National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for btu short ton

  1. Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1 Pennsylvania 3.8 3.3 18.9 .8 .0 .0 .0 22.7 4.2 26.9 Virginia .1

  2. Table 7.2 Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Production, 1949-2011 (Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1 Underground Surface 1 East of the Mississippi 1 West of the Mississippi 1 1949 437,868,000 [2] [2] 42,702,000 358,854,000 121,716,000 444,199,000 36,371,000 480,570,000 1950 516,311,000 [2] [2] 44,077,000 421,000,000 139,388,000 524,374,000 36,014,000 560,388,000 1951 533,665,000 [2] [2] 42,670,000 442,184,000 134,151,000 541,703,000 34,632,000 576,335,000

  3. Table 7.4 Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Imports by Country of Origin, 2000-2011 (Short Tons) Year Australia New Zealand Canada Mexico Colombia Venezuela China India Indonesia Europe South Africa Other Total Norway Poland Russia Ukraine United Kingdom Other Total 2000 167,595 0 1,923,434 6,671 7,636,614 2,038,774 19,646 205 718,149 0 0 1,212 0 238 0 1,450 0 85 12,512,623 2001 315,870 24,178 2,571,415 8,325 11,176,191 3,335,258 109,877 1,169 882,455 15,933 514,166 219,077 0 75,704 12 824,892 440,408 97,261 19,787,299 2002 821,280 0

  4. Table 7.5 Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Exports by Country of Destination, 1960-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Canada Brazil Europe Japan Other 3 Total Belgium 1 Denmark France Germany 2 Italy Nether- lands Spain Turkey United Kingdom Other 3 Total 1960 12,843 1,067 1,116 130 794 4,566 4,899 2,837 331 NA – 2,440 17,113 5,617 1,341 37,981 1961 12,135 994 971 80 708 4,326 4,797 2,552 228 NA – 2,026 15,688 6,614 974 36,405 1962 12,302 1,327 1,289 38 851 5,056 5,978 3,320 766 NA 2 1,848 19,148 6,465 973 40,215 1963 14,557 1,161

  5. Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per Employee Hour 1) Year Mining Method Location Total 2 Underground Surface 2 East of the Mississippi West of the Mississippi Underground Surface 2 Total 2 Underground Surface 2 Total 2 1949 0.68 [3] 1.92 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA 0.72 1950 .72 [3] 1.96 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .76 1951 .76 [3] 2.00 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .80 1952 .80 [3] 2.10 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .84 1953 .88 [3] 2.22 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA .93 1954 1.00 [3] 2.48 [3] NA NA NA NA NA NA

  6. Table 7.8 Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke Overview, 1949-2011 (Thousand Short Tons) Year Production Trade Stock Change 2 Consumption 3 Imports Exports Net Imports 1 1949 63,637 279 548 -269 176 63,192 1950 72,718 438 398 40 -659 73,417 1951 79,331 162 1,027 -865 372 78,094 1952 68,254 313 792 -479 419 67,356 1953 78,837 157 520 -363 778 77,696 1954 59,662 116 388 -272 269 59,121 1955 75,302 126 531 -405 -1,248 76,145 1956 74,483 131 656 -525 634 73,324 1957 75,951 118 822 -704 814 74,433 1958 53,604 122 393 -271 675 52,658 1959

  7. Table 7.9 Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Short Ton) Year Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite 1 Anthracite Total Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 Nominal 2 Real 3 1949 4.90 [4] 33.80 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.37 16.35 [R] 8.90 61.38 [R] 5.24 36.14 [R] 1950 4.86 [4] 33.16 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.41 16.44 [R] 9.34 63.73 [R] 5.19 35.41 [R] 1951 4.94 [4] 31.44 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.44 15.53 [R] 9.94 63.26 [R] 5.29 33.67 [R] 1952 4.92 [4] 30.78 [4,R] [4] [4] 2.39 14.95 [R] 9.58 59.94 [R]

  8. Btu)","per Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet)","Total (trillion Btu)","per Building (million Btu)","per...

  9. First BTU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that is consumed by the United States.3 References First BTU First BTU Green Energy About First BTU Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleFirstBT...

  10. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  11. Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

    1983-07-01

    Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

  12. BTU International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1862 Product: US-based manufacturer of thermal processing equipment, semiconductor packaging, and surface mount assembly. References: BTU International Inc1 This article is a...

  13. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide...

  14. Annual Energy Outlook 2015 - Appendix G

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    G-1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2015 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.169 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.664 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 28.710 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short

  15. ,"Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Heat Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"District Heat Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  16. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  17. Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "GeothermalCapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR...

  18. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "GeothermalAnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR...

  19. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12:00:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per ...

  20. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    monitoring. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural gas monitoring. The natural gas industry seeks inexpensive sensors and instrumentation to rapidly measure gas heating value in widely distributed locations. For gas pipelines, this will improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and will

  1. DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Information Resources » Energy Analysis » DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) DYNAMIC MANUFACTURING ENERGY SANKEY TOOL (2010, UNITS: TRILLION BTU) About the Energy Data Use this diagram to explore (zoom, pan, select) and compare energy flows across U.S. manufacturing and key subsectors. Line widths indicate the volume of energy flow in trillions of British thermal units (TBtu). The 15 manufacturing subsectors together consume 95% of all

  2. E TON Solar Tech | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name: E-TON Solar Tech Place: Tainan, Taiwan Zip: 709 Product: Taiwan-based manufacturer of PV cells. Coordinates: 22.99721, 120.180862...

  3. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  4. Bioenergy Impacts … Billion Dry Tons

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Oak Ridge National Laboratory published research that shows that U.S. resources could sustainably produce by 2030 at least one billion dry tons of non-food biomass resources, yielding up to 60 billion gallons of biofuels, as well as bio- based chemicals, products, and electricity. This could potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions by up to 500 million tons per year, create 1.5 million new jobs, and keep about $200 billion extra in the U.S. economy each year. Research is showing that U.S.

  5. EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this draft environmental impact statement that evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky. DOE cancelled this project after publication of the draft.

  6. Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Breakout Session 1A: Biomass Feedstocks for the Bioeconomy Billion Ton Study-A Historical Perspective Bryce Stokes, Senior Advisor, CNJV PDF icon stokes_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass Econ 101: Measuring the Technological Improvements on Feedstocks Costs WEBINAR: A CHANGING MARKET FOR BIOFUELS AND BIOPRODUCTS U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts

  7. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value

  8. "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and

  9. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers | Department of Energy A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers Comment that a requirement to reduce the BTU input rate of existing decorative

  10. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources | Department of Energy New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting Opportunities for Growth in Bioenergy Resources August 10, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today released a report - 2011 U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry - detailing U.S. biomass

  11. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  12. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  13. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011

  14. Appendix G: Conversion factors

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production ... million Btu per short ton 20.142 Consumption...

  15. Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CO2 | Department of Energy Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of CO2 Energy Department Sponsored Project Captures One Millionth Metric Ton of CO2 June 27, 2014 - 11:09am Addthis An aerial view of Air Products’ steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. An aerial view of Air Products' steam methane reforming facility at Port Arthur, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Air Products and Chemicals Inc. Allison Lantero

  16. Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Hawaii Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,056 1,055 1,057 1,043 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 983 2014 947 946 947 947 947 947 951 978 990 968 974 962 2015 968 954 947 959 990 1,005 1,011 965 989 996 996 997 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. Picture of the Week: The 100-Ton Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 The 100-Ton Test Before the historic Trinity test on July 16th, 1945, Los Alamos scientists conducted a host of other experiments designed to ensure that they would be ready to successfully measure the full force, efficiency, energy release, shock and radiological phenomena of the blast. July 9, 2015 Trinity 1945 x View extra-large image on Flickr » Before the historic Trinity test on July 16th, 1945, Los Alamos scientists conducted a host of other experiments designed to ensure that they

  18. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons ... DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of ...

  19. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency...

  20. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save 1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy...

  1. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons ...

  2. Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Georgia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,017 1,016 1,017 1,017 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,023 1,023 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,025 2015 1,025 1,026 1,025 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,026 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Delaware Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,050 1,049 1,046 1,048 1,041 1,049 1,058 1,054 1,065 1,064 1,067 1,057 2014 1,052 1,048 1,048 1,051 1,045 1,049 1,063 1,065 1,062 1,063 1,063 1,064 2015 1,061 1,061 1,062 1,051 1,055 1,055 1,044 1,044 1,043 1,051 1,051 1,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Colorado Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,032 1,030 1,033 1,040 1,051 1,056 1,057 1,058 1,037 1,032 1,033 2014 1,030 1,036 1,038 1,041 1,051 1,050 1,048 1,048 1,050 1,055 1,042 1,051 2015 1,046 1,044 1,051 1,059 1,059 1,070 1,073 1,069 1,076 1,069 1,060 1,051 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Florida Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,018 1,018 2014 1,018 1,018 1,018 1,019 1,019 1,019 1,022 1,023 1,024 1,023 1,024 1,025 2015 1,024 1,025 1,024 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,024 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Connecticut Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,018 1,025 1,011 1,022 1,028 1,024 1,032 1,028 1,030 1,030 1,026 1,024 2014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,022 1,023 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,017 2015 1,017 1,026 1,029 1,026 1,049 1,027 1,027 1,026 1,026 1,028 1,027 1,026 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  7. Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Iowa Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,028 1,032 1,033 1,032 2014 1,034 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,040 1,039 1,043 1,047 1,044 1,046 1,044 1,045 2015 1,045 1,047 1,047 1,051 1,054 1,060 1,059 1,059 1,058 1,058 1,057 1,056 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Cubic Foot) Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,029 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,025 1,028 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016

  9. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,028 1,026 1,028 1,028 1,027 1,027 1,025 2010's 1,023 1,022 1,024 1,027 1,032 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  10. Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Louisiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,013 1,015 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,016 1,017 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,019 2014 1,017 1,016 1,018 1,021 1,028 1,025 1,029 1,029 1,031 1,034 1,037 1,038 2015 1,030 1,031 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,024 1,023 1,023 1,022 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  11. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,018 1,018 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,017 1,016 1,017 2014 1,017 1,017 1,019 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,025 1,027 1,025 1,028 1,025 2015 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,044 1,039 1,040 1,042 1,039 1,037 1,035 1,031 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Kentucky Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,023 1,022 1,023 1,025 1,026 1,027 1,028 1,030 1,031 1,028 1,028 1,033 2014 1,029 1,024 1,026 1,028 1,031 1,037 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,022 1,017 1,019 2015 1,023 1,018 1,015 1,016 1,023 1,021 1,024 1,015 1,020 1,024 1,021 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Idaho Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,015 1,031 1,021 1,010 997 988 994 1,001 1,026 1,034 1,054 2014 1,048 1,036 1,030 1,022 1,006 993 984 996 1,005 1,019 1,046 1,039 2015 1,047 1,037 1,030 1,023 1,000 1,010 1,034 1,028 1,024 1,033 1,035 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  14. Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Illinois Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,014 1,015 1,015 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,018 2014 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021 1,021 1,023 1,024 2015 1,027 1,030 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,027 1,028 1,028 1,030 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Indiana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,011 1,012 1,013 1,015 1,019 1,020 1,019 1,021 1,020 1,018 1,015 1,014 2014 1,016 1,017 1,019 1,019 1,023 1,023 1,025 1,030 1,028 1,027 1,025 1,029 2015 1,028 1,029 1,031 1,039 1,037 1,043 1,043 1,044 1,041 1,039 1,034 1,033 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Minnesota Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,020 1,021 1,020 1,021 1,026 1,030 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,029 1,027 2014 1,031 1,027 1,033 1,034 1,038 1,042 1,042 1,051 1,046 1,040 1,038 1,040 2015 1,041 1,034 1,033 1,037 1,044 1,047 1,043 1,041 1,039 1,041 1,045 1,041 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  17. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,015 1,018 1,018 1,021 1,022 1,025 1,020 1,020 2014 1,019 1,014 1,019 1,026 1,030 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,035 1,033 1,035 1,034 2015 1,036 1,033 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,030 1,030 1,029 1,031 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  18. Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Missouri Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,015 1,014 1,014 1,013 1,014 1,013 1,017 1,015 1,016 1,019 1,013 1,014 2014 1,013 1,013 1,014 1,014 1,011 1,016 1,016 1,018 1,017 1,018 1,017 1,017 2015 1,017 1,020 1,025 1,026 1,024 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,026 1,025 1,024 1,023 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Montana Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,044 1,040 1,032 1,034 1,034 1,044 1,048 1,043 1,047 1,041 1,032 1,031 2014 1,034 1,030 1,030 1,027 1,032 1,030 1,038 1,036 1,040 1,031 1,026 1,030 2015 1,028 1,029 1,028 1,021 1,019 1,030 1,031 1,033 1,032 1,032 1,034 1,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maine Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,032 1,028 1,031 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,037 1,032 1,029 2014 1,029 1,030 1,030 1,030 1,033 1,030 1,031 1,039 1,023 1,016 1,025 1,027 2015 1,033 1,035 1,030 1,025 1,022 1,020 1,020 1,018 1,019 1,026 1,025 1,027 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Maryland Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,041 1,037 1,032 1,027 1,037 1,042 1,060 1,056 1,062 1,059 1,061 1,059 2014 1,053 1,048 1,045 1,049 1,047 1,052 1,051 1,051 1,049 1,052 1,057 1,057 2015 1,059 1,061 1,058 1,051 1,058 1,057 1,055 1,049 1,050 1,053 1,049 1,050 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Massachusetts Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,037 1,033 1,032 1,033 1,035 1,032 1,033 1,034 1,036 1,038 1,033 1,030 2014 1,035 1,032 1,031 1,030 1,030 1,031 1,030 1,029 1,029 1,028 1,029 1,028 2015 1,035 1,035 1,030 1,029 1,027 1,027 1,029 1,028 1,027 1,028 1,029 1,030 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  3. Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foot) Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Michigan Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1,021 1,021 1,022 1,026 1,020 1,022 1,024 1,021 1,019 1,019 1,017 1,019 2014 1,019 1,021 1,021 1,017 1,020 1,019 1,015 1,028 1,022 1,023 1,026 1,029 2015 1,027 1,026 1,030 1,035 1,028 1,033 1,034 1,035 1,036 1,034 1,041 1,040 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry | Department of Energy Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry An update to the 2005 report, "Biomass as a Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply" PDF icon billion_ton_update.pdf More Documents & Publications ECOWAS - GBEP REGIONAL BIOMASS RESOURCE ASSESSMENT WORKSHOP Biomass Program

  5. Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Flexible, Low-Emissions Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuels ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE Enabling Clean Combustion of Low-Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines By enabling ultralow-emission, lean premixed combustion of a wide range of gaseous opportunity fuels, this unique, fuel- fexible catalytic combustor for gas turbines can reduce natural gas consumption in industry. Introduction Gas turbines are commonly used in industry for onsite power and heating needs because of their high

  6. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" "

  7. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil prices topped $70 per barrel (bbl) and catastrophic hurricanes in the Gulf Coast shut down a significant fraction of U.S. refinery capacity. The following year, oil approached $80 per bbl due to supply concerns, as well as continued political tensions in the Middle East. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was enacted in December of that year. By the end of December 2007, oil prices surpassed $100 per bbl for the first time, and by mid-summer 2008, prices approached $150 per bbl because of supply concerns, speculation, and weakness of the U.S. dollar. As fast as they skyrocketed, oil prices fell, and by the end of 2008, oil prices dropped below $50 per bbl, falling even more a month later due to the global economic recession. In 2009 and 2010, oil prices began to increase again as a result of a weak U.S. dollar and the rebounding of world economies.

  8. Neutrino physics with multi-ton scale liquid xenon detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baudis, L.; Ferella, A.; Kish, A.; Manalaysay, A.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodn; Schumann, M., E-mail: laura.baudis@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: alfredo.ferella@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: alexkish@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: aaronm@ucdavis.edu, E-mail: marrodan@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: marc.schumann@lhep.unibe.ch [Physik Institut, University of Zrich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zrich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of large-scale xenon detectors to low-energy solar neutrinos, to coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering and to neutrinoless double beta decay. As a concrete example, we consider the xenon part of the proposed DARWIN (Dark Matter WIMP Search with Noble Liquids) experiment. We perform detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the expected backgrounds, considering realistic energy resolutions and thresholds in the detector. In a low-energy window of 230 keV, where the sensitivity to solar pp and {sup 7}Be-neutrinos is highest, an integrated pp-neutrino rate of 5900 events can be reached in a fiducial mass of 14 tons of natural xenon, after 5 years of data. The pp-neutrino flux could thus be measured with a statistical uncertainty around 1%, reaching the precision of solar model predictions. These low-energy solar neutrinos will be the limiting background to the dark matter search channel for WIMP-nucleon cross sections below ? 2 10{sup ?48} cm{sup 2} and WIMP masses around 50 GeV?c{sup ?2}, for an assumed 99.5% rejection of electronic recoils due to elastic neutrino-electron scatters. Nuclear recoils from coherent scattering of solar neutrinos will limit the sensitivity to WIMP masses below ? 6 GeV?c{sup ?2} to cross sections above ? 4 10{sup ?45}cm{sup 2}. DARWIN could reach a competitive half-life sensitivity of 5.6 10{sup 26} y to the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe after 5 years of data, using 6 tons of natural xenon in the central detector region.

  9. Coal Markets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Markets Release date: March 14, 2016 | Next release date: March 21, 2016 | Archive Coal Markets Weekly production Dollars per short ton Dollars per mmbtu Average weekly coal commodity spot prices dollars per short ton Week ending Week ago change Central Appalachia 12,500 Btu, 1.2 SO2 Northern Appalachia 13,000 Btu, < 3.0 SO2 Illinois Basin 11,800 Btu, 5.0 SO2 Powder River Basin 8,800 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Uinta Basin 11,700 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Source: With permission, SNL Energy Note: Coal prices shown

  10. Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107 313 Textile Mills 32 0 65 (s) (s) 2 66 12 -0 178 314 Textile Product Mills 3 0 46 (s) 1 Q 20 (s) -0 72 315 Apparel 0 0 7 (s) (s)

  11. Taking the One-Metric-Ton Challenge | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taking the One-Metric-Ton ... Taking the One-Metric-Ton Challenge Posted: January 13, 2016 - 4:46pm NNSA Uranium Program Manager Tim Driscoll speaks with the One-Metric-Ton Challenge team in Building 9212. The team has undertaken an extensive dedicated maintenance effort to improve metal production equipment reliability and reduce unexpected down time, with an end goal of significantly increasing purified metal production by fiscal year 2017. Last year, NNSA Uranium Program Manager Tim Driscoll

  12. U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile U.S. Removes Nine Metric Tons of Plutonium From Nuclear Weapons Stockpile September 17, 2007 - 2:41pm Addthis Declaration Reinforces U.S. Commitment to Nonproliferation VIENNA, AUSTRIA - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will remove nine metric tons of plutonium from further use as fissile material in U.S.

  13. Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Heat Pumps (5.4 >=< 20 Tons) Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Project Type New Installation Replacement New Installation Condenser Type Air Source Water Source Air Source Existing Capacity * ton - Existing Cooling Efficiency * EER -

  14. Removal of 1,082-Ton Reactor Among Richland Operations Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from groundwater across the site ahead of schedule and pumped a record volume of water through treatment facilities to remove contamination, with more than 130 tons of...

  15. U.S. Billion-Ton Update. Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-08-01

    This report is an update to the 2005 Billion-Ton Study that addresses shotcomings and questions that arose from the original report..

  16. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  17. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  18. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  19. Combined compressed air storage-low BTU coal gasification power plant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kartsounes, George T.; Sather, Norman F.

    1979-01-01

    An electrical generating power plant includes a Compressed Air Energy Storage System (CAES) fueled with low BTU coal gas generated in a continuously operating high pressure coal gasifier system. This system is used in coordination with a continuously operating main power generating plant to store excess power generated during off-peak hours from the power generating plant, and to return the stored energy as peak power to the power generating plant when needed. The excess coal gas which is produced by the coal gasifier during off-peak hours is stored in a coal gas reservoir. During peak hours the stored coal gas is combined with the output of the coal gasifier to fuel the gas turbines and ultimately supply electrical power to the base power plant.

  20. Table 3.1 Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fossil Fuel Production Prices, 1949-2011 (Dollars per Million Btu) Year Coal 1 Natural Gas 2 Crude Oil 3 Fossil Fuel Composite 4 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Nominal 5 Real 6 Percent Change 7 1949 0.21 1.45 0.05 0.37 0.44 3.02 0.26 1.81 – – 1950 .21 1.41 .06 .43 .43 2.95 [R] .26 1.74 -3.6 1951 .21 1.35 .06 .40 .44 2.78 .26 1.65 -5.4 1952 .21 1.31 [R] .07 .45 .44 2.73 .26 1.63 -1.0 1953 .21 1.29 .08 .50 .46 2.86 .27 1.69 3.3 1954 .19 1.18 .09 .55 .48 2.94 .28 1.70 .7 1955

  1. 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site 6 Million Tons of Mill Tailings Removed From DOE Moab Project Site June 18, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 (Grand Junction, CO) - Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced that 6 million tons of uranium mill tailings have been shipped from Moab, Utah, under the

  2. Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation Billion-Ton Update: Home-Grown Energy Resources Across the Nation August 11, 2011 - 3:59pm Addthis Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from Billion-Ton Update Total potential biomass resources by county in the contiguous U.S. from the baseline scenario of the Update (Figure 6.4, page 159) | Map from

  3. 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016 | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016 11,970,363 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of February 23, 2016 This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from 210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program

  4. Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone Moab Marks 6-Million-Ton Cleanup Milestone June 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis At Tuesday's Grand County Council meeting in Utah, Moab Federal Project Director Donald Metzler, center, moves a piece from a plaque representing Moab’s uranium mill tailings pile to a plaque representing the disposal cell in recognition of the site achieving a milestone by shipping 6 million tons of the tailings. Grand County Council Chair Gene Ciarus is on the left and

  5. DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CO2 | Department of Energy Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 DOE-Sponsored Mississippi Project Hits 1-Million-Ton Milestone for Injected CO2 November 5, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) storage project in Mississippi has become the fifth worldwide to reach the important milestone of more than 1 million tons injected. As a result, it is helping to both further carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a mitigation strategy

  6. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015 This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOE's Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the annual greenhouse gas emissions from 210,526 passenger vehicles. The projects currently injecting CO2 within DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program

  7. table7.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Bituminous and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Coal Lignite Coke Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) (gallons) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 2.1 0.6 1 0.6

  8. Moab Project Disposes 2 Million Tons of Uranium Mill Tailings with Recovery Act Funds

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project reached its primary American Recovery and Reinvestment Act milestone ahead of schedule on Wednesday with the disposal of 2 million tons of...

  9. 11,202,720 Metric Tons of CO2 Injected as of October 14, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This carbon dioxide (CO2) has been injected in the United States as part of DOEs Clean Coal Research, Development, and Demonstration Programs. One million metric tons of CO2 is equivalent to the...

  10. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed- Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996.

  11. U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Investments | Department of Energy Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments U.S. Manufacturers Save $1 Billion, 11 Million Tons of CO2 through Energy Efficiency Investments September 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Underscoring the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help businesses save money and energy, the Energy Department today recognized more than

  12. SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: SO2907, A Putative TonB-dependent Receptor, Is Involved in Dissimilatory Iron Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis Strain MR-1 Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 utilizes soluble and insoluble ferric ions as terminal electron

  13. Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely | Department of Energy Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145

  14. DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Weapons Stockpile | Department of Energy to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile DOE to Remove 200 Metric Tons of Highly Enriched Uranium from U.S. Nuclear Weapons Stockpile November 7, 2005 - 12:38pm Addthis Will Be Redirected to Naval Reactors, Down-blended or Used for Space Programs WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will

  15. Photo of the Week: Smashing Atoms with 80-ton Magnets | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy The cyclotron, invented by Ernest Lawrence in the 1930s, is a unique circular particle accelerator, which Lawrence himself referred to as a "proton merry-go-round." In reality, the cyclotron specialized in smashing atoms. Part of this atom-smashing process requires very large, very heavy magnets -- sometimes weighing up to 220 tons. In this photo, workers at the Federal Telegraph facility in Menlo Park, California, are smoothing two castings for 80-ton magnets for use in one

  16. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry U.S. BILLI N-TON UPDATE U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Energy Effciency and Renewable Energy Offce of the Biomass Program August 2011 Prepared by OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6335 managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 This report was prepared as an account of

  17. Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas | Department of Energy Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas Cleanup of 77 Waste Sites Meets Two TPA Milestones: 1.2 million tons of soil and debris disposed of from D, H Reactor Areas January 11, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE (509) 376-5365, Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Dieter Bohrmann, Ecology (509) 372-7954,

  18. DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings DOE Moab Project Safely Removes 7 Million Tons of Mill Tailings July 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis View of the Crescent Junction disposal cell, looking northwest. From center left to right, the photo shows final cover, interim cover, tailings, and excavated cell ready to be filled. View of the Crescent Junction disposal cell, looking northwest. From center left to right, the photo shows final cover, interim cover,

  19. Planning for the 400,000 tons/year AISI ironmaking demonstration plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E. . AISI Direct Steelmaking Program)

    1993-01-01

    The American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) has formulated a four-year program to design, construct, and operate a 400,000 net ton per year ironmaking demonstration plant. The plant will employ the coal-based ironmaking process developed under a 1989 cooperative agreement with DOE. AISI will manage the design and construction to be completed in the first two years and operate the plant for the second two years with a variety or ores, coals, and fluxes. Campaigns of increasing length are planned to optimize operations. After successful operation, the plant will be taken over by the host company. Results of studies to date indicate that, on a commercial scale, the AISI process will use 27% less energy and have variable operating costs $10 per ton lower and capital costs of $160 per annual ton, compared to the $250 per annual ton rebuild cost for the coke oven-blast furnace process it will replace. The process will enable the domestic steel industry to become more competitive by reducing its capital and operating cost. Furthermore, by eliminating the pollution problems associated with coke production and by completely enclosing the smelting reactions, this process represents a major step towards an environmentally friendly steel industry.

  20. Energy Department Project Captures and Stores One Million Metric Tons of Carbon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of President Obama’s all-of-the-above energy strategy, the Department of Energy announced today that its Illinois Basin-Decatur Project successfully captured and stored one million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and injected it into a deep saline formation.

  1. Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source, Selected Years, 1979-2003 (Trillion Btu) Energy Source and Year Square Footage Category Principal Building Activity Census Region 1 All Buildings 1,001 to 10,000 10,001 to 100,000 Over 100,000 Education Food Sales Food Service Health Care Lodging Mercantile and Service Office All Other Northeast Midwest South West Major Sources 2 1979 1,255 2,202 1,508 511 [3] 336 469 278 894 861 1,616 1,217 1,826 1,395 526 4,965 1983 1,242 1,935 1,646 480 [3]

  2. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  3. "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand

  4. DOE Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Will Dispose of 34 Metric Tons of Plutonium by Turning it into Fuel for Civilian Reactors | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations

  5. Y-12's rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration rough roads smoothed over with 23,000 tons of recycled asphalt | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets

  6. How well will ton-scale dark matter direct detection experiments constrain minimal supersymmetry?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akrami, Yashar; Savage, Christopher; Scott, Pat; Conrad, Jan; Edsj, Joakim E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se E-mail: conrad@fysik.su.se

    2011-04-01

    Weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are amongst the most interesting dark matter (DM) candidates. Many DM candidates naturally arise in theories beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics, like weak-scale supersymmetry (SUSY). Experiments aim to detect WIMPs by scattering, annihilation or direct production, and thereby determine the underlying theory to which they belong, along with its parameters. Here we examine the prospects for further constraining the Constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (CMSSM) with future ton-scale direct detection experiments. We consider ton-scale extrapolations of three current experiments: CDMS, XENON and COUPP, with 1000 kg-years of raw exposure each. We assume energy resolutions, energy ranges and efficiencies similar to the current versions of the experiments, and include backgrounds at target levels. Our analysis is based on full likelihood constructions for the experiments. We also take into account present uncertainties on hadronic matrix elements for neutralino-quark couplings, and on halo model parameters. We generate synthetic data based on four benchmark points and scan over the CMSSM parameter space using nested sampling. We construct both Bayesian posterior PDFs and frequentist profile likelihoods for the model parameters, as well as the mass and various cross-sections of the lightest neutralino. Future ton-scale experiments will help substantially in constraining supersymmetry, especially when results of experiments primarily targeting spin-dependent nuclear scattering are combined with those directed more toward spin-independent interactions.

  7. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu 1989 16,510 1,410 16,357

  8. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    45 Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Trillion Btu Trillion Btu

  9. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11<//td> 1989 767,378,330 25,574,094 241,960,194 3,460 517,385 270,124,673

  10. Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.6b and 8.6c) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 16,509,639 1,410,151 16,356,550 353,000 247,409 19,356,746

  11. Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 638,798 119,640 1,471,031 762 – 1,591,433 81,669,945 2,804 24,182 5,687

  12. Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu Commercial Sector 11<//td> 1989 711,212 202,091 600,653 – –

  13. Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and

  14. Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99

  15. Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4

  16. Table 7.6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,108 75,652 2 4

  17. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  18. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 *

  19. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed

  20. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107

  1. Originally Released: July 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3

  2. table2.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1

  3. table4.1_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  4. table7.6_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column

  5. Table 3.3 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by Source, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Primary Energy 2 Electric Power Sector 11,12 Retail Electricity 13 Total Energy 9,10,14 Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Nuclear Fuel Biomass 8 Total 9,10 Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel 4 LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total 1970 0.38 0.59 1.16 0.73 1.43 2.85 0.42 1.38 1.71 0.18 1.29 1.08 0.32 4.98 1.65 1971 .42 .63 1.22 .77 1.46 2.90 .58 1.45 1.78 .18 1.31 1.15 .38 5.30 1.76 1972 .45 .68 1.22

  6. Industrial co-generation through use of a medium BTU gas from biomass produced in a high throughput reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldmann, H.F.; Ball, D.A.; Paisley, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    A high-throughput gasification system has been developed for the steam gasification of woody biomass to produce a fuel gas with a heating value of 475 to 500 Btu/SCF without using oxygen. Recent developments have focused on the use of bark and sawdust as feedstocks in addition to wood chips and the testing of a new reactor concept, the so-called controlled turbulent zone (CTZ) reactor to increase gas production per unit of wood fed. Operating data from the original gasification system and the CTZ system are used to examine the preliminary economics of biomass gasification/gas turbine cogeneration systems. In addition, a ''generic'' pressurized oxygen-blown gasification system is evaluated. The economics of these gasification systems are compared with a conventional wood boiler/steam turbine cogeneration system.

  7. COMPCOAL{trademark}: A profitable process for production of a stable high-Btu fuel from Powder River Basin coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, V.E.; Merriam, N.W.

    1994-10-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is developing a process to produce a stable, clean-burning, premium fuel from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal and other low-rank coals. This process is designed to overcome the problems of spontaneous combustion, dust formation, and readsorption of moisture that are experienced with PRB coal and with processed PRB coal. This process, called COMPCOAL{trademark}, results in high-Btu product that is intended for burning in boilers designed for midwestern coals or for blending with other coals. In the COMPCOAL process, sized coal is dried to zero moisture content and additional oxygen is removed from the coal by partial decarboxylation as the coal is contacted by a stream of hot fluidizing gas in the dryer. The hot, dried coal particles flow into the pyrolyzer where they are contacted by a very small flow of air. The oxygen in the air reacts with active sites on the surface of the coal particles causing the temperature of the coal to be raised to about 700{degrees}F (371{degrees}C) and oxidizing the most reactive sites on the particles. This ``instant aging`` contributes to the stability of the product while only reducing the heating value of the product by about 50 Btu/lb. Less than 1 scf of air per pound of dried coal is used to avoid removing any of the condensible liquid or vapors from the coal particles. The pyrolyzed coal particles are mixed with fines from the dryer cyclone and dust filter and the resulting mixture at about 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) is fed into a briquettor. Briquettes are cooled to about 250{degrees}F (121{degrees}C) by contact with a mist of water in a gas-tight mixing conveyor. The cooled briquettes are transferred to a storage bin where they are accumulated for shipment.

  8. Table 11.4 Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nitrous Oxide Emissions, 1980-2009 (Thousand Metric Tons of Nitrous Oxide) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 3 Total Mobile Combustion 1 Stationary Combustion 2 Total Waste Combustion Human Sewage in Wastewater Total Nitrogen Fertilization of Soils Crop Residue Burning Solid Waste of Domesticated Animals Total 1980 60 44 104 1 10 11 364 1 75 440 88 642 1981 63 44 106 1 10 11 364 2 74 440 84 641 1982 67 42 108 1 10 11 339 2 74 414 80 614 1983 71 43 114

  9. Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste facility: 3,000,000 tons later

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasins, G.F. )

    1988-01-01

    Occidental Chemical's Energy From Waste's cogeneration facility continues to be one of the most successful RDF plants in the U.S. The facility began operation in 1980 and was an operational success after a lengthy 2-1/2 year start-up and redesign, utilizing the air classification technology to produce RDF. In 1984, the plant was converted to a simplified shred and burn concept, significantly improving overall economics and viability of the operation. After processing 3.0 million tons the facility is a mature operation with a well developed experience base in long range operation and maintenance of the equipment utilized for processing and incinerating municipal solid waste.

  10. Cracked lifting lug welds on ten-ton UF{sub 6} cylinders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorning, R.E.

    1991-12-31

    Ten-ton, Type 48X, UF{sub 6} cylinders are used at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant to withdraw enriched uranium hexafluoride from the cascade, transfer enriched uranium hexafluoride to customer cylinders, and feed enriched product to the cascade. To accomplish these activities, the cylinders are lifted by cranes and straddle carriers which engage the cylinder lifting lugs. In August of 1988, weld cracks on two lifting lugs were discovered during preparation to lift a cylinder. The cylinder was rejected and tagged out, and an investigating committee formed to determine the cause of cracking and recommend remedial actions. Further investigation revealed the problem may be general to this class of cylinder in this use cycle. This paper discusses the actions taken at the Portsmouth site to deal with the cracked lifting lug weld problem. The actions include inspection activities, interim corrective actions, metallurgical evaluation of cracked welds, weld repairs, and current monitoring/inspection program.

  11. Table 11.3 Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Methane Emissions, 1980-2009 (Million Metric Tons of Methane) Year Energy Sources Waste Management Agricultural Sources Industrial Processes 9 Total 5 Coal Mining Natural Gas Systems 1 Petroleum Systems 2 Mobile Com- bustion 3 Stationary Com- bustion 4 Total 5 Landfills Waste- water Treatment 6 Total 5 Enteric Fermen- tation 7 Animal Waste 8 Rice Cultivation Crop Residue Burning Total 5 1980 3.06 4.42 NA 0.28 0.45 8.20 10.52 0.52 11.04 5.47 2.87 0.48 0.04 8.86 0.17 28.27 1981 2.81 5.02 NA .27

  12. Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

    1985-05-01

    The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

  13. Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

    1995-08-01

    Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

  14. Philadelphia gas works medium-Btu coal gasification project: capital and operating cost estimate, financial/legal analysis, project implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    This volume of the final report is a compilation of the estimated capital and operating costs for the project. Using the definitive design as a basis, capital and operating costs were developed by obtaining quotations for equipment delivered to the site. Tables 1.1 and 1.2 provide a summary of the capital and operating costs estimated for the PGW Coal Gasification Project. In the course of its Phase I Feasibility Study of a medium-Btu coal-gas facility, Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) identified the financing mechanism as having great impact on gas cost. Consequently, PGW formed a Financial/Legal Task Force composed of legal, financial, and project analysis specialists to study various ownership/management options. In seeking an acceptable ownership, management, and financing arrangement, certain ownership forms were initially identified and classified. Several public ownership, private ownership, and third party ownership options for the coal-gas plant are presented. The ownership and financing forms classified as base alternatives involved tax-exempt and taxable financing arrangements and are discussed in Section 3. Project implementation would be initiated by effectively planning the methodology by which commercial operation will be realized. Areas covered in this report are sale of gas to customers, arrangements for feedstock supply and by-product disposal, a schedule of major events leading to commercialization, and a plan for managing the implementation.

  15. Low/medium Btu coal gasification assessment of central plant for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing, distributing, selling, and using fuel gas for industrial applications in Philadelphia. The primary driving force for the assessment is the fact that oil users are encountering rapidly escalating fuel costs, and are uncertain about the future availability of low sulfur fuel oil. The situation is also complicated by legislation aimed at reducing oil consumption and by difficulties in assuring a long term supply of natural gas. Early in the gasifier selection study it was decided that the level of risk associated with the gasification process sould be minimal. It was therefore determined that the process should be selected from those commercially proven. The following processes were considered: Lurgi, KT, Winkler, and Wellman-Galusha. From past experience and a knowledge of the characteristics of each gasifier, a list of advantages and disadvantages of each process was formulated. It was concluded that a medium Btu KT gas can be manufactured and distributed at a lower average price than the conservatively projected average price of No. 6 oil, provided that the plant is operated as a base load producer of gas. The methodology used is described, assumptions are detailed and recommendations are made. (LTN)

  16. Table 2.4 Household Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household 1 Energy Consumption by Census Region, Selected Years, 1978-2009 (Quadrillion Btu, Except as Noted) Census Region 2 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1984 1987 1990 1993 1997 2001 2005 2009 United States Total (does not include wood) 10.56 9.74 9.32 9.29 8.58 9.04 9.13 9.22 10.01 10.25 9.86 10.55 10.18 Natural Gas 5.58 5.31 4.97 5.27 4.74 4.98 4.83 4.86 5.27 5.28 4.84 4.79 4.69 Electricity 3 2.47 2.42 2.48 2.42 2.35 2.48 2.76 3.03 3.28 3.54 3.89 4.35 4.39 Distillate Fuel Oil and Kerosene 2.19

  17. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  18. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  19. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the puritymore » requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.« less

  20. Performance and results of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montanari, David; Adamowski, Mark; Hahn, Alan; Norris, Barry; Reichenbacher, Juergen; Rucinski, Russell; Stewart, Jim; Tope, Terry

    2015-07-15

    We report on the performance and commissioning of the first membrane cryostat to be used for scientific application. The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) has designed and fabricated a membrane cryostat prototype in collaboration with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI). LBNE has designed and fabricated the supporting cryogenic system infrastructure and successfully commissioned and operated the first membrane cryostat. Original goals of the prototype are: to demonstrate the membrane cryostat technology in terms of thermal performance, feasibility for liquid argon and leak tightness; to demonstrate that we can remove all the impurities from the vessel and achieve the purity requirements in a membrane cryostat without evacuation; to demonstrate that we can achieve and maintain the purity requirements of the liquid argon using mol sieve and copper filters. The purity requirements of a large liquid argon detector such as LBNE are contaminants below 200 parts per trillion (ppt) oxygen equivalent. LBNE is planning the design and construction of a large liquid argon detector. This presentation will present requirements, design and construction of the LBNE 35 ton membrane cryostat prototype, and detail the commissioning and performance. The experience and results of this prototype are extremely important for the development of the LBNE detector.

  1. High temperature experiments on a 4 tons UF6 container TENERIFE program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casselman, C.; Duret, B.; Seiler, J.M.; Ringot, C.; Warniez, P.

    1991-12-31

    The paper presents an experimental program (called TENERIFE) whose aim is to investigate the behaviour of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when exposed to a high temperature fire for model validation. Taking into account the experiments performed in the past, the modelization needs further information in order to be able to predict the behaviour of a real size cylinder when engulfed in a 800{degrees}C fire, as specified in the regulation. The main unknowns are related to (1) the UF{sub 6} behaviour beyond the critical point, (2) the relationship between temperature field and internal pressure and (3) the equivalent conductivity of the solid UF{sub 6}. In order to investigate these phenomena in a representative way it is foreseen to perform experiments with a cylinder of real diameter, but reduced length, containing 4 tons of UF{sub 6}. This cylinder will be placed in an electrically heated furnace. A confinement vessel prevents any dispersion of UF{sub 6}. The heat flux delivered by the furnace will be calibrated by specific tests. The cylinder will be changed for each test.

  2. A Proposal for a Ton Scale Bubble Chamber for Dark Matter Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collar, Juan; Dahl, C.Eric; Fustin, Drew; Robinson, Alan; Behnke, Ed; Behnke, Joshua; Breznau, William; Connor, Austin; Kuehnemund, Emily Grace; Levine, Ilan; Moan, Timothy; /Indiana U., South Bend /Fermilab

    2010-10-07

    The nature of non-baryonic dark matter is one of the most intriguing questions for particle physics at the start of the 21st century. There is ample evidence for its existence, but almost nothing is known of its properties. WIMPs are a very appealing candidate particle and several experimental campaigns are underway around the world to search for these particles via the nuclear recoils that they should induce. The COUPP series of bubble chambers has played a significant role in the WIMP search. Through a sequence of detectors of increasing size, a number of R&D issues have arisen and been solved, and the technology has now been advanced to the point where the construction of large chambers requires a modest research effort, some development, but mostly just engineering. It is within this context that we propose to build the next COUPP detector - COUPP-500, a ton scale device to be built over the next three years at Fermilab and then deployed deep underground at SNOLAB. The primary advantages of the COUPP approach over other technologies are: (1) The ability to reject electron and gamma backgrounds by arranging the chamber thermodynamics such that these particles do not even trigger the detector. (2) The ability to suppress neutron backgrounds by having the radioactively impure detection elements far from the active volume and by using the self-shielding of a large device and the high granularity to identify multiple bubbles. (3) The ability to build large chambers cheaply and with a choice of target fluids. (4) The ability to increase the size of the chambers without changing the size or complexity of the data acquisition. (5) Sensitivity to spin-dependent and spin-independent WIMP couplings. These key advantages should enable the goal of one background event in a ton-year of exposure to be achieved. The conceptual design of COUPP-500 is scaled from the preceding devices. In many cases all that is needed is a simple scaling up of components previously used. Calibration and R&D are still needed on some aspects of the system. We know we have the ability to distinguish alpha-induced events from nuclear recoils, but we do not yet know whether the combination of material purity and rejection are good enough to run for a year with no alpha background. We also need to have more detailed measurements of the detector threshold and a better understanding of its high gamma rejection. In addition, there are important checks to make on the longevity of the detector components in the hydraulic fluid and on the chemistry of the active fluid. The 2009 PASAG report explicitly supported the construction of the COUPP-500 device in all funding scenarios. The NSF has shown similar enthusiasm. It awarded one of its DUSEL S4 grants to assist in the engineering needed to build COUPP-500. The currently estimated cost of COUPP-500 is $8M, about half the $15M-$20M price tag expected by the PASAG report for a next generation dark matter search experiment. The COUPP-500 device will have a spin independent WIMP-nucleus cross-section sensitivity of 6 x 10{sup -47} cm{sup 2} after a background-free year of running. This device should then provide the benchmark against which all other WIMP searches are measured.

  3. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 Table 7.3c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.3a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total .................... 417 953 28 15 10,740

  4. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19 Table 7.4c Consumption of Selected Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors (Subset of Table 7.4a) Commercial Sector a Industrial Sector b Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Biomass Coal c Petroleum d Natural Gas e Other Gases g Biomass Other i Waste f Wood h Waste f Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1990 Total

  5. Fuel Tables.indd

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7: Coal Consumption Estimates and Imports and Exports of Coal Coke, 2013 State Coal Coal Coke Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Residential a Commercial Industrial Electric Power Total Imports Exports Imports Exports Thousand Short Tons Trillion Btu Thousand Short Tons Trillion Btu Alabama - 0 2,834 24,400 27,235 - 0.0 76.4 488.6 565.1 - - - - Alaska - 585 1 400 986 - 8.9 (s) 5.9 14.8 - - - - Arizona - 0 181 23,298 23,479 - 0.0 4.3 450.5 454.9 - - - - Arkansas - 0 215

  6. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  7. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  8. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  9. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  10. table5.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total

  11. table5.5_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE

  12. Table 1.13 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 U.S. Government Energy Consumption by Agency and Source, Fiscal Years 2003, 2010, and 2011 (Trillion Btu) Resource and Fiscal Years Agriculture Defense Energy GSA 1 HHS 2 Interior Justice NASA 3 Postal Service Trans- portation Veterans Affairs Other 4 Total Coal 2003 (s) 15.4 2.0 0.0 (s) (s) 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.2 0.0 17.7 2010 (s) 15.5 4.5 .0 0.0 0.0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 20.1 2011 P 0.0 14.3 4.2 .0 .0 .0 .0 .0 (s) .0 .1 .0 18.6 Natural Gas 5 2003 1.4 76.6 7.0 7.6 3.7 1.3 8.6 2.9 10.4 .7 15.6 4.2

  13. Table 3.4 Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumer Price Estimates for Energy by End-Use Sector, 1970-2010 (Dollars 1 per Million Btu) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Natural Gas 2 Petroleum Retail Electricity 3 Total 4 Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Retail Electricity 3 Total 6,7 Coal Natural Gas 2 Petroleum 5 Biomass 8 Retail Electricity 3 Total 7,9 Petroleum 5 Total 7,10 1970 1.06 1.54 6.51 2.10 0.75 0.90 [R] 6.09 1.97 0.45 0.38 0.98 1.59 2.99 0.84 2.31 2.31 1971 1.12 1.59 6.80 2.24 .80 1.02 6.44 2.15 .50 .41 1.05

  14. Commercial low-Btu coal-gasification plant. Feasibility study: General Refractories Company, Florence, Kentucky. Volume I. Project summary. [Wellman-Galusha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-11-01

    In response to a 1980 Department of Energy solicitation, the General Refractories Company submitted a Proposal for a feasibility study of a low Btu gasification facility for its Florence, KY plant. The proposed facility would substitute low Btu gas from a fixed bed gasifier for natural gas now used in the manufacture of insulation board. The Proposal from General Refractories was prompted by a concern over the rising costs of natural gas, and the anticipation of a severe increase in fuel costs resulting from deregulation. The proposed feasibility study is defined. The intent is to provide General Refractories with the basis upon which to determine the feasibility of incorporating such a facility in Florence. To perform the work, a Grant for which was awarded by the DOE, General Refractories selected Dravo Engineers and Contractors based upon their qualifications in the field of coal conversion, and the fact that Dravo has acquired the rights to the Wellman-Galusha technology. The LBG prices for the five-gasifier case are encouraging. Given the various natural gas forecasts available, there seems to be a reasonable possibility that the five-gasifier LBG prices will break even with natural gas prices somewhere between 1984 and 1989. General Refractories recognizes that there are many uncertainties in developing these natural gas forecasts, and if the present natural gas decontrol plan is not fully implemented some financial risks occur in undertaking the proposed gasification facility. Because of this, General Refractories has decided to wait for more substantiating evidence that natural gas prices will rise as is now being predicted.

  15. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Fossil fuel sales of production from federal lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 679 3,939 33.0% 93 347 14.7% 6,798 6,981 35.7% 436 8,960 40.6%

  16. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Table 2. Fossil fuel sales of production from Indian lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 10 59 0.5% 2 6 0.3% 283 291 1.5% 30 616 2.8% 972 1.7% 2004 10 58

  17. Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar

  18. Taking out 1 billion tons of CO2: The magic of China's 11th Five-Year Plan?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Fridley, David

    2007-07-01

    China's 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) sets an ambitious target for energy-efficiency improvement: energy intensity of the country's gross domestic product (GDP) should be reduced by 20% from 2005 to 2010 (NDRC, 2006). This is the first time that a quantitative and binding target has been set for energy efficiency, and signals a major shift in China's strategic thinking about its long-term economic and energy development. The 20% energy intensity target also translates into an annual reduction of over 1.5 billion tons of CO2 by 2010, making the Chinese effort one of most significant carbon mitigation effort in the world today. While it is still too early to tell whether China will achieve this target, this paper attempts to understand the trend in energy intensity in China and to explore a variety of options toward meeting the 20% target using a detailed end-use energy model.

  19. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet

  20. table1.1_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources RSE NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 *

  1. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Short-Pulse Lasers NIF Petawatt Laser Is on Track to Completion The National Ignition Facility's Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC), a petawatt-class laser with peak power exceeding a quadrillion (1015) watts, is moving rapidly along the path to completion and commissioning. ARC is designed to produce brighter, more penetrating, higher-energy x rays than can be obtained with conventional radiographic techniques. When complete, ARC will be the world's highest-energy short-pulse laser, capable

  2. Short wavelength laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hagelstein, P.L.

    1984-06-25

    A short wavelength laser is provided that is driven by conventional-laser pulses. A multiplicity of panels, mounted on substrates, are supported in two separated and alternately staggered facing and parallel arrays disposed along an approximately linear path. When the panels are illuminated by the conventional-laser pulses, single pass EUV or soft x-ray laser pulses are produced.

  3. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasability of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2005-12-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are both strongly committed to expanding the role of biomass as an energy source. In particular, they support biomass fuels and products as a way to reduce the need for oil and gas imports; to support the growth of agriculture, forestry, and rural economies; and to foster major new domestic industries--biorefineries--making a variety of fuels, chemicals, and other products. As part of this effort, the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee, a panel established by the Congress to guide the future direction of federally funded biomass R&D, envisioned a 30 percent replacement of the current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. Biomass--all plant and plant-derived materials including animal manure, not just starch, sugar, oil crops already used for food and energy--has great potential to provide renewable energy for America's future. Biomass recently surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy and currently provides over 3 percent of the total energy consumption in the United States. In addition to the many benefits common to renewable energy, biomass is particularly attractive because it is the only current renewable source of liquid transportation fuel. This, of course, makes it invaluable in reducing oil imports--one of our most pressing energy needs. A key question, however, is how large a role could biomass play in responding to the nation's energy demands. Assuming that economic and financial policies and advances in conversion technologies make biomass fuels and products more economically viable, could the biorefinery industry be large enough to have a significant impact on energy supply and oil imports? Any and all contributions are certainly needed, but would the biomass potential be sufficiently large to justify the necessary capital replacements in the fuels and automobile sectors? The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the country's present petroleum consumption--the goal set by the Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  4. BTU LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Small start-up with breakthrough technology seeking funding to prove commercial feasibility Coordinates: 45.425788, -122.765754 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply, April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine whether the land resources of the United States are capable of producing a sustainable supply of biomass sufficient to displace 30 percent or more of the countrys present petroleum consumption the goal set by the Biomass R&D Technical Advisory Committee in their vision for biomass technologies. Accomplishing this goal would require approximately 1 billion dry tons of biomass feedstock per year.

  6. Short-wavelength,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1...Countdown pressure cooker Short-wavelength, high-powered UV LEDs Hitting a bullet with a bullet A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 5, NO. 4 WINTER * 2004 S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y Sandia Technology (ISSN: 1547-5190) is a quarterly journal published by Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia is a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque,

  7. Assessment of Reusing 14-ton, Thin-Wall, Depleted UF{sub 6} Cylinders as LLW Disposal Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, D.G.

    2000-11-30

    Approximately 700,000 MT of DUF{sub 6} is stored, or will be produced under a current agreement with the USEC, at the Paducah site in Kentucky, Portsmouth site in Ohio, and ETTP site in Tennessee. On July 21, 1998, the 105th Congress approved Public Law 105-204 (Ref; 1), which directed that facilities be built at the Kentucky and Ohio sites to convert DUF{sub 6} to a stable form for disposition. On July 6, 1999, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as Required by Public Law 105-204 (Ref. 2), in which DOE committed to develop a Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap''. On September 1, 2000, DOE issued the Draft Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap (Ref. 3) (Roadmap), which provides alternate paths for the long-term storage, beneficial use, and eventual disposition of each product form and material that will result from the DUF{sub 6} conversion activity. One of the paths being considered for DUF{sub 6} cylinders is to reuse the empty cylinders as containers to transport and dispose of LLW, including the converted DU. The Roadmap provides results of the many alternate uses and disposal paths for conversion products and the empty DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders. As a part of the Roadmap, evaluations were conducted of cost savings, technical maturity, barriers to implementation, and other impacts. Results of these evaluations indicate that using the DUF{sub 6} storage cylinders as LLW disposal containers could provide moderate cost savings due to the avoided cost of purchasing LLW packages and the avoided cost of disposing of the cylinders. No significant technical or institutional issues were identified that would make using cylinders as LLW packages less effective than other disposition paths. Over 58,000 cylinders have been used, or will be used, to store DUF{sub 6}. Over 51,000 of those cylinders are 14TTW cylinders with a nominal wall thickness of 5/16-m (0.79 cm). These- 14TTW cylinders, which have a nominal diameter of 48 inches and nominally contain 14 tons (12.7 MT) of DUF{sub 6}, were originally designed and fabricated for temporary storage of DUF{sub 6}. They were fabricated from pressure-vessel-grade steels according to the provisions of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (Ref. 4). Cylinders are stored in open yards at the three sites and, due to historical storage techniques, were subject to corrosion. Roughly 10,000 of the 14TTW cylinders are considered substandard (Ref. 5) due to corrosion and other structural anomalies caused by mishandling. This means that approximately 40,000 14TTW cylinders could be made available as containers for LLW disposal In order to demonstrate the use of 14TTW cylinders as LLW disposal containers, several qualifying tasks need to be performed. Two demonstrations are being considered using 14TTW cylinders--one demonstration using contaminated soil and one demonstration using U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. The objective of this report are to determine how much information is known that could be used to support the demonstrations, and how much additional work will need to be done in order to conduct the demonstrations. Information associated with the following four qualifying tasks are evaluated in this report. (1) Perform a review of structural assessments that have been conducted for 14TTW. (2) Develop a procedure for filling 14TTW cylinders with LLW that have been previously washed. (3) Evaluate the transportation requirements for shipping 14TTW cylinders containing LLW. (4) Evaluate the WAC that will be imposed by the NTS. Two assumptions are made to facilitate this evaluation of using DUF{sub 6} cylinders as LLW disposal containers. (1) Only 14TTW cylinders will be considered for use as LLW containers, and (2) The NTS will be the LLW disposal site.

  8. A nuclear criticality safety assessment of the loss of moderation control in 2 1/2 and 10-ton cylinders containing enriched UF{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newvahner, R.L.; Pryor, W.A.

    1991-12-31

    Moderation control for maintaining nuclear criticality safety in 2 {1/2}-ton, 10-ton, and 14-ton cylinders containing enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) has been used safely within the nuclear industry for over thirty years, and is dependent on cylinder integrity and containment. This assessment evaluates the loss of moderation control by the breaching of containment and entry of water into the cylinders. The first objective of this study was to estimate the required amounts of water entering these large UF{sub 6} cylinders to react with, and to moderate the uranium compounds sufficiently to cause criticality. Hypothetical accident situations were modeled as a uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) slab above a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder, and a UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} sphere centered within a UF{sub 6} hemicylinder. These situations were investigated by computational analyses utilizing the KENO V.a Monte Carlo Computer Code. The results were used to estimate both the masses of water required for criticality, and the limiting masses of water that could be considered safe. The second objective of the assessment was to calculate the time available for emergency control actions before a criticality would occur, i.e., a {open_quotes}safetime{close_quotes}, for various sources of water and different size openings in a breached cylinder. In the situations considered, except the case for a fire hose, the safetime appears adequate for emergency control actions. The assessment shows that current practices for handling moderation controlled cylinders of low enriched UF{sub 6}, along with the continuation of established personnel training programs, ensure nuclear criticality safety for routine and emergency operations.

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Coal Coal Supply EIA estimates that U.S. coal production for February 2016 was 54 million short tons (MMst), a 4 MMst (7%) decrease from the previous month and 18 MMst less than in February 2015. Forecast coal production is expected to decrease by 111 MMst (12%) in 2016, which would be the largest annual percentage decline since 1958. In 2016, forecast Appalachian and Western region production declines by 9% and 17%, respectively, and Interior region production falls by 4%. Total coal production

  10. Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal 3 Natural Gas 4 Petroleum Total 2,9 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 5 Jet Fuel Kero- sene LPG 6 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 7 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 8 Total Wood 10 Waste 11 Fuel Ethanol 12 Bio- diesel Total 1949 1,118 270 12 140 NA 42 13 7 329 8 244 25 820 2,207 145 NA NA NA 145 1950 1,152 313 14 168 NA 48 16 9 357 8 273 26 918 2,382 147 NA NA

  11. Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Residential Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene Liquefied Petroleum Gases Total Wood 6 Total 6 1949 121 55 51 21 7 80 66 321 99 99 1950 120 66 61 25 9 95 69 350 94 94 1951 111 81 68 27 10 105 78 374 90 90 1952 103 89 70 27 10 108 85 385 84 84 1953 92 93 71 26 11 108 94 387 78 78 1954 82 104 79 27 12 118 99 404 75 75

  12. Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Industrial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Coal Coke Net Imports Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 8 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kero- sene LPG 5 Lubri- cants Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Other 7 Total Wood 9 Waste 10 Fuel Ethanol 11 Total 1949 500 -1 166 41 18 3 3 16 8 95 25 209 120 995 44 NA NA 44 1950 531 (s) 184 51 20 4 3 18 8 110 26 239 140 1,095 50 NA NA 50

  13. Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Transportation Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Elec- tricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Jet Fuel LPG 5 Lubricants Motor Gasoline 6 Residual Fuel Oil Total Fuel Ethanol 8 Biodiesel Total 1949 161 NA 12 30 NA (s) 4 306 91 443 6 611 NA NA NA 1950 146 7 14 35 NA (s) 5 332 95 481 6 640 NA NA NA 1951 129 11 18 42 NA (s) 6 360 102 529 7 675 NA NA NA

  14. THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W,, Wash&-ton, D,C: 200.24~ZJ74, Telephone:'(

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -t / . \; ', THE A.EROSPACE CORPORATION Suite 4000, 955 L'Enfk Plaza, S. W,, Wash&-ton, D,C: 200.24~ZJ74, Telephone:'( Mr: Edward DeLaney, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S; Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. DeLaney: AUTHORITY REVIEW FOR MED OPERATIONS CONDUCTED AT AMES LABDRATORY :@*oi-l 12) 488-6000 1 I Enclosed please find Attachment 1, I a summary of the facts and issues relating to the authority for remedial action at Ames; of

  15. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 Table 7.4a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.4b and 7.4c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955

  16. Word Pro - S7

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Table 7.3a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Total (All Sectors) (Sum of Tables 7.3b and 7.3c) Coal a Petroleum Natural Gas f Other Gases g Biomass Other j Distillate Fuel Oil b Residual Fuel Oil c Other Liquids d Petroleum Coke e Total e Wood h Waste i Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Trillion Btu 1950 Total .................... 91,871 5,423 69,998 NA NA 75,421 629 NA 5 NA NA 1955 Total ....................

  17. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, Selected Years, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Thousand Short Tons Thousand Barrels Million Cubic Feet Trillion Btu

  18. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  19. Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.3b and 8.3c; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 1989 323,191 95,675 461,905 92,556 973,327 546,354 30,217 576,571 39,041 1,588,939 1990 362,524 127,183 538,063 140,695 1,168,465 650,572 36,433 687,005 40,149 1,895,619 1991 351,834 112,144 546,755 148,216 1,158,949 623,442 36,649

  20. Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Renewable Energy Other 7 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Biomass Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 13,517 3,896 9,920 102 27,435 145 10,305 10,450 – 37,885 1990 14,670 5,406 15,515 118 35,709 387 10,193 10,580 – 46,289 1991 15,967 3,684 20,809 118 40,578 169 8,980 9,149 1 49,728 1992

  1. Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Commercial Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Retail Electricity 7 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Kerosene LPG 5 Motor Gasoline 6 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 8 Waste 9 Fuel Ethanol 10 Total 1949 148 19 16 3 2 7 NA 28 55 58 280 2 NA NA 2 1950 147 21 19 3 2 7 NA 33 66 63 297 2 NA NA 2 1951 125 25 21 4 3 8 NA 34 70 69 289 2 NA NA 2 1952 112 28 22 4 3 8 NA 35 71 73

  2. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  3. Scale-up of mild gasification to be a process development unit mildgas 24 ton/day PDU design report. Final report, November 1991--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    From November 1991 to April 1996, Kerr McGee Coal Corporation (K-M Coal) led a project to develop the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) Mild Gasification (MILDGAS) process for near-term commercialization. The specific objectives of the program were to: design, construct, and operate a 24-tons/day adiabatic process development unit (PDU) to obtain process performance data suitable for further design scale-up; obtain large batches of coal-derived co-products for industrial evaluation; prepare a detailed design of a demonstration unit; and develop technical and economic plans for commercialization of the MILDGAS process. The project team for the PDU development program consisted of: K-M Coal, IGT, Bechtel Corporation, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC), General Motors (GM), Pellet Technology Corporation (PTC), LTV Steel, Armco Steel, Reilly Industries, and Auto Research.

  4. Gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.67 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based...

  5. Gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.63 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the...

  6. Gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.68 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

  7. Gasoline prices increase (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    gasoline prices increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to 3.69 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

  8. Gasoline prices decrease (Short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.65 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the...

  9. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33% was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  10. Corrosion of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the 70 ton cask during transfer from L area to H-canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J. I.

    2015-08-31

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 263 °C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 °C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  11. CORROSION OF ALUMINUM CLAD SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN THE 70 TON CASK DURING TRANSFER FROM L AREA TO H-CANYON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.

    2014-06-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel will be transported for processing in the 70-ton nuclear fuel element cask from L Basin to H-canyon. During transport these fuels would be expected to experience high temperature aqueous corrosion from the residual L Basin water that will be present in the cask. Cladding corrosion losses during transport were calculated for material test reactor (MTR) and high flux isotope reactors (HFIR) fuels using literature and site information on aqueous corrosion at a range of time/temperature conditions. Calculations of the cladding corrosion loss were based on Arrhenius relationships developed for aluminum alloys typical of cladding material with the primary assumption that an adherent passive film does not form to retard the initial corrosion rate. For MTR fuels a cladding thickness loss of 33 % was found after 1 year in the cask with a maximum temperature of 260 {degrees}C. HFIR fuels showed a thickness loss of only 6% after 1 year at a maximum temperature of 180 {degrees}C. These losses are not expected to impact the overall confinement function of the aluminum cladding.

  12. This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Users can also compare data across different energy sources by converting to British thermal units (Btu) and tons of oil equivalent (TOE). New visualization features include...

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (83/3Q) Short-Term Energy Outlook iuarterly Projections August 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 20585 t rt jrt- .ort- iort- iort- iort- nort- lort- '.ort- ort- Tt- .-m .erm -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term -Term Term .-Term -Term xrm Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy -OJ.UUK Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    and Summer Fuels Outlook April 2015 1 April 2015 Short-Term Energy and Summer Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights * On April 2, Iran and the five permanent members of the United Nations Security Council plus Germany (P5+1) reached a framework agreement that could result in the lifting of oil- related sanctions against Iran. Lifting sanctions could substantially change the STEO forecast for oil supply, demand, and prices by allowing a significantly increased volume of Iranian barrels to enter the

  15. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2016.  December was the sixth consecutive month in which monthly average Brent prices decreased, falling $17/barrel (bbl) from November to a monthly average of $62/bbl, the lowest since May 2009. The December price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production, strong global supply, and weakening outlooks for the global economy and oil demand growth.  EIA forecasts

  16. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 October 2014 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, electricity, and propane will decrease this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter, which was 11% colder than the previous 10-year average nationally. Projected average household expenditures for propane and heating oil are 27% and 15% lower, respectively, because of lower heating demand and prices.

  17. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5 1 October 2015 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas, heating oil, and propane during the upcoming winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) will be 10%, 25%, and 18% lower, respectively, than last winter, because of lower fuel prices and lower heating demand. Forecast lower heating demand and relatively unchanged prices contribute to electricity expenditures that are 3% lower than last winter

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Outlook September 2015 1 September 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $47/barrel (b) in August, a $10/b decrease from July. This third consecutive monthly decrease in prices likely reflects concerns about lower economic growth in emerging markets, expectations of higher oil exports from Iran, and continuing growth in global inventories. Crude oil price volatility increased significantly, with Brent prices showing daily changes of more

  19. SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ATTACHMENT 2 SHORT NARRATIVE ABOUT PROMISING PRACTICES Briefly identify a policy, practice or procedure where your agency has been successful in the implementation of actions outlined in its Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan. Responses should be limited to the space provided below. Please note that the box below is limited to 4000 Characters. The National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Human Capital Management participated on a limited basis with the Department of

  20. Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and...

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Crude oil prices fell sharply at the onset of war in Iraq, but the initial declines probably overshot levels that we consider to be generally consistent with fundamental factors in the world oil market. Thus, while near-term price averages are likely to be below our previous projections, the baseline outlook for crude oil prices (while generally lower) is not drastically different and includes an average for spot West Texas

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 December 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices fell by more than 15% in November, declining from $85/barrel (bbl) on November 3 to $72/bbl on November 28. Monthly average Brent crude oil prices have declined 29% from their 2014 high of $112/bbl in June to an average of $79/bbl in November, the lowest monthly average since September 2010. The November price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production along with weakening

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    June 2014 1 June 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil spot prices increased from a monthly average of $108/barrel (bbl) in April to $110/bbl in May. This was the 11 th consecutive month in which the average Brent crude oil spot price fell within a relatively narrow range of $107/bbl to $112/bbl. The discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent crude oil, which averaged more than $13/bbl from November through January, fell below $4/bbl in

  4. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    March 2015 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  North Sea Brent crude oil prices averaged $58/barrel (bbl) in February, an increase of $10/bbl from the January average, and the first monthly average price increase since June 2014. The price increase reflects news of falling U.S. crude oil rig counts and announced reductions in capital expenditures by major oil companies, along with lower-than-expected Iraqi crude oil exports.  EIA forecasts that Brent crude oil prices will average

  5. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shockwave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more.

  6. Ultra-short pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1993-12-28

    An inexpensive pulse generating circuit is disclosed that generates ultra-short, 200 picosecond, and high voltage 100 kW, pulses suitable for wideband radar and other wideband applications. The circuit implements a nonlinear transmission line with series inductors and variable capacitors coupled to ground made from reverse biased diodes to sharpen and increase the amplitude of a high-voltage power MOSFET driver input pulse until it causes non-destructive transit time breakdown in a final avalanche shock wave diode, which increases and sharpens the pulse even more. 5 figures.

  7. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  8. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 1 January 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015. After falling to the...

  9. Shapeable short circuit resistant capacitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Ralph S.; Myers, John D.; Baney, William J.

    2015-10-06

    A ceramic short circuit resistant capacitor that is bendable and/or shapeable to provide a multiple layer capacitor that is extremely compact and amenable to desirable geometries. The capacitor that exhibits a benign failure mode in which a multitude of discrete failure events result in a gradual loss of capacitance. Each event is a localized event in which localized heating causes an adjacent portion of one or both of the electrodes to vaporize, physically cleaning away electrode material from the failure site. A first metal electrode, a second metal electrode, and a ceramic dielectric layer between the electrodes are thin enough to be formed in a serpentine-arrangement with gaps between the first electrode and the second electrode that allow venting of vaporized electrode material in the event of a benign failure.

  10. Drop short control of electrode gap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Maroone, James P. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipping, Donald W. (Albuquerque, NM); Zanner, Frank J. (Sandia Park, NM)

    1986-01-01

    During vacuum consumable arc remelting the electrode gap between a consumable electrode and a pool of molten metal is difficult to control. The present invention monitors drop shorts by detecting a decrease in the voltage between the consumable electrode and molten pool. The drop shorts and their associated voltage reductions occur as repetitive pulses which are closely correlated to the electrode gap. Thus, the method and apparatus of the present invention controls electrode gap based upon drop shorts detected from the monitored anode-cathode voltage. The number of drop shorts are accumulated, and each time the number of drop shorts reach a predetermined number, the average period between drop shorts is calculated from this predetermined number and the time in which this number is accumulated. This average drop short period is used in a drop short period electrode gap model which determines the actual electrode gap from the drop short. The actual electrode gap is then compared with a desired electrode gap which is selected to produce optimum operating conditions and the velocity of the consumable error is varied based upon the gap error. The consumable electrode is driven according to any prior art system at this velocity. In the preferred embodiment, a microprocessor system is utilized to perform the necessary calculations and further to monitor the duration of each drop short. If any drop short exceeds a preset duration period, the consumable electrode is rapidly retracted a predetermined distance to prevent bonding of the consumable electrode to the molten remelt.

  11. Scientists teach short course on fuel cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists teach short course on fuel cells Scientists teach short course on fuel cells Los Alamos scientists gave presentations covering Hydrogen and Lab Safety, the Laboratory's Membrane-and-Electrode Process, Fuel Cell Materials Characterization, Modeling, Durability and Testing. October 8, 2015 Scientists teach short course on fuel cells Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices (MPA-11) scientists, Rangachary Mukundan (seated) and Tommy Rockward (left), during a demonstration in their fuel

  12. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566,415 218,383,703 145,398,976 363,247 5,590,014 1,943,302,355 14,468,564 1,059 984,406

  13. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  14. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  15. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial...

  16. DOE/EIA-0202(88/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1988 Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy . oi Lor L- . ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term :

  17. Property:ShortName | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the property "ShortName" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 + 2008-04...

  18. Gasoline prices inch down slightly (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell slightly to 3.54 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly...

  19. Gasoline prices inch down (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to 3.68 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the...

  20. Gasoline prices inch down (Short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose slightly to 3.66 a gallon on Monday. That's up nine tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly...

  1. Gasoline prices fall slightly (short version)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell slightly to 3.49 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly...

  2. Are shorted pipeline casings a problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, W.F. )

    1994-11-01

    The pipeline industry has many road and railroad crossings with casings which have been in service for more than 50 years without exhibiting any major problems, regardless of whether the casing is shorted to or isolated from the carrier pipe. The use of smart pigging and continual visual inspection when retrieving a cased pipeline segment have shown that whether shorted or isolated, casings have no significant bearing on the presence or absence of corrosion on the carrier pipe.

  3. Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

    2008-05-01

    The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konynenburg, R.A. van; Farmer, J.C.

    1999-11-09

    A fuse and filter arrangement is described for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  5. Means for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Konynenburg, Richard A. (Livermore, CA); Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A fuse and filter arrangement for limiting and ameliorating electrode shorting in capacitive deionization water purification systems utilizing carbon aerogel, for example. This arrangement limits and ameliorates the effects of conducting particles or debonded carbon aerogel in shorting the electrodes of a system such as a capacitive deionization water purification system. This is important because of the small interelectrode spacing and the finite possibility of debonding or fragmentation of carbon aerogel in a large system. The fuse and filter arrangement electrically protect the entire system from shutting down if a single pair of electrodes is shorted and mechanically prevents a conducting particle from migrating through the electrode stack, shorting a series of electrode pairs in sequence. It also limits the amount of energy released in a shorting event. The arrangement consists of a set of circuit breakers or fuses with one fuse or breaker in the power line connected to one electrode of each electrode pair and a set of screens of filters in the water flow channels between each set of electrode pairs.

  6. Word Pro - A

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    191 Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke (Million Btu per Short Ton) Coal Coal Coke Production a Waste Coal Supplied b Consumption Imports Exports Imports and Exports Residential and Commercial Sectors c Industrial Sector Electric Power Sector e,f Total Coke Plants Other d 1950 ........................ 25.090 NA 24.461 26.798 24.820 23.937 24.989 25.020 26.788 24.800 1955 ........................ 25.201 NA 24.373 26.794 24.821 24.056 24.982 25.000 26.907 24.800 1960

  7. Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons)

  8. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21

  9. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL

  10. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18

  11. table5.3_02

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Row Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States 311 - 339

  12. table5.7_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Row End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.3 2.4

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 EPA Criteria Pollutant Emissions Coefficients (Million Short Tons/Delivered Quadrillion Btu, unless otherwise noted) All Buildings | SO2 0.402 0.042 | 0.130 NOx 0.164 0.063 | 0.053 CO 0.057 0.283 | 0.018 Note(s): Source(s): Electricity Electricity (1) Site Fossil Fuel (2) (per primary quad) (1) 1) Emissions of SO2 are 28% lower for 2002 than 1994 estimates since Phase II of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments began in 2000. Buildings energy consumption related SO2 emissions dropped 65% from 1994

  14. Catalysts for synthesizing various short chain hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colmenares, Carlos (Alamo, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10), including novel photocatalysts, are disclosed for the synthesis of various short chain hydrocarbons. Light-transparent SiO.sub.2 aerogels doped with photochemically active uranyl ions (18) are fluidized in a fluidized-bed reactor (12) having a transparent window (16), by hydrogen and CO, C.sub.2 H.sub.4 or C.sub.2 H.sub.6 gas mixtures (20), and exposed to radiation (34) from a light source (32) external to the reactor (12), to produce the short chain hydrocarbons (36).

  15. Coal sector profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-05

    Coal is our largest domestic energy resource with recoverable reserves estimated at 268 billion short tons or 5.896 quads Btu equivalent. This is approximately 95 percent of US fossil energy resources. It is relatively inexpensive to mine, and on a per Btu basis it is generally much less costly to produce than other energy sources. Its chief drawbacks are the environmental, health and safety concerns that must be addressed in its production and consumption. Historically, coal has played a major role in US energy markets. Coal fueled the railroads, heated the homes, powered the factories. and provided the raw materials for steel-making. In 1920, coal supplied over three times the amount of energy of oil, gas, and hydro combined. From 1920 until the mid 1970s, coal production remained fairly constant at 400 to 600 million short tons a year. Rapid increases in overall energy demands, which began during and after World War II were mostly met by oil and gas. By the mid 1940s, coal represented only half of total energy consumption in the US. In fact, post-war coal production, which had risen in support of the war effort and the postwar Marshall plan, decreased approximately 25 percent between 1945 and 1960. Coal demand in the post-war era up until the 1970s was characterized by increasing coal use by the electric utilities but decreasing coal use in many other markets (e.g., rail transportation). The oil price shocks of the 1970s, combined with natural gas shortages and problems with nuclear power, returned coal to a position of prominence. The greatly expanded use of coal was seen as a key building block in US energy strategies of the 1970s. Coal production increased from 613 million short tons per year in 1970 to 950 million short tons in 1988, up over 50 percent.

  16. Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short Introduction Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: Numerical Modelling of Geothermal Systems a Short...

  17. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark...

  18. Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches Authors: Bane, Karl ; Stupakov, Gennady ;...

  19. Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dechirper Wakefields for Short Bunches You are accessing a document from the...

  20. Electricity and short wavelength radiation generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, E.V.

    1985-08-26

    Methods and associated apparati for use of collisions of high energy atoms and ions of He, Ne, or Ar with themselves or with high energy neutrons to produce short wavelength radiation (lambda approx. = 840-1300 A) that may be utilized to produce cathode-anode currents or photovoltaic currents.

  1. Gasoline prices show sharp increase (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline saw its sharpest increase this year at $3.54 a gallon on Monday. That's up 18.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  2. Gasoline prices up this week (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's up 7.3 cents from a week ago and up 25.4 cents from two weeks ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  3. Gasoline prices up this week (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.75 a gallon on Monday. That's up almost 14 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  4. Gasoline prices up this week (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.78 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.7 cents from a week ago and up almost 43 cents from 4 weeks ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  5. Gasoline price shows small increase (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    shows small increase (Short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.32 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  6. Gasoline price shows small increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline showed little movement from last week. Prices rose 4/10 of a cent to $3.30 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  7. Gasoline price up this week (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.36 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  8. Gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.65 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 1/2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  9. Gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.29 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  10. Gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.50 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  11. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.54 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  12. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline decreased for the second week in a row to $3.71 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  13. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.70 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  14. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.61 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  15. Gasoline prices continue to fall (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.52 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  16. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.44 a gallon on Monday. That's up 6.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  17. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.48 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  18. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.51 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  19. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.55 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  20. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4, 2014 Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.65 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  1. Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1, 2014 Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.68 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  2. Gasoline prices continue to rise (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to rise (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.67 a gallon on Monday. That's up 7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  3. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Jay P. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Denver, Denver, CO 80208 (United States); Gehrels, Neil [Astroparticle Physics Laboratory, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Scargle, Jeffrey D. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA/Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of {approx}2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts ({approx}6x10{sup -10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) is {approx}>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts ({approx}60,000 s) is {approx}30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  4. Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

    2010-04-01

    This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

  5. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G.; Szoke, Abraham

    1985-01-01

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  6. combines high intensity and short pulse duration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    combines high intensity and short pulse duration - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  7. Source of coherent short wavelength radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus for producing coherent radiation ranging from X-rays to the far ultraviolet (i.e., 1 Kev to 10 eV) utilizing the Compton scattering effect. A photon beam from a laser is scattered on a high energy electron bunch from a pulse power linac. The short wavelength radiation produced by such scattering has sufficient intensity and spatial coherence for use in high resolution applications such as microscopy.

  8. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

  9. Short Term Energy Outlook, February 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. World oil markets will likely remain tight through most of 2003, as petroleum inventories and global spare production capacity continue to dwindle amid blasts of cold weather and constrained output from Venezuela. OPEC efforts to increase output to make up for lower Venezuela output has reduced global spare production capacity to only 2 million barrels per day, leaving little room to make up for unexpected supply or demand

  10. Short Term Energy Outlook, March 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook March 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. February crude oil prices moved higher than expected pushed by fears of a war in Iraq, low inventories, slow recovery in Venezuelan exports, continued cold weather and sharply higher natural gas prices in the United States. West Texas Intermediate prices averaged close to $36 for the month (Figure 1), a level not seen since October 1990. Oil inventories continued lower through the month resulting in a cumulative reduction in

  11. Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 1 February 2014 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  Temperatures east of the Rocky Mountains have been significantly colder this winter (October - January) compared with the same period both last winter and the previous 10- year average, putting upward pressure on consumption and prices of fuels used for space heating. U.S. average heating degree days were 12% higher than last winter (indicating colder weather) and 8% above the previous 10-year average. The Northeast was 11% colder

  12. Deformable mirror for short wavelength applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, Henry N. (2417 Kilkare Rd., Sunol, CA 94586); Sweeney, Donald W. (5020 Canyon Crest Dr., San Ramon, CA 94583)

    1999-01-01

    A deformable mirror compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation that can be precisely controlled to nanometer and subnanometer accuracy is described. Actuators are coupled between a reaction plate and a face plate which has a reflective coating. A control system adjusts the voltage supplied to the actuators; by coordinating the voltages supplied to the actuators, the reflective surface of the mirror can be deformed to correct for dimensional errors in the mirror or to produce a desired contour.

  13. Short-Rotation Woody Biomass Sustainability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Review Short-Rotation Woody Biomass Sustainability Natalie A. Griffiths, Oak Ridge National Laboratory C. Rhett Jackson, University of Georgia Kellie Vache, Oregon State University Jeffrey J. McDonnell, University of Saskatchewan Gregory Starr, University of Alabama John I. Blake, Ben M. Rau, USDA Forest Service This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information March 23, 2015 Analysis and Sustainability *2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S.

  14. DOE/EIA-0202(87/3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3Q) Energy Information Administration Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections July 1987 aergy i . Energy ' Energy Energy Energy i Energy i . Energy . Energy Energy Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy i Energy . Energy . Energy Energy Energy Energy . Energy "nergy ; Short-Term : Short-Term . Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term ; Short-Term : Short-Term : Short-Term ; Short-Term ;

  15. Short Term Energy Outlook ,November 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    November 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: During the past 3-4 months, OPEC 10 production has risen more quickly than projected, thus reducing upward pressure on prices. More specifically, while the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price averaged $28.84 in October, about $6.70 per barrel above the year-ago level (Figure 1), the WTI average price for fourth quarter 2002 is now projected to soften to $28.20, which is about $2 per barrel below

  16. Short Term Energy Outlook, December 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    December 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook December 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Average crude oil prices fell by about $2.50 per barrel between October and November in response to continued high production levels from OPEC 10 countries (Figure 1). However, by the end of November oil prices had risen to end-October levels as concerns over the situations in Iraq and Venezuela pushed prices up. Oil inventories, which are currently in the lower portion of the previous 5-year range, are poised to

  17. Short Term Energy Outlook, January 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The oil market is vulnerable to a number of forces that could cause substantial price volatility over the coming months. The combination of a sustained loss of most of Venezuela's exports, risk of increased tensions in the Middle East and low oil inventories could cause oil prices to spike at least temporarily above our base case. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) price, which stood at $27.27 per barrel on December 2,

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2014

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2015.  After falling to the lowest monthly average of 2013 in November, U.S. regular gasoline retail prices increased slightly to reach an average of $3.28 per gallon (gal) during December. The annual average regular gasoline retail price, which was $3.51/gal in 2013, is expected to fall to $3.46/gal in 2014 and $3.39/gal in 2015.  The North Sea Brent crude oil spot price in December

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 July 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights  The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. This forecast assumes there are no disruptions to energy markets arising from the recent unrest in Egypt. After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 June 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Highlights * After increasing to $119 per barrel in early February 2013, the Brent crude oil spot price fell to a low of $97 per barrel in mid-April and then recovered to an average of $103 per barrel in May. EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average $102 per barrel over the second half of 2013, and $100 per barrel in 2014. * EIA expects the price of regular gasoline will average $3.53 per gallon over the summer driving season

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook- May 2003

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The April 24 meeting of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) raised official quotas for members (excluding Iraq) by 0.9 million barrels per day from the previous (suspended) quota to 25.4 million barrels per day. OPEC members also sought tighter compliance with quotas, calling for production cuts of 2 million barrels per day from April levels. We expect these measures to result in an average total OPEC

  2. August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    August 2012 1 August 2012 Short-Term Energy Outlook Highlights  EIA projects that the Brent crude oil spot price will average about $103 per barrel during the second half of 2012, about $3.50 per barrel higher than in last month's Outlook. The forecast Brent crude oil spot price falls to an average of $100 per barrel in 2013. The projected West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price discount to Brent crude oil narrows from about $14 in the third quarter of 2012 to $9 by late 2013.

  3. Short wavelength ion temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chowdhury, J.; Ganesh, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar (India); Brunner, S.; Lapillonne, X.; Villard, L. [CRPP, Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jenko, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    The ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode in the high wavenumber regime (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}>1), referred to as short wavelength ion temperature gradient mode (SWITG) is studied using the nonlinear gyrokinetic electromagnetic code GENE. It is shown that, although the SWITG mode may be linearly more unstable than the standard long wavelength (k{sub y}{rho}{sub s}<1) ITG mode, nonlinearly its contribution to the total thermal ion heat transport is found to be low. We interpret this as resulting from an increased zonal flow shearing effect on the SWITG mode suppression.

  4. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  5. Longitudinal Diagnostics for Short Electron Beam Bunches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loos, H.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Single-pass free electron lasers require high peak currents from ultra-short electron bunches to reach saturation and an accurate measurement of bunch length and longitudinal bunch profile is necessary to control the bunch compression process from low to high beam energy. The various state-of-the-art diagnostics methods from ps to fs time scales using coherent radiation detection, RF deflection, and other techniques are presented. The use of linear accelerators as drivers for free electron lasers (FEL) and the advent of single-pass (SASE) FELs has driven the development of a wide range of diagnostic techniques for measuring the length and longitudinal distribution of short and ultra-short electron bunches. For SASE FELs the radiation power and the length of the undulator needed to achieve saturation depend strongly on the charge density of the electron beam. In the case of X-ray FELs, this requires the accelerator to produce ultra-high brightness beams with micron size transverse normalized emittances and peak currents of several kA through several stages of magnetic bunch compression. Different longitudinal diagnostics are employed to measure the peak current and bunch profile along these stages. The measurement techniques can be distinguished into different classes. Coherent methods detect the light emitted from the beam by some coherent radiation process (spectroscopic measurement), or directly measure the Coulomb field traveling with the beam (electro-optic). Phase space manipulation techniques map the time coordinate onto a transverse dimension and then use conventional transverse beam diagnostics (transverse deflector, rf zero-phasing). Further methods measure the profile or duration of an incoherent light pulse emitted by the bunch at wavelengths much shorted than the bunch length (streak camera, fluctuation technique) or modulate the electron beam at an optical wavelength and then generate a narrow bandwidth radiation pulse with the longitudinal profile of the beam mapped onto (optical replicator). The operational needs for bunch length measurements to have fast acquisitions, to be used in feedback systems, to distinguish pulse to pulse changes and to be nondestructive or parasitically have resulted into developing many of the diagnostics into single-shot techniques and in the following the main discussion will emphasize them.

  6. Short rise time intense electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, C.L.

    1984-03-16

    A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

  7. Short-term energy outlook, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from January 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the fourth quarter 1998, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the January 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  8. Short-term energy outlook, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares The Short-Term Energy Outlook (energy supply, demand, and price projections) monthly for distribution on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. In addition, printed versions of the report are available to subscribers in January, April, July and October. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from July 1998 through December 1999. Values for second quarter of 1998 data, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the July 1998 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. 28 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Tonga: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Tonga Population 103,036 GDP 439,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.00 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code TO 3-letter ISO code TON Numeric ISO...

  10. Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

  11. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of...

  12. Short-term energy outlook quarterly projections. Third quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This document presents the 1997 third quarter short term energy projections. Information is presented for fossil fuels and renewable energy.

  13. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  14. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  15. Short course review and the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corden, Pierce S.

    2014-05-09

    The presentations at the short course that were the basis of the present Proceedings covered many critical issues related to the objective of eliminating nuclear weapons as a means of ensuring global security and stability. This paper is based on the concluding talk, which briefly reviewed the course, offered a net assessment of where the project of elimination - a policy objective for nearly all the world's states - stands, and discussed some of the factors that need to be dealt with in achieving a nuclear weapon free world. These include understanding what 'proliferation' means and how it has changed over time, how the spread of nuclear weapons has proceeded over time, both 'vertical' in numbers and 'horizontal' to additional countries, what way the 'vector' of reversing proliferation is pointing, and the roles of nuclear energy and international governance.

  16. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

  17. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10

  18. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30

  19. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804

  20. SAS Output

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2004 - 2014 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4

  1. Short-term energy outlook, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from April 1999 through December 2000. Data values for the first quarter 1999, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the April 1999 version of the Short-Term Integrated forecasting system (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the STIFS model. 25 figs., 19 tabs.

  2. SHORT DYNAMIC FIBRILS IN SUNSPOT CHROMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouppe van der Voort, L.; De la Cruz Rodrguez, J.

    2013-10-10

    Sunspot chromospheres display vigorous oscillatory signatures when observed using chromospheric diagnostics such as the strong Ca II lines and H?. New high-resolution sunspot observations from the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope show the ubiquitous presence of small-scale, periodic, jet-like features that move up and down. This phenomenon has not been described before. The typical width of these features is about 0.''3 and they display clear parabolic trajectories in space-time diagrams. The maximum extension of the top of the jets is lowest in the umbra, a few 100 km, and progressively longer further away from the umbra in the penumbra, with the longest extending more than 1000 km. These jets resemble the dynamic fibrils found in plage regions but at smaller extensions. Local thermodynamic equilibrium inversion of spectropolarimetric Ca II 8542 observations enabled a comparison of the magnetic field inclination and properties of these short jets. We find that the most extended of these jets also have longer periods and tend to be located in regions with more horizontal magnetic fields. These results are direct observational confirmation of the mechanism of long-period waves propagating along inclined magnetic fields into the solar chromosphere. This mechanism was identified earlier as the driver of dynamic fibrils in plage, part of the mottles in the quiet Sun, and the type I spicules at the limb. The sunspot dynamic fibrils that we report here represent a new class of manifestation of this mechanism, distinct from the transient penumbral and umbral micro-jets reported earlier.

  3. Year STB EIA STB EIA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release Date: November 16, 2012 Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments...

  4. Barge Truck Total

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

  5. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2013" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Produc...

  6. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Average Sales Price of Coal by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2013" "(dollars per short ton)" "Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)","Underground","Surface","Total"...

  7. West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and Status | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Project: A Short History and Status West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and Status Presentation made by Bryan C. Bower for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY. PDF icon West Valley Demonstration Project: A Short History and Status More Documents & Publications EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0337: Record of Decision Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Vitrification Mel

  8. Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Efficacy and action mechanisms (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity: Efficacy and action mechanisms Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel short antibacterial and antifungal peptides with low cytotoxicity: Efficacy and action mechanisms Research highlights: {yields} Short antimicrobial peptides with nine and eleven residues were developed. {yields} These peptides

  9. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Internal Short Circuit in a

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Li-ion Cell | Department of Energy and Experimental Investigation of Internal Short Circuit in a Li-ion Cell Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Internal Short Circuit in a Li-ion Cell 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es109_kim_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation of Internal Short

  10. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - August 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook - Regional Enhancements Starting with this edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO), EIA is introducing regional projections (the scope of which will vary by fuel) of energy prices, consumption, and production. The addition of regional data and forecasts will allow us to examine regional fuel demands and prices, regional fuel inventory trends, the interaction between regional electricity demand shifts, and regional

  11. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer.

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) | Department of Energy Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Advanced High-Strength Steel and Aluminum) In the short term, replacing heavy steel components with materials such as high-strength steel, aluminum, or glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites can decrease component weight by 10-60 percent. Advanced High-Strength Steel

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Short-Term Lightweight Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In the short term, replacing heavy steel components with materials such as high-strength steel, aluminum, or glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites can decrease component weight ...

  14. Short-term energy outlook. Quarterly projections, Third quarter 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent cases with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202). The feature article for this issue is Demand, Supply and Price Outlook for Reformulated Gasoline, 1995.

  15. Experience from the Short Course on Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Short Course - Overview & Lessons Learned David Kosson, Vanderbilt & CRESP Introduction to Nuclear Chemistry and Fuel Cycle Separations December 16-18, 2008 Vanderbilt University...

  16. DSOPilot project Automatic receipt of short circuiting indicators...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    project Automatic receipt of short circuiting indicators Country Denmark Coordinates 56.26392, 9.501785 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type...

  17. Abstract: Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header Abstract: Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage ...

  18. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    change the pattern of annual demand shifts reported in earlier Outlooks. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2002 History Projections Sep-02 Oct-02 Nov-02...

  19. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, October 2003 History Projections Jul-03 Aug-03 Sep-03...

  20. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to increase because of accelerated economic growth and generally lower prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, November 2003 History Projections Aug-03 Sep-03 Oct-03...

  1. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation ... Research Org: SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of ...

  2. Fluctuations, Phase Transitions, and Latent Heat in Short Diblock...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Phase Transitions, and Latent Heat in Short Diblock Copolymers: Comparison of Experiment, Simulation, and Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluctuations, Phase...

  3. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Internal Short Circuit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Progress of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA...

  4. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. ... The eligibility criteria included locally advanced andor metastatic pelvic cancer and ...

  5. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12...

  6. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.001 1.720 2.433 2.463 2.231 2.376 2000's 4.304 4.105 3.441 5.497 6.417 9.186 7.399 7.359 9.014 4.428 2010's 4.471 4.090 2.926 3.775 4.236 2.684

  7. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177 2.175 2.205 2.297 2.317 2.582 2.506 2.120 2.134 2.601 2.862 3.260 1997 2.729 2.016 1.954 2.053 2.268 2.171 2.118 2.484 2.970 3.321 3.076 2.361 1998 2.104 2.293 2.288 2.500 2.199 2.205 2.164 1.913 2.277 2.451 2.438 1.953 1999 1.851 1.788 1.829 2.184 2.293 2.373 2.335 2.836 2.836

  8. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/14 2.113 01/21 2.159 01/28 2.233 1994-Feb 02/04 2.303 02/11 2.230 02/18 2.223 02/25 2.197 1994-Mar 03/04 2.144 03/11 2.150 03/18 2.148 03/25 2.095 1994-Apr 04/01 2.076 04/08 2.101 04/15 2.137 04/22 2.171 04/29 2.133 1994-May 05/06 2.056 05/13 2.017 05/20 1.987 05/27 1.938 1994-Jun 06/03 2.023 06/10 2.122 06/17 2.173 06/24 2.118 1994-Jul 07/01 2.182 07/08 2.119

  9. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.039 1.739 2.350 2.418 2.290 2.406 2000's 4.217 4.069 3.499 5.466 6.522 9.307 7.852 7.601 9.141 4.669 2010's 4.564 4.160 3.020 3.822 4.227 2.739

  10. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.116 2.168 2.118 2.139 2.038 2.150 2.083 2.031 2.066 2.037 1.873 1.694 1995 1.490 1.492 1.639 1.745 1.801 1.719 1.605 1.745 1.883 1.889 1.858 1.995 1996 1.964 2.056 2.100 2.277 2.307 2.572 2.485 2.222 2.272 2.572 2.571 2.817 1997 2.393 1.995 1.978 2.073 2.263 2.168 2.140 2.589 3.043 3.236 2.803 2.286 1998 2.110 2.312 2.312 2.524 2.249 2.234 2.220 2.168 2.479 2.548 2.380 1.954 1999 1.860 1.820 1.857 2.201 2.315 2.393 2.378 2.948 2.977

  11. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/21 2.055 01/28 2.133 1994-Feb 02/04 2.189 02/11 2.159 02/18 2.174 02/25 2.163 1994-Mar 03/04 2.127 03/11 2.136 03/18 2.141 03/25 2.103 1994-Apr 04/01 2.085 04/08 2.105 04/15 2.131 04/22 2.175 04/29 2.149 1994-May 05/06 2.076 05/13 2.045 05/20 2.034 05/27 1.994 1994-Jun 06/03 2.078 06/10 2.149 06/17 2.172 06/24 2.142 1994-Jul 07/01 2.187 07/08 2.143 07/15 2.079

  12. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.906 2.054 1.746 2.270 2.363 2.332 2.418 2000's 4.045 4.103 3.539 5.401 6.534 9.185 8.238 7.811 9.254 4.882 2010's 4.658 4.227 3.109 3.854 4.218 2.792

  13. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1993 1.906 1994 2.012 2.140 2.120 2.150 2.081 2.189 2.186 2.168 2.079 1.991 1.843 1.672 1995 1.519 1.541 1.672 1.752 1.810 1.763 1.727 1.826 1.886 1.827 1.770 1.844 1996 1.877 1.985 2.040 2.245 2.275 2.561 2.503 2.293 2.296 2.436 2.317 2.419 1997 2.227 1.999 1.987 2.084 2.249 2.194 2.274 2.689 2.997 2.873 2.532 2.204 1998 2.124 2.324 2.333 2.533 2.289 2.291 2.428 2.419 2.537 2.453 2.294 1.940 1999 1.880 1.850 1.886 2.214 2.331 2.429 2.539

  14. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1993-Dec 12/24 1.869 12/31 1.943 1994-Jan 01/07 1.935 01/14 1.992 01/21 2.006 01/28 2.088 1994-Feb 02/04 2.133 02/11 2.135 02/18 2.148 02/25 2.149 1994-Mar 03/04 2.118 03/11 2.125 03/18 2.139 03/25 2.113 1994-Apr 04/01 2.107 04/08 2.120 04/15 2.140 04/22 2.180 04/29 2.165 1994-May 05/06 2.103 05/13 2.081 05/20 2.076 05/27 2.061 1994-Jun 06/03 2.134 06/10 2.180 06/17 2.187

  15. Microfabricated BTU monitoring device for system-wide natural...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 03 NATURAL GAS; COMBUSTION; EFFICIENCY; FEEDBACK; ...

  16. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.188 2.232 2.123 2.136 1.999 2.130 2.021 1.831 1.881 1.961 1.890 1.709 1995 1.457 1.448 1.595 1.718 1.770 1.685 1.525 1.630 1.805 1.870 1.936 2.200 1996 2.177...

  17. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.934 1.692 2.502 2.475 2.156 2.319 2000's 4.311 4.053 3.366 5.493 6.178 9.014 6.976 7.114 8.899 4.159 2010's 4.382 4.026 2.827 3.731 4.262 2.627

  18. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1994-Jan 01/14 2.231 01/21 2.297 01/28 2.404 1994-Feb 02/04 2.506 02/11 2.369 02/18 2.330 02/25 2.267 1994-Mar 03/04 2.178 03/11 2.146 03/18 2.108 03/25 2.058 1994-Apr 04/01 2.065 04/08 2.092 04/15 2.127 04/22 2.126 04/29 2.097 1994-May 05/06 2.025 05/13 1.959 05/20 1.933 05/27 1.855 1994-Jun 06/03 1.938 06/10 2.052 06/17 2.128 06/24 2.065 1994-Jul 07/01 2.183 07/08 2.087

  19. Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.130 2.072 2.139 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.196 2.131 2.115 2.148 2.206 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.283 2.134 2.209 2.236 2.305 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.329 2.388 2.352 2.252 2.198 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.207 2.256 2.220 2.231 2.236 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.180 2.189 2.253 2.240 2.254 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.220 2.168 2.179 2.221 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.165 2.146 2.139 2.126 2.144 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.149 2.168 2.160 2.144 2.132 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18

  20. Natural Gas Futures Contract 3 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.019 2.043 2.103 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.162 2.071 2.119 2.128 2.185 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.217 2.258 2.227 2.127 2.118 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.137 2.175 2.162 2.160 2.165 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.140 2.145 2.205 2.190 2.190 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.180 2.140 2.148 2.186 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.148 2.134 2.122 2.110 2.124 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.129 2.148 2.143 2.135 2.125 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.111 2.137 2.177 2.152 2.130 1994 Mar-21 to Mar-25

  1. Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1993 Dec-20 to Dec-24 1.894 1.830 1.859 1.895 1993 Dec-27 to Dec-31 1.965 1.965 1.943 1.901 1994 Jan- 3 to Jan- 7 1.883 1.896 1.962 1.955 1.980 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 1.972 2.005 2.008 1.966 2.010 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.006 1.991 1.982 2.000 2.053 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.095 2.044 2.087 2.088 2.130 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.157 2.185 2.157 2.075 2.095 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.115 2.145 2.142 2.135 2.140 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.128 2.125 2.175 2.160 2.155 1994 Feb-21 to

  2. Kansas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 1,018 1,034 1,019 2010's 1,019 1,020 1,022 1,020 1,021...

  3. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1994 Jan-10 to Jan-14 2.194 2.268 1994 Jan-17 to Jan-21 2.360 2.318 2.252 2.250 2.305 1994 Jan-24 to Jan-28 2.470 2.246 2.359 2.417 2.528 1994 Jan-31 to Feb- 4 2.554 2.639 2.585 2.383 2.369 1994 Feb- 7 to Feb-11 2.347 2.411 2.358 2.374 2.356 1994 Feb-14 to Feb-18 2.252 2.253 2.345 2.385 2.418 1994 Feb-21 to Feb-25 2.296 2.232 2.248 2.292 1994 Feb-28 to Mar- 4 2.208 2.180 2.171 2.146 2.188 1994 Mar- 7 to Mar-11 2.167 2.196 2.156 2.116 2.096 1994 Mar-14 to Mar-18 2.050

  4. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Daily","3212016" ,"Release Date:","3232016" ,"Next Release Date:","3302016" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  5. ,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly","22016" ,"Release Date:","3232016" ,"Next Release Date:","3302016" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnavnghist...

  6. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this table do not include enclosed malls and strip malls. In the 1999 CBECS, total fuel oil consumption in malls was not statistically significant. (*)Value rounds to zero...

  7. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Week Of Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri 1997 Jan- 6 to Jan-10 3.82 3.80 3.61 3.92 1997 Jan-13 to Jan-17 4.00 4.01 4.34 4.71 3.91 1997 Jan-20 to Jan-24 3.26 2.99 3.05 2.96 2.62 1997 Jan-27 to ...

  8. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value End Date Value 1997-Jan 0110 3.79 0117 4.19 0124 2.98 0131 2.91 ...

  9. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2.49 2.09 2.27 2000's 4.31 3.96 3.38 5.47 5.89 8.69 6.73 6.97 8.86 3.94 2010's 4.37 4.00 2.75 ...

  10. Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 3.45 2.15 1.89 2.03 2.25 2.20 2.19 2.49 2.88 3.07 3.01 2.35 1998 2.09 2.23 2.24 2.43 2.14 2.17 2.17 1.85 2.02 1.91 2.12 ...

  11. Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1994 2.347 2.355 2.109 2.111 1.941 2.080 1.963 1.693 1.619 1.721 1.771 1.700 1995 1.426 1.439 1.534 1.660 1.707 1.634 1.494...

  12. Short-term energy outlook, annual supplement 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (Supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  13. Short-Circuit Modeling of a Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gevorgian, V.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the short-circuit behavior of a WPP for different types of wind turbines. The short-circuit behavior will be presented. Both the simplified models and detailed models are used in the simulations and both symmetrical faults and unsymmetrical faults are discussed.

  14. Short-term energy outlook annual supplement, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-06

    The Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement (supplement) is published once a year as a complement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook), Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts.

  15. Propagation of ultra-short solitons in stochastic Maxwell's equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt, Levent; Schfer, Tobias

    2014-01-15

    We study the propagation of ultra-short short solitons in a cubic nonlinear medium modeled by nonlinear Maxwell's equations with stochastic variations of media. We consider three cases: variations of (a) the dispersion, (b) the phase velocity, (c) the nonlinear coefficient. Using a modified multi-scale expansion for stochastic systems, we derive new stochastic generalizations of the short pulse equation that approximate the solutions of stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations. Numerical simulations show that soliton solutions of the short pulse equation propagate stably in stochastic nonlinear Maxwell's equations and that the generalized stochastic short pulse equations approximate the solutions to the stochastic Maxwell's equations over the distances under consideration. This holds for both a pathwise comparison of the stochastic equations as well as for a comparison of the resulting probability densities.

  16. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal'shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  17. Off-site Lodging (short-term) | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Off-site Lodging (short-term): Extended Stay America external link 2345 Sokol Court, Darien, IL (For special Argonne rates call 630-985-4708) Oakwood Apartments external link...

  18. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  19. Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) Overview

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The Regional Short-Term Energy Model (RSTEM) utilizes estimated econometric relationships for demand, inventories and prices to forecast energy market outcomes across key sectors and selected regions throughout the United States.

  20. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  1. Value of Improved Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Florita, A.; Sharp, J.; Margulis, M.; Mcreavy, D.

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes an assessment of improved short-term wind power forecasting in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market and provides a quantification of its potential value.

  2. SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "A Short History of Length" | Princeton...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, 2013, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "A Short History of Length" Professor Joel Langer Department of Mathematics, Case Western Reserve University...

  3. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    late September as hurricanes Isidore and Lili caused production shut downs in the Gulf of Mexico. However, this price surge is expected to be short-lived, unless the weather in...

  4. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    commercial sector demand are offset by lower demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, September 2003 History Projections Jun-03 Jul-03 Aug-03...

  5. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    by 1.8 percent as the economy continues to expand and prices ease slightly. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2004 History Projections Oct-03 Nov-03 Dec-03...

  6. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    economy. In 2003, natural gas demand growth is expected across all sectors. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2002 History Projections Apr-02 Ma May-02 Jun-02...

  7. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004 and relatively lower fuel oil prices. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, April 2004 History Projections Jan-04 Feb-04 Mar-04...

  8. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    should relieve some of the potential upward price pressure on the domestic market Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, January 2003 History Projections Oct-02 Nov-02 Dec-02...

  9. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    because of somewhat weaker prices and higher demand in the electric power sector. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, July 2003 History Projections Apr-03 May-03 Jun-03 Jul-03...

  10. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than those of 2003, when stocks after the winter of 2002-2003 were at record lows. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, December 2003 History Projections Sep-03 Oct-03 Nov-03...

  11. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    power sector eases and relative coal and fuel oil spot prices decline somewhat. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, May 2004 History Projections Feb-04 Mar-04 Apr-04 May-04...

  12. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    demand in the first quarter of 2005 relative to the first quarter of 2004. Short-Term Natural Gas Market Outlook, March 2004 History Projections Dec-03 Jan-04 Feb-04...

  13. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the rest of the winter and perhaps well into spring, with prices averaging 4.90 per MMBtu through March and 4.45 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2003). Wellhead...

  14. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    the rest of the winter and the first part of spring, with prices averaging 5.19 per MMBtu through March and 4.58 in April (Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2004). Wellhead...

  15. Short-Term Outlook for Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Other Liquids Natural Gas Coal Electricity Renewables and Carbon Dioxide Emissions ... day (bd) in 2008 to 13.75 million bd in 2015. However, the Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

  16. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13%...

  17. Natural Gas Summary from the Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    63 and 2.72 per MMBtu during the months through October without the wide variations that occurred over the spring and early summer months (Short-Term Energy Outlook, August 2002)....

  18. Ultra-short ion and neutron pulse production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Barletta, William A.; Kwan, Joe W.

    2006-01-10

    An ion source has an extraction system configured to produce ultra-short ion pulses, i.e. pulses with pulse width of about 1 .mu.s or less, and a neutron source based on the ion source produces correspondingly ultra-short neutron pulses. To form a neutron source, a neutron generating target is positioned to receive an accelerated extracted ion beam from the ion source. To produce the ultra-short ion or neutron pulses, the apertures in the extraction system of the ion source are suitably sized to prevent ion leakage, the electrodes are suitably spaced, and the extraction voltage is controlled. The ion beam current leaving the source is regulated by applying ultra-short voltage pulses of a suitable voltage on the extraction electrode.

  19. Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Consumption and Prices Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Consumption and Prices - Short-Term Energy Outlook Model i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of

  20. Thermoacoustic Engines and Refrigerators: A Short Course (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Thermoacoustic Engines and Refrigerators: A Short Course Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermoacoustic Engines and Refrigerators: A Short Course × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  1. Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Analytical theory of coherent synchrotron radiation wakefield of short bunches shielded by conducting parallel plates Authors: Stupakov, Gennady ; /SLAC ; Zhou, Demin ; /KEK, Tsukuba Publication Date: 2016-01-22 OSTI Identifier: 1236428 Report

  2. Dedication, Innovation, and Courage: A Short History of Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dedication, Innovation, and Courage: A Short History of Y-12 Dedication, Innovation, and Courage: A Short History of Y-12 Page | i This booklet was written and compiled by Eve Whittenburg in the year 2012. Articles were written by Y-12 National Security Complex Historian D. Ray Smith. A sincere thank you goes out to everyone who contributed with historical materials. Page | ii Page | 1 Table of Contents Table of Contents

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory's Safety Short program wins Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Award DOE Innovation Award Los Alamos National Laboratory's Safety Short program wins Department of Energy Innovation Award The Lab's Safety Short products address practices that promote the well-being of every Lab worker throughout each day, both at work and at home. October 7, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from

  4. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections. Second quarter 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-02

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly, short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in February, May, August, and November in the Short-Term Energy Outlook (Outlook). An annual supplement analyzes the performance of previous forecasts, compares recent projections with those of other forecasting services, and discusses current topics related to the short-term energy markets. (See Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement, DOE/EIA-0202.) The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1995 through the fourth quarter of 1996. Values for the first quarter of 1995, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations using the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled into the second quarter 1995 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service.

  5. Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells for PHEVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sriramulu, Suresh; Stringfellow, Richard

    2013-05-25

    Development of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEVs) has recently become a high national priority because of their potential to enable significantly reduced petroleum consumption by the domestic transportation sector in the relatively near term. Lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are a critical enabling technology for PHEVs. Among battery technologies with suitable operating characteristics for use in vehicles, Li-ion batteries offer the best combination of energy, power, life and cost. Consequently, worldwide, leading corporations and government agencies are supporting the development of Li-ion batteries for PHEVs, as well as the full spectrum of vehicular applications ranging from mild hybrid to all-electric. In this project, using a combination of well-defined experiments, custom designed cells and simulations, we have improved the understanding of the process by which a Li-ion cell that develops an internal short progresses to thermal runaway. Using a validated model for thermal runaway, we have explored the influence of environmental factors and cell design on the propensity for thermal runaway in full-sized PHEV cells. We have also gained important perspectives about internal short development and progression; specifically that initial internal shorts may be augmented by secondary shorts related to separator melting. Even though the nature of these shorts is very stochastic, we have shown the critical and insufficiently appreciated role of heat transfer in influencing whether a developing internal short results in a thermal runaway. This work should lead to enhanced perspectives on separator design, the role of active materials and especially cathode materials with respect to safety and the design of automotive cooling systems to enhance battery safety in PHEVs.

  6. Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 Hopper compilers and DDT short outage next Wed, May 16 May 10, 2012 Due to a scheduled maintenance for the License Servers, most of the compilers (except GNU) and the DDT debugger on Hopper will not be available from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm on Wednesday, May 16. If there are any questions or concerns, please contact "consult at nersc dot gov". Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April

  7. First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Articles First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven neutron source First time nuclear material detection by one short-pulse-laser-driven...

  8. Process for protecting bonded components from plating shorts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarte, Lisa A. (Livermore, CA); Bonde, Wayne L. (Pleasanton, CA); Carey, Paul G. (Mountain View, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); McCarthy, Anthony M. (Menlo Park, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method which protects the region between a component and the substrate onto which the components is bonded using an electrically insulating fillet of photoresist. The fillet protects the regions from subsequent plating with metal and therefore shorting the plated conductors which run down the sides of the component and onto the substrate.

  9. Gasoline prices fall for first time this year (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell for the first time this year to $3.76 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 1/2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  10. Gasoline prices increase for first time since February (short version)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose for the first time since February to $3.54 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  11. U.S. Gasoline Price Continues to Increase (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline Price Continues to Increase (Short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.27 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  12. U.S. Gasoline prices continue increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.69 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  13. U.S. gasoline continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. gasoline continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.33 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1- tenth of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  14. U.S. gasoline continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. gasoline continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.33 a gallon on Monday. That's up 6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  15. U.S. gasoline price continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.75 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington.

  16. U.S. gasoline price continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.69 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  17. U.S. gasoline price continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.63 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  18. U.S. gasoline price continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gasoline Price Increases (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.72 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  19. U.S. gasoline price continues to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price continues to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.79 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  20. U.S. gasoline price continues to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5, 2015 U.S. gasoline price continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.32 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodydard

  1. U.S. gasoline price continues to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price continues to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.19 a gallon on Monday. That's up 12.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  2. U.S. gasoline price continues to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price continues to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.33 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  3. U.S. gasoline price continues to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price continues to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.47 a gallon on Monday. That's up 14.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  4. U.S. gasoline price decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline dropped to $2.80 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  5. U.S. gasoline price decreases (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.64 a gallon on Monday. That's down 7.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  6. U.S. gasoline price increases (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price increases (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.83 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  7. U.S. gasoline price increases this week (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline price increases this week (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.46 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4 tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  8. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.03 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  9. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.00 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  10. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $1.91 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  11. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $1.86 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  12. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $1.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  13. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $1.76 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  14. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $1.72 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  15. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $1.73 a gallon on Monday. That's up 6- tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  16. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $1.78 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  17. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $1.84 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  18. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $1.96 a gallon on Monday. That's up 12 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  19. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.44 a gallon on Monday. That's down 7.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  20. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.38 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  1. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.23 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  2. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.22 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  3. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  4. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down 7.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  5. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.06 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  6. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.78 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  7. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.05 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  8. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since April 2009 to $2.04 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  9. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.03 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  10. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.45 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  11. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.35 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  12. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.27 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  13. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.49 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  14. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.66 a gallon on Monday. That's up 9.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  15. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.69 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  16. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.74 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  17. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.77 a gallon on Memorial Day Monday. That's up 3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  18. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to increase (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.78 a gallon on Monday. That's up 6- tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  19. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.68 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4 1/2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  20. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.63 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  1. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.56 a gallon on Monday. That's down 7.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  2. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.55 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  3. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.61 a gallon on Labor Day Monday. That's up 5.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  4. U.S. gasoline prices continue to increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $3.29 a gallon on Monday. That's up 7.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  5. U.S. gasoline prices continued to decreased (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. gasoline prices continued to decreased (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.24 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  6. U.S. gasoline prices continues to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.33 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.8 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  7. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.28 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  8. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (Short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6, 2015 U.S. gasoline prices decrease (Short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.41 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  9. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.30 a gallon on Monday. That's down a nickel and a half from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard

  10. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    14, 2014 U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level of the year at $3.21 a gallon on Monday. That's down 9.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the

  11. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $2.18 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5.7 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  12. U.S. gasoline prices decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.64 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  13. U.S. gasoline prices increase (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose to $2.03 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8- tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  14. U.S. gasoline prices increase slightly (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose slightly to $3.55 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  15. U.S. gasoline prices increase slightly (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline rose slightly to $3.36 a gallon on Monday. That's up 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  16. U.S. gasoline prices remain steady (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices remain steady (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline remained unchanged this week at $2.78 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration

  17. U.S. gasoline prices unchanged (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices unchanged (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline showed no movement from last week. The average price remained flat at $3.70 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This

  18. U.S. gasoline prices unchanged (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.68 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington

  19. Gasoline prices continue to decrease nationally (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to $3.58 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.9 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

  20. Short sequence motifs, overrepresented in mammalian conservednon-coding sequences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minovitsky, Simon; Stegmaier, Philip; Kel, Alexander; Kondrashov,Alexey S.; Dubchak, Inna

    2007-02-21

    Background: A substantial fraction of non-coding DNAsequences of multicellular eukaryotes is under selective constraint. Inparticular, ~;5 percent of the human genome consists of conservednon-coding sequences (CNSs). CNSs differ from other genomic sequences intheir nucleotide composition and must play important functional roles,which mostly remain obscure.Results: We investigated relative abundancesof short sequence motifs in all human CNSs present in the human/mousewhole-genome alignments vs. three background sets of sequences: (i)weakly conserved or unconserved non-coding sequences (non-CNSs); (ii)near-promoter sequences (located between nucleotides -500 and -1500,relative to a start of transcription); and (iii) random sequences withthe same nucleotide composition as that of CNSs. When compared tonon-CNSs and near-promoter sequences, CNSs possess an excess of AT-richmotifs, often containing runs of identical nucleotides. In contrast, whencompared to random sequences, CNSs contain an excess of GC-rich motifswhich, however, lack CpG dinucleotides. Thus, abundance of short sequencemotifs in human CNSs, taken as a whole, is mostly determined by theiroverall compositional properties and not by overrepresentation of anyspecific short motifs. These properties are: (i) high AT-content of CNSs,(ii) a tendency, probably due to context-dependent mutation, of A's andT's to clump, (iii) presence of short GC-rich regions, and (iv) avoidanceof CpG contexts, due to their hypermutability. Only a small number ofshort motifs, overrepresented in all human CNSs are similar to bindingsites of transcription factors from the FOX family.Conclusion: Human CNSsas a whole appear to be too broad a class of sequences to possess strongfootprints of any short sequence-specific functions. Such footprintsshould be studied at the level of functional subclasses of CNSs, such asthose which flank genes with a particular pattern of expression. Overallproperties of CNSs are affected by patterns in mutation, suggesting thatselection which causes their conservation is not always verystrong.

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

  2. Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-08-12

    Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

  3. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Murray (Newington, CT); Schroll, Craig R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1985-10-22

    Electrical short protection is provided in an electrolytic cell stack by the combination of a thin, nonporous ceramic shield and a noble metal foil disposed on opposite sides of the sealing medium in a gas manifold gasket. The thin ceramic shield, such as alumina, is placed between the porous gasket and the cell stack face at the margins of the negative end plate to the most negative cells to impede ion current flow. The noble metal foil, for instance gold, is electrically coupled to the negative potential of the stack to collect positive ions at a harmless location away from the stack face. Consequently, corrosion products from the stack structure deposit on the foil rather than on the stack face to eliminate electrical shorting of cells at the negative end of the stack.

  4. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly

  5. U.S. gasoline price falls under $3 (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3, 2014 U.S. gasoline price falls under $3 (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell to its lowest level since December 2010 at $2.99 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington. For more information, contact Amerine Woodyard, 202-586-1256

  6. U.S. gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell 5.4 cents from a week ago to $3.54 a gallon on Monday. This marks the first time since early March that prices have dipped below 3.55, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington

  7. U.S. gasoline prices unchanged (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell 4.2 cents from a week ago to $3.59 a gallon on Monday. This marks the first time since early April that prices have dipped below 3.60, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington

  8. U.S. gasoline prices unchanged (short version)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    gasoline prices continue to decrease (short version) The U.S. average retail price for regular gasoline fell for the 5 th week in a row to $3.52 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.4 cents from a week ago and down 16.3 cents from a month ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. This is Amerine Woodyard, with EIA, in Washington

  9. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 1 April 2006 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Summer Fuels Outlook April 11, 2006 Release Contents Overview Global Petroleum Markets U.S. Petroleum Markets Motor Gasoline Diesel Fuel Natural Gas Markets Electricity Markets Coal Markets Overview Continued steady world oil demand growth, combined with only modest increases in world spare oil production capacity and the continuing risks of geopolitical instability, are expected to keep crude oil prices high through 2006. The price of West Texas

  10. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - February 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook February 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Despite some cold weather during the second half of January, expected average consumer prices for heating fuels this heating season are little changed since the January Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously reported. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 32 percent above last winter's levels, with

  11. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - January 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook January 2005 Winter Fuels Update (Figure 1) Consumer prices for heating fuels are relatively unchanged since the December Outlook, leaving projections for household heating fuel expenditures about the same as previously projected, despite continued warm weather in the middle of the heating season. Heating oil expenditures by typical Northeastern households are expected to average 30 percent above last winter's levels, with residential fuel oil prices

  12. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - October 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 1 October 2005 Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook October 12, 2005 Release (Next Update: November 8, 2005) Overview Warnings from previous Outlooks about the potential adverse impacts of an active hurricane season on domestic energy supply and prices are unfortunately being reflected in the challenging realities brought about by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The impact of the hurricanes on oil and natural gas production, oil refining, natural gas processing, and pipeline systems

  13. Microsoft Word - Short Form CRADA Agreement Boilerplate Approved June 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agreement, which is uniform across the Departmental facilities, for small value transactions. Except for minor modifications to the terms of this agreement made by CONTRACTOR, most changes will require approval by the DOE Contracting Officer, WHICH WILL LIKELY DELAY THE START DATE OF THE PROJECT. If substantive changes are required, the DOE Model CRADA may be more appropriate due to the increased flexibility such agreements afford. STEVENSON-WYDLER (15 U.S.C. 3710a) SHORT FORM COOPERATIVE

  14. Application of Yb:YAG short pulse laser system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erbert, Gaylen V.; Biswal, Subrat; Bartolick, Joseph M.; Stuart, Brent C.; Crane, John K.; Telford, Steve; Perry, Michael D.

    2004-07-06

    A diode pumped, high power (at least 20W), short pulse (up to 2 ps), chirped pulse amplified laser using Yb:YAG as the gain material is employed for material processing. Yb:YAG is used as the gain medium for both a regenerative amplifier and a high power 4-pass amplifier. A single common reflective grating optical device is used to both stretch pulses for amplification purposes and to recompress amplified pulses before being directed to a workpiece.

  15. Short-term energy outlook, Annual supplement 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-25

    This supplement is published once a year as a complement to the Short- Term Energy Outlook, Quarterly Projections. The purpose of the Supplement is to review the accuracy of the forecasts published in the Outlook, make comparisons with other independent energy forecasts, and examine current energy topics that affect the forecasts. Chap. 2 analyzes the response of the US petroleum industry to the recent four Federal environmental rules on motor gasoline. Chap. 3 compares the EIA base or mid case energy projections for 1995 and 1996 (as published in the first quarter 1995 Outlook) with recent projections made by four other major forecasting groups. Chap. 4 evaluates the overall accuracy. Chap. 5 presents the methology used in the Short- Term Integrated Forecasting Model for oxygenate supply/demand balances. Chap. 6 reports theoretical and empirical results from a study of non-transportation energy demand by sector. The empirical analysis involves the short-run energy demand in the residential, commercial, industrial, and electrical utility sectors in US.

  16. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  17. Subtask 4.2 - Coal Gasification Short Course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Galbreath

    2009-06-30

    Major utilities, independent power producers, and petroleum and chemical companies are intent on developing a fleet of gasification plants primarily because of high natural gas prices and the implementation of state carbon standards, with federal standards looming. Currently, many projects are being proposed to utilize gasification technologies to produce a synthesis gas or fuel gas stream for the production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, chemicals, and electricity. Financing these projects is challenging because of the complexity, diverse nature of gasification technologies, and the risk associated with certain applications of the technology. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has developed a gasification short course that is designed to provide technical personnel with a broad understanding of gasification technologies and issues, thus mitigating the real or perceived risk associated with the technology. Based on a review of research literature, tutorial presentations, and Web sites on gasification, a short course presentation was prepared. The presentation, consisting of about 500 PowerPoint slides, provides at least 7 hours of instruction tailored to an audience's interests and needs. The initial short course is scheduled to be presented September 9 and 10, 2009, in Grand Forks, North Dakota.

  18. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, fourth quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-14

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for printed publication in January, April, July, and October in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates on or about the 6th of each interim month, are available on the internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the fourth quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the fourth quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the fourth quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. 19 tabs.

  19. Department of Energy Releases New 'Billion-Ton' Study Highlighting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in biomass-derived energy sources can be produced in a sustainable manner through the use of widely-accepted conservation practices, such as no-till farming and crop rotation. ...

  20. 14,700 tons of silver at Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    calutron magnets was because of a shortage of copper during the war. As you will recall, Gen. Groves sent Col. Nichols to arrange for the purchase of as much uranium ore as could...

  1. Energy Department Employee Recognized for Eliminating One Million Tons of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department of Energy The Energy Department is pleased to announce that Dr. Josh Silverman, Director of the Office of Sustainability Support, has been selected as a finalist for the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal from the Partnership for Public Service. Silverman was selected for his dedication to reducing the Department's greenhouse gas emissions. Silverman is being recognized for identifying gaps in air pollution controls at Department facilities where

  2. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from cleanup operations across the...

  3. KCP relocates 18-ton machine | National Nuclear Security Administratio...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    relocations. It took nearly three days to disassemble the machine and prepare it for transport. The machine was partially disassembled, removing auxiliary pieces from the main...

  4. Disposal Facility Reaches 15-Million-Ton Milestone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. EMs Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) a massive landfill for low-level radioactive and hazardous waste at the Hanford site has achieved a major cleanup milestone.

  5. Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

  6. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Uncertainties in the Short-Term Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast February 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: Uncertainties in the Global Petroleum and Other Liquids Supply Forecast i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data,

  7. Two (2) 175 Ton (350 Tons total) Chiller Geothermal Heat Pumps for recently commissioned LEED Platinum Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project will operate; collect data; and market the energy savings and capital costs of a recently commissioned chiller geothermal heat pump project to promote the wide-spread adoption of this mature technology.

  8. Short-term energy outlook: Quarterly projections, second quarter 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections for publication in January, April, July, and October in the Outlook. The forecast period for this issue of the Outlook extends from the second quarter of 1997 through the fourth quarter of 1998. Values for the first quarter of 1997, however, are preliminary EIA estimates (for example, some monthly values for petroleum supply and disposition are derived in part from weekly data reported in EIA`s Weekly Petroleum Status Report) or are calculated from model simulations that use the latest exogenous information available (for example, electricity sales and generation are simulated by using actual weather data). The historical energy data, compiled in the second quarter 1997 version of the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) database, are mostly EIA data regularly published in the Monthly Energy Review, Petroleum Supply Monthly, and other EIA publications. Minor discrepancies between the data in these publications and the historical data in this Outlook are due to independent rounding. The STIFS database is archived quarterly and is available from the National Technical Information Service. The STIFS model is driven principally by three sets of assumptions or inputs: estimates of key macroeconomic variables, world oil price assumptions, and assumptions about the severity of weather. Macroeconomic estimates are produced by DRI/McGraw-Hill but are adjusted by EIA to reflect EIA assumptions about the world price of crude oil, energy product prices, and other assumptions which may affect the macroeconomic outlook. By varying the assumptions, alternative cases are produced by using the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS). 34 figs., 19 tabs.

  9. Energy and materials flows in the copper industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.

    1980-12-01

    The copper industry comprises both the primary copper industry, which produces 99.9%-pure copper from copper ore, and the secondary copper industry, which salvages and recycles copper-containing scrap metal to extract pure copper or copper alloys. The United States uses about 2 million tons of copper annually, 60% of it for electrical applications. Demand is expected to increase less than 4% annually for the next 20 years. The primary copper industry is concentrated in the Southwest; Arizona produced 66% of the 1979 total ore output. Primary production uses about 170 x 10/sup 12/ Btu total energy annually (about 100 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton pure copper produced from ore). Mining and milling use about 60% of the total consumption, because low-grade ore (0.6% copper) is now being mined. Most copper is extracted by smelting sulfide ores, with concomitant production of sulfur dioxide. Clean air regulations will require smelters to reduce sulfur emissions, necessitating smelting process modifications that could also save 20 x 10/sup 12/ Btu (10 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper) in smelting energy. Energy use in secondary copper production averages 20 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/ton of copper. If all copper products were recycled, instead of the 30% now salvaged, the energy conservation potential would be about one-half the total energy consumption of the primary copper industry.

  10. Short-term energy outlook, quarterly projections, second quarter 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares quarterly short-term energy supply, demand, and price projections. The details of these projections, as well as monthly updates, are available on the Internet at: www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/steo/pub/contents.html. The paper discusses outlook assumptions; US energy prices; world oil supply and the oil production cutback agreement of March 1998; international oil demand and supply; world oil stocks, capacity, and net trade; US oil demand and supply; US natural gas demand and supply; US coal demand and supply; US electricity demand and supply; US renewable energy demand; and US energy demand and supply sensitivities. 29 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. OMEGA: a short-wavelength laser for fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soures, J.M.; Hutchison, R.J.; Jacobs, S.D.; Lund, L.D.; McCrory, R.L.; Richardson, M.C.

    1983-01-01

    The OMEGA, Nd:glass laser facility was constructed for the purpose of investigating the feasibility of direct-drive laser fusion. With 24 beams producing a total energy of 4 kJ or a peak power of 12 TW, OMEGA is capable of nearly uniform illumination of spherical targets. Six of the OMEGA beams have recently been converted to short-wavelength operation (351 nm). In this paper, we discuss details of the system design and performance, with particular emphasis on the frequency-conversion system and multi-wavelength diagnostic system.

  12. The Value of Improved Short-Term Wind Power Forecasting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Value of Improved Short- Term Wind Power Forecasting B.-M. Hodge and A. Florita National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Sharp Sharply Focused, LLC M. Margulis and D. Mcreavy Lockheed Martin Technical Report NREL/TP-5D00-63175 February 2015 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

  13. Short protection device for stack of electrolytic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, M.; Schroll, C.R.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention relates to a device for preventing the electrical shorting of a stack of electrolytic cells during an extended period of operation. The device has application to fuel cell and other electrolytic cell stacks operating in low or high temperature corrosive environments. It is of particular importance for use in a stack of fuel cells operating with molten metal carbonate electrolyte for the production of electric power. Also, the device may have application in similar technology involving stacks of electrolytic cells for electrolysis to decompose chemical compounds.

  14. January 2013 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (STEO)  This edition of the Short-Term Energy Outlook is the first to include forecasts for 2014.  EIA expects that the Brent crude oil spot price, which averaged $112 per barrel in 2012, will fall to an average of $105 per barrel in 2013 and $99 per barrel in 2014. The projected discount of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil to Brent, which averaged $18 per barrel in 2012, falls to an average of $16 per barrel in 2013 and $8 per barrel in 2014, as planned new pipeline capacity lowers

  15. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - April 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook April 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook (Figure 1) Gasoline prices in 2005 are projected to remain high, at an expected average of $2.28 per gallon for the April to September summer season, 38 cents above last summer. Similar high motor gasoline prices are expected through 2006. Monthly average prices are projected to peak at about $2.35 per gallon in May. Summer diesel fuel prices are expected to average $2.24 per gallon. As in 2004, the primary

  16. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - July 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2005 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) Retail regular-grade gasoline prices moved up from about $2.12 per gallon at the beginning of June to $2.33 on July 11. Gasoline pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.25 per gallon, 8 cents per gallon higher than last month's projection and about 35 cents per gallon above the year-ago level. Crude oil prices are expected to remain high enough to keep quarterly

  17. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - June 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook June 2005 2005 Summer Motor Fuels Outlook Update (Figure 1) In May, while West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil prices oscillated from the low $50s range to $47 and back again, retail gasoline prices declined steadily from about $2.24 per gallon at the beginning of the month to $2.10 on May 30. On June 6, average retail prices were $2.12 per gallon. Pump gasoline prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, similar to last

  18. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - May 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook May 2005 2005 Summer Motor Gasoline Outlook Update (Figure 1) A considerable break in the expected strength of near-term crude oil prices has resulted in a lower forecast for retail gasoline prices this spring. Gasoline prices may well have seen their peak for the year, barring sharp disruptions in crude oil supply or refinery operations. Pump prices for the summer (April-September) are now projected to average $2.17 per gallon, still high by historical standards

  19. Energy Information Administration/Short-Term Energy Outlook - September 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2005 Hurricane Katrina (Figures 1 and 2) The Gulf of Mexico coast region is a major oil and natural gas supply center for the United States with significant offshore oil and natural gas production, refining capacity, and petrochemical facilities, and serves as a major import hub and nexus for pipeline infrastructure. In the Gulf coast region, Federal offshore crude oil production accounts for 1.5 million barrels per day (29 percent of total U.S.

  20. Short-Term Test Results: Multifamily Home Energy Efficiency Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, J.

    2013-01-01

    Multifamily deep energy retrofits (DERs) represent great potential for energy savings, while also providing valuable insights on research-generated efficiency measures, cost-effectiveness metrics, and risk factor strategies for the multifamily housing industry. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a base scope retrofit with a goal of achieving 30% savings (relative to pre-retrofit), and a DER scope with a goal of 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit). The base scope has been applied to the entire complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. Findings from the implementation, commissioning, and short-term testing at Bay Ridge include air infiltration reductions of greater than 60% in the DER building; a hybrid heat pump system with a Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) > 1 (relative to a high efficiency furnace) which also provides the resident with added incentive for energy savings; and duct leakage reductions of > 60% using an aerosolized duct sealing approach. Despite being a moderate rehab instead of a gut rehab, the Bay Ridge DER is currently projected to achieve energy savings ? 50% compared to pre-retrofit, and the short-term testing supports this estimate.