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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

2

Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 Table 1.4a Primary Energy Imports by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Imports

3

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

4

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 7 Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption by Source (Quadrillion Btu)

5

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review August 2013 5 Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source (Quadrillion Btu) Fossil Fuels

6

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 10.1 Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Total and Major Sources, 1949–2012 By Source, 2012 By Sector, 2012 Compared With Other Resources, 1949–2012

7

STABILIZED HIGH INTENSITY SOURCE OF 80 kv  

SciTech Connect

With the change of the current load from 0 to 2.5 mamp and simultaneous change of incoming intensity from 270 to 190 v, the stabilized high-intensity source changes less than l%.. The stabilized intensity can be arranged in steps of 5 kv from 60 to 80 kv. The high-intensity stabilizer automatically switches on upon reaching 60 kv. (tr-auth)

Polivanov, V.V.; Izyurov, A.V.; Pyatakov, N.I.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Btu tax is dead, long live the Btu tax  

SciTech Connect

The energy industry is powerful. That is the only explanation for its ability to jettison a cornerstone of the Clinton Administration's proposed deficit reduction package, the Btu tax plan, expected to raise about $71.5 billion over a five-year period. Clinton had proposed a broad-based energy tax of 25.7 cents per million Btus, and a surcharge of 34.2 cents on petroleum products, to be phased in over three years starting July 1, 1994. House Democrats went along, agreeing to impose a tax of 26.8 cents per million Btus, along with the 34.2-cent petroleum surcharge, both effective July 1, 1994. But something happened on the way to the Senate. Their version of the deficit reduction package contains no broad-based energy tax. It does, however, include a 4.3 cents/gallon fuel tax. Clinton had backed down, and House Democrats were left feeling abandoned and angry. What happened has as much to do with politics-particularly the fourth branch of government, lobbyists-as with a President who wants to try to please everyone. It turns out that almost every lawmaker or lobbyist who sought an exemption from the Btu tax, in areas as diverse as farming or ship and jet fuel used in international commercial transportation, managed to get it without giving up much in return. In the end, the Btu tax was so riddled with exemptions that its effectiveness as a revenue-raiser was in doubt. Meanwhile, it turns out that the Btu tax is not dead. According to Budget Director Leon Panetta, the Administration has not given up on the Btu tax and will fight for it when the reconciliation bill goes to a joint House-Senate conference.

Burkhart, L.A.

1993-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Study of Vibration Stability at Operating Light Source Facilities and Lessons Learned in Achieving NSLS II Stability Goals

Simos, N; Fallier, M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Renewable source controls for grid stability.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this study was to evaluate the small signal and transient stability of the Western Electric- ity Coordinating Council (WECC) under high penetrations of renewable energy, and to identify control technologies that would improve the system performance. The WECC is the regional entity responsible for coordinating and promoting bulk electric system reliability in the Western Interconnection. Transient stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a large disturbance while small signal stability is the ability of the power system to maintain synchronism after a small disturbance. Tran- sient stability analysis usually focuses on the relative rotor angle between synchronous machines compared to some stability margin. For this study we employed generator speed relative to system speed as a metric for assessing transient stability. In addition, we evaluated the system transient response using the system frequency nadir, which provides an assessment of the adequacy of the primary frequency control reserves. Small signal stability analysis typically identi es the eigenvalues or modes of the system in response to a disturbance. For this study we developed mode shape maps for the di erent scenarios. Prony analysis was applied to generator speed after a 1.4 GW, 0.5 second, brake insertion at various locations. Six di erent WECC base cases were analyzed, including the 2022 light spring case which meets the renewable portfolio standards. Because of the di culty in identifying the cause and e ect relationship in large power system models with di erent scenarios, several simulations were run on a 7-bus, 5-generator system to isolate the e ects of di erent con gurations. Based on the results of the study, for a large power system like the WECC, incorporating frequency droop into wind/solar systems provides a larger bene t to system transient response than replacing the lost inertia with synthetic inertia. From a small signal stability perspective, the increase in renewable penetration results in subtle changes to the system modes. In gen- eral, mode frequencies increase slightly, and mode shapes remain similar. The system frequency nadir for the 2022 light spring case was slightly lower than the other cases, largely because of the reduced system inertia. However, the nadir is still well above the minimum load shedding frequency of 59.5 Hz. Finally, several discrepancies were identi ed between actual and reported wind penetration, and additional work on wind/solar modeling is required to increase the delity of the WECC models.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Elliott, Ryan Thomas; Neely, Jason C.; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Schoenwald, David Alan; Grant, Lisa

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

12

Diagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation. f Transmission and distribution losses (electricity losses that occur between the pointDiagram 5. Electricity Flow, 2007 (Quadrillion Btu) Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2007 221 Coal 20.99 Nuclear Electric Power 8.41 Energy Consumed To Generate Electricity 42

Bensel, Terrence G.

13

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

14

Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

15

Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

16

Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

17

Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

18

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

19

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 23 Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu) End-Use Sectors Electric

20

Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013 29 Table 2.4 Industrial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu) Primary Consumptiona

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review November 2013 3 Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu) Production Trade

22

Stability of thermal structures with an internal heating source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal equilibrium and stability of isobaric, spherical structures having a radiation source located at its center. The thermal conduction coefficient, external heating and cooling rates are represented as power laws of the temperature. The internal heating decreases with distance from the source r approximately as exp(-tau)/(r**2), being tau the optical depth. We find that the influence of the radiation source is important only in the central region, but its effect is enough to make the system thermally unstable above a certain threshold central temperature. This threshold temperature decreases as the internal heating efficiency increases, but, otherwise, it does not depend on the structure size. Our results suggest that a solar-like star migrating into a diffuse interstellar region may destabilize the surrounding medium.

Sanchez, Nestor

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Stability of thermal structures with an internal heating source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the thermal equilibrium and stability of isobaric, spherical structures having a radiation source located at its center. The thermal conduction coefficient, external heating and cooling rates are represented as power laws of the temperature. The internal heating decreases with distance from the source r approximately as exp(-tau)/(r**2), being tau the optical depth. We find that the influence of the radiation source is important only in the central region, but its effect is enough to make the system thermally unstable above a certain threshold central temperature. This threshold temperature decreases as the internal heating efficiency increases, but, otherwise, it does not depend on the structure size. Our results suggest that a solar-like star migrating into a diffuse interstellar region may destabilize the surrounding medium.

Nestor Sanchez; Eugenio Lopez

2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

25

Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather than air) is used for gasification, the resulting medium Btu gas could be economically transported by pipeline from the gasification sites to the Gulf coast. Technical, environmental, and economic aspects of implementing this technology are discussed.

Edgar, T. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

27

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

28

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

29

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

30

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

31

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

32

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

33

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

Lubsandorzhiev, B K

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on blue ultra bright LEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of stability studies of nanosecond light sources based on single quantum well (SQW) InGaN/GaN ultra bright blue LEDs. It is shown that the light yield of such light sources and their timing characteristics don't deteriorate even after 10^10 total pulses. The longterm stability of the sources light yield is better than 1%.

B. K. Lubsandorzhiev; Y. E. Vyatchin

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Transportation and Handling of Medium Btu Gas in Pipelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-derived medium btu gas can be safely transported by pipeline over moderate distances, according to this survey of current industrial pipeline practices. Although pipeline design criteria will be more stringent than for natural gas pipelines, the necessary technology is readily available.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oklahoma, 1960 - 2011 1960 33.9 902.0 1,118.9 0.0 NA 17.8 17.8 2,072.6 1961 26.1 976.9 1,119.9 0.0 NA 20.2 20 ...

37

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, California, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 589.7 1,771.0 (s) NA 270.2 270.2 2,630.9 1961 0.0 633.8 1,737.7 0.1 NA 248.2 ...

38

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Delaware, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.0 5.0 5.0 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 5.1 5.1 5.1

39

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Texas, 1960 - 2011 1960 26.4 6,610.7 5,379.4 0.0 NA 50.2 50.2 12,066.6 1961 26.5 6,690.2 5,447.3 0.0 NA 52.0 ...

40

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Indiana, 1960 - 2011 1960 346.3 0.3 69.9 0.0 NA 24.6 24.6 441.1 1961 336.7 0.4 66.7 0.0 NA 24.2 24.2 428.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Oregon, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 190.5 190.5 190.5 1961 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 NA 188.9 188.9 188.9

42

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Arizona, 1960 - 2011 1960 0.1 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 36.2 36.2 36.7 1961 0.0 0.0 0.4 0.0 NA 35.1 35.1 35.5

43

Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high price of natural gas and fuel oil for steam/power generation has alerted industry's decision makers to potentially more economical ways to provide the needed energy. Low-Btu fuel gas produced from coal appears to be an attractive alternate that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification facility needs to address those items that are not only unique to the gasification process itself, but also items generic to conventional firing of coal. This paper will discuss the environmental data necessary for permitting a low-Btu gasification facility located in the State of Louisiana. An actual case study for a 500,000 lb/hr natural gas-fired process steam plant being converted to low Btu gas will be presented. Typical air, water and solid waste effluents that must be considered will also be described.

Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

BTU convergence spawning gas market opportunities in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The so-called BTU convergence of US electric power and natural gas sectors is spawning a boom in market opportunities in the US Northeast that ensures the region will be North America`s fastest growing gas market. That`s the view of Catherine Good Abbott, CEO of Columbia Gas Transmission Corp., who told a Ziff Energy conference in Calgary that US Northeast gas demand is expected to increase to almost 10 bcfd in 2000 and more than 12 bcfd in 2010 from about 8 bcfd in 1995 and only 3 bcfd in 1985. The fastest growth will be in the US Northeast`s electrical sector, where demand for gas is expected to double to 4 bcfd in 2010 from about 2 bcfd in 1995. In other presentations at the Ziff Energy conference, speakers voiced concerns about the complexity and speed of the BTU convergence phenomenon and offered assurances about the adequacy of gas supplies in North American to meet demand growth propelled by the BTU convergence boom. The paper discusses the gas demand being driven by power utilities, the BTU convergence outlook, electric power demand, Canadian production and supply, and the US overview.

NONE

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

45

Chemical potential as a source of stability for gravitating Skyrmions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A discussion of the stability of self gravitating Skyrmions, with a large winding number N, in a Schwarzschild type of metric, is presented for the case where an isospin chemical potential is introduced. It turns out that the chemical potential stabilizes the behavior of the Skyrmion discussed previously in the literature. This analysis is carried on in the framework of a variational approach using different ansaetze for the radial profile of the Skyrmion. We found a divergent behavior for the size of the Skyrmion, associated to a certain critical value $\\mu_c$ of the chemical potential. At this point, the mass of the Skyrmion vanishes. $\\mu_c$ is essentialy independent of gravitating effects. The stability of a large N skyrmion against decays into single particles is also discussed.

M. Loewe; S. Mendizabal; J. C. Rojas

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

49

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year

50

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Production: Trade: Stock Change and Other 8: Consumption: Fossil Fuels 2

51

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

53

On the Application of a Lagrangian Particle–Puff Model to Elevated Sources in Surface Layers with Neutral Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lagrangian particle–puff model is presented for predicting the statistical properties of tracers dispersing from elevated sources into surface layers with neutral stability. The model is based upon F. A. Gifford’s meandering-plume concept and ...

Andrew Michael Reynolds

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

2012 Short Course Fats and Oils for Confectionary and Chocolates: Chemistry, Primary Sources, Crystallization, Alternatives, and Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fats and Oils for Confectionary and Chocolates: Chemistry, Primary Sources, Crystallization, Alternatives, and Stability held at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2012 Short Course Fats and Oils for Confectionary and Chocolates: Chemistry, Primary So

55

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

56

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Minnesota ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... includes refuse recovery. sources except biofuels. ... Coal a Natural Gas b Crude Oil c Biofuels d Other e Production U.S. Energy Information Administration

57

Figure 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Web Page: http://www.eia.gov/totalenergy/data/monthly/#summary. Source: Table 1.1. 2 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review October 2013

58

Analysis of medium-BTU gasification condensates, June 1985-June 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides the final results of chemical and physical analysis of condensates from biomass gasification systems which are part of the US Department of Energy Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The work described in detail in this report involves extensive analysis of condensates from four medium-BTU gasifiers. The analyses include elemental analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis, ash, moisture, heating value, density, specific chemical analysis (gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, infrared spectrophotometry, Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry) and Ames Assay. This work was an extension of a broader study earlier completed of the condensates of all the gasifers and pyrolyzers in the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The analytical data demonstrates the wide range of chemical composition of the organics recoverd in the condensates and suggests a direct relationship between operating temperature and chemical composition of the condensates. A continuous pathway of thermal degradation of the tar components as a function of temperature is proposed. Variations in the chemical composition of the organic in the tars are reflected in the physical properties of tars and phase stability in relation to water in the condensate. The biological activity appears to be limited to the tars produced at high temperatures as a result of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in high concentrations. Future studies of the time/temperature relationship to tar composition and the effect of processing atmosphere should be undertaken. Further processing of the condensates either as wastewater treatment or upgrading of the organics to useful products is also recommended. 15 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils, the inability to utilize caking coals, and the inability to accept coal fines. Mansfield Carbon Products, Inc., a subsidiary of A.T. Massey Coal Company, has developed an atmospheric pressure, two-stage process that eliminates these three problems.

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of the market and product costs for coal-derived high Btu gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE analyzed the market potential and economics of coal-derived high-Btu gas using supply and demand projections that reflect the effects of natural gas deregulation, recent large oil-price rises, and new or pending legislation designed to reduce oil imports. The results indicate that an increasingly large market for supplemental gas should open up by 1990 and that SNG from advanced technology will probably be as cheap as gas imports over a wide range of assumptions. Although several studies suggest that a considerable market for intermediate-Btu gas will also exist, the potential supplemental gas demand is large enough to support both intermediate - and high-Btu gas from coal. Advanced SNG-production technology will be particularly important for processing the US's abundant, moderately to highly caking Eastern coals, which current technology cannot handle economically.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Orbit Stability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Parameter Table Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Lattice Definitions Orbit Stability This section lists the specifications of orbit stability. The stored beam...

63

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

64

Table A26. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region and" " Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)"...

65

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1.3 Primary Energy Consumption Estimates by Source, 1949-2011 (Quadrillion Btu) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power

66

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu, Ohio, 1960 - 2011 1960 796.6 36.9 31.3 0.0 NA 37.0 37.0 901.9 1961 756.0 37.3 32.7 0.0 NA 36.4 36.4 862.4

67

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million BTU) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 12.91: 15.20 ...

68

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

69

Table 1.2 Primary Energy Production by Source, 1949-2011 (Billion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (Dry) Crude Oil 3: NGPL 4: Total: Hydro-electric Power 6: Geothermal 7: Solar/PV 8: Wind 9: Biomass 10: Total: 1949. ... refuse recovery. See Table 7.1.

70

Process designs and cost estimates for a medium Btu gasification plant using a wood feedstock  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasification plant to effect the conversion of wood to medium-Btu gas has been designed. The Purox gasifier and associated equipment were selected as a prototype, since this system is nearer to commercialization than others considered. The object was to determine the cost of those processing steps common to all gasification schemes and to identify specific research areas. A detailed flowsheet and mass-balance are presented. Capital investment statements for three plant sizes (400, 800, 1,600 oven-dry tons per day) are included along with manufacturing costs for each of these plants at three feedstock prices: $10, $20, $30 per green ton (or $20, $40, $60 per dry ton). The design incorporates a front-end handling system, package cryogenic oxygen plant, the Purox gasifier, a gas-cleaning train consisting of a spray scrubber, ionizing wet scrubber, and condenser, and a wastewater treatment facility including a cooling tower and a package activated sludge unit. Cost figures for package units were obtained from suppliers and used for the oxygen and wastewater treatment plants. The gasifier is fed with wood chips at 20% moisture (wet basis). For each pound of wood, 0.32 lb of oxygen are required, and 1.11 lb of gas are produced. The heating value of the gas product is 300 Btu/scf. For each Btu of energy input (feed + process energy) to the plant, 0.91 Btu exists with the product gas. Total capital investments required for the plants considered are $9, $15, and $24 million (1978) respectively. In each case, the oxygen plant represents about 50% of the total investment. For feedstock prices from $10 to $30 per green ton ($1.11 to $3.33 per MM Btu), break-even costs of fuel gas range from $3 to $7 per MM Btu. At $30/ton, the feedstock cost represents approximately 72% of the total product cost for the largest plant size; at $10/ton, it represents only 47% of product cost.

Desrosiers, R. E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development and testing of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) concept represents a highly efficient and environmentally compatible advanced coal fueled power generation technology. When IGCC is coupled with high temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), the efficiency and cost advantage of IGCC is further improved with respect to systems based on conventional low temperature gas cleanup. Commercialization of the IGCC/HGCU concept requires successful development of combustion systems for high temperature low Btu fuel in gas turbines. Toward this goal, a turbine combustion system simulator has been designed, constructed, and fired with high temperature low Btu fuel. Fuel is supplied by a pilot scale fixed bed gasifier and hot gas desulfurization system. The primary objectives of this project are: (1) demonstration of long term operability of the turbine simulator with high temperature low Btu fuel; (2) characterization of particulates and other contaminants in the fuel as well as deposits in the fuel nozzle, combustor, and first stage nozzle; and (3) measurement of NO{sub x}, CO, unburned hydrocarbons, trace element, and particulate emissions.

Bevan, S.; Abuaf, N.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Samuels, M.S.; Tolpadi, A.K.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown gasifiers could potentially replace the natural gas now used in process heaters. The technology is well established and requires less capital than the higher-btu process heaters. Low-btu gas has sufficient heating value and flame temperature to be acceptable fuel for most process heaters. Economics for gas production appear promising, but somewhat uncertain. Rough evaluations indicate rates of return of as much as 30-40%. However, the economics are very dependent on a number of site- specific considerations including: coal vs. natural gas prices, economic life of the gas-consuming facility, quantity of gas required, need for desulfurization, location of gasifiers in relation to gas users, existence of coal unloading and storage facilities, etc. Two of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis.

Nebeker, C. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

74

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities  

SciTech Connect

The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is intended to give the reader knowledge into utility marketing strategies, rates, and services. Although water is a utility service, this paper will concern itself with the energy utilities, gas and electric. Commonality and diversity exist in the strategies and rates of the gas and electric utilities. Both provide services at no charge which make energy operation for their customers easier, safer and more economical. It is important to become familiar with utility strategies, rates, and services because energy knowledge helps your business operate at the lowest energy cost ($/BTU).

Phillips, J. N.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Pitters, Jason L. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, National Research Council of Canada, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada)

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dietary lipid source and vitamin e influence on chicken meat quality and lipid oxidation stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the poultry industry, further processed meat products have the highest share in the market, and because there is a growing demand of food products with enriched amounts of unsaturated fatty acids, the objectives of this research were to assess lipid oxidation development and quality characteristics of chicken meat as affected by dietary fat and vitamin E levels. Broilers were fed during six weeks with diets containing animal/vegetable, lard, palm kernel, soybean, conjugated linoleic acid, flaxseed, or menhaden oil. Each lipid diet was supplemented with either a control (33 or 42 mg/kg) or a supranutritional level (200-400 or 200 mg/kg) of vitamin E. Breast and thigh meat, or skin, were processed, packaged, and refrigerated as raw meat, cooked patties, or cooked sous vide meat. The results showed that the chicken meat fatty acid composition reflected those from the dietary fats. In the meat or skin there was a higher lipid oxidation susceptibility as the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increased, shown as malonaldehyde values, particularly in the treatments with low supplemented level of vitamin E (P<0.05). The relative lipid oxidative stability of the meat decreased in consecutive order from raw, cooked sous vide, and cooked meat patties. Sous vide cooked meat developed lipid oxidation at a slow rate and showed not to be affected by nonheme iron values. Dietary fat and vitamin E level affected breast meat lightness (L* color space) values (P<0.05), but not muscle pH, Allo-Kramer shear force, or water holding capacity. In conclusion, the increment in the proportion of unsaturated fatty acids increases the susceptibility to lipid oxidation in the meat. Supranutritional supplementation levels of vitamin E are more effective at inhibiting the lipid oxidation development in chicken meat than some current levels used by the poultry industry. Neither dietary fat nor vitamin E level seems to affect the development of pale, soft, and exudative meat condition in chicken meat.

Narciso-Gaytan, Carlos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fuel plate stability experiments and analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planned reactor for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will use closely spaced arrays of involute-shaped fuel plates that will be cooled by water flowing through the channels between the plates. There is concern that at certain coolant flow velocities, adjacent plates may deflect and touch, with resulting failure of the plates. Experiments have been conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine this potential phenomenon. Results of the experiments and comparison with analytical predictions are reported. The tests were conducted using full-scale epoxy plate models of the aluminum/uranium silicide ANS involute-shaped fuel plates. Use of epoxy plates and model theory allowed lower flow velocities and pressures to explore the potential failure mechanism. Plate deflections and channel pressures as functions of the flow velocity are examined. Comparisons with mathematical models are noted.

Swinson, W.F.; Battiste, R.L.; Luttrell, C.R.; Yahr, G.T.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators. The effects of cofiring coal and DB have been studied in a 30 kW (100,000 BTU/hr) burner boiler facility. Experiments were performed with Texas Lignite coal (TXL) as a base line fuel. The combustion efficiency from co-firing is also addressed in the present work. Two forms of partially composted DB fuels were investigated: low ash separated solids and high ash soil surface. Two types of coal were investigated: TXL and Wyoming Powder River Basin coal (WYO). Proximate and ultimate analyses were performed on coal and DB. DB fuels have much higher nitrogen (kg/GJ) and ash content (kg/GJ) than coal. The HHV of TXL and WYO coal as received were 14,000 and 18,000 kJ/kg, while the HHV of the LA-PC-DBSepS and the HA-PC-DB-SoilS were 13,000 and 4,000 kJ/kg. The HHV based on stoichiometric air were 3,000 kJ/kg for both coals and LA-PC-DB-SepS and 2,900 kJ/kg for HA-PC-DB-SoilS. The nitrogen and sulfur loading for TXL and WYO ranged from 0.15 to 0.48 kg/GJ and from 0.33 to 2.67 for the DB fuels. TXL began pyrolysis at 640 K and the WYO at 660 K. The HA-PC-DB-SoilSs began pyrolysis at 530 K and the LA-PC-DB-SepS at 510 K. The maximum rate of volatile release occurred at 700 K for both coals and HA-PC-DB-SoilS and 750K for LA-PC-DB-SepS. The NOx emissions for equivalence ratio (?) varying from 0.9 to 1.2 ranged from 0.34 to 0.90 kg/GJ (0.79 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for pure TXL. They ranged from 0.35 to 0.7 kg/GJ (0.82 to 0.16 lb/mmBTU) for a 90:10 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend and from 0.32 to 0.5 kg/GJ (0.74 to 0.12 lb/mmBTU) for a 80:20 TXL:LA-PC-DB-SepS blend over the same range of ?. In a rich environment, DB:coal cofiring produced less NOx and CO than pure coal. This result is probably due to the fuel bound nitrogen in DB is mostly in the form of urea which reduces NOx to non-polluting gases such as nitrogen (N2).

Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Materials exposure test facilities for varying low-Btu coal-derived gas  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the United States Department of Energy's High Temperature Turbine Technology Readiness Program, the Morgantown Energy Technology Center is participating in the Ceramics Corrosion/Erosion Materials Study. The objective is to create a technology base for ceramic materials which could be used by stationary gas power turbines operating in a high-temperature, coal-derived, low-Btu gas products of combustion environment. Two METC facilities have been designed, fabricated and will be operated simultaneously exposing ceramic materials dynamically and statically to products of combustion of a coal-derived gas. The current studies will identify the degradation of ceramics due to their exposure to a coal-derived gas combustion environment.

Nakaishi, C.V.; Carpenter, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Analysis of industrial markets for low and medium Btu coal gasification. [Forecasting  

SciTech Connect

Low- and medium-Btu gases (LBG and MBG) can be produced from coal with a variety of 13 existing and 25 emerging processes. Historical experience and previous studies indicate a large potential market for LBG and MBG coal gasification in the manufacturing industries for fuel and feedstocks. However, present use in the US is limited, and industry has not been making substantial moves to invest in the technology. Near-term (1979-1985) market activity for LBG and MBG is highly uncertain and is complicated by a myriad of pressures on industry for energy-related investments. To assist in planning its program to accelerate the commercialization of LBG and MBG, the Department of Energy (DOE) contracted with Booz, Allen and Hamilton to characterize and forecast the 1985 industrial market for LBG and MBG coal gasification. The study draws five major conclusions: (1) There is a large technically feasible market potential in industry for commercially available equipment - exceeding 3 quadrillion Btu per year. (2) Early adopters will be principally steel, chemical, and brick companies in described areas. (3) With no additional Federal initiatives, industry commitments to LBG and MBG will increase only moderately. (4) The major barriers to further market penetration are lack of economic advantage, absence of significant operating experience in the US, uncertainty on government environmental policy, and limited credible engineering data for retrofitting industrial plants. (5) Within the context of generally accepted energy supply and price forecasts, selected government action can be a principal factor in accelerating market penetration. Each major conclusion is discussed briefly and key implications for DOE planning are identified.

1979-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

87

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

88

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

89

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

93

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

94

Table E3. Electricity Consumption (Btu) by End Use for Non ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Due to rounding, data may not sum to totals. HVAC = Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Source: Energy Information Administration, ...

95

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

96

Table 8. U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil. (b) Wood and wood-derived fuels. (c) Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, ...

97

Stability of the Atlantic Overturning Circulation: Competition between Bering Strait Freshwater Flux and Agulhas Heat and Salt Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role played by interocean fluxes of buoyancy in stabilizing the present-day overturning circulation of the Atlantic Ocean is examined. A 2D model of the Atlantic overturning circulation is used, in which the interocean fluxes of heat and salt ...

Wilbert Weijer; Wilhelmus P. M. De Ruijter; Henk A. Dijkstra

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

100

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's). ~Butanol is safer to handle with a Reid Value of 0.33 psi is easily recovered, increasing the energy yield of a bushel of corn by an additional 18 percent over the energy yield of ethanol produced from the same quantity of corn. ~Current butanol prices as a chemical

Toohey, Darin W.

102

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

103

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

104

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

105

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

106

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

107

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

108

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

109

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

110

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

111

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

112

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

113

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

114

The Impact of Codes, Regulations, and Standards on Split-Unitary Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and Under  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document establishes a framework for understanding the technology and regulation of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps 65,000 Btu/hr and under. The reporting framework is structured so that it can be added to in the future. This study is broken into six chapters:The basic components, refrigeration cycle, operation, and efficiency ratings of split-unitary air conditioners and heat pumps are covered for background information.Equipment efficiency ...

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

117

Table 1.12 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

gasoline: 5.250 million Btu/barrel; electricity: 3,412 Btu/kilowatthour; and purchased steam: 1,000 Btu/pound.

118

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

119

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

120

Comparison of coal-based systems: marketability of medium-Btu gas and SNG (substitute natural gas) for industrial applications. Final report, July 1979-March 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In assessing the marketability of synthetic fuel gases from coal, this report emphasizes the determination of the relative attractiveness of substitute natural gas (SNG) and medium-Btu gas (MBG) for serving market needs in eight industrial market areas. The crucial issue in predicting the marketability of coal-based synthetic gas is the future price level of competing conventional alternatives, particularly oil. Under a low oil-price scenario, the market outlook for synthetic gases is not promising, but higher oil prices would encourage coal gasification.

Olsen, D.L.; Trexel, C.A.; Teater, N.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

122

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

123

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; " " Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

124

Table 7.5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 5 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

125

Table N8.2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

126

"Table E8.2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." " ",," "," ",," "," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Row" "Characteristic(a)","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Factors" ,"Total United States"

127

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

128

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

129

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

130

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

131

Automated on-line determination of PPB levels of sodium and potassium in low-Btu coal gas and fluidized bed combustor exhaust by atomic emission spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), US Department of Energy, is involved in the development of processes and equipment for production of low-Btu gas from coal and for fluidized bed combustion of coal. The ultimate objective is large scale production of electricity using high temperature gas turbines. Such turbines, however, are susceptible to accelerated corrosion and self-destruction when relatively low concentrations of sodium and potassium are present in the driving gas streams. Knowledge and control of the concentrations of those elements, at part per billion levels, are critical to the success of both the gas cleanup procedures that are being investigated and the overall energy conversion processes. This presentation describes instrumentation and procedures developed at the Ames Laboratory for application to the problems outlined above and results that have been obtained so far at METC. The first Ames instruments, which feature an automated, dual channel flame atomic emission spectrometer, perform the sodium and potassium determinations simultaneously, repetitively, and automatically every two to three minutes by atomizing and exciting a fraction of the subject gas sample stream in either an oxyhydrogen flame or a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. The analytical results are printed and can be transmitted simultaneously to a process control center.

Haas, W.J. Jr.; Eckels, D.E.; Kniseley, R.N.; Fassel, V.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas from Local

133

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

134

Membrane stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

Mingenbach, W.A.

1988-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

135

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

136

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

137

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

138

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

139

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

140

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

142

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

143

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

144

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

145

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

146

file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Btu) Note: The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 BtuKWh, 10,173 BtuKWh, and 9,919 BtuKWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources:...

147

file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Btu) Note: 1. The Btu conversion factors used for primary electricity are 10,197 BtuKWh, 10,173 BtuKWh, and 9,919 BtuKWh for 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively. Sources:...

148

Spin Stability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stability Stability of Asymmetrically Charged Plasma Dust I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA Recently it has been reported that, under some circumstances, dust particles sus- pended in the sheath edge are observed to spin [1, 2, 3]. The present paper shows that there is a natural electrostatic mechanism that should cause even perfectly spherical par- ticles in a perfectly irrotational, magnetic-field-free flowing plasma to spin. The stability criterion and the final spin state are obtained[4]. When the particle is made of an insulating material, it can support potential dif- ferences around its surface. In the limit of zero conductivity, and ignoring all charging effects other than electron or ion collection, the surface charge density accumulates in such a way as to bring the local electric current density to zero.

149

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

150

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

151

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

152

Stability of Molten Core Materials  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document a literature and data search for data and information pertaining to the stability of nuclear reactor molten core materials. This includes data and analysis from TMI-2 fuel and INL’s LOFT (Loss of Fluid Test) reactor project and other sources.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

STABILIZED OSCILLATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

1958-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

154

"Table A25 Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" Average Prices of Selected Purchased Energy Sources by Census" " Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Dollars per Million Btu)" ,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","Factors" ,,"Total United States" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.7,0.8,1,2.8,1,0.7 20,"Food and Kindred Products",15.789,2.854,6.064,2.697,7.596,1.433,4.5

155

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

156

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Composite stabilizer unit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabilizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, L.R.; Sadler, C.P.; Carter, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Composite stabilizer unit  

SciTech Connect

An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

Ebaugh, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM); Sadler, Collin P. (Los Alamos, NM); Carter, Gary D. (Espanola, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

System design description PFP thermal stabilization  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a system design description and design basis for the Plutonium Finishing P1ant (PFP) Thermal Stabilization project. The sources of material for this project are residues scraped from glovebox floors and materials already stored in vault storage that need further stabilizing to meet the 3013 storage requirements. Stabilizing this material will promote long term storage and reduced worker exposure. This document addresses: function design, equipment, and safety requirements for thermal stabilization of plutonium residues and oxides.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

160

Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual consumption (in quadrillion Btu) of renewable energy by energy use sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electricity) and by energy source (e.g. solar, biofuel) for 2004 through 2008. Original sources for data are cited on spreadsheet. Also available from: www.eia.gov/cneaf/solar.renewables/page/trends/table1_2.xls Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords annual energy consumption biodiesel Biofuels biomass energy use by sector ethanol geothermal Hydroelectric Conventional Landfill Gas MSW Biogenic Other Biomass renewable energy Solar Thermal/PV Waste wind Wood and Derived Fuels Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon RE Consumption by Energy Use Sector, Excel file (xls, 32.8 KiB)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector and Source Consumption by Sector and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

162

Sources - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help · annotate · Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] · [Shownotes]. References [7] ...

163

Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system s described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission systems described wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source. The transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber. 3 figs.

Nelson, M.A.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is, an object of this invention to provide a fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source, the transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, M.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is, an object of this invention to provide a fiber optically isolated and remotely stabilized data transmission system wherein optical data may be transmitted over an optical data fiber from a remote source which includes a data transmitter and a power supply at the remote source, the transmitter may be remotely calibrated and stabilized via an optical control fiber, and the power source may be remotely cycled between duty and standby modes via an optical control fiber.

Nelson, M.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ehlers, Kenneth W. (Alamo, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

169

Switching between stabilizing controllers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the problem of switching between several linear time-invariant (LTI) controllers-all of them capable of stabilizing a specific LTI process-in such a way that the stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed for any switching ... Keywords: Hybrid systems, Impulse system, Realization theory, Stability theory, Switched systems

JoãO P. Hespanha; A.Stephen Morse

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Application to Particle Accelerator Beam Stabilization Glenn Decker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the the Measurement of Noise with Application to Particle Accelerator Beam Stabilization Glenn Decker Advanced Photon Source Accelerator Systems Division December 1998 LS-273 1 1.0 Introduction One of the most important figures of merit for a synchrotron radiation source, once speci- fied beam intensity and energy have been achieved, is charged particle beam stability. While a sig- nificant effort has been expended at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) to reduce or eliminate undesirable sources of beam motion, it will be necessary to employ active feedback to stabilize the user photon beams to the very stringent levels required. This becomes especially important when one considers that transverse beam stability is generally quoted as a fraction of beam dimensions. Since source brightness tends to be inversely proportional to these transverse dimen-

171

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ Report on Competitive Sourcing Results Fiscal Year 2006 May 2007 Executive Office of the President Office of Management and Budget TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ...................................................................................... 1 Introduction................................................................................................. 4 I. The big picture ......................................................................................... 4 II. How public-private competition was used in FY 2006 .................................... 6 A. Anticipated benefits from competition in FY 2006

172

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source is obtained without employing any separate beryllia receptacle, as was formerly required. The new method is safer and faster, and affords a source with both improved yield and symmetry of neutron emission. A Be container is used to hold and react with Pu. This container has a thin isolating layer that does not obstruct the desired Pu--Be reaction and obviates procedures previously employed to disassemble and remove a beryllia receptacle. (AEC)

Richmond, J.L.; Wells, C.E.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 2, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The energy consumption data is broken down by sector (residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power) as well as source, and also provides total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

175

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Plant Processing Plant Processing Definitions Key Terms Definition Extraction Loss The reduction in volume of natural gas due to the removal of natural gas liquid constituents such as ethane, propane, and butane at natural gas processing plants. Natural Gas Processed Natural gas that has gone through a processing plant. Natural Gas Processing Plant A facility designed to recover natural gas liquids from a stream of natural gas which may or may not have passed through lease separators and/or field separation facilities. These facilities also control the quality of the natural gas to be marketed. Cycling plants are classified as natural gas processing plants. For definitions of related energy terms, refer to the EIA Energy Glossary. Sources Natural Gas Processed, Total Liquids Extracted, and Extraction Loss Volume: Form EIA-64A, "Annual Report of the Origin of Natural Gas Liquids Production" . Estimated Heat Content of Extraction Loss: Estimated, assuming the makeup to total liquids production as reported on Form EIA-64A for each State was proportional to the components and products ultimately separated in the States as reported on the 12 monthly reports on Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," and applying the following conversion factors to the individual component and product production estimates (million Btu extraction loss per barrel of liquid produced): ethane - 3.082; propane - 3.836; normal butane - 4.326; isobutane - 3.974; pentanes plus - 4.620.

176

Hoosac tunnel geothermal heat source. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hoosac Rail Tunnel has been analyzed as a central element in a district heating system for the City of North Adams. The tunnel has been viewed as a collector of the earth's geothermal heat and a seasonal heat storage facility with heat piped to the tunnel in summer from existing facilities at a distance. Heated fluid would be transported in winter from the tunnel to users who would boost the temperature with individual heat pumps. It was concluded the tunnel is a poor source of geothermal heat. The maximum extractable energy is only 2200 million BTU (20000 gallons of oil) at 58/sup 0/F. The tunnel is a poor heat storage facility. The rock conductivity is so high that 75% of the heat injected would escape into the mountain before it could be recaptured for use. A low temperature system, with individual heat pumps for temperature boost could be economically attractive if a low cost fuel (byproduct, solid waste, cogeneration) or a cost effective seasonal heat storage were available.

Not Available

1982-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Competitive Sourcing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competitive Sourcing Competitive Sourcing The Department of Energy's (DOE) Competitive Sourcing program is a management initiative aimed at improving DOE's performance and reducing the Department's operational costs. The program is governed by Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A- 76, Performance of Commercial Activities, dated May 29, 2003. The commercial activities selected for review and competition include functions performed by government employees that are readily available in the private sector, and where the potential for efficiencies, regardless of the winning provider, are highly likely. The candidate functions are chosen from the Department's annual Federal Activities Inventory Reform (FAIR) Act Inventory and subjected to a feasibility review to determine if a prudent business case can be made to enter

178

Neutron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source which is particularly useful for neutron radiography consists of a vessel containing a moderating media of relatively low moderating ratio, a flux trap including a moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio at the center of the vessel, a shell of depleted uranium dioxide surrounding the moderating media of relatively high moderating ratio, a plurality of guide tubes each containing a movable source of neutrons surrounding the flux trap, a neutron shield surrounding one part of each guide tube, and at least one collimator extending from the flux trap to the exterior of the neutron source. The shell of depleted uranium dioxide has a window provided with depleted uranium dioxide shutters for each collimator. Reflectors are provided above and below the flux trap and on the guide tubes away from the flux trap.

Cason, J.L. Jr.; Shaw, C.B.

1975-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

179

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The ion source described essentially eliminater the problem of deposits of nonconducting materials forming on parts of the ion source by certain corrosive gases. This problem is met by removing both filament and trap from the ion chamber, spacing them apart and outside the chamber end walls, placing a focusing cylinder about the filament tip to form a thin collimated electron stream, aligning the cylinder, slits in the walls, and trap so that the electron stream does not bombard any part in the source, and heating the trap, which is bombarded by electrons, to a temperature hotter than that in the ion chamber, so that the tendency to build up a deposit caused by electron bombardment is offset by the extra heating supplied only to the trap.

Leland, W.T.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NEUTRON SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron source of the antimony--beryllium type is presented. The source is comprised of a solid mass of beryllium having a cylindrical recess extending therein and a cylinder containing antimony-124 slidably disposed within the cylindrical recess. The antimony cylinder is encased in aluminum. A berylliunn plug is removably inserted in the open end of the cylindrical recess to completely enclose the antimony cylinder in bsryllium. The plug and antimony cylinder are each provided with a stud on their upper ends to facilitate handling remotely.

Reardon, W.A.; Lennox, D.H.; Nobles, R.G.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

182

Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

1984-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMPETITIVE SOURCING COMPETITIVE SOURCING EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP MEETING PROCEEDINGS June 17, 2002 8:30 am - 11:00 am Room 5E-069 ATTENDEES John Gordon Robert Card Bruce Carnes Kathy Peery Brendan Danaher, AFGE Tony Lane Karen Evans Bill Sylvester Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Laurie Smith Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Rosalie Jordan Dennis O'Brien Mark Hively Robin Mudd Steven Apicella AGENDA 8:30 a.m. - 8:35 a.m. Opening Remarks 8:35a.m. - 8:55 a.m. Executive Steering Group roles and responsibilities, A-76 status, and talking points Team Briefings 8:55 a.m. - 9:20 a.m. Information Technology Study 9:20 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. Financial Services Study

184

ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source is described and comprises an arc discharge parallel to the direction of and inside of a magnetic field. an accelerating electrode surrounding substantially all of the discharge except for ion exit apertures, and means for establishing an electric field between that electrode and the arc discharge. the electric field being oriented at an acute angle to the magnetic field. Ions are drawn through the exit apertures in the accelrating electrcde in a direction substantially divergent to the direction of the magnetic field and so will travel in a spiral orbit along the magnetic field such that the ions will not strike the source at any point in their orbit within the magnetic field.

Blue, C.W.; Luce, J.S.

1960-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 5, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption sector South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 297.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

186

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 8, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption mountain region Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

187

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New England New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England- Reference Case (xls, 297.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

188

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 7, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

189

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 6, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Commercial East South Central EIA Electric Power Energy Consumption Industrial Residential transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

190

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 4, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 297.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

191

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 10, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Consumption United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 298.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

192

Surface controlled blade stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

Russell, Larry R. (6025 Edgemor, Suite C, Houston, TX 77081)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor for fuel oil (BTU/ BTU) SFo: Source factor for otherOil Other fuels District Chilled water District hot water District steam Source

Mathew, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Hygrometry with Temperature Stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for stabilizing the temperature of air to allow the use of temperature-sensitive, humidity sensors for direct determination of an invariant humidity characteristic such as specific humidity and/or its fluctuations. Problems ...

Krzysztof E. Haman; Andrzej M. Makulski

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

196

COMPETITIVE SOURCING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXECUTIVE STEERING GROUP Meeting Proceedings October 30, 2002 Room 6E-069, 10:30 - 12:00 Agenda Opening Remarks Bruce Carnes Competitive Sourcing Update Denny O'Brien Team Briefings Team Leads ESG Discussion/Wrap up Bruce Carnes Attendees Bruce Carnes, Acting Chair MaryAnn Shebek Robert Card Prentis Cook Ambassador Brooks Tony Lane Kyle McSlarrow Karen Evans Suzanne Brennan, NTEU Claudia Cross Brian Costlow Helen Sherman Frank Bessera Laurie Morman Denny O'Brien Travis McCrory Bill Pearce Jeff Dowl Mark Hively Steven Apicella Robin Mudd Bruce Carnes chaired the meeting and began with welcoming NTEU to the meeting. In regard to the OMB's Balanced Scorecard, the Department has achieved a Green on progress and we are close to achieving a yellow on status.

197

Nonlinear stability of viscous roll waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending results of Oh--Zumbrun and Johnson--Zumbrun for parabolic conservation laws, we show that spectral stability implies nonlinear stability for spatially periodic viscous roll wave solutions of the one-dimensional St. Venant equations for shallow water flow down an inclined ramp. The main new issues to be overcome are incomplete parabolicity and the nonconservative form of the equations, which leads to undifferentiated quadratic source terms that cannot be handled using the estimates of the conservative case. The first is handled by treating the equations in the more favorable Lagrangian coordinates, for which one can obtain large-amplitude nonlinear damping estimates similar to those carried out by Mascia--Zumbrun in the related shock wave case, assuming only symmetrizability of the hyperbolic part. The second is handled by the observation that, similarly as in the relaxation and detonation cases, sources occurring in nonconservative components experience greater decay comparable to that experienced b...

Johnson, Matthew; Noble, Pascal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Var Coordinated Control of DFIG Impact on Small Signal Stability of Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind farm based on Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is built. Not only it can be as active power source to provide active power to network, but also as reactive power source to stabilize voltage or supply Var compensation (reactive power absorbed ... Keywords: Doubly Fed Induction Generator, Var coordinated control, low-frequency oscillation, small signal stability

Lei Wang; Hongjie Jia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Aquifer stability investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous rock reservoirs is carried out within the Reservoir Stability Studies Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The goal of the study is to establish criteria for long-term stability of aquifer CAES reservoirs. These criteria are intended to be guidelines and check lists that utilities and architect-engineering firms may use to evaluate reservoir stability at candidate CAES sites. These criteria will be quantitative where possible, qualitative where necessary, and will provide a focal point for CAES relevant geotechnical knowledge, whether developed within this study or available from petroleum, mining or other geotechnical practices using rock materials. The Reservoir Stability Studies Program had four major activities: a state-of-the-art survey to establish preliminary stability criteria and identify areas requiring research and development; numerical modeling; laboratory testing to provide data for use in numerical models and to investigate fundamental rock mechanics, thermal, fluid, and geochemical response of aquifer materials; and field studies to verify the feasibility of air injection and recovery under CAES conditions in an aquifer, to validate and refine the stability criteria, and to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of the numerical and experimental methodologies developed in previous work. Three phases of study, including preliminary criteria formulation, numerical model development, and experimental assessment of CAES reservoir materials have been completed. Present activity consists of construction and operation of the aquifer field test, and associated numerical and experimental work in support of that activity. Work is presently planned to be complete by 1983 at the end of the field test. At that time the final stability criteria for aquifers will be issued. Attached here also are preliminary criteria for aquifers.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Stability of growing vesicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the stability of growing vesicles using the formalism of nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The vesicles are growing due to the accretion of lipids to the bilayer which forms the vesicle membrane. The thermodynamic description is based on the hydrodynamics of a water{/}lipid mixture together with a model of the vesicle as a discontinuous system in the sense of linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. This formulation allows the forces and fluxes relevant to the dynamic stability of the vesicle to be identified. The method is used to analyze the stability of a spherical vesicle against arbitrary axisymmetric perturbations. It is found that there are generically two critical radii at which changes of stability occur. In the case where the perturbation takes the form of a single zonal harmonic, only one of these radii is physical and is given by the ratio $2 L_p / L_\\gamma$, where $L_p$ is the hydraulic conductivity and $L_\\gamma$ is the Onsager coefficient related to changes in membrane area due to lipid accretion. The stability of such perturbations is related to the value of $l$ corresponding to the particular zonal harmonic: those with lower $l$ are more unstable than those with higher $l$. Possible extensions of the current work and the need for experimental input are discussed.

Richard G. Morris; Alan J. McKane

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Radiation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device and method for relativistic electron beam heating of a high-density plasma in a small localized region. A relativistic electron beam generator or accelerator produces a high-voltage electron beam which propagates along a vacuum drift tube and is modulated to initiate electron bunching within the beam. The beam is then directed through a low-density gas chamber which provides isolation between the vacuum modulator and the relativistic electron beam target. The relativistic beam is then applied to a high-density target plasma which typically comprises DT, DD, or similar thermonuclear gas at a density of 10.sup.17 to 10.sup.20 electrons per cubic centimeter. The target gas is ionized prior to application of the relativistic electron beam by means of a laser or other preionization source to form a plasma. Utilizing a relativistic electron beam with an individual particle energy exceeding 3 MeV, classical scattering by relativistic electrons passing through isolation foils is negligible. As a result, relativistic streaming instabilities are initiated within the high-density target plasma causing the relativistic electron beam to efficiently deposit its energy into a small localized region of the high-density plasma target.

Thode, Lester E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Stabilized PV system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilized PV system comprises an array of photovoltaic (PV) assemblies mounted to a support surface. Each PV assembly comprises a PV module and a support assembly securing the PV module to a position overlying the support surface. The array of modules is circumscribed by a continuous, belt-like perimeter assembly. Cross strapping, extending above, below or through the array, or some combination of above, below and through the array, secures a first position along the perimeter assembly to at least a second position along the perimeter assembly thereby stabilizing the array against wind uplift forces. The first and second positions may be on opposite sides on the array.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Charged Vacuum Bubble Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A type of scenario is considered where electrically charged vacuum bubbles, formed from degenerate or nearly degenerate vacuua separated by a thin domain wall, are cosmologically produced due to the breaking of a discrete symmetry, with the bubble charge arising from fermions residing within the domain wall. Stability issues associated with wall tension, fermion gas, and Coulombic effects for such configurations are examined. The stability of a bubble depends upon parameters such as the symmetry breaking scale and the fermion coupling. A dominance of either the Fermi gas or the Coulomb contribution may be realized under certain conditions, depending upon parameter values.

J. R. Morris

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Garwin, Edward L. (Los Altos, CA); Nyaiesh, Ali R. (Palo Alto, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Stabilized chromium oxide film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

206

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

207

AEO2011: Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - East North Central |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description http://en.openei.org/w/skins/openei/images/ui-bg_gloss_wave-medium_40_d6...); background-attachment: scroll; background-origin: initial; background-clip: initial; background-color: rgb(214, 235, 225); line-height: 17px; width: 650px; background-position: 50% 0%; background-repeat: repeat no-repeat; ">This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 3, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion btu. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power and total energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago)

208

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fue -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487 32 345 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 206 * 1 32 * * -- Machine Drive

209

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 2,850 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 41 133 23 2,119 8 547 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 41 71 17 1,281 8 129 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- -- 62 6 838 1 417 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 2,244 62 52 2,788 39 412 -- Process Heating -- 346 59 19 2,487

210

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

211

Source Selection | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Source SelectionSource Selection Boards Source Evaluation Board (SEB) Monthly Status Reporting Requirement (pdf) Source Evaluation Board (SEB)...

212

Stabilized floating platforms  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The subject invention is directed to a floating platform for supporting nuclear reactors and the like at selected offshore sites. The platform is provided with a stabilizer mechanism which significantly reduces the effects of wave action upon the platform and which comprises a pair of relatively small floats attached by rigid booms to the platform at locations spaced therefrom for reducing wave pitch, acceleration, and the resonance period of the wave.

Thomas, David G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Stability of ferroelectric ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the stability conditions of the ferroelectric ice of the Cmc21 structure, which has been considered, for decades, one of the most promising candidates of the low temperature proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih. It turned out that the Cmc21 structure is stable only with a certain amount of dopant and the true proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih remains to be found at lower temperature. Implication for spin ice is mentioned.

Iitaka, Toshiaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Breakthrough in stability assessment  

SciTech Connect

Maintaining a stable flow of electricity is critical for secure power grid operation and customer satisfaction. Recently, a breakthrough method was developed for enhancing the stability of electricity flow. The application of this method, which is based on a 100-year-old mathematical concept known as normal forms, promises to increase power system efficiency by improving utilities` ability to predict and control grid behavior. 9 figs.

Haase, P.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Quantum convolutional stabilizer codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum error correction codes were introduced as a means to protect quantum information from decoherance and operational errors. Based on their approach to error control, error correcting codes can be divided into two different classes: block codes and convolutional codes. There has been significant development towards finding quantum block codes, since they were first discovered in 1995. In contrast, quantum convolutional codes remained mainly uninvestigated. In this thesis, we develop the stabilizer formalism for quantum convolutional codes. We define distance properties of these codes and give a general method for constructing encoding circuits, given a set of generators of the stabilizer of a quantum convolutional stabilizer code, is shown. The resulting encoding circuit enables online encoding of the qubits, i.e., the encoder does not have to wait for the input transmission to end before starting the encoding process. We develop the quantum analogue of the Viterbi algorithm. The quantum Viterbi algorithm (QVA) is a maximum likehood error estimation algorithm, the complexity of which grows linearly with the number of encoded qubits. A variation of the quantum Viterbi algorithm, the Windowed QVA, is also discussed. Using Windowed QVA, we can estimate the most likely error without waiting for the entire received sequence.

Chinthamani, Neelima

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Measuring Atmospheric Stability with GPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowcasting of convective systems plays a crucial role in weather forecasting. The strength of convection depends on the (in)stability of the air column. The stability can be detected by radiosonde observations. However, these observations are not ...

Siebren de Haan

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Static Stability—An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static stability should not be evaluated from the local lapse rate. There is a growing body of observations, such as within portions of mixed layers and forest canopies, showing that the whole sounding should be considered to evaluate stability. ...

Roland B. Stull

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geothermal source potential and utilization for alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of using a potential geothermal source to drive a fuel grade alcohol plant. Test data from the well at the site indicated that the water temperature at approximately 8500 feet should approach 275/sup 0/F. However, no flow data was available, and so the volume of hot water that can be expected from a well at this site is unknown. Using the available data, numerous fuel alcohol production processes and various heat utilization schemes were investigated to determine the most cost effective system for using the geothermal resource. The study found the direct application of hot water for alcohol production based on atmospheric processes using low pressure steam to be most cost effective. The geothermal flow rates were determined for various sizes of alcohol production facility using 275/sup 0/F water, 235/sup 0/F maximum processing temperature, 31,000 and 53,000 Btu per gallon energy requirements, and appropriate process approach temperatures. It was determined that a 3 million gpy alcohol plant is the largest facility that can practically be powered by the flow from one large geothermal well. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared, operating costs were calculated, the economic feasibility of the propsed project was examined, and a sensitivity analysis was performed.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Chassis stabilization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stabilizing suspension system is provided for vehicles carrying telescopic booms or aerial work platforms having a fixed axle and a oscillating axle. Hydraulic cylinders are connected to each end of the oscillating axle, each cylinder being capable of extending and retracting. An off level sensor senses the angle of tilt of the chassis in both left and right directions and, when a predetermined threshold of tilt has been detected, the hydraulic cylinder on the downhill side of the chassis is locked against retracting, but is free to move in the downhill direction to allow the downhill wheel to remain in contact with the ground.

Claxton, Gerald L. (Fresno, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix A. A table is included in Appendix A which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. This Revision of the Blend Plan adds items of lesser dose rate to lower the exposure of the workers until additional shielding can be added to the gloveboxes.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids.

Doddapaneni, Narayan (Albuquerque, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Electrolytes for power sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrolytes are disclosed for power sources, particularly alkaline and acidic power sources, comprising benzene polysulfonic acids and benzene polyphosphonic acids or salts of such acids. 7 figures.

Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Calibrated Neutron Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST designed a compliant source. ... needed for new purposes and as old sources decay ... The figure shows a reprentative energy spectrum from such ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

224

Stability Breakout Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breakout Session Breakout Session I Chemical Stability * What are the Reactions? i. Products must be identified (loss of IEC is not enough) ii. Establish reaction mechanism(s) iii. Measure the kinetics II Reaction of membrane with OH - /HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- at various hydration levels - nucleophilicity and basicity of anion species i. Cations a) Small molecule analogues b) Effects of hydration state and temperature c) Cation design R 4 N + ???? Families of cations * Ammoniums * Guanadiniums * Sulfoniums * Phosphoniums [problematic] * Phosphazeniums II Reaction with OH - /HCO 3 - /CO 3 2- and Hydration levels (cont'd) ii. Tethers - Link to cation - Link to backbone - Spacers (in between) iii. Backbone a) Hydrocarbon - Structure - Functional makeup b) Fluoropolymer III Reactive O 2 Species HOO - /H

225

Laser controlled flame stabilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus is provided for initiating and stabilizing fuel combustion in applications such as gas turbine electrical power generating engines and jet turbine engines where it is desired to burn lean fuel/air mixtures which produce lower amounts of NO.sub.x. A laser induced spark is propagated at a distance from the fuel nozzle with the laser ignitor being remotely located from the high temperature environment of the combustion chamber. A laser initiating spark generated by focusing high peak power laser light to a sufficiently tight laser spot within the fuel to cause the ionization of air and fuel into a plasma is unobtrusive to the flow dynamics of the combustion chamber of a fuel injector, thereby facilitating whatever advantage can be taken of flow dynamics in the design of the fuel injector.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Matthew E. (Huntsville, AL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Blend Plan was written to identify items stored outside of the 213 MBA that will be moved into the MBA for thermal stabilization processing. Product quality oxide items stored in our vaults are found in Appendix B. A table is included in Appendix B which details the isotopic values for the oxide items and calculates the amount of material of any specific run that can be placed in a product can and maintain the 15 watt limit to meet storage vault specifications. There is no chance of exceeding the 15 watt limit with items starting with the designations ''LAO'' or ''PBO.'' All items starting with the designations ''BO,'' ''BLO,'' and ''DZ0'' are at risk of exceeding the 15 watt specification if the can were to be filled.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

227

STABILIZED FEEDBACK AMPLIFIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Negative feedback amplifiers, and particularly a negative feedback circuit which is economical on amode power consumption, are described. Basically, the disclosed circuit comprises two tetrode tubes where the output of the first tube is capacitamce coupled to the grid of the second tube, which in turn has its plate coupled to the cathode of the first tube to form a degenerative feedback circuit. Operating potential for screen of the second tube is supplied by connecting the cathode resistor of the first tube to the screen, while the screen is by-passed to the cathode of its tube for the amplified frequencies. Also, the amplifier incorporates a circuit to stabilize the transconductance of the tubes by making the grid potential of each tube interdependent on anode currents of both lubes by voltage divider circuitry.

Fishbine, H.L.; Sewell, C. Jr.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Improved thermal stability of Ni-silicides on Si: C epitaxial layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal stability of Ni-silicides on tensily strained in situ P doped Si:C epitaxial layers was evaluated. The baseline Ni silicidation process was shown to be compatible with Si:C Recessed Source-Drain (RSD) stressors for NMOS strain engineering ... Keywords: Epitaxy, Ni, SiC stressors, Silicide, Thermal stability

V. Machkaoutsan; S. Mertens; M. Bauer; A. Lauwers; K. Verheyden; K. Vanormelingen; P. Verheyen; R. Loo; M. Caymax; S. Jakschik; D. Theodore; P. Absil; S. G. Thomas; E. H. A. Granneman

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Short-Term Metal/Organic Interface Stability Investigations of Organic Photovoltaic Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper addresses one source of degradation in OPV devices: the metal/organic interface. The basic approach was to study the completed device stability vs. the stability of the organic film itself as shown in subsequent devices fabricated from the films.

Reese, M. O.; Morfa, A. J.; White, M. S.; Kopidakis, N.; Shaheen, S. E.; Rumbles, G.; Ginley, D. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 3,335 251 129 5,512 79 1,016 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 84 133 23 2,119 8 547 Conventional Boiler Use 84 71 17 1,281 8 129 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 62 6 838 1 417 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,639 62 52 2,788 39 412 Process Heating 379 59 19 2,487 32 345 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

231

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

232

Orbit Control at the Advanced Photon Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Advanced Photon Source (APS) began operation in 1995 with the objective of providing ultra-stable high-brightness hard x-rays to its user community. This paper will be a review of the instrumentation and software presently in use for orbit stabilization. Broad-band and narrow-band rf beam position monitors as well as x-ray beam position monitors supporting bending magnet and insertion device source points are used in an integrated system. Status and upgrade plans for the system will be discussed.

Decker, G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Source Selection Guide | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide More Documents & Publications Source Selection Guide Source Selection Guide Source Selection...

234

Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supplemental Supplies Supplemental Supplies Definitions Key Terms Definition Biomass Gas A medium Btu gas containing methane and carbon dioxide, resulting from the action of microorganisms on organic materials such as a landfill. Blast-furnace Gas The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to metallic iron. It is commonly used as a fuel within steel works. British Thermal Unit (Btu) The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which water has its greatest density (approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit). Coke-oven Gas The mixture of permanent gases produced by the carbonization of coal in a coke oven at temperatures in excess of 1,000 degrees Celsius.

236

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 5.02 0.31 0.00 53.34 236.66 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9.78 0.27 0.00 90.59 0.00 3115 Dairy Products 11.21 0.10 0.00 103.12 0.00 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

237

Source Tree Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dividing software systems in components improves software reusability as well as software maintainability. Components live at several levels, we concentrate on the implementation level where components are formed by source files, divided over directory structures. Such source code components are usually strongly coupled in the directory structure of a software system. Their compilation is usually controlled by a single global build process. This entangling of source trees and build processes often makes reuse of source code components in different software systems difficult. It also makes software systems inflexible because integration of additional source code components in source trees and build processes is difficult. This paper's subject is to increase software reuse by decreasing coupling of source code components. It is achieved by automized assembly of software systems from reusable source code components and involves integration of source trees, build processes, and configuration processes. Application domains include generative programming, product-line architectures, and commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software engineering.

Merijn De Jonge

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Field investigation of keyblock stability  

SciTech Connect

Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. This engineering problem is divided into two parts: block identification, and evaluation of block stability. One stable keyblock and thirteen fallen keyblocks were observed in field investigations at the Nevada Test Site. Nine blocks were measured in detail sufficient to allow back-analysis of their stability. Measurements included block geometry, and discontinuity roughness and compressive strength. Back-analysis correctly predicted stability or failure in all but two cases. These two exceptions involved situations that violated the stress assumptions of the stability calculations. Keyblock faces correlated well with known joint set orientations. The effect of tunnel orientation on keyblock frequency was apparent. Back-analysis of physical models successfully predicted block pullout force for two-dimensional models of unit thickness. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were examined. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls block displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender. Rock mass temperature decreases reduce the confining stress magnitudes and can lead to failure. The pattern of stresses affecting each block face explains conceptually the occurrence of pyramidal keyblocks that are truncated near their apex.

Yow, J.L. Jr.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Plutonium stabilization and packaging system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the functional design of the Plutonium Stabilization and Packaging System (Pu SPS). The objective of this system is to stabilize and package plutonium metals and oxides of greater than 50% wt, as well as other selected isotopes, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE standard for safe storage of these materials for 50 years. This system will support completion of stabilization and packaging campaigns of the inventory at a number of affected sites before the year 2002. The package will be standard for all sites and will provide a minimum of two uncontaminated, organics free confinement barriers for the packaged material.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Sources of Thermodynamic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...The thermodynamic data summarized in Table 2 are collected from a variety of sources. The certainty with which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Next Generation Light Source  

•Next Generation Light Source – Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination •High Entry Barrier – 71 ...

242

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

243

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial from Market Trends Commercial from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

244

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential from Market Trends Residential from Market Trends Industrial and commercial sectors lead U.S. growth in primary energy use figure data Total primary energy consumption, including fuels used for electricity generation, grows by 0.3 percent per year from 2011 to 2040, to 107.6 quadrillion Btu in 2040 in the AEO2013 Reference case (Figure 53). The largest growth, 5.1 quadrillion Btu from 2011 to 2040, is in the industrial sector, attributable to increased use of natural gas in some industries (bulk chemicals, for example) as a result of an extended period of relatively low prices coinciding with rising shipments in those industries. The industrial sector was more severely affected than the other end-use sectors by the 2007-2009 economic downturn; the increase in industrial energy consumption from 2008 through 2040 is 3.9 quadrillion Btu.

245

Generalized Stability Theory. Part I: Autonomous Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classical stability theory is extended to include transient growth processes. The central role of the nonnormality of the linearized dynamical system in the stability problem is emphasized, and a generalized stability theory is constructed that ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Generalized Stability Theory. Part II: Nonautonomous Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension of classical stability theory to address the stability of perturbations to time-dependent systems is described. Nonnormality is found to play a central role in determining the stability of systems governed by nonautonomous operators ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stabile in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

Callstrom, Matthew R. (Columbus, OH); Bednarski, Mark D. (Berkeley, CA); Gruber, Patrick R. (St. Paul, MN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Necessary conditions for stabilization agreements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Climate Convention calls for stabilization of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. This paper considers the issues that must be faced in formulating a plan to meet any such target, using a proposed CO2 level ...

Yang, Zili.; Jacoby, Henry D.

249

DC source assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Embodiments of DC source assemblies of power inverter systems of the type suitable for deployment in a vehicle having an electrically grounded chassis are provided. An embodiment of a DC source assembly comprises a housing, a DC source disposed within the housing, a first terminal, and a second terminal. The DC source also comprises a first capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the first terminal. The DC source assembly further comprises a second capacitor having a first electrode electrically coupled to the housing, and a second electrode electrically coupled to the second terminal.

Campbell, Jeremy B; Newson, Steve

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

Iodine Stabilized Helium-Neon Laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... stabilized lasers or spectral lamps that have been recommended for use by international consensus. The iodine stabilized helium-neon laser is just ...

251

Radiation Stability of GFR Candidate Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stability of these ceramics were examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to understand the effect of radiation on lattice stability,  ...

252

Ion Sources - Cyclotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sources Sources The 88-Inch Cyclotron is fed by three Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) high-charge-state ion sources, the ECR, the AECR, and VENUS, currently the most powerful ECR ion source in the world. Built to answer the demand for intense heavy ion beams, these high performance ion sources enable the 88-Inch Cyclotron to accelerate beams of ions from hydrogen to uranium. The ECR ion sources allow the efficient use of rare isotopes of stable elements, either from natural or enriched sources. A variety of metallic ion beams are routinely produced in our low temperature oven (up to 600°C) and our high temperature oven (up to 2100°C). Furthermore, the ability to produce "cocktails" (mixtures of beams) for the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects (BASE) Facility adds tremendously to the flexibility of the 88-Inch Cyclotron.

253

Vibrational Stability of SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently developed, the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facilities at Fermilab support the International Linear Collider (ILC), High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These facilities; Meson Detector Building (MDB) and New Muon Lab (NML) have very different foundations, structures, relative elevations with respect to grade level and surrounding soil composition. Also, there are differences in the operating equipment and their proximity to the primary machine. All the future machines have stringent operational stability requirements. The present study examines both near-field and ambient vibration in order to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of near-field sources (e.g. compressors, ultra-high and standard vacuum equipment, klystrons, modulators, utility fans and pumps) and distant noise sources to the overall system displacements. Facility vibration measurement results and methods of possible isolation from noise sources are presented and discussed.

McGee, M.W.; Volk, J.T.; /Fermilab

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Spallation Neutron Source, SNS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutron Source Spallation Neutron Source Providing the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world... Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source The Spallation Neutron Source, located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has passed another milestone on the way to completion this year--the commissioning of the proton accumulator ring. Brookhaven led the design and construction of the accumulator ring, which will allow an order of magnitude more beam power than any other facility in the world. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, by the U.S. Department of Energy. The figure on the right shows a schematic of the accumulator ring and transport beam lines that are being designed and built by Brookhaven

255

Source and replica calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

Whalen, P.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Dynamic radioactive particle source  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stability of Underwater Periodic Locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most aquatic vertebrates swim by lateral flapping of their bodies and caudal fins. While much effort has been devoted to understanding the flapping kinematics and its influence on the swimming efficiency, little is known about the stability (or lack of) of periodic swimming. It is believed that stability limits maneuverability and body designs/flapping motions that are adapted for stable swimming are not suitable for high maneuverability and vice versa. In this paper, we consider a simplified model of a planar elliptic body undergoing prescribed periodic heaving and pitching in potential flow. We show that periodic locomotion can be achieved due to the resulting hydrodynamic forces, and its value depends on several parameters including the aspect ratio of the body, the amplitudes and phases of the prescribed flapping. We obtain closed-form solutions for the locomotion and efficiency for small flapping amplitudes, and numerical results for finite flapping amplitudes. We then study the stability of the (finite amplitude flapping) periodic locomotion using Floquet theory. We find that stability depends nonlinearly on all parameters. Interesting trends of switching between stable and unstable motions emerge and evolve as we continuously vary the parameter values. This suggests that, for live organisms that control their flapping motion, maneuverability and stability need not be thought of as disjoint properties, rather the organism may manipulate its motion in favor of one or the other depending on the task at hand.

Fangxu Jing; Eva Kanso

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

AnthroSources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... placed into the HANIM format (www.hanim.org) and existing animation sequences are applied. The original source of the animations comes from ...

259

Locating Sources of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Guides and directories to sources of materials data and information...1993 The CD-ROM Directory 1993, TFPL Publishing, Washington, DC, 1993.

260

Brochures | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) The Advanced Photon Source: Lighting the Way to a Better Tomorrow aps brochure The APS helps...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Publications | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compendium of information on results from research at the APS. It is the official source for listing APS-related journal articles, conference proceedings and papers,...

262

Divisions | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chart Argonne Research Divisions APS Research Divisions In May 2002, The Advanced Photon Source was reorganized into three divisions: the Accelerator Systems Division...

263

Sources of Corrosion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Sources of corrosion information...Sci.chem.electrochem Newsgroup www.groups.google.com/groups?group=sci.chem..electrochem/...

264

Improved ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species,

Leung, K.N.; Ehlers, K.W.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836 3.046 2.649 2.429 2000 2.392 2.596 2.852 3.045 3.604 4.279 3.974 4.467 5.246 5.179 5.754 8.267 2001 7.374 5.556 5.245 5.239 4.315 3.867 3.223 2.982 2.558 2.898 2.981 2.748

266

Table 2.1 Energy Consumption by Sector (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

c Electricity-only and combined-heat-and-power (CHP) ... and electrical system energy losses. ... • Geographic coverage is the 50 states and the Distr ...

267

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5; End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value; 1997-Jan : 01/10 : 3.79 : ...

268

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 01/10 3.79 01/17 4.19 01/24 2.98 01/31 2.91 1997-Feb 02/07 2.53 02/14 2.30 02/21 1.91 02/28 1.82 1997-Mar 03/07 1.86 03/14 1.96 03/21 1.91 03/28 1.84 1997-Apr 04/04 1.88 04/11 1.98 04/18 2.04 04/25 2.14 1997-May 05/02 2.15 05/09 2.29 05/16 2.22 05/23 2.22 05/30 2.28 1997-Jun 06/06 2.17 06/13 2.16 06/20 2.22 06/27 2.27 1997-Jul 07/04 2.15 07/11 2.15 07/18 2.24 07/25 2.20 1997-Aug 08/01 2.22 08/08 2.37 08/15 2.53 08/22 2.54 08/29 2.58

269

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050 2.104 2.163 2.124 2.103 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.055 2.107 2.077 1.981 2.072 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.066 2.062 2.058 2.075 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.144 2.069 2.097 2.085 2.066 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.068 2.089 2.131 2.163 2.187

270

Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494 1.557 1.674 1.790 1.961 2.459 1996 2.483 2.458 2.353 2.309 2.283 2.544 2.521 2.049 1.933 2.481 3.023 3.645 1997 3.067 2.065 1.899 2.005 2.253 2.161 2.134 2.462 2.873 3.243 3.092 2.406 1998 2.101 2.263 2.253 2.465 2.160 2.168 2.147 1.855 2.040 2.201 2.321 1.927 1999 1.831 1.761 1.801 2.153 2.272 2.346 2.307 2.802 2.636 2.883 2.549 2.423 2000 2.385 2.614 2.828 3.028 3.596 4.303 3.972 4.460 5.130 5.079 5.740 8.618 2001 7.825 5.675 5.189 5.189 4.244 3.782 3.167 2.935 2.213 2.618 2.786 2.686

271

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.112 2.131 2.117 2.068 2.087 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.086 2.082 2.083 2.092 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.124 2.100 2.116 2.100 2.086 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.095 2.099 2.123 2.155 2.183 1994 Apr-18 to Apr-22 2.187 2.167 2.174 2.181 2.169

272

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

273

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to Jan-31 2.98 3.05 2.91 2.86 2.77 1997 Feb- 3 to Feb- 7 2.49 2.59 2.65 2.51 2.39 1997 Feb-10 to Feb-14 2.42 2.34 2.42 2.22 2.12 1997 Feb-17 to Feb-21 1.84 1.95 1.92 1.92 1997 Feb-24 to Feb-28 1.92 1.77 1.81 1.80 1.78 1997 Mar- 3 to Mar- 7 1.80 1.87 1.92 1.82 1.89 1997 Mar-10 to Mar-14 1.95 1.92 1.96 1.98 1.97 1997 Mar-17 to Mar-21 2.01 1.91 1.88 1.88 1.87 1997 Mar-24 to Mar-28 1.80 1.85 1.85 1.84 1997 Mar-31 to Apr- 4 1.84 1.95 1.85 1.87 1.91 1997 Apr- 7 to Apr-11 1.99 2.01 1.96 1.97 1.98 1997 Apr-14 to Apr-18 2.00 2.00 2.02 2.08 2.10

274

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 1.72 1999 1.85 1.77 1.79 2.15 2.26 2.30 2.31 2.80 2.55 2.73 2.37 2.36 2000 2.42 2.66 2.79 3.04 3.59 4.29 3.99 4.43 5.06 5.02 5.52 8.90 2001 8.17 5.61 5.23 5.19 4.19 3.72 3.11 2.97 2.19 2.46 2.34 2.30 2002 2.32 2.32 3.03 3.43 3.50 3.26 2.99 3.09 3.55 4.13 4.04 4.74 2003 5.43 7.71 5.93 5.26 5.81 5.82 5.03 4.99 4.62 4.63 4.47 6.13 2004 6.14 5.37 5.39 5.71 6.33 6.27 5.93 5.41 5.15 6.35 6.17 6.58 2005 6.15 6.14 6.96 7.16 6.47 7.18 7.63 9.53 11.75 13.42 10.30 13.05

275

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187 06/24 2.176 1994-Jul 07/01 2.256 07/08 2.221 07/15 2.172 07/22 2.137 07/29 2.207

276

Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977 3.055 2.586 2.403 2000 2.396 2.591 2.868 3.058 3.612 4.258 3.981 4.526 5.335 5.151 5.455 7.337 2001 6.027 5.441 5.287 5.294 4.384 3.918 3.309 3.219 2.891 3.065 3.022 2.750

277

ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry: BTU QuickConverter | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program...

278

Table PT2. Energy Production Estimates in Trillion Btu ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1963 54.3 228.1 837.6 0.0 na 10.6 10.6 1,130.6 ... 1976 562.9 339.4 778.1 0.0 na 12.5 12.5 1,692.9 ... 2010 7,658.3 2,521.3 r 308.8 r 0.0 0.9 43.5 r ...

279

Table E4. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End Use ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters Other All Buildings* ..... ...

280

Table E4A. Electricity Consumption (Btu) Intensities by End ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat-ing Cool-ing Venti-lation Water Heat-ing Light-ing Cook-ing Refrig-eration Office Equip-ment Com-puters ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between the high and low steam pressures. The discussion below shows how the savings in using low pressure steam can be above 25%! The key to the savings is not in the heat exchanger equipment or the steam trap, but is back at the powerhouse - the sensible heat requirement of the boiler feed water. Chart III shows potential steam energy savings and will be useful in estimating the steam energy savings of high pressure processes.

Vallery, S. J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

British Thermal Units (Btu) - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

283

Table 1.1 Primary Energy Overview (Quadrillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil Fuelsa Nuclear Electric Power Renew-able Energyb Total Imports Exports Net Importsc ... fuel ethanol stock change; and biodiesel stock change and balancing item.

284

POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.160 2.130 2.138 2.171 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.140 2.128 2.112 2.103 2.111 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.116 2.133 2.130 2.130 2.120 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.114 2.137 2.170 2.146 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.117 2.134 2.120 2.086 2.112

286

Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.109 2.142 2.192 2.164 2.136 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25 2.107 2.129 2.115 2.050 2.077 1994 Mar-28 to Apr- 1 2.076 2.072 2.070 2.087 1994 Apr- 4 to Apr- 8 2.134 2.090 2.109 2.093 2.081 1994 Apr-11 to Apr-15 2.090 2.099 2.128 2.175 2.196

287

Table 2.3 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption (Trillion Btu)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

e Conventional hydroelectric power. f Electricity retail sales to ultimate customers reported by electric utilities and, beginning in 1996, other energy service ...

288

Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Stabilization of Nickel Metal Catalysts for Aqueous Processing Systems Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

289

Method of extracting thermally stable optical signals from a GaAlAs LED source  

SciTech Connect

A self-compensating scheme is described that eliminates the need for temperature control devices employed in many LED-based optical test and measurement instruments to ensure optical signal stability. Thermal behavior of GaAlAs LED sources is exploited to provide an optical wavelength band signal with 0.1%/C power level stability.

Murtaza, G.; Senior, J.M. [Manchester Metropolitan Univ. (United Kingdom). Faculty of Science and Engineering

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Nuclear structure far from stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern nuclear structure theory is rapidly evolving towards regions of exotic short-lived nuclei far from stability, nuclear astrophysics applications, and bridging the gap between low-energy QCD and the phenomenology of finite nuclei. The principal objective is to build a consistent microscopic theoretical framework that will provide a unified description of bulk properties, nuclear excitations and reactions. Stringent constraints on the microscopic approach to nuclear dynamics, effective nuclear interactions, and nuclear energy density functionals, are obtained from studies of the structure and stability of exotic nuclei with extreme isospin values, as well as extended asymmetric nucleonic matter. Recent theoretical advances in the description of structure phenomena in exotic nuclei far from stability are reviewed.

D. Vretenar

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Photonic crystal fibre-based light source for STED lithography  

SciTech Connect

A light source having a relative noise level in the order of 10{sup -6} and sufficient stability for application in STED lithography has been obtained using the generation of Cherenkov peaks in a supercontinuum spectrum. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Glubokov, D A; Sychev, V V; Vitukhnovsky, Alexey G; Korol'kov, A E

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

PORTABLE SOURCE OF RADIOACTIVITY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable source for radiogiaphy or radiotherapy is described. It consists of a Tl/sup 170/ or Co/sup 60/ source mounted in a rotatable tungsten alloy plug. The plug rotates within a brass body to positions of safety or exposure. Provision is made for reloading and carrying the device safely. (T.R.H.)

Goertz, R.C.; Ferguson, K.R.; Rylander, E.W.; Safranski, L.M.

1959-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source for the Paul Scherrer Institute's proton accelerator facility  

SciTech Connect

A compact electron cyclotron resonance proton source has been developed and installed recently at thePaul Scherrer Institute's high intensity proton accelerator. Operation at the ion source test stand and the accelerator demonstrates a high reliability and stability of the new source. When operated at a 10 - 12 mA net proton current the lifetime of the source exceeds 2000 h. The essential development steps towards the observed performance are described.

Baumgarten, C.; Barchetti, A.; Einenkel, H.; Goetz, D.; Schmelzbach, P. A. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Photonic crystal light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light source is provided by a photonic crystal having an enhanced photonic density-of-states over a band of frequencies and wherein at least one of the dielectric materials of the photonic crystal has a complex dielectric constant, thereby producing enhanced light emission at the band of frequencies when the photonic crystal is heated. The dielectric material can be a metal, such as tungsten. The spectral properties of the light source can be easily tuned by modification of the photonic crystal structure and materials. The photonic crystal light source can be heated electrically or other heating means. The light source can further include additional photonic crystals that exhibit enhanced light emission at a different band of frequencies to provide for color mixing. The photonic crystal light source may have applications in optical telecommunications, information displays, energy conversion, sensors, and other optical applications.

Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM); Bur, James A. (Corrales, NM)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Neutron sources and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Review of Neutron Sources and Applications was held at Oak Brook, Illinois, during September 8--10, 1992. This review involved some 70 national and international experts in different areas of neutron research, sources, and applications. Separate working groups were asked to (1) review the current status of advanced research reactors and spallation sources; and (2) provide an update on scientific, technological, and medical applications, including neutron scattering research in a number of disciplines, isotope production, materials irradiation, and other important uses of neutron sources such as materials analysis and fundamental neutron physics. This report summarizes the findings and conclusions of the different working groups involved in the review, and contains some of the best current expertise on neutron sources and applications.

Price, D.L. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rush, J.J. [ed.] [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Material stabilization characterization management plan  

SciTech Connect

This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

GIBSON, M.W.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

Stability of charged thin shells  

SciTech Connect

In this article we study the mechanical stability of spherically symmetric thin shells with charge, in Einstein-Maxwell and Einstein-Born-Infeld theories. We analyze linearized perturbations preserving the symmetry, for shells around vacuum and shells surrounding noncharged black holes.

Eiroa, Ernesto F. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, C.C. 67, Suc. 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Simeone, Claudio [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); IFIBA, CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria Pab. I, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Basis Document for Sludge Stabilization  

SciTech Connect

Vault personnel have begun a program of radiographing plutonium metal cans. Metal that appears to be corroded will be processed through the furnaces in Glovebox HC-21C. The fire suppression system activation temperature will be deleted because it is not maintained by PFP Stabilization.

WILKINS, N.E.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Aerodynamic Drag and Gyroscopic Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the effects on aerodynamic drag of rifle bullets as the gyroscopic stability is lowered from 1.3 to 1.0. It is well known that a bullet can tumble for stability less than 1.0. The Sierra Loading Manuals (4th and 5th Editions) have previously reported that ballistic coefficient decreases significantly as gyroscopic stability, Sg, is lowered below 1.3. These observations are further confirmed by the experiments reported here. Measured ballistic coefficients were compared with gyroscopic stabilities computed using the Miller Twist Rule for nearly solid metal bullets with uniform density and computed using the Courtney-Miller formula for plastic-tipped bullets. The experiments reported here also demonstrate a decrease in aerodynamic drag near Sg = 1.23 +/- 0.02. It is hypothesized that this decrease in drag over a narrow band of Sg values is due to a rapid damping of coning motions (precession and nutation). Observation of this drag decrease at a consistent value of Sg demonstrates the relative accuracy of the twist formulas used to compute Sg. The relationship between Sg and drag may be used to test the applicability of existing twist formulas to given bullet designs and to evaluate the accuracy of alternate formulas in cases where the existing twist formulas are not as accurate.

Elya R. Courtney; Michael W. Courtney

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

SNG process is a potential CO/sub 2/ source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hoffman single-step coal gasification process produces approximately equal quantities of high-Btu gas and CO/sub 2/. There is an increasing use of CO/sub 2/ for enhanced oil recovery and this potential market has added a new dimension to the economics of the gasification process.

Not Available

1982-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quantum stabilizer codes and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of quantum error correction in paving the way to build a practical quantum computer is no longer in doubt. Despite the large body of literature in quantum coding theory, many important questions, especially those centering on the issue of "good codes" are unresolved. In this dissertation the dominant underlying theme is that of constructing good quantum codes. It approaches this problem from three rather different but not exclusive strategies. Broadly, its contribution to the theory of quantum error correction is threefold. Firstly, it extends the framework of an important class of quantum codes - nonbinary stabilizer codes. It clarifies the connections of stabilizer codes to classical codes over quadratic extension fields, provides many new constructions of quantum codes, and develops further the theory of optimal quantum codes and punctured quantum codes. In particular it provides many explicit constructions of stabilizer codes, most notably it simplifies the criteria by which quantum BCH codes can be constructed from classical codes. Secondly, it contributes to the theory of operator quantum error correcting codes also called as subsystem codes. These codes are expected to have efficient error recovery schemes than stabilizer codes. Prior to our work however, systematic methods to construct these codes were few and it was not clear how to fairly compare them with other classes of quantum codes. This dissertation develops a framework for study and analysis of subsystem codes using character theoretic methods. In particular, this work established a close link between subsystem codes and classical codes and it became clear that the subsystem codes can be constructed from arbitrary classical codes. Thirdly, it seeks to exploit the knowledge of noise to design efficient quantum codes and considers more realistic channels than the commonly studied depolarizing channel. It gives systematic constructions of asymmetric quantum stabilizer codes that exploit the asymmetry of errors in certain quantum channels. This approach is based on a Calderbank- Shor-Steane construction that combines BCH and finite geometry LDPC codes.

Sarvepalli, Pradeep Kiran

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Microfabricated diffusion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated diffusion source to provide for a controlled diffusion rate of a vapor comprises a porous reservoir formed in a substrate that can be filled with a liquid, a headspace cavity for evaporation of the vapor therein, a diffusion channel to provide a controlled diffusion of the vapor, and an outlet to release the vapor into a gas stream. The microfabricated diffusion source can provide a calibration standard for a microanalytical system. The microanalytical system with an integral diffusion source can be fabricated with microelectromechanical systems technologies.

Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Alternative fuel information sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This short document contains a list of more than 200 US sources of information (Name, address, phone number, and sometimes contact) related to the use of alternative fuels in automobiles and trucks. Electric-powered cars are also included.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Proposed Upgrade and Improvement of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York This Environmental Assessment addresses the proposed action by the U.S. Department of Energy to upgrade the facilities of the National Synchrotron Light Source Complex, namely the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the Accelerator Test Facility and the Source Development Laboratory. The environmental effects of a No-Action Alternative as well as a Proposed Action are evaluated in the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment Fact Sheet” link below leads to a one-page summary of the Environmental Assessment. The “NSLS Environmental Assessment” link below leads to the whole 41-page

307

Source Remediation vs. Plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This summary paper reviews just some of the extensive scientific literature from the past 20 years on the various aspects of contaminant source remediation and plume management. Some of the major findings of the numerous research projects are presented.

Management Critical Factors; G. Teutsch; H. Rgner; D. Zamfirescu; M. Finkel; M. Bittens

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Sources of Error  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Sources of error in damage tolerance analysis can be classified as: Uncertainty and assumptions in data input Uncertainty due to assumptions about flaws Interpretations of, and assumptions in, stress history Inaccuracies in stress intensity Computer...

309

About | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Here you will find an introduction and tour of the facility, as well as information about the organizations and opportunities at...

310

Specific Sources of Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Sources of materials data...ASM International, 1989, 1224 pp (C) NIST High Temperature Superconductors Database, Ceramics Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg,

311

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Locating illicit radiological sources using gamma ray or neutron detection is a key challenge for both homeland security and nuclear nonproliferation. Localization methods using an array of detectors or a sequence of observations in time and space must provide rapid results while accounting for a dynamic attenuating environment. In the presence of significant attenuation and scatter, more extensive numerical transport calculations in place of the standard analytical approximations may be required to achieve accurate results. Numerical adjoints based on deterministic transport codes provide relatively efficient detector response calculations needed to determine the most likely location of a true source. Probabilistic representations account for uncertainty in the source location resulting from uncertainties in detector responses, the approximations that are used, and the potential for nonunique solutions. A Bayesian approach improves on previous likelihood methods for source localization by allowing the incorporation of all available information to help constrain solutions.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Miller, Erin A.; Wittman, Richard S.; Gesh, Christopher J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Spallation Neutron Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

D/gim D/gim Spallation Neutron Source SNS is an accelerator-based neutron source. This one-of-a-kind facility pro- vides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world. When ramped up to its full beam power of 1.4 MW, SNS will be eight times more powerful than today's best facility. It will give researchers more detailed snapshots of the smallest samples of physical and biological materials than ever before

313

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, WA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA); Grabner, R. Fred (Brentwood, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Magnetron sputtering source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal. 12 figs.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Grabner, R.F.; Ramsey, P.B.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

Luce, J.S.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotron light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne National Laboratory and has been fully operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATs). The 7-GeV synchrotron light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

2000-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Long-term stability of the APS storage ring  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Photon Source (APS), a third-generation synchrotrons light source, was commissioned in 1995 at Argonne ''National Laboratory and has been fully-operational for beamline users since 1997. The APS storage ring can accommodate up to 68 user beamlines; about 70% of the available beamlines are currently in use by various collaborative access teams (CATS). The 7-GeV synchrotrons light source produces light in the soft to hard x-ray range that is used for research in such areas as x-ray instrumentation; material, chemical and atomic sciences; biology; and geo/soil/ environmental sciences. For the successful operation of an x-ray light source such as the Advanced Photon Source, the long-term stability of the concrete floor supporting the beam components and user beamlines is crucial. Settlements impact the orbit and location of the x-ray source points as well as the position of the x-ray beamlines. This paper compares the results of two successive resurveys of the APS accelerator components performed in 1995 and 1998.

Friedsam, H.; Penicka, M.; Error, J.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mercury Stability in FGD Byproducts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant fraction of the mercury in coals fired for power generation currently is removed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems and incorporated in the byproducts from those systems. This report summarizes the results of an EPRI-sponsored project to measure the stability of mercury in FGD byproducts from coal-fired generating plants under simulated landfill and reuse conditions. The current effort repeated portions of a 2003 project, documented in EPRI report 1004254, to determine whether th...

2004-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Inter-sourcing: alternative IT sourcing solutions using student interns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information Technology (IT) sourcing decisions are motivated by cost savings, skills acquisition, and staffing flexibility. The research in progress introduces a new alternative in sourcing, inter-sourcing. This practice incorporates the benefits of ... Keywords: inter-sourcing, it education, it internships, it sourcing

Mari W. Buche

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

On the stability of stationary age distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Age structured nonlinear single species and predator prey population models are treated and a straightforward relatively simple method is shown to arrive at a condition of stability of stationary solutions. Keywords: population dynamics, stability

M. Farkas

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

On Stability of Cellular Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main results about stability of cellular neural networks (CNNs) are reviewed. Some of them are extended and reformulated, with the purpose of providing to the CNN designer simple criteria for checking the stability properties. A particular emphasis ...

Pier Paolo-Civalleri; Marco Gilli

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Stabilization of Graphene-Polyaniline Based Nanocomposite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Stabilization of Graphene-Polyaniline Based Nanocomposite Electrodes Using Barium Strontium Titanate for Supercapacitor Application.

325

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transport, surface energies, matrix structure. C. Hydrogen-energy save. •Fiber reinforced polymers -Stability of polymer matrix (

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Stability issues for dynamic traffic assignment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores stability issues for operational route guidance control strategies for vehicular traffic networks equipped with advanced information systems, and develops a general procedure for the stability analysis of the associated dynamic traffic ... Keywords: Dynamical systems, Feedback control, Lyapunov methods, Stability analysis

S. Peeta; T. -H. Yang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Voltage Stability Studies for Southern Company Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a study conducted under an EPRI Tailored Collaboration project to develop and demonstrate procedures for the assessment of voltage security of the Southern Electric System (SES). The contractor used EPRI steady-state analysis tools including VSTAB (Voltage STABility assessment program) to assess stability margins and verified them using EPRI dynamic tools including ETMSP (Extended Transient / Mid-term Stability Program).

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

A Stability of LCLS Linac Modulators  

SciTech Connect

Information concerning to a stability of LCLS RF linac modulators is allocated in this paper. In general a 'pulse-to-pulse' modulator stability (and RF phase as well) is acceptable for the LCLS commission and FEL programs. Further modulator stability improvements are possible and approaches are discussed based on our experimental results.

Decker, F.-J.; Krasnykh, A.; Morris, B.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A recent assessment indicates that if 20% of US homes replaced their existing space-conditioning and water-heating systems with properly designed, installed and operated state-of-the-art GSHP systems, it would yield significant benefits each year. These include 0.8 quad British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy savings, 54.3 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} emission reductions, $10.4 billion in energy cost savings and 43.2 gigawatts of reduction in summer peak electrical demand.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ISG8-RF Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RF Sources - (WG3) RF Sources - (WG3) Orange Rm Yong Ho Chin, Christopher Nantista, and Sami G. Tantawi Parallel Sessions: Working Groups: WG1: Parameters, Design, Instrumentation and Tuning WG2: Damping Rings and ATF WG3: RF Sources WG4:Structures WG5: Ground Motion; Site Requirements and Investigations Monday Morning 9:00-10:30 Plenary Coffee Break 11:00-12:00 Planning Session. Monday Afternoon 13:30-15:30 High Gradient Issues (Joint with working group 4) Coffee Break 16:00-16:30 The 8-Pack Project -- D. Atkinson 16:30-17:30 High Gradient Issues and Discussions Continued. Tuesday Morning 9:30-10:30 Klystrons 9:30-10:00 Status of PPM Klystron Development for JLC -- Y. H. Chin 10:00-10:30 Design of 150MW Multi-Beam Klystron -- S. Matsumoto Coffee Break 11:00-11:30 Klystron Development at SLAC -- G. Caryotakis

331

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

332

Source Emissions and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation electron micrograph image, Lara Gundel with instrumentation Source Emissions and Transport Investigators conduct research here to characterize and better understand the sources of airborne volatile, semi-volatile and particulate organic pollutants in the indoor environment. This research includes studies of the physical and chemical processes that govern indoor air pollutant concentrations and exposures. The motivation is to contribute to the reduction of potential human health effects. Contacts Randy Maddalena RLMaddalena@lbl.gov (510) 486-4924 Mark Mendell MJMendell@lbl.gov (510) 486-5762 Links Pollutant Sources, Dynamics and Chemistry Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy Technologies Environmental Impacts

333

Heat Source Lire,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source Lire, Source Lire, (liayrICS-25 ) tooling Tulles (Ai 1,06:1) - 11 (31.118 Module Stack Thermoelectric Module:, (14) ltcal L/Mr r a it i lli tisli Block Mounting Interface MMRTG Design Housing (At 2219) Fin (At Go63) Thermal Insulation (Min-K & Microtherm) Space Radioisotope Power Systems Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator January 2008 What is a Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator? Space exploration missions require safe, reliable, long-lived power systems to provide electricity and heat to spacecraft and their science instruments. A uniquely capable source of power is the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) - essentially a nuclear battery that reliably converts heat into electricity. The Department of Energy and NASA are developing

334

Source Selection Guide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Source Selection Source Selection Overview This chapter provides guidance to the acquisition team on conducting source selection in accordance with Part 15 of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR). Background The mid 1990's was a time of significant change in many areas of procurement, particularly in the introduction of new tools and processes that help the procurement professional better meet the needs of demanding customers. The passage of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining Act in 1994 and the Federal Acquisition Reform Act in 1995 , coupled with Government-wide and Department of Energy (DOE) contract reform efforts not only changed traditional procurement processes but also changed the role of the procurement professional. No longer are procurement

335

Dual source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX); Pietsch, Joseph A. (Dallas, TX)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Definitions Key Terms Definition British Thermal Unit (Btu) The quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of liquid water by 1 degree Fahrenheit at the temperature at which water has its greatest density (approximately 39 degrees Fahrenheit). Delivered to Consumers (Heat Content) Heat content of residential, commercial, industrial, vehicle fuel and electric power deliveries to consumers. Electric Power (Heat Content) Heat content of natural gas used as fuel in the electric power sector. Heat Content The amount of heat energy available to be released by the transformation or use of a specified physical unit of an energy form (e.g., a ton of coal, a barrel of oil, a kilowatthour of electricity, a cubic foot of natural gas, or a pound of steam). The amount of heat energy is commonly expressed in British thermal units (Btu). Note: Heat content of combustible energy forms can be expressed in terms of either gross heat content (higher or upper heating value) or net heat content (lower heating value), depending upon whether or not the available heat energy includes or excludes the energy used to vaporize water (contained in the original energy form or created during the combustion process). The Energy Information Administration typically uses gross heat content values.

337

INEEL Source Water Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

Sehlke, Gerald

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a neutron source from polonium-210 and substances, such as beryllium and boron, characterized by emission of neutrons upon exposure to alpha particles from the polonium. According to the invention, a source is prepared by placing powdered beryllium and a platinum foil electroplated with polonium-2;.0 in a beryllium container. The container is sealed and then heated by induction to a temperature of 450 to 1100 deg C to volatilize the polonium off the foil into the powder. The heating step is terminated upon detection of a maximum in the neutron flux level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

339

Identifying PM10 Sources and Estimating Source Contributions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of ammonium nitric, secondary aerosol of ammonium sulfate, and incinerator and fuel oil burning sources. The source mass profiles derived by the PMF model well describe the...

340

Policy options for stabilizing global climate  

SciTech Connect

The structure of this paper is designed to answer the following questions in turn: What is the greenhouse effect What evidence i there that the greenhouse effect is increasing How will the Earth's climate respond to changes in greenhouse gas concentrations What activities are responsible for the greenhouse gas emissions How might emissions and climate change in the future What technologies are available for limiting greenhouse gas emissions And what domestic and international policy options, if implemented, would help to stabilize global climate This chapter provides a general introduction to the climate change issue and reviews selected previous studies. Chapter II discusses the greenhouse gases, their sources and sinks, chemical properties, current atmospheric concentrations and distributions, and related uncertainties. Chapter III relates the greenhouse gases to the process of climatic change. Once this link is made, Chapter IV examines those human activities that affect trace-gas emissions and ultimately influence climate change. Chapter V discusses the scenarios developed for this report to assist us in thinking about possible future emissions and climate change. Chapter VI then presents sensitivity analyses of the modeling results. Chapter VII gives a detailed description of existing and emerging technologies that should be considered in the formation of a comprehensive strategy for mitigating global warming. Chapter VIII outlines domestic policy options, and the concluding chapter (Chapter IX) discusses international mechanisms for responding to climate change.

Lashof, D.A.; Tirpak, D.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Selective ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ion source is described wherein selected ions maybe extracted to the exclusion of unwanted ion species of higher ionization potential. Also described is a method of producing selected ions from a compound, such as P.sup.+ from PH.sub.3. The invention comprises a plasma chamber, an electron source, a means for introducing a gas to be ionized by electrons from the electron source, means for limiting electron energy from the electron source to a value between the ionization energy of the selected ion species and the greater ionization energy of an unwanted ion specie, and means for extracting the target ion specie from the plasma chamber. In one embodiment, the electrons are generated in a plasma cathode chamber immediately adjacent to the plasma chamber. A small extractor draws the electrons from the plasma cathode chamber into the relatively positive plasma chamber. The energy of the electrons extracted in this manner is easily controlled. The invention is particularly useful for doping silicon with P.sup.+, AS.sup.+, and B.sup.+ without the problematic presence of hydrogen, helium, water, or carbon oxide ions. Doped silicon is important for manufacture of semiconductors and semiconductor devices.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Strategic Sourcing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Strategic Sourcing Energy Wide Strategic Sourcing (EWSS) DOE leadership has recognized that benefits could be achieved at the federal level through an organized, systematic and collaborative approach to acquiring commonly used goods and services. The DOE strategic sourcing program builds upon historical accomplishments as well as establishes a more cohesive and disciplined program, consistent with OMB's direction, for the conduct of DOE future strategic sourcing efforts. The DOE and NNSA Senior Procurement Executives have created a strategic sourcing capability and organizational components to identify federal strategic sourcing opportunities and coordinate strategic thinking. To date, this program has identified a number of opportunities; particularly in the areas of

344

Book sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Linked Data Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Book sources Jump to: navigation, search Search for book sources ISBN: Go Retrieved from...

345

Book sources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Linked Data Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Book sources Jump to: navigation, search Search for book sources ISBN: 9781603580304 Go...

346

WIPP Opportunities - Procurement - Sources Sought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procurement Sources Sought This page displays a listing Sources Sought. If you are interested in submitting an outline, please contact the cognizant buyer to find out more. Please...

347

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Learn more about Solar, Water, Biomass, Geothermal and Wind Energy. Read more Nuclear Learn more about how we use Nuclear Energy. Read more...

348

Energy Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Energy Sources Energy Sources Renewable Energy Learn more about Solar, Water, Biomass, Geothermal and Wind Energy. Read more Nuclear Learn more about how we...

349

Lean Premixed Flame Stability Investigations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fellowship Experience Throughout my twelve-week fellowship at Pratt & Whitney I had the opportunity to interact with numerous engineers and managers as well as to be exposed to a variety of disciplines and areas of engineering. My mentor, Bill Proscia, is an expert in the field of combustion instability analysis and modeling. I gained valuable experience working on a combustion project under his guidance. The project involved studying combustor aerodynamics and static stability of lean-premixed flames for two combustor geometries as a function of swirl number and fuel type. Having an almost non-existent background in the field of combustion, this was a challenging, but very rewarding project to work on. The first few weeks consisted of meeting with engineers and managers to decide on what kind of study I could conduct that would be useful to Pratt & Whitney. During this time I also was able to learn about the business side of engineering and gain a small insight into the overall infrastructure of Pratt & Whitney. In addition to these meetings much of my time was spent reading published literature as well as textbooks on combustion, methods used for modeling combustion, combustion stability, and other

Jared Crosby

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Posters | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Cart (0 Posters) Your Cart (0 Posters) Your cart is empty. checkout Subtotal: $0.00 update empty Posters Order a printed APS poster! 11 in. x 17 in. prints will be mailed in the order requests are received. 36 in. x 36 in. posters will be sent to school addresses once all orders are processed. The Advanced Photon Source Is The Advanced Photon Source Is Qty: 1 add to cart Technologies from Materials Science Technologies from Materials Science Qty: 1 add to cart Materials Under Extreme Pressure Materials Under Extreme Pressure Qty: 1 add to cart Biological Macromolecules in Action Biological Macromolecules in Action Qty: 1 add to cart Journey to the Center of the Earth Journey to the Center of the Earth Qty: 1 add to cart Earthshaking Monitor Earthshaking Monitor Qty: 1 add to cart Imaging with X-rays

351

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

352

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

353

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Home Group Members Accelerator Magnets Insertion Devices Facilities Presentations & Publications Internal Magnetic Devices Group The primary mission of the Magnetic Devices (MD) Group is to design, build, and maintain Insertion Devices (IDs) that are reliable and transparent to the electron beam at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The majority of IDs at the APS are conventional planar hybrid undulators, but an essential part of the mission is to develop novel IDs, such as short-period superconducting undulators and long-period electromagnetic undulators. The capabilities of APS IDs are matched to users' experimental needs. The mission also includes magnetic tuning of the IDs to ensure their near-ideal performance as x-ray sources and calculations to predict the radiation

354

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

355

Photon Source Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Print Photon Source Parameters Print Summary Graph of Brightness Curves for All Insertion Devices Insertion Device and Bend Magnet Parameters Bend Magnet Superbend Magnet U30 Undulator U50 Undulator U80 Undulator U100 Undulator W114 Wiggler The ALS has six elliptically polarizing undulators, two in straight 4, two in straight 11, and one each in straights 6 and 7. All are arranged with chicanes so that two such devices can be installed to feed two independent beamlines. They can be used in a variety of polarization modes, including circular, elliptical, horizontal, and vertical. These modes can be chosen by appropriate phasing of the magnet rows. The brightness and flux curves below are shown for horizontal and circular polarization. Curves for elliptical and vertical polarization are similar to the horizontal polarization curve, but the minimum photon energy is higher.

356

Overview | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Overview: APS Overview: Introduction APS Systems Map LINAC Booster Synchrotron Storage Ring Insertion Devices Experiment Hall LOMs & Beamlines Overview of the APS The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines. Photo: Aerial Photo of APS Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose

357

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report 2001 Report 2001 National Synchrotron Light Source For the period October 1, 2000 through September 30, 2001 Introduction Science Highlights Year in Review Operations Publications Abstracts Nancye Wright & Lydia Rogers The National Synchrotron Light Source Department is supported by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences United States Department of Energy Washington, D.C. Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven Science Associates, Inc. Upton, New York 11973 Under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 Mary Anne Corwin Steven N. Ehrlich & Lisa M. Miller Managing Editor Science Editors Production Assistants Cover images (clockwise from top left) 1. from Science Highlight by K.R. Rajashankar, M.R. Chance, S.K. Burley, J. Jiang, S.C. Almo, A. Bresnick, T. Dodatko, R. Huang, G. He,

358

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tomography Interest Group Contact: Robert Winarski, Center for Nanoscale Materials winarski@anl.gov Contact: Francesco De Carlo, Advanced Photon Source decarlo@aps.anl.gov The tomography special interest group of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has been created to promote awareness of the tomography facilities at the APS and to foster communications between the various research groups. Through this group, we believe we can build a strong user community for tomography. The following beamlines have active tomography research programs: 2-BM-B (XOR) http://www.aps.anl.gov/Xray_Science_Division/Xray_Microscopy_and_Imaging/Science_and_Research/Techniques/Tomography/index.html Information about the beamline: http://beam.aps.anl.gov/pls/apsweb/beamline_display_pkg.display_beamline?p_beamline_num_c=31

359

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45{degrees} to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Evaluated teletherapy source library  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The Evaluated Teletherapy Source Library (ETSL) is a system of hardware and software that provides for maintenance of a library of useful phase space descriptions (PSDs) of teletherapy sources used in radiation therapy for cancer treatment. The PSDs are designed to be used by PEREGRINE, the all-particle Monte Carlo dose calculation system. ETSL also stores other relevant information such as monitor unit factors (MUFs) for use with the PSDs, results of PEREGRINE calculations using the PSDs, clinical calibration measurements, and geometry descriptions sufficient for calculational purposes. Not all of this information is directly needed by PEREGRINE. It also is capable of acting as a repository for the Monte Carlo simulation history files from which the generic PSDs are derived.

Cox, Lawrence J. (Los Alamos, NM); Schach Von Wittenau, Alexis E. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

364

Open Source Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Source Physics (Brown, 2012; Christian, 2010; Esquembre, 2012; Hwang, 2010) empowers teachers and students to create and use these free tools with the associated intellectual property rights given to customise (Wee & Mak, 2009) the computer models/tools to suit their teaching and learning needs. Open Source Physics (OSP) focuses on design of computer models, such as Easy Java Simulations (EJS) and the use of video modeling and analysis (Tracker). They allow students to investigate, explore and analyse data which is either real or simulated. The OSP approach helps users overcome barriers in creating, using and scaling up meaningful ICT use in education. In Singapore, teachers and students have created or customised existing computer models to design and re-purpose EJS models to suit their context and learning needs. Tracker tools allow students to analyse different aspects of a physics phenomena to deepen their understanding of abstract physics concepts. Using Tracker, students record the motion of ob...

Wee, Loo Kang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Voltage controlled current source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

Casne, Gregory M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Advanced Photon Source 0 Advanced Photon Source A U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences national synchrotron x-ray research facility Search Button About Welcome Overview Visiting the APS Mission & Goals Find People Organization Charts Committees Job Openings User Information Prospective Users New Users Current Users APS User Portal Macromolecular Crystallographers Administrators Find a Beamline Apply for Beam Time Contacts Calendars Community Scientific Access Site Access Training Science & Education Science & Research Highlights Conferences Seminars Publications Annual Reports APS Upgrade Courses and Schools Graduate Programs Scientific Software Media Center Calendar of Events APS News User News Argonne/APS Press Releases Argonne/APS Feature Stories Argonne/APS In The News

367

Comparisons with Other sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Estimates Compared with Other sources Estimates Compared with Other sources The following seven graphs were prepared to give a sense of the variation and confidence level of the EIA-914 estimates. Each graph shows the reported sample production (the starting point for making an estimate), the EIA-914 estimates, State reported data, HPDI reported data, and Lippman Consulting data for comparison. State data are obtained directly from the States usually via a State agency web site as a monthly total. HPDI is a commercial data vender. They acquire data from all the States and provide it to EIA in a single format and query system at the well or lease level. EIA then sums this data to the operator level and State level. HPDI data typically lag the State data by 1 or 2 months.

368

FABRICATION OF NEUTRON SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for preparing a more efficient neutron source comprising inserting in a container a quantity of Po-210, inserting B powder coated with either Ag, Pt, or Ni. The container is sealed and then slowly heated to about 450 C to volatilize the Po and effect combination of the coated powder with the Po. The neutron flux emitted by the unit is moritored and the heating step is terminated when the flux reaches a maximum or selected level.

Birden, J.H.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

Compact superradiant Cerenkov source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An economical, coherent, and widely tunable source does not exist spanning the far-infrared electromagnetic spectral range of 50-1000 {mu}m in wavelength. The Cerenkov free-electron laser (CFEL) is a promising candidate. This report describes an experimental investigation of a compact CFEL driven by a high-quality low-energy electron beam. Cerenkov emission and strong gain but remarkably low output coupling were observed.

Owens, I.J.; Brownell, J.H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755-3528 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

High current ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reeccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200.degree. to 500.degree. for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Open-Source GIS  

SciTech Connect

The components making up an Open Source GIS are explained in this chapter. A map server (Sect. 30.1) can broadly be defined as a software platform for dynamically generating spatially referenced digital map products. The University of Minnesota MapServer (UMN Map Server) is one such system. Its basic features are visualization, overlay, and query. Section 30.2 names and explains many of the geospatial open source libraries, such as GDAL and OGR. The other libraries are FDO, JTS, GEOS, JCS, MetaCRS, and GPSBabel. The application examples include derived GIS-software and data format conversions. Quantum GIS, its origin and its applications explained in detail in Sect. 30.3. The features include a rich GUI, attribute tables, vector symbols, labeling, editing functions, projections, georeferencing, GPS support, analysis, and Web Map Server functionality. Future developments will address mobile applications, 3-D, and multithreading. The origins of PostgreSQL are outlined and PostGIS discussed in detail in Sect. 30.4. It extends PostgreSQL by implementing the Simple Feature standard. Section 30.5 details the most important open source licenses such as the GPL, the LGPL, the MIT License, and the BSD License, as well as the role of the Creative Commons.

Vatsavai, Raju [ORNL; Burk, Thomas E [University of Minnesota; Lime, Steve [Minnesota Department of Natural Resources

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Improved negative ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for providing a negative ion source accelerates electrons away from a hot filament electron emitter into a region of crossed electric and magnetic fields arranged in a magnetron configuration. During a portion of the resulting cycloidal path, the electron velocity is reduced below its initial value. The electron accelerates as it leaves the surface at a rate of only slightly less than if there were no magnetic field, thereby preventing a charge buildup at the surface of the emitter. As the electron traverses the cycloid, it is decelerated during the second, third, and fourth quadrants, then reaccelerated as it approaches the end of the fourth quadrant to regain its original velocity. The minimum velocity occurs during the fourth quadrant, and corresponds to an electron temperature of 200 to 500/sup 0/C for the electric and magnetic fields commonly encountered in the ion sources of magnetic sector mass spectrometers. An ion source using the above-described thermalized electrons is also disclosed.

Delmore, J.E.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

HIGH INTENSITY LIGHT SOURCES (Part II of Thesis)  

SciTech Connect

A stable carbon arc operated in controlled atmosphere is described. The arc was designed to serve as a light source during lifetime studies of the B/sup 2/ SIGMA state of the CN molecule. The CN radiation from the plasma of the arc was investigated and found to have a brightness temperature of 5500 icient laborato K at lambda 3883 A. This is considerably higher than an estimate of the value required for lifetime measurements. The stability of the carbon arc under various conditions is discussed. For successful lifetime measurements, the light source employed must have a high brightness temperature (intensity). A method for the determination of the brightness temperature of a light source at a specific wave length is described. The method was used for determining the brightness temperatures of some available light sources. Sodium, thallium, and mercury discharge lamps, a medium-pressure mercury arc lamp, and the carbon arc were studied. (auth)

Worden, E.F. Jr.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Surface rheology and interface stability.  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk fluid.

Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Efficiency from Executive Summary Efficiency from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

377

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

378

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation from Executive Summary Transportation from Executive Summary With more efficient light-duty vehicles, motor gasoline consumption declines while diesel fuel use grows, even as more natural gas is used in heavy-duty vehicles figure data The AEO2013 Reference case incorporates the GHG and CAFE standards for LDVs [6] through the 2025 model year. The increase in vehicle efficiency reduces LDV energy use from 16.1 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 14.0 quadrillion Btu in 2025, predominantly motor gasoline (Figure 6). LDV energy use continues to decline through 2036, then levels off until 2039 as growth in population and vehicle miles traveled offsets more modest improvement in fuel efficiency. Furthermore, the improved economics of natural gas as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles result in increased use that offsets a portion of diesel fuel

379

Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current baseline assumption is that packaging ¡§as is¡¨ and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80„aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels in the hydroceramic grout process (i.e., 21 m) appears to be about the same as that estimated by the Direct Cementitious Waste Process in 1998, for which a conceptual design was developed. Some of the conceptual design efforts in the 1998 study may be applicable to the stabilizer processes addressed in this EDF. (e) The gamma radiation fields near the process vessels handling HLW calcine would vary from a range of about 300-350 R/hr at a distance of 2.5 cm from the side of the vessels to a range of about 50-170 R/hr at a distance of 100 cm from the side of the vessels. The calculations were made for combined calcine, which was defined as the total HLW calcine inventory uniformly mixed. (f) The gamma radiation fields near the stabilized waste in canisters would range from about 25-170 R/hr at 2.5 cm from the side of the canister and 5-35 R/hr at 100 cm from the side of the canister, depending on the which bin set was the source of calcine.

T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Rocky Flats ash test procedure (sludge stabilization)  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Flats Ash items have been identified as the next set of materials to be stabilized. This test is being run to determine charge sizes and soak times to completely stabilize the Rocky Flats Ash items. The information gathered will be used to generate the heating rampup cycle for stabilization. This test will also gain information on the effects of the glovebox atmosphere (moisture) on the stabilized material. This document provides instructions for testing Rocky Flats Ash in the HC-21C muffle furnace process.

Winstead, M.L.

1995-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Thermochemical Stability of Blue Ceramic Powders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, This paper presents the thermo-chemical stability of diverse ... Hydraulic Simulation of Fluid Flow in Beam Blank Continuous Casting Mold with

382

Precursor Compositions and Stabilization Methods for ...  

Precursor Compositions and Stabilization Methods for Polyolefin-Based Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

383

Manpower Training Programs and Employment Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluations of Training Programs with Experimental Data,MANPOWER TRAINING PROGRAMS AND EMPLOYMENT STABILITY by JosefS44 and JO548-SOZ. Manpower training programs and employment

Zweimuller, Josef; Winter- Ebmer, Rudolf

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Phase Stability, Phase Transformations, and Reactive Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... New Phase in Stoichiometric Cu6Sn5 and Effect of Ni Addition on Phase Stabilization in Wide Temperature Range · Optical Properties of ...

385

Sources of tritium  

SciTech Connect

A review of tritium sources is presented. The tritium production and release rates are discussed for light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs), liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and molten salt breeder reactors (MSBRs). In addition, release rates are discussed for tritium production facilities, fuel reprocessing plants, weapons detonations, and fusion reactors. A discussion of the chemical form of the release is included. The energy producing facilities are ranked in order of increasing tritium production and release. The ranking is: HTGRs, LWRs, LMFBRs, MSBRs, and HWRs. The majority of tritium has been released in the form of tritiated water.

Phillips, J.E.; Easterly, C.E.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Plasma-based EUV light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Various mechanisms are provided relating to plasma-based light source that may be used for lithography as well as other applications. For example, a device is disclosed for producing extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light based on a sheared plasma flow. The device can produce a plasma pinch that can last several orders of magnitude longer than what is typically sustained in a Z-pinch, thus enabling the device to provide more power output than what has been hitherto predicted in theory or attained in practice. Such power output may be used in a lithography system for manufacturing integrated circuits, enabling the use of EUV wavelengths on the order of about 13.5 nm. Lastly, the process of manufacturing such a plasma pinch is discussed, where the process includes providing a sheared flow of plasma in order to stabilize it for long periods of time.

Shumlak, Uri (Seattle, WA); Golingo, Raymond (Seattle, WA); Nelson, Brian A. (Mountlake Terrace, WA)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

388

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

389

Stability of stationary and time-varying nongyrotropic particle distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The ubiquity of nongyrotropic particle populations in space plasmas warrants the study of their characteristics, in particular their stability. The unperturbed nongyrotropic distribution functions in homogeneous media without sources and sinks (closed phase space) must be rotating and time-varying (TNG), whereas consideration of open phase spaces allows for the occurrence of homogeneous and stationary distributions (SNG). The free energy brought about by the introduction of gyrophase organization in a particle population can destabilize otherwise thoroughly stable magnetoplasmas (or, a fortiori, enhance pre-existing gyrotropic instabilities) and feed intense wave growth both in TNG and SNG environments: The nongyrotropic (electron or ion) species can originate unstable coupling among the gyrotropic characteristic waves. The stability properties of these two types of homogeneous nongyrotropy shall be contrasted for parallel (with respect to the ambient magnetic ®eld) and perpendicular propagation, and their potential role as wave activity sources shall be illustrated resorting to solutions of the appropriate dispersion equations and numerical simulations. Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities) Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities) Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence) 1

A. L. Brinca

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Thermal Stability of Li-Ion Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal stability of Li-ion cells with intercalating carbon anodes and metal oxide cathodes was measured as a function of state of charge and temperature for two advanced cell chemistries. Cells of the 18650 design with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes (commercial SONY cells) and Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathodes were measured for thermal reactivity in the open circuit cell condition. Accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) was used to measure cell thermal runaway as a function of state of charge (SOC). Microcalorimetry was used to measure the time dependence of heat generating side reactions also as a function of SOC. Components of cells were measured using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the thermal reactivity of the individual electrodes to determine the temperature regimes and conditions of the major thermal reactions. Thermal decomposition of the SEI layer at the anodes was identified as the initiating source for thermal runaway. The cells with Li{sub x}CoO{sub 2} cathodes showed greater sensitivity to SOC and higher accelerating heating rates than seen for the cells with Li{sub x}Ni{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2}cathodes. Lower temperature reactions starting as low as 40 C were also observed that were SOC dependent but not accelerating. These reactions were also measured in the microcalorimeter and observed to decay over time with a power-law dependence and are believed to result in irreversible capacity loss in the cells.

ROTH,EMANUEL P.

1999-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Contrast analysis and stability on the ExAO testbed  

SciTech Connect

High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. The Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at UC Santa Cruz is investigating limits to high-contrast imaging in support of the Gemini Planet Imager. Previous contrast measurements were made with a simple single-opening prolate spheroid shaped pupil that produced a limited region of high-contrast, particularly when wavefront errors were corrected with the 1024-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror currently in use on the testbed. A more sophisticated shaped pupil is now being used that has a much larger region of interest facilitating a better understanding of high-contrast measurements. In particular we examine the effect of heat sources in the testbed on PSF stability. We find that rms image motion scales as 0.02 {lambda}/D per watt when the heat source is near the pupil plane. As a result heat sources of greater than 5 watts should be avoided near pupil planes for GPI. The safest place to introduce heat is near a focal plane. Heat also can effect the standard deviation of the high-contrast region but in the final instrument other sources of error should be more significant.

Evans, J; Thomas, S; Gavel, D; Dillon, D; Macintosh, B

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

SOURCE TERMS IN THE TRANSIENT SEEPAGE EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation; Pore Pressure Generation; Sources; Source Terms)In this paper, sources involving the generation of mass areincludes source terms for both fluid mass generation and

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Stability of Java interfaces: a preliminary investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The attribute of stability is regarded by some as an important attribute of software. Some claims regarding software design quality imply that what are called interfaces in Java are stable. This paper introduces some new metrics for investigating ... Keywords: java interface, software metrics, stability

Jonathan Chow; Ewan Tempero

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Quantifying Dynamic Stability of Genetic Memory Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bistability/Multistability has been found in many biological systems including genetic memory circuits. Proper characterization of system stability helps to understand biological functions and has potential applications in fields such as synthetic biology. ... Keywords: Dynamic stability, genetic memory, gene circuit, dynamic noise margin.

Yong Zhang; Peng Li; Garng Huang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Stability analysis of switched linear singular systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the stability analysis problem for switched linear continuous-time singular systems. First, based on the equivalent dynamics decomposition form, a refined description for state jumps of the switched singular system is presented, ... Keywords: Average dwell time, Exponential stability, State jumps, Switched singular systems

Lei Zhou, Daniel W. C. Ho, Guisheng Zhai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

KSTABILITY AND PARABOLIC STABILITY YANN ROLLIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K­STABILITY AND PARABOLIC STABILITY YANN ROLLIN Abstract. Parabolic structures with rational that the three notions of parabolic polystability, K­polystability and existence of constant sca­ lar curvature K, we study iterated blowups of ruled surfaces encoded by a parabolic structure. Our main result, stated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

397

National Synchrotron Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and All Documents listed below are part of the Photon Sciences Directorate and will be updated as needed. Photon Sciences ESH Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) SOP No. Standard Operating Procedure for: LS-ES-0002 Procedure for Acid Etching of Silicon and Germanium Crystals LS-ESH-0004 NSLS Operations Group Chemical Spill and Gas Release Response LS-ESH-0010 VUV Injection Shutter LOTO LS-ESH-0012 LINAC LOTO LS-ESH-0013 Controlled Access to the VUV Ring LS-ESH-0014 Radiation Safety Interlocks at the National Synchrotron Light Source LS-ESH-0019 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements LS-ESH-0020 Biosafety Requirements at the NSLS LS-ESH-0021 Biosafety Level 2 work at the NSLS/ A Technical Basis LS-ESH-0022 Beam Line Configuration Control Checklist Requirements

398

Welcome | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome Welcome Aerial view of APS Aerial view of the APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Whether you are a current or potential scientific user of our unique facility or are simply interested in learning more about the APS, we are delighted that you are visiting our website. The APS is funded by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy. We operate a National User Facility that is open to everyone who has a need for extremely brilliant x-ray photon beams. The APS is one of the most technologically complex machines in the world. This premier national research facility provides the brightest x-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere to more than 5,000 (and growing) scientists from

399

ILC Positron source simualtion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(DOE Review 2007) (DOE Review 2007) Wanming Liu, Haitao Wang, Sergey Antipov, Wei Gai, Kwang-Je Kim HEP, ANL 04/27/2007 Where we are making contribution * Undulator radiation modeling * Adiabatic Matching Device modeling * Keep alive source simulation * Thermal dynamic study on windows * Eddy current simulation * Laser compton scheme positron production simulation for KEK/CLIC Where we are making contributions Outline Undulator and e+ yield OMD/AMD modeling and designing Thermal dynamic of target chamber window Energy deposition profile of target Collaboration with KEK/CLIC Comparison of positron yield from different undulators High K Devices Low K Devices BCD UK I UK II UK III Cornell I Cornell II Cornell III Period (mm) 10.0 11.5 11.0 10.5 10.0 12.0 7 0.3 0.46 28 ~0.54 Yield(Low Pol, 500m drift) ~2.13

400

Thulium-170 heat source  

SciTech Connect

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, C.E.; Van Konynenburg, R.; VanSant, J.H.

1990-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thulium-170 heat source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isotopic heat source is formed using stacks of thin individual layers of a refractory isotopic fuel, preferably thulium oxide, alternating with layers of a low atomic weight diluent, preferably graphite. The graphite serves several functions: to act as a moderator during neutron irradiation, to minimize bremsstrahlung radiation, and to facilitate heat transfer. The fuel stacks are inserted into a heat block, which is encased in a sealed, insulated and shielded structural container. Heat pipes are inserted in the heat block and contain a working fluid. The heat pipe working fluid transfers heat from the heat block to a heat exchanger for power conversion. Single phase gas pressure controls the flow of the working fluid for maximum heat exchange and to provide passive cooling.

Walter, Carl E. (Pleasanton, CA); Van Konynenburg, Richard (Livermore, CA); VanSant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Multiple source heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.5 Generic Fuel Quad and Comparison  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 4 Average Annual Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Various Functions Stock Refrigerator (1) kWh - Electricity Stock Electric Water Heater kWh - Electricity Stock Gas Water Heater million Btu - Natural Gas Stock Oil Water Heater million Btu - Fuel Oil Single-Family Home million Btu Mobile Home million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Large Building million Btu Multi-Family Unit in Small Building million Btu School Building million Btu Office Building million Btu Hospital, In-Patient million Btu Stock Vehicles Passenger Car gallons - Gasoline Van, Pickup Truck, or SUV gallons - Gasoline Heavy Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Tractor Trailer Truck gallons - Diesel Fuel Note(s): Source(s): 10,749 95.8 211,312 1) Stock refrigerator consumption is per household refrigerator consumption, not per refrigerator.

404

Interferometry using undulator sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical systems for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography need to use optical components with subnanometer surface figure error tolerances to achieve diffraction-limited performance [M.D. Himel, in {ital Soft} {ital X}-{ital Ray} {ital Projection} {ital Lithography}, A.M. Hawryluk and R.H. Stulen, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1993), {bold 18}, 1089, and D. Attwood {ital et} {ital al}., Appl. Opt. {bold 32}, 7022 (1993)]. Also, multilayer-coated optics require at-wavelength wavefront measurement to characterize phase effects that cannot be measured by conventional optical interferometry. Furthermore, EUV optical systems will additionally require final testing and alignment at the operational wavelength for adjustment and reduction of the cumulative optical surface errors. Therefore, at-wavelength interferometric measurement of EUV optics will be the necessary metrology tool for the successful development of optics for EUV lithography. An EUV point diffraction interferometer (PDI) has been developed at the Center for X-Ray Optics (CXRO) and has been already in operation for a year [K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., in {ital Extreme} {ital Ultra} {ital Lithography}, D.T. Attwood and F. Zernike, eds. (OSA, Washington, D.C., 1994), K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., Proc. SPIE {bold 2437}, to be published, and K. Goldberg {ital et} {ital al}., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B {bold 13}, 2923 (1995)] using an undulator radiation source and coherent optics beamline at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. An overview of the PDI interferometer and some EUV wavefront measurements obtained with this instrument will be presented. In addition, future developments planned for EUV interferometry at CXRO towards the measurement of actual EUV lithography optics will be shown. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Beguiristain, R.; Goldberg, K.A.; Tejnil, E.; Bokor, J.; Medecki, H.; Attwood, D.T.; Jackson, K. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd., MS 2-400, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler is described having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibility to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in ''inch worm'' fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting. 5 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion irradiation of carbon nanotubes is a tool that can be used to achieve modification of the structure. Irradiation stability of carbon nanotubes was studied by ion and electron bombardment of the samples. Different ion species at various energies were used in experiments, and several defect characterization techniques were applied to characterize the damage. Development of dimensional changes of carbon nanotubes in microscopes operated at accelerating voltages of 30 keV revealed that binding energy of carbon atoms in CNs is much lower than in bulk materials. Resistivity measurements during irradiation demonstrated existence of a quasi state of defect creation. Linear relationship between ID/IG ratio and increasing irradiation fluence was revealed by Raman spectroscopy study of irradiated carbon buckypapers. The deviations from linear relationship were observed for the samples irradiated to very high fluence values. Annealing of irradiated samples was able to reduce the value of ID/IG ratio and remove defects. However, annealing could not affect ID/IG ratio and remove defects in amorphized samples. The extracted value of activation energy for irradiated sample was 0.36 ±0.05 eV. The value of activation energy was in good agreement with theoretical studies.

Aitkaliyeva, Assel

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Definition: Stability Limit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limit Limit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Stability Limit The maximum power flow possible through some particular point in the system while maintaining stability in the entire system or the part of the system to which the stability limit refers.[1] Related Terms power, system, stability References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Stability_Limit&oldid=480505" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

408

Laser stabilization using spectral hole burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have frequency stabilized a Coherent CR699-21 dye laser to a transient spectral hole on the 606 nm transition in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5. A frequency stability of 1 kHz has been obtained on the 10 microsecond timescale together with a long-term frequency drift below 1 kHz/s. RF magnetic fields are used to repopulate the hyperfine levels allowing us to control the dynamics of the spectral hole. A detailed theory of the atomic response to laser frequency errors has been developed which allows us to design and optimize the laser stabilization feedback loop, and specifically we give a stability criterion that must be fulfilled in order to obtain very low drift rates. The laser stability is sufficient for performing quantum gate experiments in Pr^{+3}:Y_2SiO_5.

L. Rippe; B. Julsgaard; A. Walther; S. Kröll

2006-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

409

Manhattan Project: Sources and Notes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SOURCES AND NOTES SOURCES AND NOTES Resources > Sources Below are the collected specific notes for the text and images used on the pages of this web site. For a discussion of the most important works on the Manhattan Project, see the "Suggested Readings." For a general discussion of the use of sources in this web site, see "A Note on Sources." To scan the sources and notes for various categories, choose from the list below. To view the sources and notes for a specific web page, see the footnote at the bottom of each page (exceptions include this page and the home page; the sources and notes for the home page are the first ones listed below). Home Events 1890s-1939: Atomic Discoveries 1939-1942: Early Government Support 1942: Difficult Choices

410

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Home HSS Logo Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) Department of Energy (DOE) Notice N 234.1 Reporting of Radioactive Sealed Sources has been superseded by DOE Order O 231.1B Environment, Safety and Health Reporting. O 231.1B identifies the requirements for centralized inventory and transaction reporting for radioactive sealed sources. Each DOE site/facility operator that owns, possesses, uses or maintains in custody those accountable radioactive sealed sources identified in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), Appendix E, and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Categories 1 and 2 radioactive sealed sources identified in Attachment 5, Appendix A of O 321.1B, will submit information to the DOE Radiological Source Registry and Tracking (RSRT) System.

411

Tracking of Moving Radioactive Sources  

Devices that detect the sources of unsecured nuclear materials are currently limited in their capabilities, ... City halls, public streets, hospitals ...

412

Sources - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help · annotate · Contents Next: References Up: RamanujanModular Equations, Previous: Ramanujan's sum. Sources. [Annotate] · [Shownotes]. References [7] ...

413

The Effect of Alternate Defrost Strategies on the Reverse-Cycle Defrost of an Air-Source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of alternate defrost strategies on the transient performance of the air-source heat pump during the reverse-cycle defrost was investigated. Tests of a base-case heat pump configuration and defrost strategy were completed to provide a basis for performance evaluations of the alternate defrost strategies. The compressor and indoor coil fan operated continuously in the base-case defrost strategy, and the outdoor coil fan was stopped. Alternate defrost strategies utilized variations in fan and compressor operation during and after the defrost. Pre-starting of the outdoor coil fan prior to termination of the reverse-cycle defrost reduced pressure spikes commonly seen at defrost termination in the base-case defrost strategy. A strategy in which the compressor was stopped and the outdoor coil was allowed to drain of melted frost during the last three minutes of the defrost improved overall cyclic performance. Strategies which involved stopping of the indoor fan during defrost or delaying the start of the outdoor fan following defrost termination had a negative impact on defrost performance. A final strategy involved down-sizing of the heat pump compressor from 3.0 tons (36,000 btu/hr) capacity to 2.5 tons capacity. This alternate configuration had a comparable overall performance with the base-case while having a reduced frequency of required defrost periods.

Schliesing, J. S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiation effects concerns at a spallation source  

SciTech Connect

Materials used at spallation neutron sources are exposed to energetic particle and photon radiation. Mechanical and physical properties of these materials are altered; radiation damage on the atomic scale leads to radiation effects on the macroscopic scale. Most notable among mechanical-property radiation effects in metals and metal alloys are changes in tensile strength and ductility, changes in rupture strength, dimensional stability and volumetric swelling, and dimensional changes due to stress-induced creep. Physical properties such as electrical resistivity also are altered. The fission-reactor community has accumulated a good deal of data on material radiation effects. However, when the incident particle energy exceeds 50 MeV or so, a new form of radiation damage ensues; spallation reactions lead to more energetic atom recoils and the subsequent temporal and spatial distribution of point defects is much different from that due to a fission-reactor environment. In addition, spallation reactions cause atomic transmutations with these new atoms representing an impurity in the metal. The higher-energy case is of interest at spallation sources; limited detailed data exist for material performance in this environment. 35 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Sommer, W.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source  

SciTech Connect

A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Huang, Zhirong (Stanford, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next >> Next >> Visitors Access to the ALS Gate Access guest-house Guest House lab-shuttles Lab Shuttles maps-and-directions Maps and Directions Parking Safety Safety for Users safety-for-staff Safety for Staff In Case of Emergency Resources Acronyms Multimedia Employment staff-intranet Staff Intranet Site Map Contact Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource Twitter: ALSBerkeleyLab YouTube: AdvancedLightSource January 2014 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Recent Science Highlights Minding the Gap Makes for More Efficient Solar Cells Using novel materials to develop thin, flexible, and more efficient photovoltaic cells is one of the hottest topics in current materials research. A class of transition metals undergo a dramatic change that makes them ideal for solar energy applications.

419

Stability estimates in stationary inverse transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the stability of the reconstruction of the scattering and absorption coefficients in a stationary linear transport equation from knowledge of the full albedo operator in dimension $n\\geq3$. The albedo operator is defined as the mapping from the incoming boundary conditions to the outgoing transport solution at the boundary of a compact and convex domain. The uniqueness of the reconstruction was proved in [M. Choulli-P. Stefanov, 1996 and 1999] and partial stability estimates were obtained in [J.-N. Wang, 1999] for spatially independent scattering coefficients. We generalize these results and prove an $L^1$-stability estimate for spatially dependent scattering coefficients.

Guillaume Bal; Alexandre Jollivet

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

420

Long life lithium batteries with stabilized electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to non-aqueous electrolytes having electrode stabilizing additives, stabilized electrodes, and electrochemical devices containing the same. Thus the present invention provides electrolytes containing an alkali metal salt, a polar aprotic solvent, and an electrode stabilizing additive. In some embodiments the additives include a substituted or unsubstituted cyclic or spirocyclic hydrocarbon containing at least one oxygen atom and at least one alkenyl or alkynyl group. When used in electrochemical devices with, e.g., lithium manganese oxide spinel electrodes or olivine or carbon-coated olivine electrodes, the new electrolytes provide batteries with improved calendar and cycle life.

Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL); Liu, Jun (Naperville, IL); Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Lu, Wenquan (Darien, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Flame stabilizer for stagnation flow reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of stabilizing a strained flame in a stagnation flow reactor. By causing a highly strained flame to be divided into a large number of equal size segments it is possible to stablize a highly strained flame that is on the verge of extinction, thereby providing for higher film growth rates. The flame stabilizer is an annular ring mounted coaxially and coplanar with the substrate upon which the film is growing and having a number of vertical pillars mounted on the top surface, thereby increasing the number of azimuthal nodes into which the flame is divided and preserving an axisymmetric structure necessary for stability.

Hahn, David W. (Dublin, CA); Edwards, Christopher F. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Enhanced life ion source for germanium and carbon ion implantation  

SciTech Connect

Germanium and carbon ions represent a significant portion of total ion implantation steps in the process flow. Very often ion source materials that used to produce ions are chemically aggressive, especially at higher temperatures, and result in fast ion source performance degradation and a very limited lifetime [B.S. Freer, et. al., 2002 14th Intl. Conf. on Ion Implantation Technology Proc, IEEE Conf. Proc., p. 420 (2003)]. GeF{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} are commonly used to generate germanium and carbon beams. In the case of GeF{sub 4} controlling the tungsten deposition due to the de-composition of WF{sub 6} (halogen cycle) is critical to ion source life. With CO{sub 2}, the materials oxidation and carbon deposition must be controlled as both will affect cathode thermionic emission and anti-cathode (repeller) efficiencies due to the formation of volatile metal oxides. The improved ion source design Extended Life Source 3 (Eterna ELS3) together with its proprietary co-gas material implementation has demonstrated >300 hours of stable continuous operation when using carbon and germanium ion beams. Optimizing cogas chemistries retard the cathode erosion rate for germanium and carbon minimizes the adverse effects of oxygen when reducing gas is introduced for carbon. The proprietary combination of hardware and co-gas has improved source stability and the results of the hardware and co-gas development are discussed.

Hsieh, Tseh-Jen; Colvin, Neil; Kondratenko, Serguei [Axcelis Technologies, Inc. 108 Cherry Hill Drive, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

423

Tennessee Electrical Contractor Witnesses Stabilization | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electrical Contractor Witnesses Stabilization Tennessee Electrical Contractor Witnesses Stabilization Tennessee Electrical Contractor Witnesses Stabilization April 2, 2010 - 11:31am Addthis Joshua DeLung David Andrews of Andrews AC Electric Inc., in Knoxville, Tenn., is one example of the small business owners who have flooded the state's Department of Human Services with positive feedback. David has seen his business go from layoffs to stabilization. As the economy has strengthened, so has his company. The DHS is responsible for awarding Recovery Act weatherization funding in Tennessee from the U.S. Department of Energy, and the effects of weatherization work in the Volunteer State are helping small businesses like David's prosper. "The weatherization contracts have helped us, and I have been able to

424

TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 TRUCK ROLL STABILITY DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS S. S. Stevens, Principal Investigator S. M. Chin K. A. Hake H. L. Hwang J. P. Rollow L. F. Truett July 2001 Prepared for the...

425

The Stability and Genesis of Rossby Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability and genesis of the vortices associated with long solitary divergent Rossby waves-the Rossby vortices–are studied numerically using the single-layer (SL) model with Jovian parameters. Vortex behavior depends on location and on ...

Gareth P. Williams; R. John Wilson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IV); Fuel stability *(N) Fossil Energy Complex Spec. ComplexInteraction 11-2 Fossil Energy Chairman: R. Jaffee Members:that programming in fossil energy research supported by the

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Stability of alert survivable forces during reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of current and projected strategic forces are discussed within a framework that contains elements of current US and Russian analyses. For current force levels and high alert, stability levels are high, as are the levels of potential strikes, due to the large forces deployed. As force levels drop towards those of current value target sets, the analysis becomes linear, concern shifts from stability to reconstitution, and survivable forces drop out. Adverse marginal costs generally provide disincentives for the reduction of vulnerable weapons, but the exchange of vulnerable for survivable weapons could reduce cost while increasing stability even for aggressive participants. Exchanges between effective vulnerable and survivable missile forces are studied with an aggregated, probabilistic model, which optimizes each sides` first and determines each sides` second strikes and costs by minimizing first strike costs.

Canavan, G.H.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Stabilizers for oil slurries of carbonaceous material  

SciTech Connect

Slurries of carbonaceous material in oil, particularly coal, are stabilized with particular tertiary amines. An example is tallow amine first condensed with two moles of propylene oxide and then condensed with thirteen moles of ethylene oxide.

Schick, M. J.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

429

Linear Stability Models of Shelfbreak Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of inviscid frontally trapped waves along a shelfbreak is examined to determine whether frontal instabilities may contribute to the alongfront variability frequently observed. Three different basic states with increasingly complex ...

Glen Gawarkiewicz

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

431

Spirals in Potential Vorticity. Part II: Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the linear stability of spiral-shaped potential vorticity (PV) filaments is constructed by using the Kolmogorov capacity as a time-independent characterization of their structure, assuming that the dynamics is essentially barotropic. ...

John Methven

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Linear Stability of Modons on a Sphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The linear stability of two stationary dipolar modon solutions of the nondivergent barotropic vorticity equation on a rotating sphere is investigated. A numerical normal mode analysis of the linearized equation is performed by solving the ...

E. C. Neven

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Stabilizing windings for tilting and shifting modes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to passive conducting loops for stabilizing a plasma ring against unstable tilting and/or shifting modes. To this end, for example, plasma ring in a spheromak is stabilized by a set of four figure-8 shaped loops having one pair on one side of the plasma and one pair on the other side with each pair comprising two loops whose axes are transverse to each other.

Jardin, Stephen C. (Princeton, NJ); Christensen, Uffe R. (Princeton, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Stabilized fuel with silica support structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

Constricted glow discharge plasma source  

SciTech Connect

A constricted glow discharge chamber and method are disclosed. The polarity and geometry of the constricted glow discharge plasma source is set so that the contamination and energy of the ions discharged from the source are minimized. The several sources can be mounted in parallel and in series to provide a sustained ultra low source of ions in a plasma with contamination below practical detection limits. The source is suitable for applying films of nitrides such as gallium nitride and oxides such as tungsten oxide and for enriching other substances in material surfaces such as oxygen and water vapor, which are difficult process as plasma in any known devices and methods. The source can also be used to assist the deposition of films such as metal films by providing low-energy ions such as argon ions.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); Anders, Simone (Albany, CA); Dickinson, Michael (San Leandro, CA); Rubin, Michael (Berkeley, CA); Newman, Nathan (Winnetka, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Sources Directorate Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan December 2009 ii | Vision and Mission Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan The VISION of the Light Sources Directorate is: to be a provider of choice for world-class photon science and facilities that deliver outstanding scientific productivity and impact, and to be recognized as a leader in developing innovative techniques and ap- plications of photon science Our MISSION is defined by the set of activities that are required to realize this vision: to advance scientific knowledge and to solve critical problems through the design, construction, operation, and use of premier photon science facilities | Table of Contents Light Sources Directorate Strategic Plan

437

Effects of buoyancy on premixed flame stabilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stabilization limits of v-flame and conical flames are investigated in normal gravity (+g) and reversed gravity (up-side-down burner, -g) to compare with observations of flame stabilization during microgravity experiments. The results show that buoyancy has most influence on the stabilization of laminar V-flames. Under turbulent conditions, the effects are less significant. For conical flames stabilized with a ring, the stabilization domain of the +g and -g cases are not significantly different. Under reversed gravity, both laminar v-flames and conical flames show flame behaviors that were also found in microgravity. The v-flames reattached to the rim and the conical flame assumed a top-hat shape. One of the special cases of -g conical flame is the buoyancy stabilized laminar flat flame that is detached from the burner. These flame implies a balance between the flow momentum and buoyant forces. The stretch rates of these flames are sufficiently low (laminar burning speed S{sub L}{sup 0}. An analysis based on evaluating the Richardson number is used to determine the relevant parameters that describe the buoyancy/momentum balance. A perfect balance i.e. Ri = l can be attained when the effect of heat loss from the flame zone is low. For the weaker lean cases, our assumption of adiabaticity tends to overestimate the real flame temperature. This interesting low stretch laminar flame configuration can be useful for fundamental studies of combustion chemistry.

Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Optically pumped polarized ion sources  

SciTech Connect

Polarization transfer collisions between protons, atomic hydrogen, or deuterium and optically pumped alkali-metal vapour are implemented in the high current optically pumped polarized ion source (OPPIS) and the laser driven source (LDS) of nuclear polarized atoms for target applications. The OPPIS technique overcomes the limitations on intensity of the conventional atomic beam source technique and meets the requirements of the new generation of polarization experiments at multi-GeV accelerators and colliders. 17 refs., 3 figs.

Zelenski, A.N.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

Cavity-stabilized laser with acceleration sensitivity below 10 g  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Typically, lasers for such applications are stabilized by locking them to a Fabry-Pérot cavity such that the fractional frequency stability of the laser is ...

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

440

Stabilization Strategies of the Lumbar Spine in Vivo.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In developing a method of quantifying stability in the lumbar spine Cholewicki and McGill (1996) have also broached the notion of sufficient stability, where too… (more)

Grenier, Sylvain

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Load Control for System Reliability and Measurement-Based Stability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Load Control for System Reliability and Measurement-Based Stability Assessment Load Control for System Reliability and Measurement-Based Stability Assessment Research and develop...

442

Analysis of Lipid OxidationChapter 9 Accelerated Stability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Lipid Oxidation Chapter 9 Accelerated Stability Tests Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Accelerated Stability Tests from ...

443

ARC SNUBBERS NEUTRAL BEAM SOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transformer cores near the source and route all of the powertransformer that transiently separates the energy in the capacitances of the power

Baker, W.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Tsunami Information Sources: Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Landslide in the Upper Aleutian Forearc,' by G.J. Fryer,of the Source of the 1946 Aleutian 'Tsunami' Earthquake,"

Wiegel, Robert L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archives APS Brochure Annual Reports Posters Podcasts Image Gallery external site Video Library Syndicated Feeds (RSS) Now Playing: The Advanced Photon Source More videos:...

446

Video Library | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Library Related Links: APS Colloquium APS Podcasts APS Today More videos: Introduction to the APS Physics of the Blues Now Playing: Building the Advanced Photon Source This...

447

Relative risks of energy sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the risks associated with various energy sources in an attempt to demonstrate the relative safety of nuclear energy. (JEF)

Haire, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

User Information | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information The Advanced Photon Source provides a variety of guides, resources, and information for prospective, new, and current users. In this section: For Prospective Users...

449

Media Center | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact on nearly every aspect of our lives. Annual Reports Articles on Advanced Photon Source research and engineering highlights that are written for the interested...

450

Document Central | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Operations Manual APS QA Plan (obsolescence memo) APS Publications: APS Database APS Technical Publications Light Source Notes Technical Bulletins Safety Committee...

451

Information Technology | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Photon Source Information Technology Support Search APS ... Search Button About User Information News & Events Science & Education Beamlines Divisions Argonne Home >...

452

CAT Communicator | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source News Archives CAT Communicator CAT Communicator was a newsletter intended to provide APS information to...

453

Organization Chart | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source (APS) organization comprises three divisions and one project office. Accelerator Systems Division (ASD) ASD provides engineering and physics support for the APS, and...

454

Crude oil and finished fuel storage stability: An annotated review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A state-of-the-art review and assessment of storage effects on crude oil and product quality was undertaken through a literature search by computer accessing several data base sources. Pertinent citations from that literature search are tabulated for the years 1980 to the present. This 1990 revision supplements earlier reviews by Brinkman and others which covered stability publications through 1979 and an update in 1983 by Goetzinger and others that covered the period 1952--1982. For purposes of organization, citations are listed in the current revision chronologically starting with the earliest 1980 publications. The citations have also been divided according to primary subject matter. Consequently 11 sections appear including: alternate fuels, gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, residual fuel, crude oil, biodegradation, analyses, reaction mechanisms, containment, and handling and storage. Each section contains a brief narrative followed by all the citations for that category.

Whisman, M.L.; Anderson, R.P.; Woodward, P.W.; Giles, H.N.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Apparatus and method for stabilization or oxidation of polymeric materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for treating polymeric materials comprises a treatment chamber adapted to maintain a selected atmosphere at a selected temperature; a means for supporting the polymeric material within the chamber; and, a source of ozone-containing gas, which decomposes at the selected temperature yielding at least one reactive oxidative species whereby the polymer is stabilized and cross linked through exposure to the oxidative species in the chamber at the selected temperature. The ozone may be generated by a plasma discharge or by various chemical processes. The apparatus may be configured for either batch-type or continuous-type processing. The apparatus and method are especially useful for preparing polymer fibers, particularly PAN fibers, for later carbonization treatments as well as to make flame-retardant fabrics.

Paulauskas, Felix L. (Knoxville, TN); Sherman, Daniel M. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

The status of the spallation neutron source ion source  

SciTech Connect

The ion source for the spallation neutron source (SNS) is a radio-frequency, multicusp source designed to deliver 45 mA of H2 to the SNS accelerator with a pulse length of 1 ms and repetition rate of 60 Hz. A total of three ion sources have been fabricated and commissioned at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and subsequently delivered to the SNS at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ion sources are currently being rotated between operation on the SNS accelerator, where they are involved in ongoing efforts to commission the SNS LINAC, and the hot spare stand (HSS), where high-current tests are in progress. Commissioning work involves operating the source in a low duty-factor mode (pulse width {approx}200 ms and repetition rate {approx}5 Hz) for extended periods of time while the high-current tests involve source operation at full duty-factor of 6 percent (1 ms/60 Hz). This report discusses routine performance of the source employed in the commissioning role as well as the initial results o f high-current tests performed on the HSS.

Welton, R.F.; Stockli, M.P.; Murray, S.N.; Keller, R.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Comprehensive Stability Analysis using Synchrophasors: Stability Assessment and Control from Synchrophasor Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power system stability is the ability of an electric power system to regain a state of operating equilibrium after being subjected to a physical disturbance. To maintain power system reliability, it is essential that operators ensure satisfactory rotor angle and voltage stability performance under anticipated operating scenarios and contingency conditions.Stability assessment has been dominated by simulation-based approach, in which off-line simulations are conducted to evaluate rotor ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

458

Structure and Stability of Small Boron and Boron Oxide Clusters  

SciTech Connect

In order to rationally design and explore a potential energy source based on the highly exothermic oxidation of boron, density functional theory (DFT) was used to characterize small boron clusters with 0-3 oxygen atoms and total of up to ten atoms. The structures, vibrational frequencies, and stabilities were calculated for each of these clusters. A quantum molecular dynamics procedure was used to locate the global minimum for each species, which proved to be crucial given the unintuitive structure of many of the most stable isomers. Additionally, due to the plane-wave, periodic DFT code used in this study, a straightforward comparison of these clusters to the bulk boron and B2O3 structures was possible, despite the great structural and energetic differences between the two forms. Through evaluation of previous computational and experimental work, the relevant low-energy structures of all but one of the pure boron clusters can be assigned with great certainty. Nearly all of the boron oxide clusters are described here for the first time, but there are strong indications that the DFT procedure chosen is particularly well-suited for the task. Insight into the trends in boron and boron oxide cluster stabilities, as well as the ultimate limits of growth for each, are also provided. The work reported herein provides crucial information towards understanding the oxidation of boron at a molecular level.

Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Drummond, Michael L [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Position Stability Monitoring of THEthe LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect

X-ray FELs demand that the positions of undulator components be stable to less than 1 {mu}m per day. Simultaneously, the undulator length increases significantly in order to saturate at x-ray wavelengths. To minimize the impact of the outside environment, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator is placed underground, but reliable data about ground motion inside such a tunnel was not available in the required stability range during the planning phase. Therefore, a new position monitor system had been developed and installed with the LCLS undulator. This system is capable of measuring x, y, roll, pitch and yaw of each of the 33 undulator quadrupoles with respect to stretched wires. Instrument resolution is about 10 nm and instrument drift is negligible. Position data of individual quadrupoles can be correlated along the entire 132-m long undulator. The system has been under continuous operation since 2009. This report describes long term experiences with the running system and the observed positional stability of the undulator quadrupoles.

Nuhn, Heinz Dieter; Gassner, Georg; Peters, Franz; /SLAC

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

460

Injection, compression and stability of intense ion-rings  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in pulsed high power ion beam technology make possible the creation of intense ion-rings with strong self-magnetic fields by single pulse injection. Such ion rings have several uses in controlled fusion e.g., to produce a min parallel B parallel magnetic geometry with a mirror ratio much higher than is possible with external conductors. For even stronger ion rings a min parallel B parallel with closed lines of force (ASTRON type) can be created. For this purpose, since the ion energies required are much higher than are available from high power sources, magnetic compression can be utilized to increase the ion energy. The success of this scheme depends critically on the stability of the ion ring. The low frequency perturbations of the ring-plasma system is examined by means of a generalization of the energy principle which established sufficient conditions for stability. The high-frequency micro- instabilities and their nonlinear consequences are discussed in terms of conventional techniques. (auth)

Sudan, R.N.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

High Performance Computing for Stability Problems - Applications to Hydrodynamic Stability and Neutron Transport Criticality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work we examine two kinds of applications in terms of stability and perform numerical evaluations and benchmarks on parallel platforms. We consider the… (more)

Subramanian, Chandramowli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Selecting quality sources: Bridging the gap between the perception and use of information sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated undergraduatesâ?? source selection behaviour: what sources they use frequently, what criteria they consider important for source selection, how they perceive different sources, and whether their source selection behaviour ... Keywords: information literacy education, source evaluation criteria, source perception, source selection, source use, undergraduates

Kyung-Sun Kim; Sei-Ching Joanna Sin

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Alternative Energy Sources – Myths and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Energy Sources - Myths and Realities Walterneed to think about alternative energy sources; the worlddepletion of oil? Alternative energy sources can be divided

Youngquist, Walter

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Alternative Energy Sources – Myths and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Energy Sources Nonrenewable Renewable Oil sands,themselves. Summary Oil is a unique energy source that hasfor oil, which is the limitation many alternative sources

Youngquist, Walter

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 1980s. Second generation sources, which operate betweengenerations. First generation ECR sources operate between 5Two superconducting 3 rd generation ECR sources, VENUS and

Lyneis, Claude M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an optimized third generation source not only translatesfirst third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS,of a third-generation synchrotron light source translates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures.

Ballou, Nathan E. (West Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hollow electrode plasma excitation source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plasma source incorporates a furnace as a hollow anode, while a coaxial cathode is disposed therewithin. The source is located in a housing provided with an ionizable gas such that a glow discharge is produced between anode and cathode. Radiation or ionic emission from the glow discharge characterizes a sample placed within the furnace and heated to elevated temperatures. 5 figs.

Ballou, N.E.

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fourth Generation Light Source Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light Sources October 27 to 29, 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This workshop is being co-hosted by APS, NSLS, SSRL and TJNAF. FGLSlogo This workshop will explore the phenomenology of interactions with ultra-high-power, -brilliance, and -coherence light sources in the DUV, soft x-ray, and x-ray regimes, as well as the scientific opportunities they provide. The workshop will begin with tutorials on the generation and properties of these sources and identify issues in their use in experimentation. Also included will be an overview of current efforts to develop these sources and a review of the scientific opportunities defined by previous research and workshops. These background talks will be followed

470

Multi-source solar simulator using single light source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, techniques and apparatus are described for adjusting the spectral irradiance characteristics of a light source. The invention is applicable to any light source and has many areas of utility. One example is for simulating solar light for use in testing efficiency of photovoltaic cells. Solar light at any point in the world can be simulated. Also, light having any desired wavelength (or combination of desired wavelengths) can be obtained from a single light source using the techniques and apparatus of the invention. 4 figs.

Emery, K.A.; Osterwald, C.R.

1989-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

471

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regenerative amplifier FELs—RAFELs). Seeded FELs may be able to operate with high stability at pulse energies

Bergmann, Uwe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Thermal stabilization FY 1999 blend plan  

SciTech Connect

This Blend Plan documents the alternate feed material items for the thermal stabilization process that will be used in place of the metal items that were originally planned to be processed. Problems with resolution of the safety basis for the metal items resulted in the decision to run material that already had an established safety basis. Various in process and scrap recovery items stored in gloveboxes, plutonium oxide and plutonium oxide mixed with uranium oxide stored in 2736-2 vaults will be processed through the stabilization furnaces until the safety basis for the metal items has been resolved. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all volatile materials and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI). The stabilized material must meet LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-94 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Physics research and technology developments of electron string ion sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most recent experimental information on electron string phenomenon, such as two step transition to electron string state, stability of e-strings in condition of electron energy recuperation, are described. The new technology developments of electron string ion sources (ESIS) include pulse injection of gaseous species in e-string and its efficient conversion to ion beams, slow ion extraction, ion-ion cooling of heavy ions with CH{sub 4} coolant, and a progress in the construction of the new Joint Institute for Nuclear Research ESIS with 6 T solenoid are briefly considered.

Donets, D. E.; Donets, E. E.; Ramzdorf, A. Yu.; Salnikov, V. V.; Shutov, V. B.; Donets, E. D. [Veksler and Baldin Laboratory of High Energy Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Honma, T.; Noda, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba, 263-8555 (Japan)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

474

Process for stabilizing the viscosity characteristics of coal derived materials and the stabilized materials obtained thereby  

SciTech Connect

A process is disclosed for stabilizing the viscosity of coal derived materials such as an SRC product by adding up to 5.0% by weight of a light volatile phenolic viscosity repressor. The viscosity will remain stabilized for a period of time of up to 4 months.

Bronfenbrenner, James C. (Allentown, PA); Foster, Edward P. (Allentown, PA); Tewari, Krishna (Allentown, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Liaison Office Industrial Liaison Office registration page New to Synchrotron Radiation New to the APS Already a User Advanced Photon Source Industrial Liaison Office APS Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source Welcome to the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. We are one of five synchrotron radiation light sources operated as national user facilities by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. The APS is open to everyone who can utilize extremely bright x-ray photon beams for high-value research. This premier national research facility provides these x-ray beams to more than 5,000 scientists from all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and several foreign countries. These scientists come to the APS from industry, universities,

476

International Data on Radiological Sources  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT The mission of radiological dispersal device (RDD) nuclear forensics is to identify the provenance of nuclear and radiological materials used in RDDs and to aid law enforcement in tracking nuclear materials and routes. The application of databases to radiological forensics is to match RDD source material to a source model in the database, provide guidance regarding a possible second device, and aid the FBI by providing a short list of manufacturers and distributors, and ultimately to the last legal owner of the source. The Argonne/Idaho National Laboratory RDD attribution database is a powerful technical tool in radiological forensics. The database (1267 unique vendors) includes all sealed sources and a device registered in the U.S., is complemented by data from the IAEA Catalogue, and is supported by rigorous in-lab characterization of selected sealed sources regarding physical form, radiochemical composition, and age-dating profiles. Close working relationships with global partners in the commercial sealed sources industry provide invaluable technical information and expertise in the development of signature profiles. These profiles are critical to the down-selection of potential candidates in either pre- or post- event RDD attribution. The down-selection process includes a match between an interdicted (or detonated) source and a model in the database linked to one or more manufacturers and distributors.

Martha Finck; Margaret Goldberg

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Diversity employment and recruitment sources  

SciTech Connect

Effective human resources management has been identified as one of four critical success factors in the Department of Energy Strategic Plan. The Plan states relative to this factor: ``The Department seeks greater alignment of resources with agency priorities and increased diversification of the workforce, including gender, ethnicity, age, and skills. This diversification will bring new thinking and perspectives that heretofore have not had a voice in departmental decision-making.`` This Guide has been developed as a key tool to assist Department of Energy management and administrative staff in achieving Goal 2 of this critical success factor, which is to ``Ensure a diverse and talented workforce.`` There are numerous sources from which to recruit minorities, women and persons with disabilities. Applying creativity and proactive effort, using traditional and non-traditional approaches, and reaching out to various professional, academic and social communities will increase the reservoir of qualified candidates from which to make selections. In addition, outreach initiatives will undoubtedly yield further benefits such as a richer cultural understanding and diversity awareness. The resource listings presented in this Guide are offered to encourage active participation in the diversity recruitment process. This Guide contains resource listings by state for organizations in the following categories: (1) African American Recruitment Sources; (2) Asian American/Pacific Islander Recruitment Sources; (3) Hispanic Recruitment Sources; (4) Native American/Alaskan Native Recruitment Sources; (5) Persons with Disabilities Recruitment Sources; and (6) Women Recruitment Sources.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALS and the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The LDLR crystals,Director for the Advanced Photon Source (APS), and Steven

Duque editor, Theresa; Greiner editor, Annette; Moxon editor, Elizabeth; Robinson editor, Arthur; Tamura editor, Lori

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Vertically stabilized elongated cross-section tokamak  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a vertically stabilized, non-circular (minor) cross-section, toroidal plasma column characterized by an external separatrix. To this end, a specific poloidal coil means is added outside a toroidal plasma column containing an endless plasma current in a tokamak to produce a rectangular cross-section plasma column along the equilibrium axis of the plasma column. By elongating the spacing between the poloidal coil means the plasma cross-section is vertically elongated, while maintaining vertical stability, efficiently to increase the poloidal flux in linear proportion to the plasma cross-section height to achieve a much greater plasma volume than could be achieved with the heretofore known round cross-section plasma columns. Also, vertical stability is enhanced over an elliptical cross-section plasma column, and poloidal magnetic divertors are achieved.

Sheffield, George V. (Hopewell, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid used in nanomedicine after electron irradiation was studied. Two types of the water-based magnetic fluids were prepared. The first one was based on the magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by one surfactant natrium oleate. The second one was biocompatibile magnetic fluid stabilized with two surfactants, natrium oleate as a first surfactant and Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a second surfactant. The magnetization measurements showed that electron irradiation up to 1000Gy caused 50% reduction of saturation magnetization in the case of the first sample with only one surfactant while in the case of the second biocompatibile magnetic fluid, only 25% reduction of saturation magnetization was observed. In the first magnetic fluid the radiation caused the higher sedimentation of the magnetic particles than in the second case, when magnetic particles are covered also with PEG. The obtained results show that PEG behave as a protective element.

Natalia Tomasovicova; Ivan Haysak; Martina Koneracka; Jozef Kovac; Milan Timko; Vlasta Zavisova; Alexander Okunev; Alexander Parlag; Alexey Fradkin; Peter Kopcansky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu stabilization source" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Stability of flows in fluidized beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the linearized stability of the state of uniform fluidization, within the context of the theory of mixtures. The mixture is assumed to be made up of a classical linearly viscous fluid mixed with solid particles. In marked departure from most of the previous studies, we model the solid as a granular material and assume a constitutive relation that stems from classical motions in continuum mechanics. The linearized stability analysis of the state of uniform fluidization, in general, leads to an eighth order equation for the characteristic whose root implies instability, when positive. We find that the characteristic equation can be factored and one of the factors is precisely the equation that governs the stability when we use a simplified analysis akin to that of the earlier study of Anderson and Jackson.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Stability windows for proto-quark stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the existence of possible stable strange matter and related stability windows at finite temperature for different models that are generally applied to describe quark stars, namely, the quark-mass density dependent model, the MIT bag model and the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. We emphasize that, although the limits for stable strange matter depend on a comparison with the ground state of 56Fe, which is a zero temperature state, the quantity that has to be used in the search for strange matter in proto-quark stars is the free energy and we analyze stability windows up to temperatures of the order of 40 MeV. The effects of strong magnetic fields on stability windows are computed and the resulting mass-radius relations for different stages of the proto-quark star are analyzed.

V. Dexheimer; J. R. Torres; D. P. Menezes

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

483

RF System Upgrades to the Advanced Photon Source Linear Accelerator in Support of the Fel Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The S-band linear accelerator, which was built to be the source of particles and the front end of the Advanced Photon Source injector, is now also being used to support a low-energy undulator test line (LEUTL) and to drive a free-electron laser (FEL). The more severe rf stability requirements of the FEL have resulted in an effort to identify sources of phase and amplitude instability and implement corresponding upgrades to the rf generation chain and the measurement system. Test data and improvements implemented and planned are described

Smith, T L; Grelick, A E; Pile, G; Nassiri, A; Arnold, N

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC TOWER JETS  

SciTech Connect

Modern theoretical models of astrophysical jets combine accretion, rotation, and magnetic fields to launch and collimate supersonic flows from a central source. Near the source, magnetic field strengths must be large enough to collimate the jet requiring that the Poynting flux exceeds the kinetic energy flux. The extent to which the Poynting flux dominates kinetic energy flux at large distances from the engine distinguishes two classes of models. In magneto-centrifugal launch models, magnetic fields dominate only at scales {approx}< 100 engine radii, after which the jets become hydrodynamically dominated (HD). By contrast, in Poynting flux dominated (PFD) magnetic tower models, the field dominates even out to much larger scales. To compare the large distance propagation differences of these two paradigms, we perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations of both HD and PFD stellar jets formed via the same energy flux. We also compare how thermal energy losses and rotation of the jet base affects the stability in these jets. For the conditions described, we show that PFD and HD exhibit observationally distinguishable features: PFD jets are lighter, slower, and less stable than HD jets. Unlike HD jets, PFD jets develop current-driven instabilities that are exacerbated as cooling and rotation increase, resulting in jets that are clumpier than those in the HD limit. Our PFD jet simulations also resemble the magnetic towers that have been recently created in laboratory astrophysical jet experiments.

Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 600 Wilson Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon (France); Hartigan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, TX 77521-1892 (United States); Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW London (United Kingdom)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

485

Effects of buoyancy on premixed flame stabilization  

SciTech Connect

The stabilization limits of v-flame and conical flames are investigated in normal gravity (+g) and reversed gravity (up-side-down burner, -g) to compare with observations of flame stabilization during microgravity experiments. The results show that buoyancy has most influence on the stabilization of laminar V-flames. Under turbulent conditions, the effects are less significant. For conical flames stabilized with a ring, the stabilization domain of the +g and -g cases are not significantly different. Under reversed gravity, both laminar v-flames and conical flames show flame behaviors that were also found in microgravity. The v-flames reattached to the rim and the conical flame assumed a top-hat shape. One of the special cases of -g conical flame is the buoyancy stabilized laminar flat flame that is detached from the burner. These flame implies a balance between the flow momentum and buoyant forces. The stretch rates of these flames are sufficiently low (< 20 s{sup -1}) such that the displacement speeds S{sub L} are almost equal to the laminar burning speed S{sub L}{sup 0}. An analysis based on evaluating the Richardson number is used to determine the relevant parameters that describe the buoyancy/momentum balance. A perfect balance i.e. Ri = l can be attained when the effect of heat loss from the flame zone is low. For the weaker lean cases, our assumption of adiabaticity tends to overestimate the real flame temperature. This interesting low stretch laminar flame configuration can be useful for fundamental studies of combustion chemistry.

Bedat, B.; Cheng, R.K.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Dynamic stability experiment of Maglev systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents dynamic stability experiments on maglev systems and compares with predictions calculated by a nonlinear dynamic computer code. Instabilities of an electrodynamic system (EDS)-type vehicle model were obtained from both experimental observations and computer simulations for a five-degree-of-freedom maglev vehicle moving on a guideway consisting of double L-shaped aluminum segments attached to a rotating wheel. The experimental and theoretical analyses developed in this study identify basic stability characteristics and future research needs of maglev systems.

Cai, Y.; Chen, S.S.; Zhu, S.; Rote, D.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Aluminum-stabilized NB3SN superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aluminum-stabilized Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb.sub.3 Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

Scanlan, Ronald M. (Livermore, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Stability of Anisotropic Cylinder with Zero Expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamical instability of anisotropic collapsing cylinder with the expansion-free condition, which generates vacuum cavity within fluid distribution. The perturbation scheme is applied to distinguish Newtonian, post-Newtonian and post-post Newtonian terms, which are used for constructing dynamical equation at Newtonian and post-Newtonian regimes. We analyze the role of pressure anisotropy and energy density inhomogeneity on the stability of collapsing cylinder. It turns out that stability of the cylinder depends upon these physical properties of the fluid, not on the stiffness of the fluid.

M. Sharif; M. Azam

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

489

Stability of Anisotropic Cylinder with Zero Expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the dynamical instability of anisotropic collapsing cylinder with the expansion-free condition, which generates vacuum cavity within fluid distribution. The perturbation scheme is applied to distinguish Newtonian, post-Newtonian and post-post Newtonian terms, which are used for constructing dynamical equation at Newtonian and post-Newtonian regimes. We analyze the role of pressure anisotropy and energy density inhomogeneity on the stability of collapsing cylinder. It turns out that stability of the cylinder depends upon these physical properties of the fluid, not on the stiffness of the fluid.

Sharif, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Annual Energy Outlook 2007: With Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

imports. 7 Marketed production (wet) minus extraction losses. 8 Synthetic natural gas, propane air, coke oven gas, refinery gas, biomass gas, air injected for Btu stabilization,...

491

Caborane beam from ITEP Bernas ion source for semiconductor implanters  

SciTech Connect

A joint research and development of steady state intense boron ion sources for hundreds of electron-volt ion implanters has been in progress for the past 5 years. The difficulties of extraction and transportation of low energy boron beams can be solved by implanting clusters of boron atoms. In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the Bernas ion source successfully generated the beam of decaborane ions. The carborane (C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) ion beam is more attractive material due to its better thermal stability. The results of carborane ion beam generation are presented. The result of the beam implantation into the silicon wafer is presented as well.

Seleznev, D.; Hershcovitch, A.; Kropachev, G.; Kozlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Koshelev, V.; Kulevoy, T.; Jonson, B.; Poole, J.; Alexeyenko, O.; Gurkova, E.; Oks, E.; Gushenets, V.; Polozov, S.; Masunov, E.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Energy Management Policies for Energy-Neutral Source-Channel Coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In cyber-physical systems where sensors measure the temporal evolution of a given phenomenon of interest and radio communication takes place over short distances, the energy spent for source acquisition and compression may be comparable with that used for transmission. Additionally, in order to avoid limited lifetime issues, sensors may be powered via energy harvesting and thus collect all the energy they need from the environment. This work addresses the problem of energy allocation over source acquisition/compression and transmission for energy-harvesting sensors. At first, focusing on a single-sensor, energy management policies are identified that guarantee a maximal average distortion while at the same time ensuring the stability of the queue connecting source and channel encoders. It is shown that the identified class of policies is optimal in the sense that it stabilizes the queue whenever this is feasible by any other technique that satisfies the same average distortion constraint. Moreover, this class...

Castiglione, Paolo; Erkip, Elza; Zemen, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on new science opportunities provided by a multi-bend achromat lattice at the APS APS-U MBA Lattice Workshop Registration is now closed. Please contact Diane Wilkinson ext. 7810 or a member of the Workshop Organizing Committee for changes or modifications to your registration. Submit Comments, Suggestions, and Ideas for MBA Lattice Workshop October 21-22 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Lab The Advanced Photon Source Upgrade is focused on delivering a powerful, versatile facility for science using high-brightness, high-energy X-rays. At APS, and around the light source community, scientists have been developing storage ring designs that push closer to the ultimate diffraction limit for X-ray sources. A recent report by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee, which advises the Director of the U.S.

494

Navy Heat Source Safety Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of these tests was to validate the integrity of the Navy Heat Source after imposing conditions which might, in the extreme, be encountered singly or serially so that safety would be assured.

Anderson, C. G.; Cartmill, W. B.

1975-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

495

Lesson 2: Energy Sources Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lesson 2: Energy Sources #12;Overview · Most geologic disasters involve the release of large amounts of energy either quickly or slowly. To understand these processes, we need to know where the energy released was derived from. #12

Chen, Po

496

APS Upgrade | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop on new science opportunities provided by a multi-bend achromat lattice at the APS October 21-22 Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Lab To prepare for the workshop...

497

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

498

Quantum fields as gravitational sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The practice of setting quantum fields as sources for classical general relativity is examined. Several conceptual problems are identified which invalidate apparently innocuous equations. Alternative ways to links classical general relativity with quantum theory using Bohm's theory are proposed.

Mark J Hadley

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

499

Impact of load type on microgrid stability.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microgrids show great promise as a means of integrating distributed generation sources into the public grid distribution system. In order to provide uninterrupted,high quality power… (more)

Monnin, Jared P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent {approx}38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of {approx}90%. H{sup -} beam pulses ({approx}1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, {approx}60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of {approx}0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of {approx}99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of {approx}75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance/installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to {approx}100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Pennisi, Terry R [ORNL; Roseberry, Ron T [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z