hydrogenwww.elsevier.com/locate/he A GIS-based assessment of coal-

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Coal - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Most Requested Most Requested Change category... Most Requested Consumption Environment Imports & Exports Industry Characteristics Prices Production Projections Reserves Stocks All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Weekly Reports Today in Energy - Coal Short, timely articles with graphs about recent coal issues and trends Coal News & Markets Summarizes spot coal prices by coal commodity regions (i.e., Central Appalachia (CAP), Northern Appalachia (NAP), Illinois Basin (ILB), Power River Basin (PRB), and Uinta Basin (UIB)) in the United States. Weekly Coal Production Estimates of U.S. coal production by State based on railroad car loadings data. (archived versions) Archived Versions Weekly Coal Production - Archive Weekly NYMEX Coal Futures

290

INVESTIGATION INTO THE EFFECTS OF TRACE COAL SYN GAS SPECIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal is the United States’ most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coal’s availability and cost dictates that it will be… (more)

Trembly, Jason P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Coal competition: prospects for the 1980s  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of 10 chapters which present an historical overview of coal and the part it has played as an energy source in the economic growth of the United States from prior to World War II through 1978. Chapter titles are: definition of coals, coal mining; types of coal mines; mining methods; mining work force; development of coal; mine ownership; production; consumption; prices; exports; and imports. (DMC)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 6. Coal production and...

293

Method for producing and treating coal gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of generating a de-sulphurized volatile matter and a relatively low Btu gas includes the initial step of pyrolyzing coal to produce volatile matter and a char. The volatile matter is fed to a first de-sulphurizer containing a de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. At the same time, the char is gasified to produce a relatively low Btu gas. The low Btu gas is fed to a second de-sulphurizer containing the de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. A regenerator is provided for removing sulphur from the de-sulphurizing agent. Portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved among the first de-sulphurizer, the second de-sulphurizer, and the regenerator such that the regenerator regenerates the de-sulphurizing agent. Preferably, the portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved from the second de-sulphurizer to the first de-sulphurizer, from the first de-sulphurizer to the regenerator, and from the regenerator to the second de-sulphurizer.

Calderon, Albert (P.O. Box 126, Bowling Green, OH 43402)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Coal pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for pressurizing pulverized coal and circulating a carrier gas is disclosed. This device has utility in a coal gasification process and eliminates the need for a separate collection hopper and eliminates the separate compressor.

Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda County, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

National Coal Quality Inventory (NACQI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted the National Coal Quality Inventory (NaCQI) between 1999 and 2005 to address a need for quality information on coals that will be mined during the next 20-30 years. Collaboration between the USGS, State geological surveys, universities, coal burning utilities, and the coal mining industry plus funding support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) permitted collection and submittal of coal samples for analysis. The chemical data (proximate and ultimate analyses; major, minor and trace element concentrations) for 729 samples of raw or prepared coal, coal associated shale, and coal combustion products (fly ash, hopper ash, bottom ash and gypsum) from nine coal producing States are included. In addition, the project identified a new coal reference analytical standard, to be designated CWE-1 (West Elk Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado) that is a high-volatile-B or high-volatile-A bituminous coal with low contents of ash yield and sulfur, and very low, but detectable contents of chlorine, mercury and other trace elements.

Robert Finkelman

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

The Destec gasification process features an oxygen-blown, two stage entrained flow gasifier. PSI will procure coal for the Project consistent with the design specification ranges of Destec's coal gasification facility. Destec's plant will be designed to accept coal with a maximum sulfur content of 5.9% (dry basis) and a minimum energy content of 13,5000 BTU/pound (moisture and ash free basis). PSI and Destec will test at least two other coals for significant periods during the demonstration period. In the Destec process, coal is ground with water to form a slurry. It is then pumped into a gasification vessel where oxygen is added to form a hot raw gas through partial combustion. Most of the noncarbon material in the coal melts and flows out the bottom of the vessel forming slag -- a black, glassy, non-leaching, sand-like material. Particulates, sulfur and other impurities are removed from the gas before combustion to make it acceptable fuel for the gas turbine. The synthetic fuel gas (syngas) is piped to a General Electric MS 7001F high temperature combustion turbine generator. A heat recovery steam generator recovers gas turbine exhaust heat to produce high pressure steam. This steam and the steam generated in the gasification process supply an existing steam turbine-generator. The plant will be designed to outperform air emission standards established by the Clean Air Act Amendments for the year 2000.

Amick, P.; Mann, G.J.; Cook, J.J.; Fisackerly, R.; Spears, R.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project  

SciTech Connect

The Destec gasification process features an oxygen-blown, two stage entrained flow gasifier. PSI will procure coal for the Project consistent with the design specification ranges of Destec`s coal gasification facility. Destec`s plant will be designed to accept coal with a maximum sulfur content of 5.9% (dry basis) and a minimum energy content of 13,5000 BTU/pound (moisture and ash free basis). PSI and Destec will test at least two other coals for significant periods during the demonstration period. In the Destec process, coal is ground with water to form a slurry. It is then pumped into a gasification vessel where oxygen is added to form a hot raw gas through partial combustion. Most of the noncarbon material in the coal melts and flows out the bottom of the vessel forming slag -- a black, glassy, non-leaching, sand-like material. Particulates, sulfur and other impurities are removed from the gas before combustion to make it acceptable fuel for the gas turbine. The synthetic fuel gas (syngas) is piped to a General Electric MS 7001F high temperature combustion turbine generator. A heat recovery steam generator recovers gas turbine exhaust heat to produce high pressure steam. This steam and the steam generated in the gasification process supply an existing steam turbine-generator. The plant will be designed to outperform air emission standards established by the Clean Air Act Amendments for the year 2000.

Amick, P.; Mann, G.J.; Cook, J.J.; Fisackerly, R.; Spears, R.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Pressure coal gasification experience in Czechoslovakia  

SciTech Connect

Czechoslovakia's large deposits of brown coal supply the country's three operating pressure gasification plants. The gas produced is suitable for further treatment to provide fuel for household and industrial consumers. Coal gasification is not new to the energy planners in Czechoslovakia. Since 1948, 56 gasifiers have been installed in the three pressure gasification plants currently in operation. The newest and biggest of these plants is at Vresova. The plant processes 5,000 tons of brown coal per day. The locally mined coal used for feed at the Vresova plant has a calorific value of 12 to 14 megajoules per kilogram (52 to 60 Btu's per pound). The gasifiers produce up to 13,000 cubic meters (459,000 cubic feet) per hour of crude gas per gasifier. Gasification technology has been under development in Czechoslovakia since 1945. The country has virtually no oil or natural gas reserves, a fact that emphasizes the importance of coal-based energy. Production of gas from coal in Czechoslovak gasifiers is based on gasification in the fixed bed of a gasifier.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... Total Energy Consumption: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP: State: Trillion Btu:

300

Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 7. Carbon intensity of the energy supply by state (2000 - 2010)" "kilograms of energy-related carbon dioxide per million Btu" ,,,"Change" ,,,"2000 to 2010"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High-pressure coal fuel processor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

303

ECONOMICS AND FEASIBILITY OF RANKINE CYCLE IMPROVEMENTS FOR COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

ALSTOM Power Inc.'s Power Plant Laboratories (ALSTOM) has teamed with the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL), American Electric Company (AEP) and Parsons Energy and Chemical Group to conduct a comprehensive study evaluating coal fired steam power plants, known as Rankine Cycles, equipped with three different combustion systems: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}). Five steam cycles utilizing a wide range of steam conditions were used with these combustion systems. The motivation for this study was to establish through engineering analysis, the most cost-effective performance potential available through improvement in the Rankine Cycle steam conditions and combustion systems while at the same time ensuring that the most stringent emission performance based on CURC (Coal Utilization Research Council) 2010 targets are met: > 98% sulfur removal; < 0.05 lbm/MM-Btu NO{sub x}; < 0.01 lbm/MM-Btu Particulate Matter; and > 90% Hg removal. The final report discusses the results of a coal fired steam power plant project, which is comprised of two parts. The main part of the study is the analysis of ten (10) Greenfield steam power plants employing three different coal combustion technologies: Pulverized Coal (PC), Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB), and Circulating Moving Bed (CMB{trademark}) integrated with five different steam cycles. The study explores the technical feasibility, thermal performance, environmental performance, and economic viability of ten power plants that could be deployed currently, in the near, intermediate, and long-term time frame. For the five steam cycles, main steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,292 F and pressures from 2,400 psi to 5,075 psi. Reheat steam temperatures vary from 1,000 F to 1,328 F. The number of feedwater heaters varies from 7 to 9 and the associated feedwater temperature varies from 500 F to 626 F. The main part of the study therefore determines the steam cycle parameters and combustion technology that would yield the lowest cost of electricity (COE) for the next generation of coal-fired steam power plants. The second part of the study (Repowering) explores the means of upgrading the efficiency and output of an older existing coal fired steam power plant. There are currently more than 1,400 coal-fired units in operation in the United States generating about 54 percent of the electricity consumed. Many of these are modern units are clean and efficient. Additionally, there are many older units in excellent condition and still in service that could benefit from this repowering technology. The study evaluates the technical feasibility, thermal performance, and economic viability of this repowering concept.

Richard E. Waryasz; Gregory N. Liljedahl

2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

305

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Hawaii" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",303,296,188,175,281,309,358,297,279 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",11536,11422,11097,10975,10943,10871,10669,10640,10562 " Average sulfur Content (percent)","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",0.32,0.44,0.49,0.55,0.51,0.47,0.66,0.65,0.62

306

Definition: Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Coal A combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons. It is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time (typically millions of years). It is the most abundant fossil fuel produced in the United States.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later

307

Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Integrated Coal Gasification Power Plant Credit states that an income taxpayer that makes a qualified investment in a new integrated coal gasification power plant or in the expansion of an existing...

309

EIA - Coal Distribution  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report > Annual Coal Distribution Archives Annual Coal Distribution Archive Release Date: February 17, 2011 Next Release Date: December 2011 Domestic coal...

310

CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CoalFleet Guideline for Advanced Pulverized Coal Power Plants provides an overview of state-of-the art and emerging technologies for pulverized coal-fired generating units along with lessons learned for current plants worldwide. The Guideline aims to facilitate the timely deployment of reliable, next-generation generating units that incorporate: Higher steam conditions for higher efficiency and reduced generation of pollutants Advanced environmental controls for reduced emissions and environmental im...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

FEASIBILITY ANALYSIS FOR INSTALLING A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILER FOR COFIRING MULTIPLE BIOFUELS AND OTHER WASTES WITH COAL AT PENN STATE UNIVERSITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University, utilizing funds furnished by the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Power Program, investigated the installation of a state-of-the-art circulating fluidized bed boiler at Penn State's University Park campus for cofiring multiple biofuels and other wastes with coal, and developing a test program to evaluate cofiring biofuels and coal-based feedstocks. The study was performed using a team that included personnel from Penn State's Energy Institute, Office of Physical Plant, and College of Agricultural Sciences; Foster Wheeler Energy Services, Inc.; Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation; Parsons Energy and Chemicals Group, Inc.; and Cofiring Alternatives. The activities included assessing potential feedstocks at the University Park campus and surrounding region with an emphasis on biomass materials, collecting and analyzing potential feedstocks, assessing agglomeration, deposition, and corrosion tendencies, identifying the optimum location for the boiler system through an internal site selection process, performing a three circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler design and a 15-year boiler plant transition plan, determining the costs associated with installing the boiler system, developing a preliminary test program, determining the associated costs for the test program, and exploring potential emissions credits when using the biomass CFB boiler.

Bruce G. Miller; Sharon Falcone Miller; Robert Cooper; John Gaudlip; Matthew Lapinsky; Rhett McLaren; William Serencsits; Neil Raskin; Tom Steitz; Joseph J. Battista

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

313

Coal Distribution Database, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 December 2008 2007 Changes in Coal Distribution Table Format and Data Sources The changes in the coal distribution data sources made in 2006 are carried over to the 2007 tables. As in 2006, EIA used data from the EIA-3 survey to distribute synfuel to the electric generation sector on a state level, aggregated with all of the other coal (such as bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coal) sent to electric generating plants. EIA supplemented the EIA-3 data with previously collected information to determine the mode of transportation from the synfuel plant to the electric generating consumer, which was not reported on the EIA-3A survey form. Although not contained in the EIA-6A master file, this information has been documented in an ancillary spreadsheet in the EIA

314

Effects of Measurement Materials and Oxygen Partial Pressure on the Viscosity of synthetic Eastern and Western United States Coal Slags  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viscosity of the molten ash (slag) resulting from the mineral constituents in carbon feedstock used in slagging gasifiers is critical for controlling the gasification process. The viscosity of two synthetic slags with compositions resembling the mineral impurities in average eastern and western coal feedstock was examined at temperatures from 1300–1500 °C using a rotating bob viscometer. A few combinations of atmospheres and experimental materials were investigated with respect to one another to determine slag viscosity. A CO/CO{sub 2} atmosphere (CO/CO{sub 2} = 1.8, corresponding to a P{sub O{sub 2}} = 10–8 atm) is required to sustain ferrous ions in FeO-containing slags, an environment that is oxidizing to most metals. Iron oxide in the slag prevents usage of Fe parts. In unpurified Ar, the Fe metal surface oxidizes. Using purified argon prevents iron measurement components from oxidation; however, the metallic surfaces act as nucleation sites for the reduction of the Fe oxide in the slag into metallic Fe. Dissolution of ceramic materials into the slag, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}, occurs in both atmospheres. Therefore, evaluating slag properties in the laboratory is challenging. The measured viscosities of two synthetic slags in this study diverged depending upon material selection. This difference is likely attributable to container/spindle-slag interactions. Viscosity measurements of the eastern coal slag using all ceramic parts agreed best with FactSage prediction above 1350 °C, with an average activation energy of 271.2 kJ. For western coal slag, the dissolution of container/spindle materials was substantial during the measurement, with precipitation of crystalline phase noted. The experimental viscosity data of the western coal slag agreed best with Kalmanovitch prediction above 1350 °C. The activation energy changed dramatically for both data sets of western coal slag, likely indicating the Newtonian-to-non-Newtonian transition.

Zhu, Jingxi; Tetsuya, Kenneth; Mu, Haoyuan; Bennett, James P.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Annual Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Distribution Report Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | Revision/Correction The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state, destination state, consumer category, and method of transportation. Also provided is a summary of foreign coal distribution by coal-producing state. All data for 2012 are final, and this report supersedes the 2012 quarterly coal distribution reports. Highlights for 2012: Total coal distributions for 2012 were 1,003.1 million short tons (mmst), a decrease of 7.9% compared to 2011. Distributions to domestic destinations were 877.3 mmst, a decrease of 104.1 mmst (i.e. 10.6% decrease) compared to 2011. Distributions to

316

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 PM)" 6 PM)" "South Dakota" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",115,113,113,110,108,103,94,92,93,94,99,103,130,134,139,142,151,156,174,176,195 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",6096,6025,6034,6057,6049,6972,9034,8687,8728,8630,8464,8540,8550,8560,8523,8711,8534,8530,8391,8386,8327 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.9,0.87,0.92,0.9,0.91,0.87,0.52,0.63,0.72,0.6,0.31,0.33,0.37,0.33,0.34,0.31,0.32,0.3,0.31,0.31,0.33 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",565,488,"-",467,"-","-",598,"-","-","-","-","-","-",804,822,1245,1546,"-",1985,1248,1808

317

Analysis of medium-BTU gasification condensates, June 1985-June 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the final results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from biomass gasification systems which are part of the US Department of Energy Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The work described in detail in this report involves extensive analysis of condensates from four medium-BTU gasifiers. The analyses include elemental analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and Ames Assay. This work was an extension of a broader study earlier completed of the condensates of all the gasifers and pyrolyzers in the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recoverd in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. Future studies of the time/temperature relationship to tar composition and the effect of processing atmosphere should be undertaken. Further processing of the condensates either as wastewater treatment or upgrading of the organics to useful products is also recommended. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cleanest Coal Technology Clean Coal 101 Lesson 5: The Cleanest Coal Technology-A Real Gas Don't think of coal as a solid black rock. Think of it as a mass of atoms. Most of the...

319

Lummus clean fuels from coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report compares two direct, catalytic, hydroliquefaction processes - H-Coal and Lummus Clean Fuels From Coal (LCFFC). These processes are compared for two sets of operating conditions. In the first, the reactors are operated to produce a product suitable for use as fuel oil (fuel oil mode). In the second, the operating conditions are more severe, so the resulting product slates more closely resemble crude oil (syncrude mode). The comparisons are performed using conceptual designs based on single point run data, with a design basis of 25,000 tpd (moisture-free basis) of Illinois No. 6 coal. Although all cost comparisons are well within the estimated 25% accuracy of the estimates, LCFFC shows generally lower costs. Three types of economic evaluation are performed: computation of internal rate of return (IRR) with product values set to estimated market value, computation of overall average product cost ($/MM Btu) with the discount rate set at 20%, and calculation of average product cost with naphtha credited at estimated market value and the discount rate set at 20%. H-Coal has a lower cost only in the fuel oil mode analysis with naphtha valued at market price. The processes are also compared with respect to the potential for commercialization and anticipated operability differences. It is concluded that the lower hydrogen content of LCFFC product may offset its advantage of lower cost if it is used as refinery feed, and that the design of the LCFFC reactor may make it harder to control. Suggestions for future research are presented.

Gantt, J.E.; Hefferan, J.K.; Chorba, W.F.; Schachtschneider, A.B.; Schulze, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64 percent of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12 percent of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12 percent) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9 percent).

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by Major Coal-Exporting States and Destination, 2001 Coal-Exporting State and Destination Metallurgical Steam Total Alaska - 761 761 South Korea - 761 761 Alabama 4,667 167 4,834 Argentina 155 - 155 Belgium 989 - 989 Brazil 1,104 - 1,104 Bulgaria 82 - 82 Egypt 518 - 518 Italy 115 - 115 Netherlands 56 83 139 Spain 412 84 496 Turkey 581 - 581 United Kingdom 654 - 654 Kentucky 2,130 - 2,130 Canada 920 - 920 France 22 - 22 Iceland 9 - 9 Italy 430 - 430 Netherlands 417 - 417 Spain 9 - 9 United Kingdom 323 - 323 Pennsylvania 1,086 14,326 15,722 Belgium - 203 203 Brazil 372 - 373 Canada - 12,141 12,418 France - 84 84 Germany 495 165 661 Ireland - 136 136 Netherlands 219 879 1,097 Norway - - 7 Peru - - 21 Portugal - 634 634 United Kingdom - 85 85 Venezuela - - 3 Utah - 1,420 1,420 Japan - 1,334 1,334 Taiwan - 86 86 Virginia 4,531

322

Testing of FMI's Coal Upgrading Process  

SciTech Connect

WRI and FMI have collaborated to develop and test a novel coal upgrading technology. Proprietary coal upgrading technology is a fluidized bed-based continuous process which allows high through-puts, reducing the coal processing costs. Processing is carried out under controlled oxidizing conditions at mild enough conditions that compared to other coal upgrading technologies; the produced water is not as difficult to treat. All the energy required for coal drying and upgrading is derived from the coal itself. Under the auspices of the Jointly Sponsored Research Program, Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40323, a nominal 400 lbs/hour PDU was constructed and operated. Over the course of this project, several low-rank coals were successfully tested in the PDU. In all cases, a higher Btu, low moisture content, stable product was produced and subsequently analyzed. Stack emissions were monitored and produced water samples were analyzed. Product stability was established by performing moisture readsorption testing. Product pyrophobicity was demonstrated by instrumenting a coal pile.

Vijay Sethi

2009-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

323

Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study Guide: WHAT IS COAL? Coal looks like a shiny black rock. Coal has lots of energy in it. When it is burned, coal makes heat and light energy. Th e cave men used coal for...

324

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Quarterly Coal Distribution Report Release Date: October 01, 2013 | Next Release Date: January 3, 2014 | full report The Quarterly Coal Distribution Report (QCDR) provides detailed U.S. domestic coal distribution data by coal origin state, coal destination state, mode of transportation, and consuming sector. Quarterly data for all years are preliminary and will be superseded by the release of the corresponding "Annual Coal Distribution Report." Highlights for the second quarter 2013: Total domestic coal distribution was an estimated 205.8 million short tons (mmst) in the second quarter 2013. This value is 0.7 mmst (i.e. 0.3 percent) higher than the previous quarter and 6.3 mmst (i.e. 3.1 percent) higher than the second quarter of 2012 estimates.

325

Coal Technology Program progress report for August 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The projects reported this month include those for coal conversion process development, materials engineering, alkali metal vapor topping cycles, a coal equipment test facility, a fluidized bed combustor technology test unit, engineering and support studies, process and program assistance, and environmental assessment studies. In hydrocarbonization research, material balance results from Run HC-21 confirm earlier tests with Wyodak coal, showing an oil yield of 21% based on MAF coal. In the coal-solvent-hydrogen mixing work, experiments were completed with the Kenics mixer reactor and with the packed-bed reactor. The fracture toughness characterization of 25.4-cm-thick ASTM A543 Class 1 plate is in progress. In the gas-fired potassium boiler project, we completed and leak-tested all of the potassium piping for the system and made preparations for loading the drain tank with potassium. The design work on the fluidized-bed, alkali-metal-vapor cycle system has been completed. In the engineering studies and evaluations project, work was continued on process modeling, the preparation of a Synthetic Fuels Research Digest, a survey of industrial coal conversion equipment capabilities, and studies of flash hydropyrolysis, hot gas purification processes, processes for heat recovery, and hydrogen production by the steam/molten iron process. In the process and program analysis studies, studies were continued on low-Btu gasification, direct combustion, advanced power conversion systems, liquefaction, high-Btu gasification, in situ gasification, and coal beneficiation. The Environmental Monitoring Handbook is being used extensively by contractors and their environmental subcontractors in designing monitoring programs for the nation's first fossil demonstration plants.

None

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy...

327

Annual Coal Distribution Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

December 2013 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Annual Coal Distribution Report 2012 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution Report 2012 Overview of Annual Coal Distribution Tables, 2012 Introduction The Annual Coal Distribution Report (ACDR) provides detailed information on domestic coal distribution by origin state,

328

Coal Reserves Data Base report  

SciTech Connect

The Coal Reserves Data Base (CRDB) Program is a cooperative data base development program sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The objective of the CRDB Program is to involve knowledgeable coal resource authorities from the major coal-bearing regions in EIA's effort to update the Nation's coal reserves data. This report describes one of two prototype studies to update State-level reserve estimates. The CRDB data are intended for use in coal supply analyses and to support analyses of policy and legislative issues. They will be available to both Government and non-Government analysts. The data also will be part of the information used to supply United States energy data for international data bases and for inquiries from private industry and the public. (VC)

Jones, R.W.; Glass, G.B.

1991-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

329

IMPROVEMENT OF METHANE STORAGE IN ACTIVATED CARBON USING METHANE HYDRATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differently based on the type and characteristics of the coal and where the coal bed is located. Equipment acre of each coal bed in the State. These ten factors include: · The present value per acre of a coal bed; · The coal price per million BTU; · The average royalty rate; · The BTU and sulfur adjustment

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

330

Nitrogen oxides emission control through reburning with biomass in coal-fired power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen from coal-fired power stations are considered to be major pollutants, and there is increasing concern for regulating air quality and offsetting the emissions generated from the use of energy. Reburning is an in-furnace, combustion control technology for NOx reduction. Another environmental issue that needs to be addressed is the rapidly growing feedlot industry in the United States. The production of biomass from one or more animal species is in excess of what can safely be applied to farmland in accordance with nutrient management plans and stockpiled waste poses economic and environmental liabilities. In the present study, the feasibility of using biomass as a reburn fuel in existing coal-fired power plants is considered. It is expected to utilize biomass as a low-cost, substitute fuel and an agent to control emission. The successful development of this technology will create environment-friendly, low cost fuel source for the power industry, provide means for an alternate method of disposal of biomass, and generate a possible revenue source for feedlot operators. In the present study, the effect of coal, cattle manure or feedlot biomass, and blends of biomass with coal on the ability to reduce NOx were investigated in the Texas A&M University 29.31 kW (100,000 Btu/h) reburning facility. The facility used a mixture of propane and ammonia to generate the 600 ppm NOx in the primary zone. The reburn fuel was injected using air. The stoichiometry tested were 1.00 to 1.20 in the reburn zone. Two types of injectors, circular jet and fan spray injectors, which produce different types of mixing within the reburn zone, were studied to find their effect on NOx emissions reduction. The flat spray injector performed better in all cases. With the injection of biomass as reburn fuel with circular jet injector the maximum NOx reduction was 29.9 % and with flat spray injector was 62.2 %. The mixing time was estimated in model set up as 936 and 407 ms. The maximum NOx reduction observed with coal was 14.4 % and with biomass it was 62.2 % and the reduction with blends lay between that of coal and biomass.

Arumugam, Senthilvasan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Wabash River Coal Gasification Combined Cycle Repowering Project: Clean Coal Technology Program. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proposed project would result in a combined-cycle power plant with lower emissions and higher efficiency than most existing coal-fired power plants of comparable size. The net plant heat rate (energy content of the fuel input per useable electrical generation output; i.e., Btu/kilowatt hour) for the new repowered unit would be a 21% improvement over the existing unit, while reducing SO{sub 2} emissions by greater than 90% and limiting NO{sub x} emissions by greater than 85% over that produced by conventional coal-fired boilers. The technology, which relies on gasified coal, is capable of producing as much as 25% more electricity from a given amount of coal than today`s conventional coal-burning methods. Besides having the positive environmental benefit of producing less pollutants per unit of power generated, the higher overall efficiency of the proposed CGCC project encourages greater utilization to meet base load requirements in order to realize the associated economic benefits. This greater utilization (i.e., increased capacity factor) of a cleaner operating plant has global environmental benefits in that it is likely that such power would replace power currently being produced by less efficient plants emitting a greater volume of pollutants per unit of power generated.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Atlas of coal/minerals and important resource problem areas for fish and wildlife in the conterminous United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The atlas highlights areas in the conterminous US of potential concern involving coal and minerals development activities and fish and wildlife resources, in particular the Important Resource Problem Areas (IRPs) designated in 1980 by the US Fish and Wildlife Service as areas of emphasis in policymaking. The atlas serves as an initial screening tool for national and regional planners and administrators to help define areas that may require additional analysis prior to development in order to minimize disturbances and adverse impacts on fish and wildlife resources and to protect and enhance these resources where practicable. The publication contains maps of selected mineral resources (coal, copper, geothermal resources, gold, iron, molybdenum, nickel, oil shale/tar sands, peat, phosphate, silver, uranium), IRPs, and Federal Endangered and Threatened Animal Species. An overlay of the IRP map is provided: by placing this on a mineral map, counties containing both mineral and wildlife resources will be highlighted. Background information on IRPs, the mineral commodities, and environmental impacts of mineral mining is provided, as well as appendices which tabulate the data displayed in the maps. The document can also be used with a series of 1:7,500,000-scale reproductions of the maps.

Honig, R.A.; Olson, R.J.; Mason, W.T. Jr.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Coal industry annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on coal consumption, distribution, coal stocks, quality, prices, coal production information, and emissions for a wide audience.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

EIA Energy Kids - Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sometimes, coal-fired electric power plants are built near coal mines to lower ... industries and businesses with their own power plants use coal to generate ...

335

Use of the GranuFlow Process in Coal Preparation Plants to Improve Energy Recovery and Reduce Coal Processing Wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing use of screen-bowl centrifuges in today's fine coal cleaning circuits, a significant amount of low-ash, high-Btu coal can be lost during the dewatering step due to the difficulty in capturing coal of this size consist (< 100 mesh or 0.15mm). The GranuFlow{trademark} technology, developed and patented by an in-house research group at DOE-NETL, involves the addition of an emulsified mixture of high-molecular-weight hydrocarbons to a slurry of finesized coal before cleaning and/or mechanical dewatering. The binder selectively agglomerates the coal, but not the clays or other mineral matter. In practice, the binder is applied so as to contact the finest possible size fraction first (for example, froth flotation product) as agglomeration of this fraction produces the best result for a given concentration of binder. Increasing the size consist of the fine-sized coal stream reduces the loss of coal solids to the waste effluent streams from the screen bowl centrifuge circuit. In addition, the agglomerated coal dewaters better and is less dusty. The binder can also serve as a flotation conditioner and may provide freeze protection. The overall objective of the project is to generate all necessary information and data required to commercialize the GranuFlow{trademark} Technology. The technology was evaluated under full-scale operating conditions at three commercial coal preparation plants to determine operating performance and economics. The handling, storage, and combustion properties of the coal produced by this process were compared to untreated coal during a power plant combustion test.

Glenn A. Shirey; David J. Akers

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wyoming coal-conversion project. Final technical report, November 1980-February 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming; contains list of appendices with title and identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report describes what WyCoalGas, Inc. and its subcontractors accomplished in resolving issues related to the resource, technology, economic, environmental, socioeconomic, and governmental requirements affecting a project located near Douglas, Wyoming for producing 150 Billion Btu per day by gasifying sub-bituminous coal. The report summarizes the results of the work on each task and includes the deliverables that WyCoalGas, Inc. and the subcontractors prepared. The co-venturers withdrew from the project for two reasons: federal financial assistance to the project was seen to be highly uncertain; and funds were being expended at an unacceptably high rate.

None

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual Coal Report 2012 Annual Coal Report 2012 December 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. iii U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Contacts This publication was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). General information about the data in this report can be obtained from:

339

coal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coal coal Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

340

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL & POWER SYSTEMS COAL & POWER SYSTEMS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY GREENER, SOONER... THROUGH TECHNOLOGY INTRODUCTION .......... i-1 STRATEGIC PLAN ........ 1-1 PROGRAM PLANS Vision 21 .......................... 2-1 Central Power Systems ...... 3-1 Distributed Generation ..... 4-1 Fuels ................................ 5-1 Carbon Sequestration ....... 6-1 Advanced Research ........... 7-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS STRATEGIC & MULTI-YEAR PROGRAM PLANS STRENGTH THROUGH SCIENCE... A "GREENER, SOONER" PHILOSOPHY Coal, natural gas, and oil fuel about 70 percent of the electricity generated in the United States. As promising as renewable and other alternative fuels are, it will be several decades before they can make significant energy contributions to the Nation's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

The directory of United States coal & technology export resources. Profiles of domestic US corporations, associations and public entities, nationwide, which offer products or services suitable for export, relating to coal and its utilization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of available U.S. coal and coal related resources to potential purchasers of those resources abroad. The directory lists business entities within the US which offer coal related resources, products and services for sale on the international market. Each listing is intended to describe the particular business niche or range of product and/or services offered by a particular company. The listing provides addresses, telephones, and telex/fax for key staff in each company committed to the facilitation of international trade. The content of each listing has been formulated especially for this directory and reflects data current as of the date of this edition. The directory listings are divided into four primary classifications: coal resources; technology resources; support services; and financing and resource packaging. The first three of which are subdivided as follows: Coal Resources -- coal derivatives, coal exporters, and coal mining; Technology Resources -- advanced utilization, architects and engineers, boiler equipment, emissions control and waste disposal systems, facility construction, mining equipment, power generation systems, technical publications, and transport equipment; Support Services -- coal transport, facility operations, freight forwarders, sampling services and equipment, and technical consultants. Listings for the directory were solicited on the basis of this industry breakdown. Each of the four sections of this directory begins with a matrix illustrating which companies fall within the particular subclassifications specific to that main classification. A general alphabetical index of companies and an index by product/service classification are provided following the last section of the directory.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

[Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems]. Technical progress report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emisssion boiler systems. The primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions, lb/million Btu; SO{sub 2} emissions, lb/million Btu; particulate emissions, lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency, not less than 42%. The secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability; reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. Accomplishments to date are summarized for the following tasks: task 1, project planning and management; task 7, component development and optimization; task 8, preliminary POC test facility design; task 9, subsystem test design and plan; task 10, subsystem test unit construction; and task 11, subsystem test operation and evaluation.

Wesnor, J.D.; Bakke, E. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J.; Kaminski, R.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of a coal reserve GIS model and estimation of the recoverability and extraction costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The United States has the world largest coal resource and coal will serve as the major and dependable energy source in the coming 200 years… (more)

Apala, Chandrakanth, Reddy.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electronic instrumentation of coal slurry impoundments for real-time data collection to support automated monitoring.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Following the breakthrough and release of coal slurry from the Martin County Coal Corporation impoundment near Inez, Kentucky on October 11, 2000 the United States… (more)

Altobello, James A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

ENCOAL mild coal gasification project public design and construction report  

SciTech Connect

This Public Design Report describes the 1000 ton per day ENCOAL mild coal gasification demonstration plant now in operation at the Buckskin Mine near Gillette, Wyoming. The objective of the project is to demonstrate that the proprietary Liquids From Coal (LFC) technology can reliably and economically convert low Btu PRB coal into a superior, high-Btu solid fuel (PDF), and an environmentally attractive low-sulfur liquid fuel (CDL). The Project`s plans also call for the production of sufficient quantities of PDF and CDL to permit utility companies to carry out full scale burn tests. While some process as well as mechanical design was done in 1988, the continuous design effort was started in July 1990. Civil construction was started in October 1990; mechanical erection began in May 1991. Virtually all of the planned design work was completed by July 1991. Most major construction was complete by April 1992 followed by plant testing and commissioning. Plant operation began in late May 1992. This report covers both the detailed design and initial construction aspects of the Project.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination Destination Glossary Home > Coal> Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination Release Date: January 2006 Next Release Date: 2006 Distribution of U.S Coal by Destination Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2004 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: ALASKA State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alaska 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 State Total 460 - - 497 957 Railroad 256 - - 497 753 Truck 204 - - * 204 EIA - Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination

348

Quarterly coal report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Quarterly Coal Report (QCR) provides comprehensive information about US coal production, distribution, exports, imports, receipts, prices, consumption, and stocks to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Coke production, consumption, distribution, imports, and exports data are also provided. This report presents detailed quarterly data for October through December 1996 and aggregated quarterly historical data for 1990 through the third quarter of 1996. Appendix A displays, from 1988 on, detailed quarterly historical coal imports data. To provide a complete picture of coal supply and demand in the US, historical information has been integrated in this report. 8 figs., 72 tabs.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Knocking the NOx Out of Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 3: Knocking the NOx Out of Coal How NOx Forms NOx Formation Air is mostly nitrogen molecules (green in the above diagram) and...

350

What are Ccf, Mcf, Btu, and therms? How do I convert ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why am I being charged more for propane than the price on EIA's website? ... How much shale gas is produced in the United States? What are Ccf, Mcf, ...

351

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Task 1, Proof of principle testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

Greenhalgh, M.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Coal and bituminous reserves  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 5 of this book contains sections entitled: other coal processes; underground processing of coal; and other important energy sources.

NONE

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

European coal mining technology  

SciTech Connect

Most new developments in mechanized longwall coal technology have been pioneered by European mines and equipment manufacturers. But ironically, the most successful adaptations of European-inspired longwalling systems have occurred in North America, Australia, South Africa and elsewhere, enabling those mines to achieve even greater productivity and cost-effective utilization than the Europeans enjoy. This anomaly has little to do with mining talents, but arises instead from a pair of factors: 1) the extremely difficult mining and geological conditions of European coal basins; and 2) the profound differences between the management style and operating routines of the largely state-owned mines of Europe and the privately-owned, profit oriented mining companies abroad. Nevertheless, Europe continues to lead the way in new developments, driven by the chemistry of tough mining conditions and the commitments of its national mining industries to invest in new technology. As a third ingredient, the supra-national European Economic Community (EEC) plays an important role in promoting and funding new developments through its various agencies. A recent EEC information symposium on new methods of coal winning at Luxembourg focused on state-of-the-art longwall technology. Thus a look at current Euopean RandD programs yields pointers as to what the international coal industry may expect in the future.

Wyllie, B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Synergistic Utilization of Coal Fines and Municipal Solid Waste in Coal-Fired Boilers. Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed on a novel concept: to synergistically utilize a blend of waste coal fines with so-called E-fuel for cofiring and reburning in utility and industrial boilers. The E-fuel is produced from MSW by the patented EnerTech's slurry carbonization process. The slurry carbonization technology economically converts MSW to a uniform, low-ash, low-sulfur, and essentially chlorine-free fuel with energy content of about 14,800 Btu/lb.

V. Zamansky; P. Maly; M. Klosky

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

355

Coal distribution, January--June 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Coal Distribution report provides information on coal production, distribution, and stocks in the United States to a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. The data in this report are collected and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275, Sections 5 and 13, as amended). This issue presents information for January through June 1991. Coal distribution data are shown (in Tables 1--34) by coal-producing Sate of origin, consumer use, method of transportation, and State of destination. All data in this report were collected by the EIA on Form EIA-6, Coal Distribution Report.'' A copy of the form and the instructions for filing appear in Appendix B. All data in this report for 1991 are preliminary. Data for previous years are final. 6 figs., 34 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

356

Coal and Co-generation at a Petro-Chemical Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Celanese Chemical Company, Inc. is converting from natural gas to coal as boiler fuel at its petrochemical plant in the Texas Panhandle. Coincident with that fuel conversion is a project in conjunction with Southwestern Public Service Company. High pressure (1450 psig) steam generated from the new Celanese coal-fired boilers will be let down through a 30 megawatt, back pressure, turbine-generator set owned by Southwestern. Heat rate will be approximately 4800 Btu's/kwh. The paper describes some of the utility and industry challenges and how they were met.

Turek, P.; Gibson, G. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Coal catalyzation to simplify the conversion of coal to SNG. Final report, March 1988-May 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process implications of catalyzing coal with impregnated calcium on the production of Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) were evaluated. An Illinois No. 6 was catalyzed with calcium at various treatment conditions and then gasified in a thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA) to determine empirical relationships relating its reactivity to treatment and gasification conditions. Catalyzed coal was also gasified in a continuous bench-scale fluid bed steam/oxygen gasifier. Results of these tests indicate catalyzation eliminates agglomeration and substantially increases gasification reactivity. In addition, the calcium acts as a sulfur adsorbent. Process cost modeling studies indicated that the greatest economic potential for the utilization of catalyzed coal is to take advantage of the reactivity by utilizing a system for steam gasification of the coal using heat supplied by combustion of the gasified char in a separate combustor thereby eliminating the need for oxygen while maintaining production of a medium BTU gas. The results of this work are also directly applicable to gasification systems for electric power generation as well as for the production of synthesis gas for chemical production.

Feldmann, H.F.; Creamer, K.S.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation ...

360

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation dropped to 34%—the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Underground Coal Gasification at Tennessee Colony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tennessee Colony In Situ Coal Gasification Project conducted by Basic Resources Inc. is the most recent step in Texas Utilities Company's ongoing research into the utilization of Texas lignite. The project, an application of the Soviet technology which was acquired under a license agreement in 1975, is a continuation of the field testing program to examine the feasibility of in situ lignite gasification in Texas which began with a 27-day test burn at a site near Fairfield in August of 1976. The objectives of the Tennessee Colony Project are to examine the economic, technological and environmental aspects of a commercial project. The Project which began in August of 1978 utilizes air as the oxidizing agent and is comprised of two channels of gasification operating simultaneously. The test is presently still in progress and producing gas with a heat content in the range of 8-100 Btu.

Garrard, C. W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Assessment of underground coal gasification in bituminous coals: potential UCG products and markets. Final report, Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) The US will continue to require new sources of energy fuels and substitutes for petrochemical feedstocks into the foreseeable future. Most of this requirement will be met using coal. However, the cost of mining, transporting, cleaning, and preparing coal, disposing of ash or slag and scrubbing stack gases continues to rise; particularly, in the Eastern US where the need is greatest. UCG avoids these pitfalls and, as such, should be considered a viable alternative to the mining of deeper coals. (2) Of the two possible product gases LBG and MBG, MBG is the most versatile. (3) The most logical use for UCG product in the Eastern US is to generate power on-site using a combined-cycle or co-generation system. Either low or medium Btu gas (LBG or MBG) can be used. (4) UCG should be an option whenever surface gasification is considered; particularly, in areas where deeper, higher sulfur coal is located. (5) There are environmental and social benefits to use of UCG over surface gasification in the Eastern US. (6) A site could be chosen almost anywhere in the Illinois and Ohio area where amenable UCG coal has been determined due to the existence of existing transportation or transmission systems. (7) The technology needs to be demonstrated and the potential economic viability determined at a site in the East-North-Central US which has commercial quantities of amenable bituminous coal before utilities will show significant interest.

None

1982-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Biomass Cofiring with Coal at Seward, Pennsylvania  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first test under the EPRI/FETC biomass cofiring process was at GPU Genco`s 32-MW{sub e} pulverized coal boiler at Seward, Pennsylvania. The unit used in the test (Boiler 12) is a wall-fired boiler built by Babcock & Wilcox, and has a nominal steaming capacity of 300,000 lb/hr of 675 psig/850 F stream. The furnace of Boiler 12 has a volume of 20,000 ft{sup 3} and has a volume in the primary combustion area of 12,700 ft{sup 3}. The boiler has two rows of burners, with three burners installed on each row. Typically it consumes coal at about 14 ton/hr when firing at 100 percent of capacity. This boiler, along with Boiler 14, supply steam to a 64 MW{sub e} Westinghouse turbine. The net station heat rate (NSHR) for Boilers 12 and 14, and the associated turbine, is 14,200 Btu/kWh. Boiler 14 has been used to test coal water slurry (CWS), and that experience contributed to the design and execution of this cofiring test, where sawdust was the biomass fuel.

Huges, E.; Battista, J. [GPU Genco (United States); Tillman, D [Foster Wheeler Environmental (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State, 2012 Destination: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Origin State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

366

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Distribution...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Origin State, 2012 Origin: Alabama (thousand short tons) Coal Destination State Transportation Mode Electric Power Sector Coke Plants Industrial Plants (excluding Coke)...

367

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy In Brief Articles What is the role of coal in the United States? The United States holds the world's largest estimated recoverable reserves of ...

368

Coal - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, Find statistics on coal production, consumption, exports, imports, stocks, mining, and prices. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Coal overview: PDF CSV XLS Monthly PDF XLS Annual Coke overview PDF XLS Coal-fired power plants Existing generating units in the U.S. by state, company and plant 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 Go Prices Additional formats Weekly spot prices (Coal News and Markets) Coal futures near-month contract final settlement price (weekly NYMEX) Average sales price: PDF XLSBy state and mine type PDF XLSBy state and disposition PDF XLSBy state and underground mining method PDF XLSBy state, county, and number of mines PDF XLSBy state and coal rank PDF XLSBy mine production range and mine type Average consumer prices by end use sector, Census division, and state,

369

DESULFURIZATION OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS AND COAL LIQUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pollutants Associated With Coal Combustion. • E.P.A.Control Guidelines for Coal-Derived Pollutants .Forms of Sulfur in Coal • . . . . Coal Desulfurization

Wrathall, James Anthony

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

372

Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) Coal Mining Regulations (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Department for Energy Development and Independence Kentucky Administrative Regulation Title 405 chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 16, 18 and 20 establish the laws governing coal mining in the state. The Department of Natural Resources under the authority of the Energy and Environment Cabinet is responsible for enforcing these laws and assuring compliance with the 1977 Federal Surface Mining Control Act (SMCRA). The Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement is responsible for inspecting

373

A GIS-based Assessment of Coal-based Hydrogen Infrastructure Deployment in the State of Ohio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Census Bureau; 2000. USEPA. eGRID database. United StatesProtection Agency (US EPA) eGrid database, which providesas detailed in the EPA eGRID database [30]. The production

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ogden, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

United States Government or any agency thereof. TMDL Impacts on Coal-Fired Power Plants Page 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

376

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average sales price of U.S. coal by State and disposition, 2011 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 33. Average sales...

377

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

stocks by sector, by census division and State, 2011, 2010 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2011 Table 27. Year-end coal stocks...

378

Coal stocks at power plants are likely sufficient despite river ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

As of March 31, 2011, EIA estimates that coal-fired power plants in States identified in the map had an average of a two-to-three month supply of coal on hand.

379

U.S. States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2

380

Coal Cleaning Using Resonance Disintegration for Mercury and Sulfur Reduction Prior to Combustion  

SciTech Connect

Coal-cleaning processes have been utilized to increase the heating value of coal by extracting ash-forming minerals in the coal. These processes involve the crushing or grinding of raw coal followed by physical separation processes, taking advantage of the density difference between carbonaceous particles and mineral particles. In addition to the desired increase in the heating value of coal, a significant reduction of the sulfur content of the coal fed to a combustion unit is effected by the removal of pyrite and other sulfides found in the mineral matter. WRI is assisting PulseWave to develop an alternate, more efficient method of liberating and separating the undesirable mineral matter from the carbonaceous matter in coal. The approach is based on PulseWave's patented resonance disintegration technology that reduces that particle size of materials by application of destructive resonance, shock waves, and vortex generating forces. Illinois No.5 coal, a Wyodak coal, and a Pittsburgh No.8 coal were processed using the resonance disintegration apparatus then subjected to conventional density separations. Initial microscopic results indicate that up to 90% of the pyrite could be liberated from the coal in the machine, but limitations in the density separations reduced overall effectiveness of contaminant removal. Approximately 30-80% of the pyritic sulfur and 30-50% of the mercury was removed from the coal. The three coals (both with and without the pyritic phase separated out) were tested in WRI's 250,000 Btu/hr Combustion Test Facility, designed to replicate a coal-fired utility boiler. The flue gases were characterized for elemental, particle bound, and total mercury in addition to sulfur. The results indicated that pre-combustion cleaning could reduce a large fraction of the mercury emissions.

Andrew Lucero

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

University Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Clean Coal Crosscutting Research University Coal Research University Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal...

382

O A L Section 2. Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Section 2. Coal Coal prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports.

383

Development of an advanced process for drying fine coal in an inclined fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research project was to demonstrate a technically feasible and economically viable process for drying and stabilizing high-moisture subbituminous coal. Controlled thermal drying of coal fines was achieved using the inclined fluidized-bed drying and stabilization process developed by the Western Research Institute. The project scope of work required completion of five tasks: (1) project planning, (2) characterization of two feed coals, (3) bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed drying studies, (4) product characterization and testing, and (5) technical and economic evaluation of the process. High moisture subbituminous coals from AMAX Eagle Butte mine located in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and from Usibelli Coal Mine, Inc. in Healy, Alaska were tested in a 10-lb/hr bench-scale inclined fluidized-bed. Experimental results show that the dried coal contains less than 1.5% moisture and has a heating value over 11,500 Btu/lb. The coal fines entrainment can be kept below 15 wt % of the feed. The equilibrium moisture of dried coal was less than 50% of feed coal equilibrium moisture. 7 refs., 60 figs., 47 tabs.

Boysen, J.E.; Cha, C.Y.; Barbour, F.A.; Turner, T.F.; Kang, T.W.; Berggren, M.H.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Wiang Haeng coal-water fuel preparation and gasification, Thailand - task 39  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources (DMR) in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a four-task program to assess the responsiveness of Wiang Haeng coal to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases (HWD). The results indicate that HWD made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 37.4 wt% for the raw coal to about 20 wt% for the HWD coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel indicates an increase from 4450 to 6650 Btu/lb by hydrothermal treatment. Raw and HWD coal were then gasified at various mild gasification conditions of 700{degrees}C and 30 psig. The tests indicated that the coal is probably similar to other low-rank coals, will produce high levels of hydrogen, and be fairly reactive.

Anderson, C.M.; Musich, M.A.; Young, B.C. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 PM)" 6 PM)" "Alabama" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",184,181,173,176,167,156,154,154,157,148,141,141,142,147,152,179,211,206,271,268,282 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12094,12107,12061,12092,12088,11861,11794,11584,11519,10963,10951,10990,10828,10977,10878,10950,10879,10644,10659,10507,10633 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.51,1.4,1.43,1.33,1.3,1.2,1.24,1.13,1.13,1.02,0.91,0.92,0.94,0.95,0.84,0.97,0.94,0.88,0.89,0.92,0.99 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",507,512,460,425,402,376,446,405,288,326,652,552,509,560,754,1148,1327,1107,1672,1249,1589 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",130098,137126,137164,137671,137864,138276,139383,139645,139510,139140,137395,144286,140588,141395,142757,141012,140469,143452,140050,137243,137733

386

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Nebraska" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",75,75,75,75,77,75,72,59,59,55,56,57,58,60,66,71,80,88,90,133,142 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8561,8542,8553,8561,8571,8594,8599,8595,8584,8498,8632,8585,8654,8673,8574,8570,8514,8511,8496,8544,8547 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.35,0.35,0.37,0.35,0.35,0.33,0.34,0.32,0.27,0.3,0.3,0.31,0.3,0.29,0.32,0.31,0.3,0.31,0.31,0.31,0.28 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",703,457,465,248,402,224,511,450,333,432,649,656,555,457,712,1343,1534,1669,1772,1056,1711 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138043,137600,137586,107945,137640,103081,137621,137567,132550,137671,137750,138571,138043,138040,136976,138119,138124,138007,139452,140500,137895

387

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 PM)" 8 PM)" "Louisiana" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",170,165,153,158,154,155,151,148,143,140,132,131,127,134,138,151,166,185,210,204,216 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8194,8223,8122,8092,8136,8110,8171,8102,8097,8149,7933,8030,8095,8023,8146,8136,8205,8246,8183,8201,8114 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.49,0.49,0.5,0.52,0.51,0.58,0.57,0.64,0.56,0.58,0.63,0.74,0.52,0.5,0.51,0.54,0.49,0.39,0.41,0.39,0.39 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",371,413,388,223,269,348,327,302,222,204,459,519,63,247,286,427,300,196,425,195,296 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",144962,143214,141950,152148,147869,141543,147221,153519,153400,154469,149843,145238,140393,145807,147379,147057,142607,139310,140002,136969,136986

388

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 PM)" 7 PM)" "North Carolina" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",178,178,173,170,168,163,148,143,144,144,143,159,176,178,200,240,269,274,326,359,352 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12544,12506,12456,12465,12416,12461,12422,12368,12398,12450,12448,12380,12422,12423,12345,12309,12268,12374,12243,12333,12270 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.96,0.94,0.92,0.96,0.95,0.86,0.89,0.9,0.89,0.85,0.82,0.86,0.85,0.87,0.86,0.88,0.91,1.01,1.01,1.04,1.01 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",512,473,441,405,384,382,468,428,311,398,616,584,467,623,715,997,1356,1042,1513,1014,1433 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138229,138317,138450,138610,138238,138148,138298,138264,138167,138169,138360,145952,144098,140848,141338,142869,139114,146617,146483,146243,144814

389

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 PM)" 9 PM)" "Wisconsin" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",136,136,133,121,121,114,106,109,107,102,102,105,112,112,118,129,150,170,198,206,218 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",9642,9643,9725,9490,9565,9351,9222,9375,9299,9115,9165,9500,9089,9006,9030,9088,8975,8967,9025,8920,8964 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.81,0.81,0.71,0.49,0.51,0.46,0.46,0.5,0.46,0.39,0.35,0.37,0.41,0.38,0.39,0.38,0.36,0.36,0.37,0.38,0.4 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",526,312,310,153,221,177,193,180,83,81,88,146,111,108,109,150,203,204,356,222,240 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",139200,113495,110433,92736,103860,95883,91924,90760,75079,73869,74440,139048,133712,134343,135093,135238,134333,134845,136126,134033,131245

390

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 PM)" 8 PM)" "Indiana" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",136,134,131,127,127,125,119,116,112,111,108,114,117,120,121,140,152,161,193,202,214 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",10562,10569,10628,10539,10535,10338,10357,10461,10517,10620,10604,10540,10593,10550,10601,10756,10638,10588,10486,10470,10498 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.06,1.98,1.88,1.78,1.76,1.57,1.59,1.61,1.63,1.58,1.51,1.43,1.48,1.5,1.53,1.72,1.61,1.74,1.71,1.73,1.76 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",191,297,218,365,390,298,198,150,184,170,245,220,208,311,330,803,1394,1337,2002,1002,1571 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",89740,105529,96317,126976,137426,115914,90057,81174,100264,90095,90071,149762,142836,138660,135267,139405,139621,140607,139538,139436,139390

391

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Texas" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",145,150,149,144,135,134,129,126,124,120,123,133,126,125,131,129,139,149,162,168,184 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",7291,7225,7234,7284,7346,7346,7440,7423,7509,7506,7548,7635,7677,7605,7641,7611,7665,7681,7759,7787,7705 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.74,0.75,0.76,0.75,0.73,0.77,0.71,0.75,0.71,0.65,0.65,0.67,0.68,0.78,0.77,0.74,0.67,0.6,0.56,0.61,0.61 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",517,471,399,179,211,283,473,342,113,96,617,556,200,423,171,248,267,240,312,213,423 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",141838,139760,140129,112764,120681,117555,138383,114810,99067,80493,135419,141905,140340,139979,137700,137955,137876,136814,136638,136569,135686

392

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 PM)" 6 PM)" "Missouri" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",135,134,134,124,110,98,95,93,92,93,92,96,90,92,93,101,111,133,151,153,159 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",10400,10298,10321,9860,9718,9216,9063,8994,8938,8948,8913,8940,8875,8865,8838,8854,8808,8825,8837,8802,8801 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.01,1.84,1.8,1.02,1.03,0.57,0.58,0.47,0.37,0.34,0.3,0.36,0.36,0.37,0.38,0.37,0.36,0.38,0.38,0.38,0.36 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",280,230,210,113,101,110,183,292,118,88,263,134,118,348,279,1236,1457,1713,1829,1022,1607 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",107890,131371,136233,83795,79640,79069,95638,123143,89640,76829,94214,136667,136381,137769,139288,137693,137188,137476,137340,137948,137655

393

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 PM)" 0 PM)" "Iowa" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",112,110,110,101,99,99,94,94,88,82,82,81,89,89,93,98,105,108,127,134,142 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8892,8890,8867,8660,8783,8678,8658,8662,8636,8581,8626,9000,8648,8705,8665,8668,8612,8619,8605,8657,8585 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.7,0.67,0.67,0.52,0.57,0.49,0.45,0.45,0.44,0.4,0.35,0.37,0.39,0.43,0.44,0.42,0.44,0.41,0.41,0.42,0.37 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",518,355,158,127,144,96,117,141,141,399,643,617,579,635,459,1077,474,603,1023,1038,878 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",137943,123305,84117,83079,86795,77324,78400,83517,88176,139340,138731,139524,139667,139171,137162,139200,134952,135219,133214,136726,133860

394

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Virginia" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",155,152,147,147,145,145,142,139,138,134,133,159,169,167,195,233,245,249,277,308,328 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12714,12768,12830,12817,12778,12743,12597,12554,12603,12702,12814,12730,12845,12826,12713,12650,12592,12531,12492,12501,12476 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.96,1,1.03,1,0.99,1.03,0.99,1.01,0.97,1.3,0.98,1.02,1.16,0.97,0.94,1,1.04,0.94,0.92,1,1.02 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",384,223,247,213,216,251,290,282,204,230,424,357,380,499,497,761,875,922,1380,978,1315 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",146360,146626,148881,150319,149743,146179,146988,148219,150157,150660,151002,148810,149779,149367,150757,149019,150090,148238,147390,145531,145626

395

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 PM)" 1 PM)" "Minnesota" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",125,126,119,113,114,114,107,109,107,110,111,102,106,108,107,113,122,150,169,164,174 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8788,8802,8838,8844,8821,8828,8914,8895,8883,8883,8929,8930,8860,8895,8914,8909,8911,8853,8902,8878,8812 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.51,0.48,0.45,0.44,0.46,0.47,0.45,0.45,0.44,0.44,0.43,0.47,0.45,0.46,0.44,0.44,0.44,0.45,0.46,0.46,0.43 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",93,88,83,80,85,85,90,78,74,76,54,65,60,85,110,157,152,444,941,1210,1568 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",73719,72052,72467,71631,73031,73310,74050,72267,72781,71055,72531,132857,131267,133093,134967,133848,134976,132929,136357,139955,140595

396

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 PM)" 4 PM)" "Washington" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",158,155,137,136,136,144,157,163,149,156,169,146,140,143,133,154,173,217,216,227 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8135,8014,8189,8125,8400,8267,7936,8043,8215,8224,8310,8014,8052,8151,8131,8532,9211,8366,8403,8391 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.7,0.66,0.66,0.71,0.65,0.69,0.71,0.62,0.59,0.75,0.73,1.01,1,0.93,0.75,0.69,0.34,0.32,0.33,0.34 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",511,573,466,469,472,485,509,499,405,479,664,241,325,412,562,1629,663,1229,965,1383 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",140948,140176,139924,139936,139933,139952,139931,139943,139907,140000,140000,137098,145438,139331,137340,142807,138598,139040,139905,130674

397

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 PM)" 7 PM)" "West Virginia" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",147,152,147,142,139,127,125,124,122,118,120,125,121,125,135,153,167,173,222,254,239 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12452,12505,12524,12489,12468,12418,12378,12398,12305,12361,12281,12085,12103,12166,12061,11976,11967,12046,11897,11959,12034 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.89,1.92,2.05,1.94,1.87,1.98,1.93,1.95,1.86,1.84,1.42,1.19,1.71,1.69,1.75,1.78,1.79,2.04,2,2.13,2.4 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",572,537,484,462,442,439,529,464,371,463,721,666,543,725,785,959,901,1063,2146,1434,1738 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",139293,139090,139486,139229,139324,138988,138655,138883,139186,139100,139324,137143,122840,140526,140943,141667,143471,143817,135557,137855,138536

398

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

32 PM)" 32 PM)" "Wyoming" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",84,83,76,80,80,82,82,81,79,76,78,77,79,82,87,95,100,105,117,120,132 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8811,8756,8840,8779,8766,8738,8716,8787,8794,8784,8803,8880,8759,8826,8826,8814,8708,8684,8769,8791,8806 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.54,0.51,0.52,0.51,0.52,0.5,0.52,0.54,0.53,0.51,0.5,0.48,0.49,0.49,0.48,0.49,0.51,0.49,0.51,0.51,0.53 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",527,494,479,473,444,445,546,517,406,476,724,707,553,714,950,1317,1628,1772,2146,1369,1736 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138848,139167,139150,139060,138986,139281,139171,138821,139138,139102,139219,146905,139448,139593,139338,139638,139333,139448,139926,139824,139238

399

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 PM)" 3 PM)" "Delaware" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",181,178,173,169,162,162,159,157,156,159,152,217,178,190,220,281,308,286,352,334,355 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",13035,13053,13064,13027,12954,13085,13020,13062,12962,12935,12995,11495,12858,12803,12530,12222,12401,12524,12452,12567,12550 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.97,0.96,1.03,0.94,0.92,1,1.01,0.99,0.98,0.97,1.01,0.67,0.91,0.9,0.83,0.67,0.74,0.73,0.74,0.8,0.77 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",278,238,242,230,259,261,321,278,215,244,446,380,406,576,611,863,1351,1304,1811,1120,1624 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",151269,151483,150760,151286,149733,152012,151900,151464,150957,150998,150486,148095,148964,147895,146312,147248,139117,144114,143781,137938,136498

400

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 PM)" 9 PM)" "New Jersey" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",180,178,173,177,182,178,175,176,159,145,139,227,187,180,205,218,273,289,333,401,416 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",13429,13402,13465,13397,13341,13282,12993,13084,13113,13150,13153,13000,13137,13056,12868,12644,12770,11890,12073,11491,11758 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.16,1.27,1.29,1.29,1.29,1.21,1.36,1.24,1.13,1.14,1.13,1.57,1.23,1.11,1.58,1.14,1.17,0.88,1.03,0.9,1.05 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",360,302,303,268,290,286,359,299,242,288,484,454,468,604,602,985,970,1147,1547,1011,1495 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",148298,148469,148864,149283,148376,149310,147321,148488,148655,149295,149557,141667,143162,139250,135095,134802,141505,136271,138217,136595,139952

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 PM)" 4 PM)" "New York" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",161,159,149,150,145,141,143,142,143,145,149,142,155,159,176,213,240,241,257,273,305 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12846,12923,12978,12914,12959,13051,13013,13105,13052,13034,13117,13025,13019,12545,12063,11832,11584,11382,11248,11187,10982 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.84,1.77,1.65,1.55,1.71,1.79,1.8,1.8,1.75,1.67,1.12,1.97,1.78,1.8,1.66,1.4,1.36,1.37,1.43,1.29,1.31 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",360,272,264,257,251,263,319,284,203,237,431,350,366,493,486,731,800,799,1390,811,1144 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",150036,150812,150898,151012,149567,148624,149671,150326,150740,150569,151162,149286,149371,149998,149024,148914,150136,151036,148410,146824,144319

402

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 PM)" 2 PM)" "New Mexico" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",132,138,132,137,141,142,143,134,131,133,138,147,153,143,148,151,156,179,199,190,206 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",9117,9092,9013,8991,9043,9033,9116,9069,9082,9132,9206,9250,9444,9164,9225,9173,9282,9198,9173,9226,8963 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.79,0.8,0.81,0.81,0.82,0.8,0.8,0.81,0.8,0.8,0.8,0.72,0.73,0.73,0.72,0.79,0.76,0.77,0.75,0.77,0.75 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",525,535,516,506,465,490,587,575,439,502,758,631,614,754,956,1293,1695,1879,2353,1526,1942 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138098,136000,135676,136000,136000,136000,136000,136000,136000,136000,136000,139524,136000,136048,136007,136252,136024,136026,134186,134086,134219

403

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 PM)" 6 PM)" "Kentucky" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",119,118,116,117,116,111,106,105,106,106,102,110,119,123,137,152,170,175,214,217,226 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",11558,11552,11620,11697,11683,11625,11536,11571,11579,11582,11604,11425,11464,11498,11550,11620,11568,11661,11534,11472,11460 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.59,2.53,2.44,2.39,2.34,2.42,2.47,2.5,2.37,2.27,2.29,2.15,2.16,2.12,2.09,2.21,2.23,2.22,2.33,2.54,2.58 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",575,505,479,204,153,318,310,361,278,275,559,567,465,227,127,117,127,127,203,168,217 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138943,138998,138993,90574,87876,118024,105736,116976,115748,110888,125371,139286,137640,132664,131967,132710,132305,134155,134110,134810,135140

404

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 PM)" 3 PM)" "Kansas" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",124,123,118,102,102,102,99,102,98,95,98,105,98,101,103,112,119,123,141,143,151 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8948,8998,8900,8654,8708,8730,8827,8766,8696,8628,8672,8700,8571,8619,8626,8569,8607,8582,8545,8526,8569 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.58,0.59,0.49,0.43,0.49,0.43,0.49,0.48,0.45,0.43,0.42,0.43,0.44,0.48,0.44,0.44,0.45,0.41,0.39,0.4,0.38 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",540,432,438,402,397,212,412,282,266,319,400,336,273,362,407,556,485,340,711,428,569 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",138176,138367,139117,138633,138890,104067,141940,154117,144688,147607,154871,154286,157186,156948,156855,155174,144821,137017,136552,137645,137600

405

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 PM)" 5 PM)" "Illinois" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",175,171,174,170,161,163,163,155,156,144,115,119,119,116,115,119,126,134,158,165,170 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",10789,10721,10666,10362,10181,9970,9878,9781,9700,9560,9690,9555,9253,9176,9120,9015,8937,8962,8892,8876,8896 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.07,2,1.91,1.63,1.46,1.14,1.16,1.17,1.1,1.03,1.11,1.1,0.7,0.66,0.65,0.62,0.53,0.52,0.5,0.48,0.5 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",395,309,304,297,280,232,298,309,234,291,324,579,524,540,464,1286,1465,1744,2432,1505,1765 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",148831,149029,149843,148693,148945,124129,128245,126779,130829,130367,96874,153333,140345,147876,143595,137405,141102,137319,137310,137181,137507

406

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 PM)" 4 PM)" "Mississippi" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",165,167,160,164,157,153,151,155,154,155,152,163,159,154,169,210,231,271,301,301,289 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12543,12555,12507,12338,11312,11221,11023,10486,10569,11062,11549,11670,9723,9235,9087,8993,8961,9290,9276,8541,8519 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.64,1.56,1.69,1.41,1.02,1.04,0.93,0.68,0.75,0.74,0.85,0.7,0.63,0.59,0.57,0.57,0.6,0.59,0.55,0.53,0.69 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",243,216,200,176,164,374,224,269,199,154,333,377,428,412,465,651,830,763,1042,1193,1076 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",151229,151257,152595,153436,152705,139507,154381,156867,157169,157967,155569,154524,145986,155336,155638,155064,155619,154738,149826,142902,151357

407

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 PM)" 6 PM)" "New Hampshire" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",178,174,169,161,152,159,161,163,161,152,148,167,180,170,202,244,256,290,353,366,380 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",13303,13247,13260,13179,13032,13111,13146,13054,13133,13133,13114,13050,13245,13262,13199,13087,13196,13109,12886,12849,12922 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.81,1.43,1.61,1.62,1.52,1.38,1.56,1.42,1.4,1.35,1.34,1.34,1.17,1.09,1.16,1.32,1.29,1.51,1.2,1.44,1.44 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",227,180,186,184,200,233,254,264,187,214,345,337,371,374,406,595,782,914,1069,717,1345 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",154329,156712,156757,154129,153464,154402,154517,152621,151850,153221,153740,151190,152400,152724,152883,154024,155071,152450,152379,151240,146800

408

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 PM)" 9 PM)" "Montana" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",67,67,71,69,69,67,71,68,67,73,92,95,61,62,64,71,85,93,102,107,111 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",8564,8522,8576,8496,8500,8520,8439,8426,8433,8435,6618,8380,8482,8515,8504,8447,8428,8426,8347,8409,8375 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.63,0.65,0.66,0.65,0.66,0.68,0.68,0.72,0.72,0.73,0.52,0.53,0.64,0.62,0.63,0.66,0.66,0.61,0.69,0.67,0.69 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",543,472,509,526,463,491,565,529,466,491,"-","-",219,746,948,1274,173,90,135,83,73 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",141000,141000,141000,141000,141000,141000,141000,141000,141000,140100,"-","-",137148,136574,137064,126095,130833,137343,136819,139021,138571

409

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 PM)" 50 PM)" "Georgia" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",179,180,180,178,169,167,158,159,155,155,154,166,168,172,180,218,240,261,307,362,390 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",11893,11936,12039,12148,11774,11576,11581,11755,11750,11740,11559,11730,11686,11668,11024,11058,10994,10983,10947,10933,10891 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.63,1.63,1.68,1.37,1.05,0.81,0.83,0.84,0.85,0.8,0.76,0.81,0.79,0.82,0.78,0.81,0.82,0.78,0.78,0.76,0.78 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",486,474,434,347,396,378,431,421,328,390,691,668,549,268,289,433,356,537,838,552,667 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",139812,138000,140514,142390,138483,139631,140676,140471,138495,138495,138498,145714,138348,134648,136533,141855,135864,141493,138081,138371,137129

410

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 PM)" 0 PM)" "Arizona" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",143,141,137,135,137,139,144,142,133,133,124,125,126,127,130,141,144,159,174,181,180 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",10482,10356,10303,10271,10281,10274,10232,10159,10186,10257,10229,10145,10232,10081,10211,10088,10011,9946,9828,9712,9685 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.49,0.51,0.51,0.49,0.51,0.53,0.55,0.54,0.55,0.55,0.56,0.58,0.6,0.64,0.57,0.57,0.57,0.57,0.59,0.65,0.66 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",446,499,467,511,428,510,539,532,429,480,860,706,654,767,859,1403,1625,1671,2102,1300,1807 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",142831,139662,140379,140533,142148,139933,142293,140336,138850,138690,138607,143333,139567,139550,133595,140912,139114,140914,138424,135340,135993

411

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 PM)" 0 PM)" "Pennsylvania" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",152,155,148,144,143,136,138,136,135,130,115,121,125,122,137,159,172,175,210,230,241 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12241,12302,12399,12443,12368,12315,12321,12279,12323,12552,12670,11240,12111,11733,11615,11741,11459,11400,11079,10940,11063 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.16,2.14,2.12,2.07,2.11,2.12,2.09,2.13,2.19,2.15,2.26,2.12,1.95,1.95,2,1.94,2.09,2.08,2.09,2.21,2.39 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",322,247,236,236,249,224,289,225,184,186,292,373,464,467,451,746,762,916,1181,762,1484 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",140462,137574,132824,141621,141245,128574,132045,126590,121550,112919,125114,146429,145976,144660,144343,146174,139310,139290,138850,138731,139112

412

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47 PM)" 47 PM)" "Florida" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",185,186,182,177,178,179,174,173,165,159,157,172,176,176,192,231,256,256,297,339,347 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",12364,12351,12370,12332,12293,12296,12193,12122,12144,12299,12330,12105,12263,12281,12249,12227,12142,12116,11929,11957,12024 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",1.73,1.73,1.68,1.57,1.6,1.47,1.55,1.59,1.55,1.53,1.59,1.54,1.55,1.44,1.44,1.38,1.37,1.35,1.38,1.45,1.67 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",302,225,242,220,226,247,278,254,193,236,409,339,324,389,392,581,568,712,1003,727,856 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",151010,151217,151471,151660,151248,150633,148417,143486,143812,147529,147162,150000,149657,148431,148183,147510,146124,147276,146433,144745,143138

413

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 PM)" 4 PM)" "Nevada" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",149,141,146,147,143,131,137,139,130,129,126,126,134,142,136,154,173,188,220,222,244 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",11122,11121,11051,11012,11291,11075,11140,11169,11199,11257,11211,11210,11284,11120,11118,11176,11495,11151,10664,10505,10626 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",0.53,0.5,0.49,0.49,0.49,0.48,0.49,0.5,0.47,0.46,0.47,0.51,0.53,0.5,0.54,0.53,0.54,0.46,0.44,0.42,0.47 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",314,393,331,358,329,337,552,508,380,453,722,585,600,601,473,990,1270,"-",2360,1382,1751 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",148233,147538,147779,148545,148195,146667,136898,138760,138845,139110,139110,151667,139110,138548,149914,141760,140610,"-",138938,138386,138452

414

Table 6. Electric Power Delivered Fuel Prices and Quality for Coal, Petroleum, N  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 PM)" 2 PM)" "Ohio" "Fuel, Quality",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Coal (cents per million Btu)",152,148,144,141,144,142,134,132,136,136,146,131,123,121,133,154,170,171,205,239,224 " Average heat value (Btu per pound)",11882,11945,11983,12049,12052,12122,12056,11891,11913,11918,11823,11550,12143,12160,12098,12097,11525,11495,11444,11768,11563 " Average sulfur Content (percent)",2.44,2.63,2.57,2.39,2.34,1.89,2.08,2.01,2.01,1.98,1.92,2.07,1.98,2.14,2.25,2.16,1.68,1.7,1.96,2.2,2.28 "Petroleum (cents per million Btu)1",459,381,233,187,197,349,347,426,202,348,635,601,532,731,777,1291,1224,1619,591,488,760 " Average heat value (Btu per gallon)",142917,131114,93026,81274,82224,128733,105121,135936,105736,128624,133586,142143,125426,137810,137986,138193,138150,138026,134567,136305,136052

415

Coal: America's energy future. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

NONE

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Coal Ash: Characteristics, Management, and Environmental Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired power plants in the United States produce more than 92 million tons of coal ash per year. About 40% is beneficially used in a variety of applications, and about 60% is managed in storage and disposal sites. This technical update summarizes information and data on the physical and chemical characteristics of coal ash, beneficial use applications, disposal practices, and management practices to mitigate environmental concerns.

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

Microbial solubilization of coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a cell-free preparation and process for the microbial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products. More specifically, the present invention relates to bacterial solubilization of coal into solubilized coal products and a cell-free bacterial byproduct useful for solubilizing coal. 5 tabs.

Strandberg, G.W.; Lewis, S.N.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

418

Tri-State Synfuels Project Review: Volume 8. Commercial status of licensed process units. [Proposed Henderson, Kentucky coal to gasoline plant; licensed commercial processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document demonstrates the commercial status of the process units to be used in the Tri-State Synfuels Project at Henderson, Kentucky. The basic design philosophy as established in October, 1979, was to use the commercial SASOL II/III plants as a basis. This was changed in January 1982 to a plant configuration to produce gasoline via a methanol and methanol to gasoline process. To accomplish this change the Synthol, Oil workup and Chemical Workup Units were eliminated and replaced by Methanol Synthesis and Methanol to Gasoline Units. Certain other changes to optimize the Lurgi liquids processing eliminated the Tar Distillation and Naphtha Hydrotreater Units which were replaced by the Partial Oxidation Unit. The coals to be gasified are moderately caking which necessitates the installation of stirring mechanism in the Lurgi Dry Bottom gasifier. This work is in the demonstration phase. Process licenses either have been obtained or must be obtained for a number of processes to be used in the plant. The commercial nature of these processes is discussed in detail in the tabbed sections of this document. In many cases there is a list of commercial installations at which the licensed equipment is used.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

State energy price system. Volume I: overview and technical documentation  

SciTech Connect

This study utilizes existing data sources and previous analyses of state-level energy prices to develop consistent state-level energy prices series by fuel type and by end-use sector. The fuels are electricity, natural gas, coal, distillate fuel oil, motor gasoline, diesel, kerosene, jet fuel, residual fuel, and liquefied petroleum gas. The end-use sectors are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Based upon an evaluation of existing data sources, recommendations were formulated on the feasible approaches for developing a consistent state energy price series. The data series were compiled based upon the approaches approved after a formal EIA review. Detailed documentation was provided, including annual updating procedures. Recommendations were formulated for future improvements in the collection of data or in data processing. Generally, the geographical coverage includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. Information on state-level energy use was generally taken from the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Corresponding average US prices are also developed using volumes reported in SEDS. To the extent possible, the prices developed are quantity weighted average retail prices. Both a Btu price series and a physical unit price series are developed for each fuel. The period covered by the data series is 1970 through 1980 for most fuels, though prices for electricity and natural gas extend back to 1960. (PSB)

Fang, J.M.; Nieves, L.A.; Sherman, K.L.; Hood, L.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Capitalizing on coal  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) predicts that the equivalent of 44 baseload coal fired power plants will be needed to keep pace with US electricity demand by 2025. Potential builders are looking for greater certainty on a number of energy, environmental and regulatory issues before they invest. The work of the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) in advocating solutions to create this certainty is reported in this article. It is asking Congress to put transmission assets on a par with other major assets and reduce their depreciable lives from 20 to 15 years, and calling for repeal legislation that limits investment in the regulated energy industry. EEI is advocating federal environmental legislation similar to the Clean Skies Act that would lower emissions faster, with greater certainty, and with greater cost savings. EEI is encouraging FERC to work with states to increase certainty of builders recovering their investment in coal plants. 2 photos.

McMahon, F. [Edison Electric Institute (United States). Alliance of Energy Suppliers

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Mercury emission control for coal fired power plants using coal and biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury is a leading concern among the air toxic metals addressed in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) because of its volatility, persistence, and bioaccumulation as methylmercury in the environment and its neurological health impacts. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reports for 2001 shows that total mercury emissions from all sources in USA is about 145 tons per annum, of which coal fired power plants contribute around 33% of it, about 48 tons per annum. Unlike other trace metals that are emitted in particulate form, mercury is released in vapor phase in elemental (Hg0) or oxidized (Hg2+, mainly HgCl2) form. To date, there is no post combustion treatment which can effectively capture elemental mercury vapor, but the oxidized form of mercury can be captured in traditional emission control devices such as wet flue gas defulrization (WFGD) units, since oxidized mercury (HgCl2) is soluble in water. The chlorine concentration present during coal combustion plays a major role in mercury oxidation, which is evident from the fact that plants burning coal having high chlorine content have less elemental mercury emissions. A novel method of co-firing blends of low chlorine content coal with high chlorine content cattle manure/biomass was used in order to study its effect on mercury oxidation. For Texas Lignite and Wyoming coal the concentrations of chlorine are 139 ppm and 309 ppm on dry ash free basis, while for Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass it is 2,691 ppm. Co-firing experiments were performed in a 100,000 BTU/hr (29.3 kWt) Boiler Burner facility located in the Coal and Biomass Energy laboratory (CBEL); coal and biomass blends in proportions of 80:20, 90:10, 95:5 and 100:0 were investigated as fuels. The percentage reduction of Hg with 95:5, 90:10 and 80:20 blends were measured to be 28- 50%, 42-62% and 71-75% respectively. Though cattle biomass serves as an additive to coal, to increase the chlorine concentration, it leads to higher ash loading. Low Ash and High Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass have 164% and 962% more ash than Wyoming coal respectively. As the fraction of cattle biomass in blend increases in proportion, ash loading problems increase simultaneously. An optimum blend ratio is arrived and suggested as 90:10 blend with good reduction in mercury emissions without any compromise on ash loading.

Arcot Vijayasarathy, Udayasarathy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Coal liquefaction and hydrogenation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a coal liquefaction process using two stages. The first stage liquefies the coal and maximizes the product while the second stage hydrocracks the remainder of the coal liquid to produce solvent.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fair Lawn, NJ); Chen, James M. (Edison, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Competitive interstate taxation of western coal  

SciTech Connect

This paper analyzes the potential market power of western states in setting coal severance taxes. An attempt to determine the emphasis placed by the western states on the development of their coal resources is also made. Three market structures are analyzed. One involves a western regional cartel, setting taxes collectively. The other cases are noncooperative tax equilibria with Montana and Wyoming competing against each other. We study the effects on these equilibria of changes in each region's relative emphasis on development of coal resources vs tax revenue. The welfare impacts of these tax setting policies are also addressed. The analysis is based on an activity analysis of US coal markets. The results show that the taxes associated with the noncooperative competitive tax equilibria are close to present tax levels. Additionally, we conclude that western states currently are quite efficient extractors of economic rent from coal produced within their boundaries, in terms of welfare loss per dollar of tax revenue collected. 2 figures.

Kolstad, C.D.; Wolak, F.A. Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 8. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $7.51 $4.74 $3.37 -33.0 -28.8 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $21.73 $20.23 $13.30 -21.8 -34.3 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

425

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

426

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

427

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data 6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama Alabama W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Georgia W W W W W W W W W W W Alabama Illinois - - - - - W W W W - W Colorado Alabama - W W W W W W W W - W Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W W W W Colorado Arkansas - - - - W W W W - - -

428

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 5. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $4.31 $4.36 $5.01 7.9 15.0 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $11.08 $12.65 $13.27 9.4 4.9 Colorado Indiana $6.29 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $13.15 $14.28 W 8.6

429

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 6. Estimated barge transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama $3.97 $3.97 $4.52 6.7 13.7 Alabama Ohio W - - - - Colorado Alabama W - - - - Colorado Florida $10.21 $11.53 $11.95 8.2 3.7 Colorado Indiana $5.79 W - - - Colorado Iowa W - - - - Colorado Kentucky W - - - - Colorado Mississippi - - W - - Colorado Ohio - W - - - Colorado Tennessee W - - - - Illinois Alabama W $11.99 $12.87 W 7.3

430

Origin State Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data 7. Estimated truck transportation rates for coal, state to state, EIA data Origin State Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Alabama Alabama W W W W W Alabama Georgia - - W - - Alabama Indiana W W - - - Colorado Colorado W W W W W Colorado Michigan - - W - - Illinois Florida W - - - - Illinois Illinois $8.16 $5.20 $3.75 -32.2 -27.9 Illinois Indiana W W - - - Illinois Minnesota W W - - - Illinois Missouri $23.60 $22.20 $14.77 -20.9 -33.5 Indiana Alabama - W - - -

431

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

432

Technical and economic assessment of the IGT peat-gasification process. Engineering support services for the DOE/GRI Coal Gasification Research Program  

SciTech Connect

Kellogg has completed a moderately detailed design and cost estimate of a 250 billion Btu/Day grass-roots SNG plant using the Peatgas process. Results indicate that the cost of SNG would be $4.40/MM Btu, using a cost of $1.50/MM Btu for peat feedstock at 50% moisture. The SNG cost is reasonably competitive with that currently estimated for SNG from coal, and Kellogg would anticipate that capital cost reductions, via design optimization, could reduce the NSG cost to a level which is quite competitive. The cost of peat feedstock is a critical area of concern in evaluating economics of the Peatgas process. The value chosen for the base-case economics ($1.50/MM Btu) is in the higher portion of the price range considered typical by most investigators; the price of $1.50/MM Btu was chosen arbitrarily to represent a 50% increase over the cost of coal ($1.00/MM Btu) used by Kellogg in parallel studies, to reflect higher costs for land use and reclamation and for harvesting and dewatering of peat. In a study concurrent with that reported here, Kellogg found that one method of wet harvesting and mechanical/thermal dewatering yields a peat (50% moisture) cost which is unfavorably high and was therefore rejected for use as a base-case cost since much cheaper feedstock is apparently available by other harvesting/dewatering methods. The base-case cost of SNG is moderate somewhat by the values placed on the benzene and oil coproducts (i.e., $1.10 and $0.75 per gallon, respectively). The total of such credits amounts to about 39% of the gross operating cost; a reduction in value of the coproducts would adversely affect the cost of SNG. Certain technical factors are discussed: materials handling problems, high reactivity, low sulfur content, and limited gasification data.

Bostwick, L.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Laramore, R.W.; Senules, E.A.; Shah, K.V.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

434

NETL: IEP - Coal Utilization By-Products Current Regulations Governing Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Products Products Current Regulations Governing Coal Combustion By-Products - Database of State Regulations Database of State Regulations Affecting Disposal and Utilization of Coal Combustion By-Products A Summary Provided by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and the American Coal Ash Association Coal Combustion By-Products (CCBs) are generated when coal is used to generate electricity and power industrial processes. Tens of millions of tons of these materials are produced each year. Many uses of these byproducts are possible, but currently most of them wind up in landfills. Previous work at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified regulatory issues as one factor preventing more widespread reuse of CCBs. CCBs are generally regulated by state authorities, and the various states have developed widely differing rules. This web site was developed as one way to help CCB generators, users, and regulators share information across state boundaries.

435

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Projects This interactive map shows the extent of FE's clean coal projects across the United States and Canada. Read more AVESTAR Training FE and local colleges signed an agreement recently to train power plant field operators. Read more FutureGen 2.0 DOE recently announced the beginning of Phase II development for this innovative carbon capture and storage project in Illinois. Read more DOE's clean coal R&D is focused on developing and demonstrating advanced power generation and carbon capture, utilization and storage technologies for existing facilities and new fossil-fueled power plants by increasing overall system efficiencies and reducing capital costs. In the near-term, advanced technologies that increase the power generation

436

FE Clean Coal News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal News Clean Coal News FE Clean Coal News RSS February 9, 2009 DOE Award Results in Several Patents, Potential Increased Coal Recovery A $13 million cooperative effort with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) over the past seven years has resulted in the successful demonstration of a novel technology that addresses a problem plaguing coal operators and environmentalists alike: separating fine coal particles from water and their ultimate use as a significant energy resource. February 5, 2009 SECA Fuel Cell Program Moves Two Key Projects Into Next Phase The U.S. Department of Energy has selected two projects for continuation within the Department's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program research portfolio. February 3, 2009

437

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration (Project)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a description of technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project (ACCP). The project is a US Department of Energy Innovative Clean Coal Technology Project. The cooperative agreement defining the project is between DOE and the Rosebud SynCoal Partnership RSCP. The RSCP is a partnership between Western Energy Company (WECo), a subsidiary of Entech, Montana Power's non-utility group, and NRG, a subsidiary of Northern States Power. The ACCP is a method of upgrading low ranked coals by reducing the moisture and sulfur content and increasing the heating value. The facility is being constructed at WECo's Rosebud No. 6 coal mine, west of Colstrip, Montana. This report contains both a history of the process development and a report of technical progress made since the beginning of the Clean Coal 1 cooperative agreement.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Annual Coal Distribution Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Coal Distribution Report Release Date: December 19, 2013 | Next Release Date: November 2014 | full report | RevisionCorrection Revision to the Annual Coal Distribution...

439

2014 Coal Form Proposals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Survey Form Changes Proposed for 2014. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has begun the process of re-clearing the coal survey ...

440

Coal Mining (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These sections describe procedures for coal exploration and extraction, as well as permitting requirements relating to surface and underground coal mining. These sections also address land...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu state coal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Metallurgical coal markets became volatile when the thriving Chinese steel industry in late 2003 and 2004 made outsized demands for coking coal and met coke, ...

442

Coal News and Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal Prices (updated December 27, 2006) This report summarizes spot coal prices for the business weeks ended December 1, 8, and 15.

443

Annual Coal Report 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

DOE/EIA-0584 (2001) Annual Coal Report 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy

444

Wyoming - State Energy Profile Overview - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Quick Facts. Wyoming produced 40 percent of all coal mined in the United States in 2011. In 2011, 35 States received coal from Wyoming mines, with ...

445

Utah's Coal Industry: Economic Contributions and Future Prospects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utah's Coal Industry: Economic Contributions and Future Prospects Pamela S. Perlich, Senior's coal industry has played a significant role in the economic development of the state for well over developments. The first section of this paper presents an overview of the coal industry in Utah, examining

446

All Price Tables.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Sector Energy Price Estimates, 2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) State Primary Energy Retail Electricity Total Energy Coal Natural Gas Petroleum Total Aviation Gasoline a Distillate...

447

Coal liquefaction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-stage liquefaction wherein coal, hydrogen and liquefaction solvent are contacted in a first thermal liquefaction zone, followed by recovery of an essentially ash free liquid and a pumpable stream of insoluble material, which includes 850.degree. F.+ liquid, with the essentially ash free liquid then being further upgraded in a second liquefaction zone, the liquefaction solvent for the first stage includes the pumpable stream of insoluble material from the first liquefaction stage, and 850.degree. F.+ liquid from the second liquefaction stage.

Schindler, Harvey D. (Fairlawn, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

NETL: Coal & Coal Biomass to Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Biomass to Liquids Hydrogen-from-Coal RD&D ENERGY ANALYSIS About Us Search Products Contacts SMART GRID ANALYSIS BASELINE STUDIES QUALITY GUIDELINES NETL-RUA About NETL-RUA...

450

The current state of the science related to the re-release of mercury from coal combustion products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of mercury associated with CCPs is an issue that has only recently been under investigation but has become a prominent question as the industry strives to determine if current management options for CCPs will need to be modified. Mercury and other air toxic elements can be present in fly ash, FGD material and bottom ash and boiler slag. Mercury concentrations ranging from {lt} 0.01 to 2.41 ppm in fly ash and from 0.001 to 0.342 ppm in bottom ash have been reported. Stability of mercury must be evaluated by tests that include 1) direct leachability; 2) vapor-phase release at ambient and elevated temperatures; and 3) microbiologically induced leachability and vapor-phase release. The amount of mercury leached from currently produced CCPs is extremely low and does not appear to represent an environmental or re-release hazard. Concentrations of mercury in leachates from fly ashes and FGD material using either the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) or the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) are generally below detection limits. The release of mercury vapor from CCPs resulting from the use of mercury control technologies has been evaluated on a limited basis. Research indicates that mercury bound to the ash or activated carbon is fairly stable. The EERC found that organomercury species were detected at very low levels both in the vapor and leachate generated from the microbiologically mediated release experiments. The current state of the science indicates that mercury associated with CCPs is stable and highly unlikely to be released under most management conditions, including utilisation and disposal. The exception to this is exposure to high temperatures such as those that may be achieved in cement and wallboard production. Therefore, existing CCPs management options are expected to be environmentally sound options for CCPs from systems with mercury control technologies installed. 2 refs., 2 photos.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink; Tera D. Buckley [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Coal Technology Program Clean Coal Technology Program Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration A DOE Assessment DOE/NETL-2005/1217 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2005 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

452

Model documentation of the Short-Term Coal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term coal analysis system (SCOAL) is used by the Data Analysis and Forecasting Branch (DAFB) as an analytic aid to support preparation of short-term projections of bituminous coal and lignite production at the state level, and anthracite production, domestic imports of coal, and domestic and export demand for US coal at the national level. A description of SCOAL is presented which includes a general overview of the model and its analytical capabilities. (DMC)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Design and economics of a plant to convert western subbituminous coal to SNG (substitute natural gas) using KRW (KRW Energy Systems Inc. ) gasifiers. Topical report (Final) May 1985-January 1986  

SciTech Connect

A first-pass design and cost estimate indicates that the levelized constant-dollar cost of gas for a 125 billion Btu/day plant to convert western subbituminous coal to substitute natural gas (SNG) using KRW gasifiers is $4.70/MMBtu. Process development allowances (PDA) increase the gas cost to $5.09/MMBtu. The levelized constant-dollar gas cost for a scaled-up 250 billion Btu/day plant is estimated at $4.17/MMBtu, indicating that smaller plants can be constructed with less capital risk while producing methane at only slightly higher costs.

Smith, J.T.; Hanny, D.J.; Smelser, S.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Clean Coal Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Research Clean Coal Turbines Gasification Fuel Cells Hydrogen from Coal Coal to Liquids Major Demonstrations Crosscutting Research Carbon Capture and...

455

Coal Combustion Products | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Combustion Products Coal Combustion Products Coal combustion products (CCPs) are solid materials produced when coal is burned to generate electricity. Since coal provides the...

456

Coal Tar and Bedrock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of bedrock groundwater and coal tar impacts is one of the most complicated tasks associated with managing manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. This report provides an overview of the fate and transport of coal tar in bedrock and the methods available to investigate coal tar at particular sites and discusses how to develop a decision-making framework for coal tar investigations.

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

457

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 14,828 4,508 19,336 Alaska 825 698 1,524 Arizona 13,143 - 13,143 Arkansas 13 - 13 Colorado 32,427 894 33,321 Illinois 33,997 285 34,283 Indiana 36,714 - 36,714 Kansas 176 - 176 Kentucky Total 131,546 2,821 134,367 East 107,000 2,707 109,706 West 24,547 114 24,660 Louisiana 3,746 - 3,746 Maryland 4,671 319 4,990 Mississippi 475 - 475 Missouri 366 - 366 Montana 38,459 485 38,944 New Mexico 28,949 - 28,949 North Dakota 30,449 - 30,449 Ohio 25,463 12 25,475 Oklahoma 1,710 - 1,710 Pennsylvania Total 64,392 6,005 70,397 Anthracite 2,852 205 3,057 Bituminous 61,540 5,800 67,340 Tennessee 3,346 28 3,374 Texas 45,019 31 45,050 Utah 24,761 2,144 26,905 Virginia 25,685 7,071 32,756 Washington 4,623 - 4,623 West Virginia Total 144,584

459

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Domestic Distribution of U.S. Coal by Destination State, Consumer, Destination and Method of Transportation, 2001 (Thousand Short Tons) DESTINATION: Alabama State of Origin by Method of Transportation Electricity Generation Coke Plants Industrial Plants (Except Coke) Residential and Commercial Total Alabama 7,212 375 6,032 3 13,622 Railroad 2,613 170 4,607 - 7,390 River 3,867 - - - 3,867 Truck 732 205 1,424 3 2,365 Illinois 1,458 - - * 1,458 Railroad 167 - - - 167 River 1,291 - - - 1,291 Truck - - - * * Kentucky Total 2,277 - 262 - 2,539 Railroad 1,928 - 165 - 2,093 River 349 - 83 - 432 Truck - - 14 - 14 Eastern 843 - 262 - 1,105 Railroad 843 - 165 - 1,008 River - - 83 - 83 Truck - - 14 - 14 Western 1,435 - - - 1,435 Railroad 1,086 - - - 1,086 River 349 - - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 242 - 62 - 304 Great Lakes - - 60 - 60 Railroad - - * - * River 242 - -

460

NETL: Clean Coal Demonstrations - Coal 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A "Bed" for Burning Coal A "Bed" for Burning Coal Clean Coal 101 Lesson 4: A "Bed" for Burning Coal? It was a wet, chilly day in Washington DC in 1979 when a few scientists and engineers joined with government and college officials on the campus of Georgetown University to celebrate the completion of one of the world's most advanced coal combustors. It was a small coal burner by today's standards, but large enough to provide heat and steam for much of the university campus. But the new boiler built beside the campus tennis courts was unlike most other boilers in the world. A Fluidized Bed Boiler A Fluidized Bed Boiler In a fluidized bed boiler, upward blowing jets of air suspend burning coal, allowing it to mix with limestone that absorbs sulfur pollutants.