Sample records for btu sta bilization

  1. Accurate BTU Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosseini, S.; Rusnak, J. J.

    1 represents a typical arrangement in which heat is supplied to, or absorbed by the difference in temperatures of a working fluid, generally water. (See Ref. 1). Supply (TIl- Supply (Tl1 E E Heat (BTU) He.' ~ Exchange Exchange Relurn (T2... rate (BTU/unit time) ? m Mass flow rate (lb/unit time) hI' h2 = Specific enthalpy of supply and return liquid (BTU/lb) BTU C p - Average specific heat (--~----) IboF Equations 1, 2 are instantaneous values for heat flow or energy transferred...

  2. BTU Accounting for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, R. O.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

  3. College of Arts and Sciences STA Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    College of Arts and Sciences STA Statistics KEY: # = new course * = course changed = course dropped University of Kentucky 2013-2014 Undergraduate Bulletin 1 STA 200 STATISTICS: A FORCE IN HUMAN JUDGMENT. (3) This course is concerned with the interaction of the science and art of statistics with our

  4. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  5. Sustainable Technology International STA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to:Holdings Co LtdLLC Place: Missoula, Montana Zip: 59812STA

  6. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  7. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  8. From the CDR Library Sta cksFrom the CDR Library Sta cks -Also, if you have any an-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Gluten Allergy May Play Role in Gastro Woes in Kids With Autism Autism Speaks and the National BlackFrom the CDR Library Sta cksFrom the CDR Library Sta cks -Also, if you have any an- nouncements.wilson@uscmed.sc.edu --Over the past month the library had the following circulation statistics: Checkouts: 11 Renewals: 1

  9. Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYrCapacityBtuHr

  10. EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

  11. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYr Jump to:

  12. BTU International DUK International JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR NewBTU

  13. High Btu gas from peat. Existing social and economic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High Btu Gas from Peat. The proposed study was designed to assess the overall viability of the design, construction and operation of a commercial facility for the production of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. In order to complete the study, Minnegasco assembled an experienced project team with the wide range of expertise required. In addition, the State of Minnesota agreed to participate in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Ertec (The Earth Technology Corporation) was selected to conduct the site evaluation and environmental assessment portions of the feasibility study. The site evaluation was completed in March of 1981 with the submittal of the first of several reports to Minnegasco. This report describes the existing social and economic conditions of the proposed project area in northern Minnesota. The baseline data presented will be used to assess the significance of potential project impacts in subsequent phases of the feasibility study. Wherever possible, the data base was established using 1980 Bureau of Census statistics. However, where the 1980 data were not yet available, the most recent information is presented. 11 figures, 46 tables.

  14. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

  15. Vol. 30 no. 14 2014, pages 20912092 BIOINFORMATICS MESSAGE FROM THE ISCB doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu117

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radivojac, Predrag

    .1093/bioinformatics/btu117 Advance Access publication March 3, 2014 The automated function prediction SIG looks back

  16. Subtask 3.16 - Low-BTU Field Gas Application to Microturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren Schmidt; Benjamin Oster

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy gas at oil production sites presents an environmental challenge to the sites owners. Typically, the gas is managed in flares. Microturbines are an effective alternative to flaring and provide on-site electricity. Microturbines release 10 times fewer NOx emissions than flaring, on a methane fuel basis. The limited acceptable fuel range of microturbines has prevented their application to low-Btu gases. The challenge of this project was to modify a microturbine to operate on gases lower than 350 Btu/scf (the manufacturer's lower limit). The Energy & Environmental Research Center successfully operated a Capstone C30 microturbine firing gases between 100-300 Btu/scf. The microturbine operated at full power firing gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. A power derating was experienced firing gases below 200 Btu/scf. As fuel energy content decreased, NO{sub x} emissions decreased, CO emissions increased, and unburned hydrocarbons remained less than 0.2 ppm. The turbine was self-started on gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. These results are promising for oil production facilities managing low-Btu gases. The modified microturbine provides an emission solution while returning valuable electricity to the oilfield.

  17. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils...

  18. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  19. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  20. Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Bernard

    Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9­i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259 Evaluating synteny

  1. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  2. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  3. An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebeker, C. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown...

  4. Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blacksmith, James Richard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A86YI University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis by JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH...

  5. Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

  6. STA 414/2104 Mar 25, 2010 k-means clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Nancy

    STA 414/2104 Mar 25, 2010 k-means clustering km15 = kmeans(x[g==0,],5) km25 = kmeans(x[g==1(mark kmeans with 5 cluster 4 -2-10123 kmeans with 2 cluster centers x1 x2 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 4 -2-10123 kmeans with 5 cluster

  7. An Unusual Role for a Mobile Flavin in StaC-like Indolocarbazole Biosynthetic Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Peter John

    The indolocarbazole biosynthetic enzymes StaC, InkE, RebC, and AtmC mediate the degree of oxidation of chromopyrrolic acid on route to the natural products staurosporine, K252a, rebeccamycin, and AT2433-A1, respectively. ...

  8. Truman STaTe univerSiTyWELCOME HOME! Air Conditioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Truman STaTe univerSiTyWELCOME HOME! Air Conditioner Welcome toTruman State University air conditioner requests.If you need air conditioning and are assigned to Centennial,Grim,or Fair conditioning, you will need to bring your own air conditioner unit that is 6000 BTUs or less.A non

  9. Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J. N.

    . The lower the energy rating (KW/Ton or KW/HP or KW/BTU) the more efficient the equipment and the less demand draw on the electric power plants, thereby reducing the need to build new power plants. To encourage DSM, utilities give rebates for high...: Bob Allwein, Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. Dick Landry, Gulf States Utility. Curtis Williford, Entex Gas Company. Bret McCants, Central Power and Light Company. Frank Tanner, Southern Union. Patric Coon, West Texas utilities. ESL-IE-93...

  10. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15(BTU perper

  11. High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

  12. Markets for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification: an analysis of 13 site specific studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978 the US Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Resource Applications, developed a commercialization plan for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. Several initial steps have been taken in that process, including a comprehensive study of industrial markets, issuance of a Notice of Program Interest, and funding of proposals under the Alternate Fuels Legislation (P.L. 96-126). To assist it in the further development and administration of the commercialization plan, the Office of Resource Applications has asked Booz, Allen and Hamilton to assess the market prospects for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. This report covers the detailed findings of the study. Following the introduction which discusses the purpose of the study, approach used for the assignment and current market attitudes on coal gasification, there are three chapters on: systems configurations and applications; economic and finanical attractiveness; and summary of management decisions based on feasibility study results. The final chapter briefly assesses the management decisions. The general consensus seems to be that coal gasification is a technology that will be attractive in the future but is marginal now. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  14. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  15. Optics in 1998 Microcavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nöckelm, Jens

    of the VCSEL for non-stabilized and sta- bilized operation. For the non-stabilized operation mode, a thermal S Microlasers with Chaotic Resonators and Bow-tie Lasers Claire Gmachl, Federico Capasso, Deborah L. Sivco

  16. The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, William Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... time when I was in need. Finally, the Center for Energy and Mineral Resources and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station for support related to this research. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES V1...

  17. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W. [Zurn/NEPCO, South Portland, MA (United States); Paisley, M. [Battelle Laboratories, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 32, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 1791 DevStaR: High-Throughput Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    of C. elegans embryonic viability in high-throughput (HTP) applications. A leading genetic model organism for the study of animal development and behavior, C. elegans is particularly amenable to HTP the algorithmic design of the DevStaR system and demonstrate its performance in scoring image data acquired in HTP

  19. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  20. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

  1. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  2. StaRMAP - A second order staggered grid method for spherical harmonics moment equations of radiative transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Seibold; Martin Frank

    2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple method to solve spherical harmonics moment systems, such as the the time-dependent $P_N$ and $SP_N$ equations, of radiative transfer. The method, which works for arbitrary moment order $N$, makes use of the specific coupling between the moments in the $P_N$ equations. This coupling naturally induces staggered grids in space and time, which in turn give rise to a canonical, second-order accurate finite difference scheme. While the scheme does not possess TVD or realizability limiters, its simplicity allows for a very efficient implementation in Matlab. We present several test cases, some of which demonstrate that the code solves problems with ten million degrees of freedom in space, angle, and time within a few seconds. The code for the numerical scheme, called StaRMAP (Staggered grid Radiation Moment Approximation), along with files for all presented test cases, can be downloaded so that all results can be reproduced by the reader.

  3. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  4. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  5. The University of Florida Dean of Students O ce creates a culture of care for students, their families, faculty and sta by providing exemplary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Subrata

    Weekend. Create a comprehensive emergency management plan for the division that is systematically updated to students, families, and sta . Disability Resource Center Conduct a faculty survey in order to guide to e ciently and e ectively manage an increasingly complex caseload and additional responsibilities

  6. Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

  7. STA TEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    through glass chemistry, functional coatings, coating design and tabrication for optics and solar control, lamination, tempering, complex bending, insulated glass unit...

  8. Short Notes Taxonomy of the Plethodontid Salamander Genus Hydromantes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wake, David B.

    Short Notes Taxonomy of the Plethodontid Salamander Genus Hydromantes (Caudata: Plethodontidae, when Dunn made a proposal that sta- bilized taxonomy (all species placed in Hy- dromantes) for over 60. His sugges- tion for the taxonomy of the group was to recog- nize a single genus, Hydromantoides

  9. 1742 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. 52, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2007 Energy-Based Nonlinear Control of Underactuated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Warren

    controllers to globally asymptotically sta- bilize/regulate an underactuated mechanical system subject to a contact condition. For the past decade, many researchers have addressed the modeling and control of impact manipulators during contact/ noncontact conditions separately. In [16], a switching control strategy

  10. Proceedings of the Conference "Path Integrals New Trends and Perspectives", ed. by W. Janke and A. Pelster (World Scientific, Singapore, 2008), pp. 531-536.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachmann, Michael

    Proceedings of the Conference "Path Integrals ­ New Trends and Perspectives", ed. by W. Janke and A are involved. They control molecular transport processes, sta- bilize the cell structure, enzymatically catalyze chemical reactions; others act as molecular motors in the complex machinery of molecular

  11. Stabilization of Mechanical Systems Using Controlled Lagrangians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marsden, Jerrold

    for the problem of sta- bilization of an inverted pendulum on a cart and for the problem of stabilization­91­57556, AFOSR grant F49620-96-1- 0100, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Inst. for Advanced Study. 2 can make use of energy methods which automati- cally provide a Lyapunov function for choosing control

  12. 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-20 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed/h. Then noting that each available air conditioner provides 4,000 Btu/h cooling, the number of air- conditioners

  13. U n i v e r z i t a P a l a c k h o v o l o m o U c i ZDOST O PEZKOUMN ROZHODNUT O STaNOvEN POPLaTKU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krupka, Michal

    místa pokracujte na zadní stran listu): 1) 1) Dle cl. 22 odst. 6 Statutu Univerzity Palackého v Olomouci rozhodnutí dle písm. a)): zrusení rozhodnutí, a to z dvodu: K této zádosti soucasn pikládám kopii rozhodnutí

  14. First BTU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County, Minnesota:Island, NewFirmGreen

  15. BTU LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR

  16. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

  17. Production of low BTU gas from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on gasification as far back as the 1930's. Some of the early work was done using fixed bed gasifiers with wood as the feed mate- In the 1960's, coal was proposed as another possible feed material. Most of the coal gasification was done using moving bed... of downdraft fixed bed, updraft fixed bed or moving bed gasifiers. Most of the work on fluidized bed opera- tion has been concentrated on catalytic cracking units. However, several researchers have used fluidized bed reactors for the gasification process...

  18. Production of low BTU gas from biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for combustion is simple relative to the gasification or pyrolysis and construc- tion and operation of the necessary equipment should also be easier. However, the final product of com- bustion, steam energy, cannot be stored for long periods of time.... Lee, B. S. , Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. G. Anthony An experimental study was conducted to examine the gasification of agricultural residues as an alter- nate energy source. The agricultural residues...

  19. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  20. BTU International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 Jump to: JumpBPL Global JumpBSST LLCBTMBTU

  1. AssiStaV; Prcfessor. Graduate Sludent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    Polycarbonate Using Carbon Dioxide for Bubble Nucleation A process ro pr~w'ricea jami1.v of not'ef materials nucleation, and bubble growif1 I R (he polyrarbonate-carbon dioxide sjJsrernor presenred, and the crirical the highsolubili~yofrar!.nn dioxide ;in po{r,carhonafefo ,nucleore a tlery large number of bubbles, on the ordcr

  2. explorations The Train STaTion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernes, Peter J.

    Music by Yevgeny Simkin Many thanks to Yevgeny Simkin, peter lichtenfels, Bella Merlin and the wonderful

  3. Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallery, S. J.

    Steam is the most common and economical way of transferring heat from one location to another. But most steam systems use the header pressure steam to do the job. The savings are substantially more than just the latent heat differences between...

  4. POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

  5. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table Home

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table HomeYear Jan

  7. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota1Resourceloading new table HomeYear

  8. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0YearThousand

  9. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0YearThousandYear Jan

  10. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68 4.50

  11. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68 4.50Week

  12. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBG 0 20Year Jan Feb Mar68

  13. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996)Nov-14Year Jan

  14. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthrough 1996)Nov-14YearYear

  15. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996) inthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  16. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW

  17. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3

  18. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilotDataGlossary AWeek Of

  19. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011 2012

  20. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011

  1. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010 2011Decade

  2. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010

  3. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010Decade Year-0

  4. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough 1996)through2009 2010Decade

  5. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. If youEIA-906 &Stocks

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)

  7. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 WeekYear

  8. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthrough 1996)Year-Month Week 1 Week 2DecadeYear

  9. Sta te a n d E v e n ts fo r W e b Se r v ic e s: A C o m p a r iso n o f F iv e W S-R e so u r c e F r a m e w o r k a n d W S-N o tific a tio n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrey, Marty

    Sta te a n d E v e n ts fo r W e b Se r v ic e s: A C o m p a r iso n o f F iv e W S-R e so u r c e F r a m e w o r k a n d W S-N o tific a tio n Im p le m e n ta tio n s M a rty H u m p h re y , G le n n W a sso n D e p a rtm e n t o f C o m p u te r S c ie n c e , U n iv e rsity o f V irg in ia , C

  10. Notes for STA 250, Radford M. Neal, 2000 Organizing Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Radford M.

    : Protection for dummies (eg, airbag) weight: Weight of the vehicle in pounds `Make', `model', `side protection weight Buick Elect.â??Parkâ??Ave 88 1467 54 Drvr manualâ??belts 3360 Chevrolet Camaro 91 585 39 Drvr dâ??airbag manualâ??belts 3757 Isuzu Stylus 91 580 57 Drvr dâ??airbag 2333 Mercury Tracer 89 940 48 Drvr manual

  11. The Campaign for STaTeSurpaSSeS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    18 1COLORADO STATE #12;www.CSUmba.com AACSB internationally accredited since 1970 We fit CSU MBAs MBA in Denver while working as Controller for Earthstone Energy, Inc. Executive MBA ­ Downtown Denver deliver strong academics at rea- sonable prices. We applaud these institutions for tightening their belts

  12. Entanglement-assisted codeword stabilized quantum codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeonghwan Shin; Jun Heo; Todd A. Brun

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Entangled qubit can increase the capacity of quantum error correcting codes based on stabilizer codes. In addition, by using entanglement quantum stabilizer codes can be construct from classical linear codes that do not satisfy the dual-containing constraint. We show that it is possible to construct both additive and non-additive quantum codes using the codeword stabilized quantum code framework. Nonadditive codes may offer improved performance over the more common sta- bilizer codes. Like other entanglement-assisted codes, the encoding procedure acts only the qubits on Alice's side, and only these qubits are assumed to pass through the channel. However, errors the codeword stabilized quantum code framework gives rise to effective Z errors on Bob side. We use this scheme to construct new entanglement-assisted non-additive quantum codes, in particular, ((5,16,2;1)) and ((7,4,5;4)) codes.

  13. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4 Relative2.4942

  14. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4 Relative2.49422

  15. Performance of an industrial type combustor burning simulated fuels of medium BTU content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goehring, Howard Lee

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studied fuels were those produced by coal gasification (1, 2, 3, 4, 5). Other widely studied fuels include petroleum distillates, alcohol type fuel, fuel made from tar sands, fuel made from oil shale (1), petro- chemical process plants "off-gases" (2...). Harmful emissions can be reduced by using steam injection (8, 2, 9). Also the amount of equipment needed to produce and refine fuels, such as coal gas, is large; whereas, in the case of steam, the amount of' equipment needed is relatively small. Also...

  16. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  17. An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebeker, C. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these factors, the difference between coal and natural gas prices and the project life are difficult to predict. The resulting uncertainty has caused Monsanto to pursue coal gasification for process heaters with cautious optimism, on a site by site basis....

  18. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  19. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

  20. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  1. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 3. Market analysis. Task 8. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to identify and characterize the market potential for the plant by-products - BTX (mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene), phenol, ammonia, sulfur, and sodium sulfate - and to assign value to them. Although traditionally a growth industry, the chemicals market has been generally weakened by the recession, and is experiencing back to back years of declining production. This is due to bad health of specific end uses, such as fertilizer from ammonia. In the long run, this trend is expected to moderate. It is felt that the proposed peat plant has a favorable position in the markets of each of its by-products. This is due to the synergism with nearby industries which are major consumers of these by-products. In the case of sulfur and ammonia, the Red River agricultural area is a large potential market. For sodium sulfate, phenols and perhaps BTX, the nearby paper and timber products industries are large potential markets. The values for these by-products used in the financial analysis were intentionally conservative. This is because of the uncertainty in the quantity and quality. More tests are needed in an integrated facility in order to determine these factors and the variability of each. This is particularly true of the by-product oils which could vary significantly with operating conditions and may even require alternate processing schemes. 18 references, 9 figures, 14 tables.

  2. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 11. Technical support. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support). This report presents the work conducted under Task II (Technical Support) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process, which was selected for the study. Task achievements are presented for: gasifier design and performance; technical support; and task management. 12 figures, 22 tables.

  3. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

  4. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

  5. Cofiring of coal and dairy biomass in a 100,000 btu/hr furnace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Benjamin Daniel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dairy biomass (DB) is evaluated as a possible co-firing fuel with coal. Cofiring of DB offers a technique of utilizing dairy manure for power/steam generation, reducing greenhouse gas concerns, and increasing financial returns to dairy operators...

  6. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A S K A2009

  7. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R A SNevadaCubic

  8. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN E B R

  9. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reservesthroughwww.eia.govN ECoalbed

  10. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels) LiquidsCoalbed MethaneFoot)

  11. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013 Next1.878 2.358 -NA

  12. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65 2013A4. CensusFeet)Cubic

  13. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0 1 2 3+Foot) Year

  14. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9 0ProvedExpected

  15. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21 4.65per9Yearper

  16. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan

  17. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors forA2. For9,250 14,609403,972

  18. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24, 2014EconomicsEnergy

  19. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard ErrorsSeptember 24,Feet) Year

  20. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePriceExpectedOtherOffshoreAnnual",2014

  1. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+

  2. ,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and NaturalWellhead PriceNet WithdrawalsVolumeHenry

  3. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B u o f l dIncreases

  4. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U B uYear JanSales (Billion

  5. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U BCubic Feet)Appendix E2

  6. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels forA 6 J 9 U (Million31 22

  7. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate

  8. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpectedSeparation, ProvedCubic

  9. California Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReserves (MillionExpectedSeparation,

  10. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c.+Foot) Decade

  11. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear JanDecade Year-0c.+Foot)

  12. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level ImportsYear Jan

  13. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21Company Level ImportsYear JanCubic

  14. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanyS

  15. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanySFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar

  16. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use

  17. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  18. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009SamplingSee See

  19. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009SamplingSee

  20. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0 Year-1

  1. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200Decade Year-0 Year-1Foot) Year

  2. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV. NorthernFoot)

  3. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess than 200DecadeCubic1.IV.

  4. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand Cubic Feet) YearFoot)

  5. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLess thanThousand Cubic Feet)

  6. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015 IndependentFoot) Decade

  7. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015 IndependentFoot)

  8. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year Jan

  9. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015Year JanFoot) Year Jan Feb

  10. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYear

  11. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688ElectricityLessApril 2015YearYearFoot) Year Jan Feb

  12. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0Foot) Decade

  13. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0Foot)

  14. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002 (next8,,9,7,3,

  15. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002 (next8,,9,7,3,Foot) Year

  16. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough, 2002DecadeYear JanN E B R

  17. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  18. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough,Cubic Foot)perper Thousand

  19. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, WetReservesCubic

  20. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  1. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May1.878 2.358 -Cubic

  2. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb Mar AprYear JanFeet)Cubic

  3. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear Jan Feb(BillionDecadeFoot) Decade

  4. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear Jan FebProvedFoot) Decade

  5. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYear JanYearCubicDecade Year-0

  6. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(BillionYear JanYearYear Jan8,859ProvedDecade

  7. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity For RenewableJanuary403,972Cubic

  8. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade217523,552.1 Table 5.1. PAD DistrictCubic

  9. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1 1,030 1,026 1,028 1,029

  10. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb MarFields34 1,035 1,036 1,036 1,036 1,037

  11. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1 andCubicEstimatedSales

  12. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane, No.1Decade6,393 6,810 6,5154019

  13. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear JanPropane,ThousandExtensions (BillionSales

  14. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0Feet) DecadetoYear Jan

  15. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0Feet) Decreases

  16. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel5,266 6,090 7,16354,828 424,763CubicCubic Foot)

  17. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 NProved ReservesDecadeFoot)

  18. Alabama Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996 NProved

  19. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0 Year-1

  20. Alaska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptemberProcessedDecade Year-0 Year-1Foot) Year

  1. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  2. Arizona Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  3. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year JanDecadeExpectedFoot)

  4. Arkansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year

  5. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarkets EnergyConsumption5 15EnvironmentalErin

  6. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr(Percent)Babb, MT Havre,Lease

  7. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0Sales (Billion CubicConsumption

  8. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA Liquid Layer Solution for theDecorative Vented

  9. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry

  10. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (BillionActivities byFuel OilDecadeEIACubic

  11. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, ElectricSales (Million CubicThousandTobago063 1,064

  12. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty Vehicles, 1975-2004Foot) Decade Year-0

  13. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty(Million Cubic Feet)Cubic117.8 105.96 1,025

  14. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Light-Duty(MillionGlossaryOf Mexico NaturalCubic974 962

  15. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Thousand Cubic6

  16. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1DecadeYear Jan FebYear Jan

  17. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,775 898,864 835,335 777,231.

  18. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009 2010 2011DecadeSame0 0 04

  19. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1Feet)YearDecadeCubic

  20. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1Feet)YearDecadeCubicCubic

  1. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet)Expected

  2. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUndergroundCubic Feet)ExpectedFoot) Year

  3. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2 Missouri22

  4. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Department2 Missouri22Cubic

  5. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale ProductionExpectedCubic

  6. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale

  7. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand CubicFoot)

  8. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale%73Thousand

  9. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil

  10. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of FossilFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  11. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota" ,"FullWestQuantityReporting Entities,Cubic

  12. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production (Billion

  13. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReserves (Billion

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubicDecade2009 2010

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New EnglandReservesCubicDecade2009 2010Year Jan

  16. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197 14,1978. Number

  17. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197(Billion Cubic(MillionFoot)

  18. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197 14,197(BillionYear Jan

  19. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet) Gas, WetCubic Foot)

  20. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197Cubic Feet)ProvedFeet)

  1. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content4,367,470 4,364,790 4,363,909 4,363,143 4,363,967 4,363,549 1973-2015 Alaska 14,197 14,197CubicYear Jan Feb MarperYork State

  2. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear Jan

  3. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1(MillionExtensionsThousand Cubic%perYear JanFoot) Year Jan Feb Mar

  4. MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - Householdshort version)6/09/2015Values shownLower

  5. Rhode Island Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar(DollarsCubicThousand68.76,760.2520099 20109

  6. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecade Year-0Feet)Thousand7ThousandYear78

  7. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan FebDecadeDecade Year-0TotalH BV CYear Jan Feb Mar AprCubic

  8. Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | Department ofEmily KnouseEnSys Energy Report on

  9. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventional Gasoline Sales to End Users, Total Refiner Sales Volumes"for Selected6.

  10. Nebraska Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in Delaware (Million3,751,360 3,740,7578 2009 20100

  11. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotal ConsumptionThousand CubicfromDryFoot)

  12. New Hampshire Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotalResidential ConsumersDecadeYear28 1,030Cubic

  13. New Jersey Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand Cubic Feet) Priceper Thousand Cubic44

  14. New Mexico Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand Cubic Feet)AdjustmentsSales (Billion

  15. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousand CubicFeet)perFeet) New2 1,033 1,034

  16. North Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (MillionNine8 2.415 -CubicYear8

  17. North Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996)McGuire"Feet) Estimated

  18. Ohio Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul AugFeet)Foot) Decade

  19. Oklahoma Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9ThousandFeet)41 1,041

  20. Oregon Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunFoot)

  1. Pennsylvania Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan

  2. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS willProvedExpected FutureCubic

  3. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan Next MECS willProvedExpected FutureCubicCubic

  4. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage Volume16, 2012PeterFoot)

  5. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage Volume16,

  6. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1 EnergyAssessment

  7. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYearUnderground Storage1 EnergyAssessmentFoot) Year

  8. South Carolina Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)Thousand Cubic7. Net5:EnergyCubic Foot) Decade

  9. South Dakota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)Thousand Cubic7.

  10. Tennessee Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)ThousandNumber andCrudeTemperature Maps andDecadeCubic

  11. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease Separation, Proved ReservesSeparation,Cubic Feet)Decade

  12. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet) U.S.Developmental Wells (Thousand Feet)2009

  13. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009Base

  14. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet) Decade949,7752009Base6Thousand417 1,019 1,023

  15. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecade Year-0 Year-1480 530Feet)37 1,038Cubic

  16. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication and Tables Publication

  17. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Cubic Feet)FuelDecadePublication10.99 12.28EA9.Foot) Decade

  18. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)ThousandFeet) Year JanCubic

  19. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (Millionper ThousandCubicFeet)6 1,029

  20. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals (MillionperYear Jan FebSamenuclear5)8)May 2003

  1. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 6,895 6,559 6,303 5,952Sales (Billion

  2. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 6,895Vehicle FuelFeet)(DollarsFoot)

  3. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 (Million CubicFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  4. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+Nonassociated NaturalPrice

  5. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;NetPrice (Dollars per+Nonassociated

  6. Utah Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year Jan FebFeet)Reserves inDecade Year-0

  7. Vermont Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousand Cubic Feet) YearDay)Foot)

  8. Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousand CubicFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  9. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousandYear Jan FebCubic Foot) Decade

  10. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)Year JanThousandYearDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Cubic

  11. Wisconsin Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion Cubic Feet)YearWellhead Price (DollarsYork State SHOPP

  12. Wyoming Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-533 1,036 1,043 1,041

  13. Notes for STA 250, Radford M. Neal, 2000 How Well Can We Predict?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Radford M.

    was on ­1000 0 500 1500 Residual Motorized_belts d&p_airbags d_airbag manual_belts passive_belts Type

  14. Piano di studi "Modelling, sta1s1cs and analysis of biosystems"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugliese, Andrea

    of biological systems; Laboratory of biological data mining; Machine learning; Biomedical · Classic models in popula1on ecology ­ Growth of single popula1ons: · Models

  15. I-united StaU;~ Depi:l.rtmen~t.he Interior, J. A. Krug ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as carbon tetrachloride (saturated with water), into any suitable vessel where the volume of water can be measured. From five to six portions of carbon tetrachloride of 10 to 15 ml. each are used; each portion with additional carbon tetrachloride after the washings from the gel have been introduced, then are stoppered

  16. UNIT NAME: C-710 Acid Interceptor Pit REGULATORY STA'l'US

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to flowing to the sanitary sewer system. WASTE DESCRIPTION: PCB (Aroclor 1248), 470 ppm; Carbon Tetrachloride (TCLP extract), 6.3 ppm; Trichloroethylene (TCLP extract), 200 ppm;...

  17. STA'IfEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY ABENGOA SOLAR INC. ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    under the above referenced cooperative agreement entitled , Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants." According to ASI's...

  18. STA'n:MENT OF CONSIDERAT IONS REQUEST BY CORNING J 'CORP ORA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    quality and performance of ceramic electrolyte members and developing th e manufac turing mea ns to dramatically lower their cost. CORNING 's success should enable PolyPus ' s...

  19. #R code: Discussion 7. Sta108, Fall 2007, Utts ### Using predict() function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utts, Jessica

    Retailer: Problem 6.9 Data = read.table("CH06PR09.txt") names(Data) = c("Hours","Cases","Costs","Holiday") Fit = lm(Hours~Cases+Costs+Holiday, data=Data) Xh=data.frame(Cases=24500, Costs=7.40, Holiday=0) #90 #method 1: x1 = Data$Cases - mean(Data$Cases) x2 = Data$Costs - mean(Data$Costs) #method 2: x1 = scale(Data

  20. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~Mwe: conversion factor from Btu to MWe-y ( 3.345 x 10- MWe-insulation R-values [fe-hr OF I Btu] for electricity heatedspecific fuel, expressed as Btu/lb coal, Btu/ gal oil, Btu/

  1. VOLUME 78, NUMBER 25 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 23 JUNE 1997 Cryogenic Optical Resonators: A New Tool for Laser Frequency Stabilization at the 1 Hz Level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Stephan

    , such as high-resolution spectroscopy, flywheel oscillators for optical frequency standards, and displacement- bilization to optical reference cavities provides suitable "flywheel" oscillators for these applications

  2. STANDARD SYMBOLS FOR UNITS OF MEASURE AIP IEEE CDR APS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    .wt. ­ at.wt. bar bar bar bar bar British Thermal Unit Btu Btu Btu calorie (cgs) cal cal cal centimeter cm

  3. Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blacksmith, James Richard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directly supervised my work. As a faculty advisor, Dr. Lalk was a graduate student's dream, and only rarely a nightmare. Finally, I would like to thank my wife, Sally. Only one person worked harder than she did on this project, and he is most grateful... gasification facility. An intermediate project will be conducted at the gasifica- tion facility in an attempt to verify the one-cylinder en- gine's performance trends determined in the laboratory. Subsequent sections of this thesis review background...

  4. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 9. 2. Financial risk analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic, and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for management structural support.) This final report presents the work conducted under Task 9.2 (Risk Assessment) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process selected for the study. At this time, there is little technical doubt that the PEATGAS gasifier can indeed operate. In order to assess the risks associated with the peat gasification facility, it was subdivided according to the following risk areas; (1) peat harvesting; (2) peat dewatering; (3) peat gasification; and (4) environmental. In summary, the risks associated with the peat gasification facility are manageable. Even under the extreme risk of no peat availability, the gasification facility can be operated with lignite at a slightly higher SNG price. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  5. The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, William Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , geothermal energy, heavy oil, oil shale, and coal waiting to be utilized (Penner and Icerman, 1981). Of these, coal is abundant and has had an immediate and significant effect on the energy situation. In response to energy problems of the decade...

  6. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter13

  7. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter134

  8. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter1343

  9. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter13434

  10. Nordisk Non*sta Rohjosmainn Nordic KontaMargan tor hmaMwgaoBtfer atofnwnafgw-liaison commitm tor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Box 8043 S-750 08 Uppsala A. Salo STUK (Finnish Centre for Ra- diation and Nuclear Safety) Box 268 SF

  11. STA 6246 Linear Models Instructor James Hobert, 221 Griffin-Floyd Hall; Office Hours: Monday & Wednesday 4th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hobert, James P.

    Statistics with S (4th edition, 2002), Springer. We will use the statistical computing language R (which can at Chapter 4. If you prefer to use other statistical languages or statistical packages and do not intend level; · a one-year sequence in theoretical statistics at the graduate level; · a course in linear

  12. File:BOEMRE oil.gas.plant.platform.sta.brbra.map.4.2010.pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of this preview: 463Map.pdf JumpInformation

  13. QR, I UNITED STA-I' ES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION W~I-WdOTDN 2B. D. D.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A' 3 ct : -. . . .~.Q

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA SPACE CONDITIONING SYSTEMS, DUCTS AND FANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , crawl- space, etc.) Duct R-value Heating Load (Btu/hr) Heating Capacity (Btu/hr) Equip Type (package Load (Btu/hr) Cooling Capacity (Btu/hr) 1. If project is new construction, see Footnotes to Standards

  15. Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzisera,, Judy Lai, Steven M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c. Hourly kBtu vs. outdoor temp. BTU meter, chiller, coolingpumps electrical power One BTU meter, each chiller input viavia VFD's Chiller Plant BTU Meter $ 4000, Chillers, Towers

  16. 2.1E BDL Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TOWERAIR) ' OPEN-CENT-COND-PWR(0.3;0.0 to 1.0 Btu/Btu) •changed i n 2.1E OPEN-REC-COND-PWR(0.03;0.0 to 1.0Btu/Btu) HERM-CENT-COND-PWR(0.3;0.0 to 1.0 Btu/Btu) •

  17. Uninterruptible Power Supplies Designed to meet or exceed the safety standards established by UL, CSA, CE and VDE. The Alpha CFR UPS is one of the safest, most reliable and versatile Uninterruptible Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    % Load 88% 90% 90% 90% 90% 90% Typical Heat Output - Line Mode 209 BTU/h 284 BTU/h 427 BTU/h 427 BTU/h 398 BTU/h 636 BTU/h Mechanical Width (in \\ mm) 8.5 \\ 216 8.5 \\ 216 8.5 \\ 216 8.5 \\ 216 8.5 \\ 216 8

  18. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model-Based Tracking Christian K¨ohler, 1- bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  19. Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative ModelBased Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    Qualitative Reasoning Feeding Back into Quantitative Model­Based Tracking Christian KË? ohler, 1­ bilize basic signal processing and pattern recognition processes like the reliable extraction of some

  20. Hydroxamate anchors for water-stable attachment to TiO2 nanoparticles William R. McNamara, Robert C. Snoeberger III, Gonghu Li, Christiaan Richter, Laura J. Allen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and photocatalysis. We synthesize and deposit a hydroxamate-functionalized terpyridine and demonstrate visible suitable for the subsequent immo- bilization of a metal for photocatalysis. We have immobilized Mn

  1. EVA PLANNING ASSUMPTIONS LRV TRAVERSE ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    VALUE. #12;ASSUMPTIONS {CONT) e METABOLIC RATES · LM OVERHEAD 1050 BTU/HR · ALSEP 1050 BTU/HR · STATION 950 BTU/HR · RIDING 550 BTU/HR #12;ACTIVITY 'METABOLIC .COMPARISON 15 ACTUAL VERSUS 16 PLANNING AVERAGE METABOLIC RATE (BTU I HR) ACTIVITY 15 ACTUAL 16 PLANNING CDR LMP LM OVERHEAD 1246 1060 '1050

  2. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v i i where, h = molar enthalpy, Btu/mol (J/mol), M = molarEnergy Used at Shower Water Heater average 5169 BTU ( 5.454MJ ) 4335 BTU ( 4.573 MJ ) 4151 BTU ( 4.379 MJ ) 4192 BTU (

  3. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conversion: 1 kwh = 10,500 Btu for power production Averageelectricity and at 10,500 Btu/kwh or 2,646 kcal/kHz energyHCs Unit Nm3/hr Nm3/hr cfh Btu/scf MM Btu/hr GJ/hr Btu/scf

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KWH X 10 3 Occup, Unaee. BTU x10 6 Qceup. Unoec. Oecuj2.H20 gal H 0 occ. -yr. x (155-60) OF x x + 40,000 BTU/occ. /yr. BTU 493,000 BTU/occ. /yr. 8,000,000 BTU/yr. 100

  5. ~A four carbon alcohol. It has double the amount of carbon of ethanol, which equates to a substantial increase in harvestable energy (Btu's).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    when consumed in an internal combustion engine yields no SOX, NOX or carbon monoxide all environmentally harmful byproducts of combustion. CO2 is the combustion byproduct of butanol, and is considered our nation's dependence on foreign oil, protect our fuel generation grid from sudden disruption while

  6. Healthcare Energy Efficiency Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanzisera,, Judy Lai, Steven M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of panels. Steam boiler efficiency Electrical includedto BTU equivalents. Boiler efficiency can be monitored as aGenerators Heating water boiler efficiency kBtu out/ kBtu in

  7. Introduction to Benchmarking: Starting a Benchmarking Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    plant Btu per pound of product Manufacturer Btu per pound of product processed Refinery Btu per number of beds occupied Hotel or hospital Kilowatt-hours per square foot...

  8. Conversion Factor Table http://vertex42.com/edu/kinematics.html Copyright 2005 Jon Wittwer Multiply by To Get

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    .696 psia bar 0.9869 atm, std bar 1x105 Pa Btu 778.169 ft·lbf Btu 1055.056 J Btu 5.40395 psia·ft3 Btu 2.928x10-4 kWh Btu 1x10-5 therm Btu / hr 1.055056 kJ / hr Btu / hr 0.216 ft·lbf / sec Btu / hr 3.929x10-4 hp Btu / hr 0.2931 W Btu / lbm 2.326* kJ / kg Btu / lbm 25,037 ft2 / s2 Btu / lbm·R 4.1868 kJ / kg

  9. TWOZONE USERS MANUAL. 2d ed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, A.J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Op) effective lumped heat capacity of house, (Btu/Op). Wein the neighborhood of 3000 Btu/Op for a typical house ofeconomic parameters (such as: Btu's saved per discounted

  10. Energy Management A Program of Energy Conservation for the Community College Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General Glossary I II Btu (British thermal unit). The amountabove a fixed data point (in Btu/lb), including sensible andsquare centimeter, or 3.69 Btu/per square foot. LA TENT HEA

  11. Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient, W/(m 2 ?K) (Btu/[h?ft 2 ?°F]) downwardcoefficient, W/(m 2 ?K) (Btu/[h?ft 2 ?° F]) forcedcoefficient, W/(m 2 ?K) (Btu/[h?ft 2 ?°F]) slab thermal

  12. ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency** Process Process BTU/Ton of MSW Input* RDSF1 - Col. 2; Col. 4 = Col. 3/11.4 Million BTU/per ton of MSWfor RDSF and 9.1 Million BTU/ton for direct combustion and

  13. ANNUAL HEATING AND COOLING REQUIREMENTS AND DESIGN DAY PERFORMANCE FOR A RESIDENTIAL MODEL IN SIX CLIMATES: A COMPARISON OF NBSLD, BLAST 2, AND DOE-2.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, William L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BLAST DOE-2 (SWF) Annual Cooling Requirements (10 6 Btu)Btu) I'" I NBSLD III DOE-2 (SW'F) DOE-2 (CW'F) DOE-2 (CWF)Heating (1 Annual Total Btu) City Jan HINNEAPOLIS NBSLD

  14. California's Energy Future - The View to 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gge) (kg H 2 ) (million Btu) tons) Electricity (kWh) GaseousH 2 ) Thermal (million Btu) Biomass (dry tons) Electricity (2 (MtH 2 ). Thermal (million Btu, TBtu): One million British

  15. TWOZONE USERS MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF) effective lumped heat capacity of house, (Btu/OF). Wein the neighborhood of 3000 Btu/OF for a typical house ofC (effective) is 3200 BTU/o F. (Typically A moderately

  16. Quantifying the Effect of the Principal-Agent Problem on US Residential Energy Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murtishaw, Scott; Sathaye, Jayant

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy – 9,860 trillion Btu (9,840 PJ) b Residential totalenergy – 17, 600 trillion Btu (17,100 PJ) In addition tototaled over 3,400 trillion Btu, equal to 35% of the site

  17. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $/MBtu) Electric Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) kWh = kilowatthour; TWh= terawatthour; MBtu = Million Btu; MtC = Metric tons ofon heavy load. Idle Rate (Btu/h) Table 6-9. Energy Star

  18. TWOZONE USERS MANUAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadgil, Ashok J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF) effective lumped heat capacity of house, (Btu/OF). Wein the neighborhood of 3000 Btu/OF for a typical house ofC (effective) is 3200 BTU/o F. (Typically A moderately

  19. California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gge) (kg H 2 ) (million Btu) tons) Electricity (kWh) GaseousH 2 ) Thermal (million Btu) Biomass (dry tons) Electricity (2 (MtH 2 ). Thermal (million Btu, TBtu): One million British

  20. Analysis of Energy Use in Building Services of the Industrial Sector in California: A Literature Review and a Preliminary Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by ERC, is 448.3 trillion Btu (TBtu). The total CaliforniaBecause the cost of an electrical Btu is roughly 4 timesthat of a source fuel Btu, industrial categories that use

  1. Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Trevor

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    69 Figure 30 Locations for chilled water BTU meter for69 Figure 31 Locations for hot water BTU meter forgood enough. Cooling energy X BTU meter should also output

  2. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Total BuildingCooling Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Non. Wind Infilt SHGC Wind.Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area, Window Window

  3. DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Year 2025 Annual Energy~ 10 Btu Heat Electricity Fuels orBalance Distributed Cases (trillion Btu) A ! -feat >350! lPfor California Industry (10 12 Btu): Scenario B Process Heat

  4. MEASURING ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH UTILITY BILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deckel, Walter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in British Thermal Units, BTU, for these comparisons. Themade by noting that there are 100,000 BTU's in one therm andthat there are 3413 BTU's in one kilowatt hour. It should be

  5. Self-benchmarking Guide for Laboratory Buildings: Metrics, Benchmarks, Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathew, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Site Energy Intensity (BTU/sf-yr). A Performance BenchmarkAnnual natural gas energy use (Million BTU) dE3: Annual fueloil energy use (Million BTU) dE4: Annual other fuel energy

  6. PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, C.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    producing 258 million Btu annually. Over a lifetimewill produce about 2.58 billion Btu. REFERENCES Case, C.W. ,will provide 8.9 million Btu of energy :::nnual or about of

  7. ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Input fuel quantities (in BTU) which account for thermalOutput energy (in BTU). Includes biomass, accounted asMWE) COIL FIRED peWER PLINT-lew BTU 1800 MWEI ~UlFUA O~IOE

  8. Site Name : Cerro Negro permanent sta Author : Sylvain, Marianne Site Code :C E R N date : year 2010 month 03 day 06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    : BRING A COMPUTER TO CHECK. Battery : ACdelco (12Ah). Antenna cable Trimble 5meters. Two 12V solar panels with regulator associated. TO BUY : metallic box / fixations for the box and for the solar panels (in rock sessions. Power Saving Mode: Disabled. Reserved Space: AutoDeleting to 1 Mbytes. AutoDelete Pools: y

  9. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: Discovery of Luminous, Metal-poor, Sta r-forming Galaxies at Redshifts z~0.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos Hoyos; David C. Koo; Andrew C. Phillips; Christopher N. A. Willmer; Puragra Guhathakurta

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have discovered a sample of 17 metal-poor, yet luminous, star-forming galaxies at redshifts z~0.7. They were selected from the initial phase of the DEEP2 survey of 3900 galaxies and the Team Keck Redshift Survey (TKRS) of 1536 galaxies as those showing the temperature-sensitive [OIII]l4363 auroral line. These rare galaxies have blue luminosities close to L*, high star formation rates of 5 to 12 solar masses per year, and oxygen abundances of 1/3 to 1/10 solar. They thus lie significantly off the luminosity-metallicity relation found previously for field galaxies with strong emission lines at redshifts z~0.7. The prior surveys relied on indirect, empirical calibrations of the R23 diagnostic and the assumption that luminous galaxies are not metal-poor. Our discovery suggests that this assumption is sometimes invalid. As a class, these newly-discovered galaxies are: (1) more metal-poor than common classes of bright emission-line galaxies at z~0.7 or at the present epoch; (2) comparable in metallicity to z~3 Lyman Break Galaxies but less luminous; and (3) comparable in metallicity to local metal-poor eXtreme Blue Compact Galaxies (XBCGs), but more luminous. Together, the three samples suggest that the most-luminous, metal-poor, compact galaxies become fainter over time.

  10. Site Name : Calleta El Maiten permanent staAuthor : Morvan + Decamps Site Code :E M A T date : year 2007 month 05 day 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vigny, Christophe

    * 4. Battery : Cellyte 12v 100 Ah * 2 (parallel plug). Antenna cable Trimble 10 meters, small section. Power connection : Solar pannels 20w * 4 (parallel plug). #12;EMAT 2/6 Receiver Configuration Identity the receiver and batteries. Need a key to open the locker on the box. #12;EMAT 5/6 4 solar pannels 20w

  11. 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the product in Btu/h. If the unit's capacity is less than 7000 Btu/h, use 7000 Btu/h in the calculation. If the unit's capacity is greater than 15,000 Btu/h, use 15,000 Btu/h in the calculation. b Replacement units and with mechanical cooling capacity at AHRI conditions of greater than or equal to 54,000 Btu/hr, shall include

  12. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy use comparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Coolinguse comparison Annual EUI, kBtu/sf-yr Lighting Heating

  13. c37a.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings...

  14. Federal Energy Management Program FY14 Budget At-a-Glance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    UESCs (utility energy service contracts)from the FY 20112012 baseline. Achieve lifecycle Btu Savings of 57 trillion Btu from FY 2014 program activities. The program's...

  15. P9>P4> P5> P7>P6> J9 J10J6J5 J7 J8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Inflow= 53.5 Btu/s Total Energy Outflow= 53.5 Btu/s Maximum Pressure is 51.6 atm at Junction 1 Inlet

  16. Life-cycle cost and payback period analysis for commercial unitary air conditioners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenquist, Greg; Coughlin, Katie; Dale, Larry; McMahon, James; Meyers, Steve

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baseline Efficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . 28 AverageEfficient Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Btu/h Commercial Air Conditioners . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  17. Costs of Generating Electrical Energy 1.0 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    , 1992 through 2008 Period Coal [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur Percent by Weight Receipts (billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur Percent by Weight Receipts (Billion BTUs) Average Cost (cents/ 10 6 Btu) Average Cost (cents/ 10 6 Btu) ($ per 10 6

  18. SOME ANALYTIC MODELS OF PASSIVE SOLAR BUILDING PERFORMANCE: A THEORETICAL APPROACH TO THE DESIGN OF ENERGY-CONSERVING BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, David Baird

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X) * Assumes ASHRAE materials properties K = .54 Btu h Btu p1bs Btu 144 -3)C = .156 of-lb. ft P °F- ft-hr F-ft -hr Fig.Insulation is R - 8: ft 2 -hr-oF Btu Dr tAssumes p = 144 Ib/

  19. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rating of at least 4000 Btu per hour per gallon of storedpackaged boiler that has an input rating from 300,000 Btu/hrto 12,500,000 Btu/hr (and at least 4,000 Btu/hr per gallon

  20. Natural Gas Variability In California: Environmental Impacts And Device Performance Combustion Modeling of Pollutant Emissions From a Residential Cooking Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tonse, S. R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2102 K 2.727e-02 KJ/s 9.298e+01 Heat release Btu/hour 1.500e+04 Btu/hour/in 2 V=0.75m/s =2 Peak TKJ/s 6.630e+01 Heat release Btu/hour 1.069e+04 Btu/hour/in 2

  1. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6/yr Operating Cost $/ton ˘/10 6 Btu Selling Price 12% DCF$/ton ˘/10 6 Btu Production (Million Tons Per Year)ash, 3.38% sulfur, 12,821 Btu/lb **15,900 Btu/lb, 1% sulfur.

  2. Distributed Energy Systems in California's Future: A Preliminary Report Volume 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balderston, F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kWh/m 2 , corresponds to a heat loss about 12 Btu/hr-sq.ft.cooling demand is about 18 Btu/hr-sq. ft. Similarly, TheseTOTALS Notes: 2 mUlinn BTU (')W'Jr,) of 8 r:J Ilion BTU (U"

  3. Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Huang, Joe; Kohler, Christian; Mitchell, Robin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA) MEC Zone MEC Pkg # Glz % Btu/h-ft2-F Fenestration U-factor W/m2-K (h-ft2-F)/Btu Ceiling R-value (m2-K)/W (h-ft2-F)/Btu Wall R-value (m2-K)/W (h-ft2-F)/Btu Floor

  4. INTERACTION OF A SOLAR SPACE HEATING SYSTEM WITH THE THERMAL BEHAVIOR OF A BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilmer, Christian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constant: TBM • 6.8 min 279. Btu/hr-°F) Switch Differential:0.44 °C (0.79 °F) 504, Btu/hr-°F) Coefficient c(: FurnaceR l/R 1/R 128 WJ°C ( 243. Btu/hr-°F) • 1640 WJ°C (3111. Btu/

  5. Building Verbs in Maltese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Matthew Alan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Royal University of Malta. ——. 1965/1995. Teach YourselfDictionary. Sta Venera, Malta: Midsea Books. Arad, Maya.A Linguistic History of Malta. Sta Venera, Malta: Midsea

  6. Qh Qwh Qrh+:= Qwh 2.07 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Qh Qwh Qrh+:= Qwh 2.07 10 8 Ă? BTU= Qrh 1.314 10 8 Ă? BTU= Qh 3.384 10 8 Ă? BTU= Qh 3.384 10 3 Ă? Therm Qrc+:= Qwc 2.228 10 7 Ă? BTU= Qrc 1.414 10 7 Ă? BTU= Qc 3.641 10 7 Ă? BTU= Qc 364.123 Therm= Qc 1.067 10 and Cooling Degree-Days for Rockford Area: HDD 6970 R day:= CDD 750 R day:= Therm 10 5 BTU:= a 270 ft:= b 150

  7. Problem 6-7: The reference cycle from Problem 6-6 with a condenser pressure of 1.0 psia has the states p1 = 1000 psia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the states p1 = 1000 psia h1 = 1192.4 BTU/lbm s1 = 1.3903 BTU/lbm-o R = s2 p2 = 1.0 psia T2 = 101.70 o F 2 = 0.6815 h2 = 775.8 BTU/lbm h3 = hf = 69.74 BTU/lbm h4 = 72.7 BTU/lbm and the transfers w12 = 416.6 BTU/lbm q23 = -706.1 w34 = -3.0 q41 = 1119.7 with the results wnet = 413.6 BTU/lbm = qnet th = 413

  8. Title Goes Here In This PositionMillersville University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Electricity consumption is responsible for 66% of emissions 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 Scope 1 Consumption: 61,734 BTU/GSF UD's Electric Consumption: 59,396 BTU/GSF 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250 Consumption & Tech. Rating Total BTU/GSF Fossil Consumption: 29,362 BTU/GSF Electric Consumption: 77,495 BTU

  9. Elizabeth City State University Dr. Linda Hayden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cores C) 35KW F) ~37,000 BTU's G) (5) IEC309 (60 amp) H) 208V (3 phase)C) ~35KW E) 180 amps (connector) D) 208V (3 Phase) E) 500lbs H) 208V (3 phase) I) ~3000lbs J) 120,000 BTU's E) ~500lbs #12;A) 320, 000 BTU/HRA) 320, 000 BTU/HR B) 1 Ton = 12,000 BTU/hr C) 26 Ton CRAC requirement (really a 30 ton CRAC

  10. On the representational status of /s/-clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, Jeremy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a. si-smi *M/S ON *M/S PIR *M/S TOP b. mi-smi **! Altering (RED-sta/ a. ta-sta *M/S PIR M AX -BR b. sta-sta **! M AX -BRby higher-ranked *M/S PIR , which favors (44a) over (44b).

  11. Enzyme mediated synthesis of phytochelatin-capped CdS nanocrystals Seung Hyun Kang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    emission spectra, good photostability and chemical sta- bility are ideal for light-emitting diodes, solar

  12. On the Production of Dissipation by Interaction of Forced Oscillating Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and parabolic type, oscillations, BKW Calculus, sta- bility. 1 Introduction In Section 1, we introduce

  13. Cornell's (LSC) project began providing 16,000 tons of cooling (1 ton of cooling = 12,000 Btu/hr, or approximately one large residential window air conditioner) to Cornell University's Ithaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    window air conditioner) to Cornell University's Ithaca campus in July of 2000. This project has almost completely replaced mechanical refrigeration for the Cornell district cooling system with the following benefits: · Greater LSC has replaced

  14. Special Problem for Chapter 4: Compare the Lower Heating Values of different fuel gases per Standard Cubic Foot, recalling that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 + 3.76N2) - 1H2Ovapor + 1.88N2 0 = 1 lbmolH2 O lbmolfuel � 18.016 lbmH2 O lbmolH2 O µ -5774.6 BTU lbmH2 0 ¶ + Qout 0 = -104040 BTU/lbmolfuel + Qout Qout = 104040 BTU/lbmolfuel = 51607 BTU/lbmfuel = 266 BTU/ft3 fuel [274 BTU/SCF] For 16.043 lbm of Methane CH4 + 2 (O2 + 3.76N2) - 2H2O + CO2 + 7.52N2

  15. Control of Stochastic Processes 048913 Winter 2006 Supplement: DP for the LQ problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shwartz, Adam

    T Qtx + uT Rtu + Eu x Vt+1(x1) (0.2) = min u xT Qtx + uT Rtu + Eu x Vt+1(Atx + Btu + Ctwt) (0.3) Theorem(x) equals = min u xT Qtx + uT Rtu + Eu x [Vt+1(Atx + Btu + Ctwt)] = min u xT Qtx + uT Rtu + Eu x (Atx + Btu + Ctwt)T Kt+1(Atx + Btu + Ctwt) + + t + 1 = min u xT Qtx + uT Rtu + Eu x (Atx + Btu)T Kt+1(Atx + Btu) +2

  16. 7-84E The claim of an inventor about the operation of a heat engine is to be evaluated. Assumptions The heat engine operates steadily.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    efficiency would be 0.45 R1000 R550 11maxth, H L T T K 550 R 1000 R HE HQ 15,000 Btu/h 5 hp When the first law is applied to the engine above, Btu/h720,27Btu/h000,15 hp1 Btu/h2544.5 )hp5(net ¸¸ ¹ · ¨¨ © § LH QWQ The actual thermal efficiency of the proposed heat engine is then 459.0 hp1 Btu/h2544.5 Btu/h27

  17. Volume 12, No. 1 (2003), pp. 95--115 Allerton Press, Inc. M A TH E M A TIC A L M E TH O D S O F STA TISTIC S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levit, Boris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 1 CMI, Universit'e de Provence 39, rue F. Joliot­Curie, 13453 Marseille, Cedex 13, France E. for libraries and other users registered with the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) Transactional Reporting

  18. Small Space Heater Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10,000 Btu to 40,000 Btu per hour. Common fuels used for this purpose are electricity, propane, natural gas, and kerosene. Although most space heaters rely on convection (the...

  19. 4-1-09_Final_Testimony_(Gruenspecht).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about 1,142 trillion British thermal units (Btu), more than 1 percent of total U.S. energy consumption of 101.9 quadrillion Btu. The components of farm energy consumption are...

  20. Hospital Energy Benchmarking Guidance - Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with filter loading. Boiler efficiencies: - kBtu out / kBtuhospital Heating water boiler efficiency: Base on availableout / kBtu in Steam boiler efficiency: Base on available

  1. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to...

  2. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in...

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Ali Bilge

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 Figure 1-3 World energy consumption (in British Thermal5 Figure 1-4 World energy consumption (in Btu) according toforms and (b) world energy consumption (in Btu) according to

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009,...

  5. 2.1E Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    125 (HPDefE) is the heat pump defrost energy. SYSTEMS A i runit (Btu/hr) HPDefE heat pump defrost energy (Btu) A.32HEAT PUMP ENHANCEMENTS Expanded Supplemental-heat-source and Defrost

  6. Air Emission Regulations for the Prevention, Abatement, and Control...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    BTU per hour heat. For installations equal or greater than 10 million BTU per hour heat input shall not exceed the rate of E 0.8808 * I-0.1667 where E is the emission rate...

  7. MASS AND DENSITY 1 kg = 2.2046 lb 1 lb = 0.4536 kg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    .m = 0.73756 ft.lbf 1 ft.lbf = 1.35582 J 1 kJ = 737.56 ft.lbf 1 Btu = 778.17 ft.lbf 1 kJ = 0.9478 Btu 1 Btu = 1.0551 kJ 1 kJ/kg = 0.42992 Btu/lb 1 Btu/lb = 2.326 kJ/kg 1 kcal = 4.1868 kJ ENERGY TRANSFER RATE 1 W = 1 J/s = 3.413 Btu/h 1 Btu/h = 0.293 W 1kW = 1.341 hp 1 hp =2545 Btu/h 1 hp = 550 ft.lbf/s 1

  8. Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition Oct. 27 to Nov. 3, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and adiabatic calculation s1 = 1.9263 BTU/lbm-o R from Table A-4E s2s = s1 = 1.9263 BTU/lbm-o R Interpolating

  9. A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    because diesel fuel contains 11% more BTUs per gallon thangenerators, in gallons-diesel fuel per million BTU of

  10. IMPLICATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS OF ENERGY USE: THE SWEDISH/AMERICAN CASE REVIEWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small customers Large customers Heavy oil l Gas (˘/:HH Btu):systems run on cheap heavy oil. Moreover, oil- Additionally,

  11. since the invention of the absorption cooling process. stage. These prototypes met the target specifications The literature is filled with many potential combi-before it was found necessary to rejecthe pair, mainly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    are given on a net heat ether formula . CH2OC2H5 input basis that is equivalent to a combustion system /// /Heat input. Btu/h 54000 54000 Refrigeration effect. Btu/h 35 700 25100 20 1 ///// /I E Heat output. Btu - - --- -- Weak liquid flow. Ibs/h 925 1029 o0 50 00 15 2002 250 300350400 Heat input. Btu/h 60550 59850 e7

  12. EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EECBG Direct Equipment Purchase Air Conditioner Guide Equipment Type Size Category (Btu/h) Size.ahridirectory.org/ceedirectory/pages/ac/cee/defaultSearch.aspx 12,000 Btu/h = 1 ton Less than 65,000 Btu/h Air Conditioners, Air Cooled Air Conditioners, Water completed by the California Energy Commission at a rate of 12,000 Btu/h per ton of air conditioning Source

  13. Understanding Sequestration as a Means of Carbon Management Howard Herzog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IN&OUT'ACC CO2'POPx GDP POP x BTU GDP x CO2 BTU 1 (1) (2) Understanding Sequestration as a Means and is a measure of fuel combustion and cement production (5.5 standard of living, BTU/GDP is energy Gt to as "deforestation" (1.6 GtC/yr). By energy intensity, and CO2/BTU is the amount of 1994, the fossil fuel

  14. Practice Problems Moran & Shapiro, 5th Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F 1.6766 1.6576 to obtain h1 = 1433.2 BTU/lbm s1 = 1.6458 BTU/lbm-o R We always start by calculating the adiabatic and reversible (=isentropic) 1 #12;reference case (turb = 100%) first s2s = s1 = 1.6458 BTU/lbm-o R p2 = 3 psia = sg = 1.8861 BTU/lbm-o R s2s

  15. M. Bahrami ENSC388 Tutorial #1 1 ENSC 388 Week #2, Tutorial #1 Dimensions and Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    .0140 . Problem 2: A car goes with average velocity of 100 km/h. Find kinetic energy of the car in [Btu] and [J everything the question is asking for) Find: KE: kinetic energy of the car in [Btu] and [J] Step 2: Prepare (Eq2) Note: 2 1][1][1 s ft sluglbf Btu ftlbf Btu ftlbfKE 465 .778 1 ].[361400 (Eq3) Part

  16. Vapor Power Systems MAE 4263 Final Exam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of formation on pages 162 and 163 114:23 ( 941:4) BTU/lbmolfuel = 9 18:016 ( 5774:6) + 8 44:011 ( 3846:7) + Qout = 114:23 ( 785:1) (9 18:016 ( 5774:6) + 8 44:011 ( 3846:7)) 114:23 Qout = 2:183 106 BTU/lbmolfuel = 19112 BTU/lbmfuel Answer (40 points): LHV= 19100 BTU/lbmfuel [19268 for gasi...ed fuel] 3. Atomic

  17. Heat Transfer Derivation of differential equations for heat transfer conduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veress, Alexander

    ) or kW *h or Btu. U is the change in stored energy, in units of kW *h (kWh) or Btu. qx is the heat conducted (heat flux) into the control volume at surface edge x, in units of kW/m2 or Btu/(h-ft2). qx volume is positive), in kW/m3 or Btu/(h-ft3) (a heat sink, heat drawn out of the volume, is negative

  18. The Role of the Flexicoking Process in Heavy Oil Processing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, R. I.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a clean product slate composed of low Btu gas, high Btu gas, LPG, naphtha, distillate and gas oil. The low Btu gas falls within the definition of an "Alternate Fuel" under current legislation (PL 95-620). Originally developed for refinery bottoms...

  19. The World Energy situation andThe World Energy situation and the Role of Renewable Energy Sources and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    is generated by fossil fuels ­ CO2 emission is increasing at an alarming rate Oil supplies are dwindling (electricity ~ $1 trillion / yr)­ World energy market ~ $3 trillion / yr (electricity ~ $1 trillion / yr,028 Btu 1 short ton of coal = 20,169,000 Btu 1 kilowatthour of electricity = 3,412 Btu 8 #12;Energy Use

  20. Energy performance of underfloor air distribution systems part IV: underfloor plenum testing and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Jin, Hui

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a bare panel is 1.359 Btu-in/hr-ft 2 -°F (0.196 W/m-K)with carpet tiles is 1.002 Btu-in/hr-ft 2 -°F (0.144 W/m-K).with thermal conductivity of 0.54 Btu/hr-ft-°F (0.93 W/m-K).

  1. Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low as 0.57 W/m 2 -K (0.10 Btu/h-ft 2 -°F). Such units havevalues Btu/h-ft 2 -°F), windows relatedA 0.57 W/m 2 -K (0.10 Btu/h-ft 2 -°F) window is targeted as

  2. COMPARISON OF PROPORTIONAL AND ON/OFF SOLAR COLLECTOR LOOP CONTROL STRATEGIES USING A DYNAMIC COLLECTOR MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Steven R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high gain: insolation = 2292 BTU/ft 2 -da~ 7224 watt-hrs/m -low gain: insolation= 1146 BTU/ft 2-dat 3612 watt-hrs/m -day°F (46.1°C) capacitance= 0.7 BTU/ft 2-°F {14.3 kJ;m 2- 0 c)

  3. Energy Data Sourcebook for the U.S. Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzel, T.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 with: area in ft uvalue in Btu/hr-F-ft slope in F-day/yrperimeter in ft, uvalue in Btu/hr-F-ft slope in F-day/yrheater w/fan RM AFUE Btu/hr Gas RM 74 AFUE >42000

  4. STAFF PAPER THERMAL EFFICIENCY OF GASFIRED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................................... 6 List of Tables Page Table 1: California Natural GasFired Heat Rates for 2001 ­ 2010 (Btu 5: Heat Rates for California's Natural GasFired Power Plants (Btu/kWh) ...................... 8 per kilowatt hour (Btu/kWh) from 2001 to 2010. Table 1: California Natural Gas-Fired Heat Rates

  5. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lb process heat: 1. 23 X 10 4 BTU electricity 5500 BTUe CaC1scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scf WASTE PROCESSING sewer~l9ZZ X 10 DEELAIQB BTU/yr) I MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 3.

  6. Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Brett C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High High Fan (cfm) Burner Fire Btu/hr A- 50 Fan/Plume EffLow Fan (cfm) Burner Fire Btu/hr Fan/Plume Eff Figure  3.  Med Fan (cfm) Burner Fire Btu/hr Fan/Plume Eff Figure  7.  

  7. Zero Energy Windows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arasteh, Dariush; Selkowitz, Steve; Apte, Josh; LaFrance, Marc

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impact of 4.1 quadrillion BTU (quads) of primary energy 1 .systems with U-factors of 0.1 Btu/hr-ft˛-°F Dynamic windows:for 1 quadrillion (10 15 ) Btu = 1.056 EJ. percent (Apte,

  8. PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, C.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    usable energy of 14.2 million Btu per year, giving an annualMWh/year or 83.6 million Btu/year. Because the evaporativeper unit of 5.02 million Btu or natural gas of 1.5 MWh of

  9. Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wall: Door @ South wall: [Btu*h -1 *ft -2 *°F -1 ] [W(m˛K)]plenum top: SA plenum bottom: [Btu*h -1 *°F -1 ] [W °K -1 ]and U-value of 2.8 W/(m˛K) (0.5 Btu/(hft˛°F)). However, this

  10. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MANAGED WINDOW SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S. E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plus .35 m2 K/W (2 hr ft 2 F/Btu) for single-glazing, and52 m2 -K/W (2 hr-ft 2 - F/Btu) for double-glazing, assumingthan .85 m -K/W (5 hr-ftL-F/Btu) diminish rapidly and would

  11. 2.1E Sample Run Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    O. HOUSE- 1 CO_'VEC EXT RACTN BTU/HR O. O. O. O. O. O. O. O.TEMP P SUNSP- 1 EXTRACTN RATE BTU/HR O. O. O. O. O. O. O. O.O. gYS-1 TOT C1,O COIL I_IR BTU/HR O. O. O. O. O. O. O. O.

  12. SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Estimates for a Medium BTU Gasification Plant Using A4.6 D /Dt / D Sus 0.7 (=) Btu/H 2 hr °F h ~ _3_,.5. ,..-thennal conductivity (=) Btu-ft/ ft2 hroF l)_ "' p particle

  13. 2.1E BDL Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COND)(—;0.0 to 30.0 Btu-ft/hr-ft -°F) and • DENSITY(DENS)(—;HEAT(S-H)(—;0.0 to 5.0 Btu/lb-°F) or just RESISTANCE insteadRES)(—;0.0 to 40.0 hr-ft -°F/Btu) Note: for materials data

  14. Review Problem 1-6: Find the speci...c volume v of steam at p = 5000 psia and T = 1000 o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the enthalpies and speci...c volumes from Table C-1 (pages 792­793) h1 = hf (T1) + (p1 ps) vf hf (T1) = 140:1 BTU/lbm T2;3 = Tsat (p2;3) = 56:05o F BTU/lbm h3 = hf (p2;3) = 104:7 BTU

  15. DOE-1 BDL SUMMARY. DOE-1 GROUP.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CON)(-;0.0 to 30.0 Btu-ft/hr-ft 2-°F) I DENSITY(DE)(-;0.0 toHEAT(SPH)(-;0.0 to 5.0 Btu/lb-°F) or Ill{ RESISTANCE (O. 0 to 40.0 hr-ft 2-°F /Btu) T 206 of 210 are used by the

  16. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF INSULATING WINDOW SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of .16 m2·K/W (.91 hr·ft2.oF/Btu) for the combined thermalvalue of 6.25 ~;m2.K (1 .1 Btu/hr·ft ·°F) might be reduced3.4- 4.5 w;m2·K (.6- .8 Btu/hr'ft ·°F). Some techniques for

  17. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hr) 2. Pilot Input Rate (Btu/hr) 3. Excess Air (%) 4. Off-atm) 14. Higher Heating Value (Btu/SCF) 1028.0 15. SpecificProtection Tubes R (hr*ft2*F/Btu)? Fitting Emissivity SCREEN

  18. Room air stratification in combined chilled ceiling and displacement ventilation systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiavon, Stefano; Bauman, Fred; Tully, Brad; Rimmer, Julian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    0 and 73 W/m 2 [0-23.1 Btu/(h ft 2 )](based on radiant panelbetween 0 and 28 W/m 2 [0-8.9 Btu/(h ft 2 )] (based on roomand 76 W/m 2 (97.8 and 239.7 Btu/(h ft 2 )), DV airflow rate

  19. Dampers for Natural Draft Heaters: Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, James D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No.11: 4474?4497. 7.0 Glossary BTU DOE EF GAMA GPM PRTD REloss coefficient was 10.619 (BTU/hr-şF). After the dampercoefficient was 9.135 (BTU/hr-şF). The recovery efficiency

  20. TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND OPTICAL PERFORMANCE [Btu/ft -hr- OF] XBL 785-8986A isbalance thermal losses is .9 Btu/ft 2 -hr- o F on a clearto an equivalent U-value of 1.9 Btu/ft 2-hr- o F due to

  1. THE MOBILE WINDOW THERMAL TEST FACILITY (MoWiTT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klems, J. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    facilitieso For a 2 K/W (10 BTU- 1 ft 2 hr F) is reasonable;or 0005 W m- 2 K- l (0.01 BTU hr- 1 ft- 2 ). For a commonthis becomes 0.05 W/K (0.1 BTU hr- 1 F- 1 ). (approximately

  2. Cooling load calculations for radiant systems: are they the same traditional methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, Fred; Feng, Jingjuan Dove; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEATURE A Radiant Air Radiant Air COOLING RATE (BTU/H· FT2 ) COOLING RATE (BTU/H· FT 2 ) B HOUR HOUR FIGURE 2total internal heat gain (4.8 Btu/h·ft 2 [15 W/m 2 ]) during

  3. Measured energy performance of a US-China demonstration energy-efficient office building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Peng; Huang, Joe; Jin, Ruidong; Yang, Guoxiong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 0.62 W/(m 2 ·K) (0.11 Btu/h·ft 2 · o F). The windows areof 1.67 W/(m 2 ·K) (0.29 Btu/h·ft 2 · o F) and a SHGC ofof 0.57 W/(m 2 ·K) (0.10 Btu/h·ft 2 · o F ). The cooling

  4. 2.1E Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkelmann, F.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F 1 2 .1E- 8 1 / 3 EXT-FUEL-BTU/HR s - PLANT-ASSIGNMENT . 28 1 / 3 ZIE- 8 1 / 3 PROCESS-CHW-BTU/HR PROCESS-CHW-POWERPROCESS-CHW-SCH PROCESS-HW-BTU/HR s - PLANT-ASSIGNMENT s -

  5. REDUCTION OF PHASE RESIDUALS TO TIME UNITS Larry R. D'Addario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    , the predicted uplink delay was * *bTu, and at the time of downlink reception the predicted downlink delay transmission, and downlink rece* *ption, respectively, as: ug(t)= sin[!u(t + bTu)] (1) us(t)= sin[!u(t + bTu- Tu)] (2

  6. Energy, Appliances and Utilities Energy&Environment * EnergySTAR * Toyota PRIUS Myths, Facts, and Hype ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    below) Typical furnace: 1 therm/hr = 100000 BTU/hr = 29.3 kW(h) heating power Typical A/C unit: 3.5 ton therm = 100000 BTU = 29.307 kWhr 1 tonR = 12000 BTU/hr = 3.516 kW(c) cooling rate 1 SEER = (1 BTU)/Whr(e) = 1000 BTU/kWhr = 0.293 kWhr(c)/kWhr(e), i.e., (cooling)/(electrical) ratio What is SEER? How does

  7. Vapor Power Systems Third MAE 4263 Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .27 BTU/lbm at compressor inlet h2 = 252.84 BTU/lbm at compressor outlet h3 = 732.33 BTU/lbm at turbine inlet h4 = 373.95 BTU/lbm at turbine outlet What is the efficiency of the gas turbine? SOLUTION: th and h200 = h4 T400 = T2 and h400 = h2 |qHX | = (h200 - h2) = |h400 - h4| = 121.11 BTU/lbm th $ wnet q

  8. MAE 3223 Thermodynamics II. Solutions for Special Problems on Exergy, the Availability of work, Chapter 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) - To (s1 - so)] + Vel2 1 2gc + g gc (z1 - zo) ¸ = ( [(168.07 - 48.09) - 539.67 (0.2940 - 0.09332)] BTU lbm + h 32.17 ft sec2 ¯ ¯ ¯ lbf-sec2 32.174 lbm-ft ¯ ¯ ¯ 5000 ft i BTU 778.17 lbf-ft ) = {[119.98 - 108.30] - [6.45]} BTU lbm = {[11.68] + [6.42]} BTU lbm = 18.10 BTU lbm = 14090 lbf-ft lbm Therefore 65

  9. Simulations of Design Modifications in Military Health Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, Christopher William

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the military population. Civilian medical 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 50+ 40-49 30-39 20-29 1-19 N u m b e r o f Faci litie s Age (years) 6 leadership, such as former Assistant Secretaries of Defense for Health Affairs, Dr. W... --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ENGLISH MULTIPLIED BY GIVES METRIC MULTIPLIED BY GIVES ENGLISH 1 1.000000 1.000000 2 1.000000 1.000000 3 BTU 0.293000 WH 3.412969 BTU 4 BTU/HR 0.293000 WATT 3.412969 BTU/HR 5 BTU/LB-F 4183.830078 J/KG-K 0.000239 BTU/LB-F 6 BTU/HR-SQFT-F 5.678260 W/M2-K 0...

  10. Prof.dr. Ewine F. van Dishoeck Nieuwe Werelden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Brink, Jeroen

    sta altijd open voor nieuwe verrassende resultaten. Heraclitus van Ephesus zei al zo'n 5 eeuwen voor

  11. Inferring Likelihoods and Climate System Characteristics from Climate Models and Multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haran, Murali

    the information contained in large-scale observational data sets with simulations of Earth system models in a sta

  12. PERFORMANCE OF AN EXPERIMENTAL SOLAR-DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONER--ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1975-SEPT. 1976

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U. THW . In T HW out TSS Q UW (Btu/hr) LiT m U IllWS (Ibs/OF) (OF) (OF) (OF) (OF) (Btu/hr ft2.F 20A 20C 19A lIS 17BU Run number m HW (1bs/hr) (Btu/hr- ft2_F) mS == ! z(nlWS+

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF ENERGY USE ON COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, C.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Base Load,A A= 1.98 xl0 Ul Q) BTU/sq. ft. month bO Q) r-r-l u 4-l $-I Q) il ;:l z o Base Load,A BTU/sq.ft. month) b.Performance,B B Ul Q) 14.0 BTU/sq. ft. HDD bO Q) r-l r-l U

  14. L:\\main\\pkc\\aeotabs\\aeo2009\\stim_all.wpd

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case 16 Table A1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Supply,...

  15. ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    droplets containi natural gas combustion nuclei. The "] \\~as5. The premixed natural gas combustion particles produced areleased during combustion of natural gas. g C/Btu Comments

  16. PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DOE APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM - PART I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, C.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    welded together like sewer pipe. Biogas production from theintends to convert the biogas into electricity. The wasteproduce 7.6 million Btu of biogas annually. This estimate

  17. Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . ....

  18. ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND END-USE SCENARIOS OF SAVINGS POTENTIAL PT.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery Direct Combustion Pyrolysis (Oil) Note: Col. 3 =Oil) Source Separation *Million BTU/ton MSW **Direct Combustionto Elec (Oil) Source Separation(2) *D.C. Direct Combustion

  19. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    absorption chiller. High-temperature hot water near or above17,000 Btu of high-temperature hot water or low-pressure

  20. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteas agricultural and wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipalscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in

  1. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

  2. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,1876.378052,1886.589233,1896.617065,1906.307617,1915.627686,1924.664062,1933.551636 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.73735809,...

  3. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    36 Reference case Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2012 6 Table A3. Energy prices by sector and source (2010 dollars per million Btu, unless otherwise...

  4. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Reference case Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless...

  5. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,96.27132416,97.48834229,98.7328186,100.0090332,101.3084106,102.6172562,103.9295502 " Energy Consumption Intensity" " (thousand Btu per square foot)" " Delivered Energy...

  6. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,96.26745605,97.52584839,98.82666779,100.167244,101.5404816,102.9384232,104.3544464 " Energy Consumption Intensity" " (thousand Btu per square foot)" " Delivered Energy...

  7. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,1876.765991,1887.016235,1897.062622,1906.736938,1916.007446,1924.966064,1933.756714 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.73736572,...

  8. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Total Building Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area,

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  10. Appendix A

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040...

  11. A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 4.1. LightingEvaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, andcomparison EUI, kBtu/Gsf Lighting Heating Cooling Pumps/C

  12. Report to Congress on Server and Data Center Energy Efficiency: Public Law 109-431

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Richard; Alliance to Save Energy; ICF Incorporated; ERG Incorporated; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Btu CAGR CEMS CEO CFO CIO CHP CO alternating current Annualin combined heat and power (CHP) systems, which use wasteheat to provide cooling. CHP systems can produce attractive

  13. Catalog of DC Appliances and Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbesi, Karina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat-pump heating, both of which have 1.5 ton (18,000 Btu/hr) cooling capacities and are marketed for PV

  14. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    application (coal gasification, coal combustion followed byversions of advanced gasification processes show promise ofFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for Retrofitting

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Percentage Btu Region map map showing electricity regions The chart above compares coal consumption in March 2014 and March 2015 by region and shows that coal consumption for...

  16. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    74. Any coal application (coal gasification, coal combustionFixed-Bed Low-Btu Coal Gasification Systems for RetrofittingPower Plants Employing Coal Gasification," Bergman, P. D. ,

  17. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu) District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  18. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  19. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  20. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Btu) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  1. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot) Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

  2. --No Title--

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    International Energy Statistics - Units Close Window Energy Equivalent Conversions Million Btu (British thermal units) Giga (109) Joules TOE (Metric Tons of Oil Equivalent) TCE...

  3. Jan 26, 2005 MAE 4263 Vapor Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = 2460o R and T2 = 1460o R, leading to Wout = 1000 lbm hr (627:54 353:02) BTU lbm = 274520 BTU hr KW-hr 3412:141BTU = 80:434 KW Since h for a dilute gas can be tabulated as a function of temperature, we 10 5 T2 2:93 3 10 9 T3 = 0:219 1460 + 3:42 2 10 5 14602 2:93 3 10 9 14603 BTU lbm resulting

  4. Problem 6-6: The ideal Rankine cycle uses saturated steam, so it can't be at 1000 o F, since the critical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the thermodynamic cycle calculation for the steam is p1 = 1000 psia T1 = Tsat = 544:75 o F h1 = hg = 1192:4 BTU/lbm s1 = sg = 1:3903 BTU/lbm- o R s2 = s1 = 1:3903 BTU/lbm- o R p2 = 1 psia T2 = Tsat = 101:70 o F 2 = 1:3903 0:1327 1:8453 = 0:6815 = 68% h2 = 69:74 + 0:6815 1036:0 = 775:8 BTU/lbm w1!2 = 1192:4 775:8 = 416

  5. Update of Horizontal Borehole Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 0.3 0.4 1 2 3 4 No Grout Rb(hr·ft·°F)/Btu Rb(hr·ft·°F)/Btu #12;Borehole #1 ­ Average Depth 11 Dimensionless Temperature Time (hr) Summer 2010 Fall 2012 #12;0 0.5 1 1.5 2 6 8 10 12 k (Btu/hr-ft-F) Average Depth (ft) Summer 2010 Fall 2012 Ground Thermal Conductivity With Depth #12;Rb(hr·ft·°F)/Btu

  6. Problem 8-3: Brayton Cycle in Figure 8-13 (page 324) operating at p1,4 = 14.696 psia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (no regenerator) using Standard Air Table I-1 (pages 809f) h1 = h(T1) = 124.27 BTU/lbm; pr1 = 1.2187 pr2 = 8 Ă? 1.2187 = 9.7496 ; T2s = 928 o R; h2s = 223.08 BTU/lbm h3 = h(T3) = 571.19 BTU/lbm; pr3 258 by extreme extrapolation pr4 = 258 Ă· 8 = 32.25 ; T4s = 1298 o R; h4s = 316.55 BTU/lbm w12s = h1 - h2s = -98

  7. Energy measurement utilizing on-line chromatograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kizer, P.E. [Applied Automation, Inc./Hartmann and Braun, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most gas contracts today have at least a BTU specification and many use MMBTU (million BTU) rather than gas volume for custody transfer measurement. Gas chromatography is today being chosen more and more because the calculations of the gas volumes in modem electronic flow meters requires not only BTU{sub 5} information, but specific gravity, Mol % CO{sub 2} and Mol % N{sub 2}. The new AGA-8 supercompressibility equations also require a complete hydrocarbon analysis. What then, is a BTU? BTU is the acronym for British Thermal Unit. One BTU is the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water from 58.5{degrees}F to 59.5{degrees}F (about 1055.056 joules (SI))3. The higher the BTU content, the more energy can be obtained from burning the gas. It just doesn`t take as many cubic feet of gas to heat the home hot water tank if the gas is 1090 BTU instead of 940 BTU per SCF. The BTU, then, is a prime indicator of natural gas quality. An MMBTU{sup 2} is calculated by: BTU/CF * MMCF = MMBTU What is it worth to keep track of the natural gas BTU? If we postulate 1000 BTU/CF as fairly average for natural gas, and {+-} 5% error between doing a lab determination of the heating value on a spot sample of the gas and an on- line (nearly continuous) monitor of the heating value, this results in a {+-} 50 BTU difference. On a station that has 50 MMCF per day at $2.50 per MCF or MMBTU, this is $125,000.00 worth of gas per day. Five percent of this is $6,250.00 per day. If a process chromatograph, $50,000 installed cost, is used to determine the energy content a pay out of less than 10 days is obtained on a 50 MMCF/day station. Most major interconnects have on- line BTU measurement of some sort today.

  8. Estimation of Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Malignancies of the Uterine Corpus by a Review of Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Primary Evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Stephen R. [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)], E-mail: stephen.thompson@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au; Delaney, Geoff [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Brachytherapy (BT) is an important treatment technique for uterine corpus malignancies. We modeled the optimal proportion of these cases that should be treated with BT-the optimal rate of brachytherapy utilization (BTU). We compared this optimal BTU rate with the actual BTU rate. Methods and Materials: Evidence-based guidelines and the primary evidence were used to construct a decision tree for BTU for malignancies of the uterine corpus. Searches of the literature to ascertain the proportion of patients who fulfilled the criteria for BT were conducted. The robustness of the model was tested by sensitivity analyses and peer review. A retrospective Patterns of Care Study of BT in New South Wales for 2003 was conducted, and the actual BTU for uterine corpus malignancies was determined. The actual BTU in other geographic areas was calculated from published reports. The differences between the optimal and actual rates of BTU were assessed. Results: The optimal uterine corpus BTU rate was estimated to be 40% (range, 36-49%). In New South Wales in 2003, the actual BTU rate was only 14% of the 545 patients with uterine corpus cancer. The actual BTU rate in 2001 was 11% in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results areas and 30% in Sweden. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that BT for uterine corpus malignancies is underused in New South Wales and in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results areas. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against which can be measured actual patterns of practice. It can also be used to assist in determining the adequacy of BT resource allocation.

  9. Coke Gasification - A Solution to Excess Coke Capacity and High Energy Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, S. S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effectively to produce medium-Btu (300 Btu/scf) gas which, in turn, can fuel the refinery furnaces to replace natural gas. Coke gasification should prove economical with natural gas price decontrol and the average price projected to rise to over $14.0 per...

  10. Building Name: ____________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________ Completed by: ___________________________________________ Date: ______________ File Number: ___________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    s Rated Btu input Condition s Combustion air: is there at least one square inch free area per 2,000 Btu input? s Fuel or combustion odors Cooling Tower s Clean? no leaks or overflow? Slime or algae growth? s Waste oil and refrigerant properly stored and disposed of? #12;Building Name

  11. Auswin G. Thomasa and Leigh Tesfatsiona,b {agthomas, tesfatsi}@iastate.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    distinct concepts: ISO up/down management of demand Automated demand dispatch Bottom-up retail customer Temperature (oF) Solar Heat Flow Rate (kBTU h) Internal Heat Flow Rate (kBTU h) Relative Humidity (%) 13 #12;Wholesale Prices Passed Thru to Households Retail prices charged to retail energy customers on day D given

  12. Waste Heat Recovery – Submerged Arc Furnaces (SAF) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, T.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designed consumes power and fuel that yields an energy efficiency of approximately 40% (Total Btu’s required to reduce to elemental form/ Btu Input). The vast majority of heat is lost to the atmosphere or cooling water system. The furnaces can be modified...

  13. Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A C EUIs (cooling, ventilation, and gas heating). The annualCooling kWh/ft Ventilation kWh/ft Heating kBtu/ft CoolingMiscellaneous DOE-2 Ventilation kWh/ft Heating kBtu/ft EDA

  14. How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Heaters With Input Ratings Above 75,000 Btu per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous” [ANSI Z21.10.3a] American National StandardsWater Heaters With Input Ratings Above 75,000 Btu Per Hour, Circulating and Instantaneous” [ANSI Z21.10.3a] American National Standards

  15. Assembly and Testing of an On-Farm Manure to Energy Conversion BMP for Animal Waste Pollution Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engler, Cady; Capereda, Sergio; Mukhtar, Saqib

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of dairy manure on a dry basis was found to be 15.93 + 0.26 MJ/kg (6,863 + 112 Btu/lb), typical of most agricultural biomass. The heating value was around 14.09 MJ/kg (6,070 Btu/lb), on an “as received” basis (around 13% moisture). • The heating value...

  16. Coke Gasification - A Solution to Excess Coke Capacity and High Energy Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, S. S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effectively to produce medium-Btu (300 Btu/scf) gas which, in turn, can fuel the refinery furnaces to replace natural gas. Coke gasification should prove economical with natural gas price decontrol and the average price projected to rise to over $14.0 per...

  17. Where are your BTUs? Watt are you doing about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    (1015 BTUs) EIA AER 2007 #12;YOUR BTU Consumption Rate USA P C it E C tiUSA Per Capita Energy Consumption 6.2% Drop EIA AER 2007 #12;More People, More Energy 350 USA Population Growth 1949-2007 250 300 #12;OUR BTU Consumption Rate USA E C tiUSA Energy Consumption EIA AER 2007 #12;You vs Your

  18. Oxygen Enriched Combustion System Performance Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, S. L.; Kwan, Y.; Abele, A. R.; Silver, L. S.; Kobayashi, H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and then to verify the performance of selected systems in research furnaces. Tests of several commercial burner designs have been conducted at scales of 1 x 10^6 Btu/hr and 10 x 10^6 Btu/hr. The burners represent both conventional air fired designs and oxygen...

  19. Reducing PM Concentrations in Simulated High Temperature Gas Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luehrs, Daniel R

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    the reaction temperatures and capture the energy in the biomass. CGT has an approximant 16,300 kJ/kg (7,000 Btu/lb) of energy. The resulting synthetic gas (syngas) can have an energy content as high as 7,450 kJ/m^(3) (200 Btu/dscf) and can be fed directly...

  20. PERFORMANCE OF AN EXPERIMENTAL SOLAR-DRIVEN ABSORPTION AIR CONDITIONER--ANNUAL REPORT JULY 1975-SEPT. 1976

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rates were calibrated The heat inputs to the generator (qG)of chilled water, lbs/hr heat input from hot water, Btu/hrof Run 20e. Q cw P T heat input from chilled water, Btu/hr

  1. Cogeneration Leads to Major Aquaculture and Greenhouse Development in Canada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercer, J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .28/MBTU '**6 Fuel Oil @ $ 8.13/MBTU 1 Boiler 8e% Efflc. Boller aO% Effic. Steam I Cost ? $5.28 - $6.21/MBTU I 0.85 Assume I MBTU of Steam to Turbine ~ _$ 3.00 200,000 BTU of Energy Produces Electricity aoo,ooo BTU Sleam2 Steam2 Cost...

  2. assesstment homa fundamento: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of modern sta- tistical signal processing. The EM Mignotte, Max 19 Fundamentos y Arquitectura de Computadores Diego R. Llanos Ferraris Computer Technologies and Information...

  3. Observations of nonmethane organic compounds during ARCTAS - Part 1: Biomass burning emissions and plume enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    burning in Siberia and Kazakhstan as an important source forgrassland fires in Kazakhstan (Warneke et al. , 2009) duringfires from East Asia/Kazakhstan. Likewise there was no sta-

  4. Feature Detection, Characterization and Confirmation Methodology: Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and sources of salts in a granite batholith on the Canadianpetrological features of Toki Granite. STA Science Exchangefrom the rapakivi granite on the island of Hästholmen.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - automated patient history Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sys- tems can... be designed to provide tailored information to patients on their health, their care teams, the sta- tus Source: Hunt, Galen - Operating Systems Group,...

  6. FMT Workforce FTEs by Scope Current Contract Scope of Work (Section...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Readiness in Technical Base & Facilities (RTBF) and Site Stewardship 110 Secure Transportation Asset (STA) 125 Security (Physical and Cyber) 160 Other NNSAOther DOE 310...

  7. arctic research station: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Rocky Mountain Research Sta- tion is one of five 19 Z .Atmospheric Research 51 1999 4575 Cloud resolving simulations of Arctic stratus Geosciences Websites Summary: Z...

  8. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prevention measure. Compressed Natural Gas Station at Build-completed for a compressed natural gas sta- tion. A requestBuilding 76 Compressed Natural Gas Station Perform sanitary

  9. Undergraduate Curriculum for the Marketing MINOR Credit Hour Requirements 19 Hours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    , HSA 3111, PHI 3803, PPE 3003C, PSY 3213C, RTV 3007, SOP 3004C, SPC 3301, SPC 4331, SPC 4426, STA 4102

  10. THE TECHNOLOGY OF SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR DIPOLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of practical superconductors,2 2. their sta-winding from the superconductive to the resistive state. *I. II. III. IV. V. Superconducting Materials Conductor Matri

  11. Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

  12. Childhood Cancer and Traffic-Related Air Pollution Exposure in Pregnancy and Early Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and residence next to petrol stations and automotive repairproximity to main roads and petrol stations. Occup Environair pollution in Taiwan: petrol sta- tion density as an

  13. MOUNTAIN LAKE BIOLOGICAL STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    . . . . . 11 Garbage / Recycling . . . . 11 Vehicles / Parking . . . . 11 Guests collec ng has led to the deple on of the habitats surrounding many field sta ons. Therefore, please

  14. Performance summary of the Balcomb solar home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.; Perry, J.E. Jr.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating performance of the Balcomb passive solar home is re-evaluated based on detailed review of 85 channels of data taken during six weeks of 1980. This led to a re-analysis of 176 days of data taken over the winter of 1978-79. Auxiliary heat during this winter was 7.4 million Btu which compares with 66.0 million Btu total heat losses from the house plus 46.4 million Btu losses from the greenhouse. Auxiliary heat predicted using the solar load ratio method is 8.1 million Btu. Solar savings are estimated as 57 million Btu. Good thermal comfort conditions are documented. Energy flows are tabulated for each month. Energy flows are tabulated for each month. Conclusions regarding detailed heat flow and storage in the house are presented.

  15. Discontinuous Modelling of Crack Propagation in a Gradient-Enhanced Continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone, A; Wells, G N; Sluys, L J

    of freedom and with the symmetries Kba #3; Kab, Kbp #3; Kbq #3; Kaq, Kqa #3; Kqb #3; Kpb, Kqp #3; Kqq #3; Kpq and Kaa #3; ? BTu #6; 1 #24; ? #8; DBu d? (27a) Kab #3; ?! BTu #6; 1 #24; ? #8; DBu d? (27b) Kap #3;#23;#24; ? BTu ?? ?? ?? ?e D?Ne d? (27c) Kaq #3... ;#23;#24; ? ! BTu ?? ?? ?? ?e D?Ne d? (27d) Kbb #3; ?! BTu #6; 1 #24; ? #8; DBu d? (27e) Kpa #3;#23;#24; ? NTe ??eq ?? T Bu d? (27f) Kpb #3;#23;#24; ? ! NTe ??eq ?? T Bu d? (27g) Kpp #3; ? NTe Ne BTe cBe d? (27h) Kpq #3; ?! NTe Ne BTe cBe d? ffi (27i...

  16. Austenite in Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steel Subjected to Multiple Isothermal Heat Treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Van Tuan; Song, You Young; Park, Kyong-Su; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    –898. [22] H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia: Bainite in Steels, 2nd edition: Institute of Materials, London, U.K., 2001. [23] P. J. Jacques: Curr. Opi. in Sol. Sta. and Mater. Sci. 8 (2004) 259–265. [24] B. C. DeCooman: Curr. Opi. in Sol. Sta. and Mater. Sci. 8 (2004...

  17. Rock Mining Operation Effects on Water Quality in the Everglades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    Foundation ­ Science Department January 8, 2010 1/22 G. Melodie Naja #12;1/22 Stewart Mining Industries Lake., under construction) 2- Less then 7 miles from STA3/4 and STA2 3- Less then 11 - 14 miles away from al. (1985) Soil and groundwater pollution Virginia Tech - Intensive agricultural land use

  18. An economic analysis of concentrate level in steer feeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Clarence Walter

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Sta. Res. Bul. 32. Knox, J. H. 1951. Amount of grain for fattening yearling steers. N. Mex. Agri. Expt. Sta ~ Bul. 367. Magee, A. C. , P. T. Marion, C. E. Fisher and d. F. Hughes. 1957. Economics of cattle feeding systems for '@est Texas. Tex...

  19. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  20. Monthly energy review: September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during June 1996 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.5% decrease from the level of production during June 1995. Energy consumption during June 1996 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.7% above the level of consumption during June 1995. Net imports of energy during June 1996 totaled 1.6 quadrillion Btu, 4.5% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Statistics are presented on the following topics: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  1. Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Problem 2.67: A gas undergoes a process from State 1, where p1 = 60 lbf/in2 & v1 = 6:0 ft3 /lbm...c volume, & internal energy is u = 0:2651 BTU-in2 lbf-ft3 pv 95:436 BTU lbm where p is in lbf/in2 , v is in ft3 /lbm, & u is in BTU/lbm. The mass of gas is 10 lbm. Neglecting kinetic- and potential-energy e

  2. Supply Fan Control for Constant Air Volume Air Handling Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Y.; Wang, G.; Liu, M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    there is fixed VFD speed, as shown in Table 1 and Figure 11. On the other hand, the energy consumption is 3,896,493 Btu/hr when there is dynamic VFD speed. The thermal energy consumption of dynamic VFD speed is less than that of the fixed VFD speed by 44... %. Therefore, when the supply fan speed control is optimized, thermal energy can be reduced. Table 1. Comparison data of thermal energy consumption Floor Fixed VFD speed (Btu/hr) Dynamic VFD speed (Btu/hr) Energy saving (%) PLF 784,891 502,611 36...

  3. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  4. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States))

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  5. Well-to-Wheels analysis of landfill gas-based pathways and their addition to the GREET model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mintz, M.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Energy Systems

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, approximately 300 million standard cubic ft/day (mmscfd) of natural gas and 1600 MW of electricity are produced from the decomposition of organic waste at 519 U.S. landfills (EPA 2010a). Since landfill gas (LFG) is a renewable resource, this energy is considered renewable. When used as a vehicle fuel, compressed natural gas (CNG) produced from LFG consumes up to 185,000 Btu of fossil fuel and generates from 1.5 to 18.4 kg of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO{sub 2}e) emissions per million Btu of fuel on a 'well-to-wheel' (WTW) basis. This compares with approximately 1.1 million Btu and 78.2 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for CNG from fossil natural gas and 1.2 million Btu and 97.5 kg of CO{sub 2}e per million Btu for petroleum gasoline. Because of the additional energy required for liquefaction, LFG-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) requires more fossil fuel (222,000-227,000 Btu/million Btu WTW) and generates more GHG emissions (approximately 22 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu WTW) if grid electricity is used for the liquefaction process. However, if some of the LFG is used to generate electricity for gas cleanup and liquefaction (or compression, in the case of CNG), vehicle fuel produced from LFG can have no fossil fuel input and only minimal GHG emissions (1.5-7.7 kg CO{sub 2}e /MM Btu) on a WTW basis. Thus, LFG-based natural gas can be one of the lowest GHG-emitting fuels for light- or heavy-duty vehicles. This report discusses the size and scope of biomethane resources from landfills and the pathways by which those resources can be turned into and utilized as vehicle fuel. It includes characterizations of the LFG stream and the processes used to convert low-Btu LFG into high-Btu renewable natural gas (RNG); documents the conversion efficiencies and losses of those processes, the choice of processes modeled in GREET, and other assumptions used to construct GREET pathways; and presents GREET results by pathway stage. GREET estimates of well-to-pump (WTP), pump-to-wheel (PTW), and WTW energy, fossil fuel, and GHG emissions for each LFG-based pathway are then summarized and compared with similar estimates for fossil natural gas and petroleum pathways.

  6. Lng vehicle technology, economics, and safety assessment. Final report, April 1991-June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powars, C.A.; Moyer, C.B.; Lowell, D.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid natural gas (LNG) is an attractive transportation fuel because of its high heating value and energy density (i.e. Btu/lb and Btu/gal), clean burning characteristics, relatively low cost ($/Btu), and domestic availability. This research evaluated LNG vehicle and refueling system technology, economics, and safety. Prior and current LNG vehicle projects were studied to identify needed technology improvements. Life-cycle cost analyses considered various LNG vehicle and fuel supply options. Safety records, standards, and analysis methods were reviewed. The LNG market niche is centrally fueled heavy-duty fleet vehicles with high fuel consumption. For these applications, fuel cost savings can amortize equipment capital costs.

  7. Innovative Self- Generating Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    furnaces ? Flat rolled and tubular steel ESL-IE-13-05-06 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 ? 2013 CLEAResult ? All rights reserved. By-Product Gas Flow COG = Coke Oven Gas BFG...-Product Gas Heat Content Heat Content Compared to Natural Gas Amount available (mmBTU/hr) Coke Oven Gas 475 BTU/scf 55% lower 40.4 Blast Furnace Gas 83 BTU/scf 91% lower 43.2 ESL-IE-13-05-06 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology...

  8. Maintaining Space Temperature and Humidity in the Digital Switch Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saman, N. F.; Johnson, H.

    the humidifier if Case A-l is used, Btu/lb Dhjj = enthalpy difference across the humidifier if Case A-2 is used, Btu/lb Dhcnjner = enthalpy difference across the sensible cooling process, case A-2, Btu/lb Case B: The outside air dry bulb temperature is higher.... Isothermal humidification (steam generator or infrared heater). b. Adiabatic humidification (evaporative cooler or ultrasonic humidification). METHODOLOGY 1. Obtain the bin data for the location (see Table 1 below for sample bin data). Table 1. Temperature...

  9. Leadership in Low NOx/ Lochinvar Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheko, D.; Boston, S.; Moore, J.

    , Texas Nashville, Tennessee On April 19, 2000, the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission adopted statewide NOx emission limits for all natural gas-fired water heaters, boilers and process heaters with input rates of 2 million Btu/hr or less... for the purposes of generating efficient boilers, and process heaters having a BTU rating of up and environmentally friendly hot water production. to 2,000,000 BTU/hour within the state of Texas. Some readers of this paper may already be aware It's not everyday...

  10. Emissions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    per Btu of fuel input. Thus, improving fuel efficiency is a more effective greenhouse gas control strategy for power plants than for motor vehicles. 6.1.4 Woody Biomass The...

  11. Annual Federal Government Energy Use and Costs by Agency, 1975...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Annual Federal Government Energy Use and Costs by Agency, 1975 - 2012 Data set presents historical energy use in native units and billion site-delivered Btu and costs (in 2012...

  12. L:\\main\\pkc\\aeotabs\\aeo2012\\appa.wpd

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3 Table A2. Energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu per year, unless otherwise noted) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2010-2035 (percent) 2009 2010...

  13. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Outlook 2011

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table A2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source (Quadrillion Btu per Year, Unless Otherwise Noted) Sector and Source Reference Case Annual Grow th 2009-2035 (percent) 2008 2009...

  14. Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0% by weight, dry basis) for combustion, as well as for the heat input of any fuel burning equipment (250,000 Btu/hour)....

  15. California's Greenhouse Gas Policies: Local Solutions to a Global Problem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, Jim B; Peterman, Carla Joy; Wolfram, Catherine D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    useful if it displaces coal generation in Canada, than if itbeyond discarding all coal generation and the current RPS2,000(coal/trash/wood))*fuel BTU]/ net generation MWh. For

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Intensity Figure DataThe energy intensity of the U.S. economy, measured as primary energy use (in Btu) per dollar of GDP (in 2005 dollars), declines by 40 percent from 2009 to 2035...

  17. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    an average of 0.5 percent per year from 2010 to 2035. The energy intensity of the U.S. economy, measured as primary energy use in British thermal units (Btu) per dollar of gross...

  18. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    valuable information on FEMP ESPC contracts. The authorsBtu DOE ECM EERE EIA ESCO ESPC HVAC LBNL MUSH NAESCO O&M OEPerformance Contract (ESPC) program (i.e. , DOE Super-

  19. Evolution of the U.S. Energy Service Company Industry: Market Size and Project Performance from 1990-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ARRA Btu DOE ECM EERE EIA ESCO ESPC HVAC LBNL MUSH NAESCOESCO project costs, local, state, and federal administrators of ESPCESPC market, (5) industry consolidation, and (6) overly optimistic projections provided by our survey respondents. ESCO

  20. Public Health Benefits of End-Use Electrical Energy Efficiency in California: An Exploratory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cogen Cogen Natural Gas Landfill Gas Tulare Tulare Woodwasteand wood waste, landfill gas, and mlmicipal solid waste andscf digester gas, or Btu/ scf landfill gas. HVs are given in