Sample records for btu consumption production

  1. Production of low BTU gas from biomass 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for combustion is simple relative to the gasification or pyrolysis and construc- tion and operation of the necessary equipment should also be easier. However, the final product of com- bustion, steam energy, cannot be stored for long periods of time.... Lee, B. S. , Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. G. Anthony An experimental study was conducted to examine the gasification of agricultural residues as an alter- nate energy source. The agricultural residues...

  2. & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

  3. U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb MarDecade Year-0Sales (Billion CubicConsumption

  4. Commercial demonstration of atmospheric medium BTU fuel gas production from biomass without oxygen the Burlington, Vermont Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohrer, J.W. [Zurn/NEPCO, South Portland, MA (United States); Paisley, M. [Battelle Laboratories, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first U.S. demonstration of a gas turbine operating on fuel gas produced by the thermal gasification of biomass occurred at Battelle Columbus Labs (BCL) during 1994 using their high throughput indirect medium Btu gasification Process Research Unit (PRU). Zurn/NEPCO was retained to build a commercial scale gas plant utilizing this technology. This plant will have a throughput rating of 8 to 12 dry tons per hour. During a subsequent phase of the Burlington project, this fuel gas will be utilized in a commercial scale gas turbine. It is felt that this process holds unique promise for economically converting a wide variety of biomass feedstocks efficiently into both a medium Btu (500 Btu/scf) gas turbine and IC engine quality fuel gas that can be burned in engines without modification, derating or efficiency loss. Others are currently demonstrating sub-commercial scale thermal biomass gasification processes for turbine gas, utilizing both atmospheric and pressurized air and oxygen-blown fluid bed processes. While some of these approaches hold merit for coal, there is significant question as to whether they will prove economically viable in biomass facilities which are typically scale limited by fuel availability and transportation logistics below 60 MW. Atmospheric air-blown technologies suffer from large sensible heat loss, high gas volume and cleaning cost, huge gas compressor power consumption and engine deratings. Pressurized units and/or oxygen-blown gas plants are extremely expensive for plant scales below 250 MW. The FERCO/BCL process shows great promise for overcoming the above limitations by utilizing an extremely high throughout circulation fluid bed (CFB) gasifier, in which biomass is fully devolitalized with hot sand from a CFB char combustor. The fuel gas can be cooled and cleaned by a conventional scrubbing system. Fuel gas compressor power consumption is reduced 3 to 4 fold verses low Btu biomass gas.

  5. BTU Accounting for Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redd, R. O.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , salesmen cars, over the highway trucks, facilities startup, waste used as fuel and fuels received for storage. This is a first step in the DOE's effort to establish usage guidelines for large industrial users and, we note, it requires BTU usage data...-generated electricity, heating, ventilating, air conditioning, in-plant transportation, ore hauling, raw material storage and finished product warehousing. Categories which are excluded are corporate and divisional offices, basic research, distribution centers...

  6. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  7. An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carney, Christopher Mark

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was to identify and determine the effect of jet burner operating variables that influence combustion of low-BTU gases. This was done by simulating the combustion of a low-BTU fuel in a jet flame and predicting...

  8. Accurate BTU Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosseini, S.; Rusnak, J. J.

    1 represents a typical arrangement in which heat is supplied to, or absorbed by the difference in temperatures of a working fluid, generally water. (See Ref. 1). Supply (TIl- Supply (Tl1 E E Heat (BTU) He.' ~ Exchange Exchange Relurn (T2... rate (BTU/unit time) ? m Mass flow rate (lb/unit time) hI' h2 = Specific enthalpy of supply and return liquid (BTU/lb) BTU C p - Average specific heat (--~----) IboF Equations 1, 2 are instantaneous values for heat flow or energy transferred...

  9. FISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Per -capita sales likely will be near 11.2 pounds--down from 11.4 pounds in 1970. Consumption had beenFISHERY PRODUCTS SITUATION Consumption of fishery products is ex- pected to be off a little in 1971 to attract more imports in 1971 . Since U.S. fish consumption is about 550/0-de- pendent on imports

  10. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Heating Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Total BuildingCooling Loads (Trillion BTU/yr) Non. Wind Infilt SHGC Wind.Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area, Window Window

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  12. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bution of the impacts of oil production and consumption. Theof harmful effects from oil production and use. A criticaland procedural impacts of oil production and consumption

  13. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Total Building Energy Consumption (Trillion BTU/yr) Area,

  14. U.S. Timber Production, Trade, Consumption,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    and Technology Assessment Unit at the Forest Products Laboratory. Chris McKeever created computer files managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations

  15. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

  16. Reduction of Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, J.

    Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

  17. Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development in the Forest Sector: Balancing production and consumption in a challenging Consumption Workshop, Geneva, 2011 Sustainable development · Management and conservation of the natural;Promoting Sustainable Consumption Workshop, Geneva, 2011 Sustainable development (in the forest sector

  18. The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the high costs of oxygen and methanation required to produce gas that can be transmitted over long distance. Standard low Btu fixed bed gasifiers have historically been plagued by three constraints; namely, the production of messy tars and oils...

  19. Subtask 3.16 - Low-BTU Field Gas Application to Microturbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darren Schmidt; Benjamin Oster

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy gas at oil production sites presents an environmental challenge to the sites owners. Typically, the gas is managed in flares. Microturbines are an effective alternative to flaring and provide on-site electricity. Microturbines release 10 times fewer NOx emissions than flaring, on a methane fuel basis. The limited acceptable fuel range of microturbines has prevented their application to low-Btu gases. The challenge of this project was to modify a microturbine to operate on gases lower than 350 Btu/scf (the manufacturer's lower limit). The Energy & Environmental Research Center successfully operated a Capstone C30 microturbine firing gases between 100-300 Btu/scf. The microturbine operated at full power firing gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. A power derating was experienced firing gases below 200 Btu/scf. As fuel energy content decreased, NO{sub x} emissions decreased, CO emissions increased, and unburned hydrocarbons remained less than 0.2 ppm. The turbine was self-started on gases as low as 200 Btu/scf. These results are promising for oil production facilities managing low-Btu gases. The modified microturbine provides an emission solution while returning valuable electricity to the oilfield.

  20. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but...

  1. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average...

  2. Evaluating Texas State University Energy Consumption According to Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnes, D.; Hunn, B. D.; Jones, J. W.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Utilization Index, energy consumption per square foot of floor area, is the most commonly used index of building energy consumption. However, a building or facility exists solely to support the activities of its occupants. Floor area...

  3. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national...

  4. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because...

  5. Production of low BTU gas from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yung N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on gasification as far back as the 1930's. Some of the early work was done using fixed bed gasifiers with wood as the feed mate- In the 1960's, coal was proposed as another possible feed material. Most of the coal gasification was done using moving bed... of downdraft fixed bed, updraft fixed bed or moving bed gasifiers. Most of the work on fluidized bed opera- tion has been concentrated on catalytic cracking units. However, several researchers have used fluidized bed reactors for the gasification process...

  6. Nonlinear coupling between cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption, and ATP production in human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Timothy Q.

    Nonlinear coupling between cerebral blood flow, oxygen consumption, and ATP production in human task performance were reported in the early 1980s, using 15 O positron emission tomography (PET) (3, 4

  7. High Btu gas from peat. Existing social and economic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High Btu Gas from Peat. The proposed study was designed to assess the overall viability of the design, construction and operation of a commercial facility for the production of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. In order to complete the study, Minnegasco assembled an experienced project team with the wide range of expertise required. In addition, the State of Minnesota agreed to participate in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Ertec (The Earth Technology Corporation) was selected to conduct the site evaluation and environmental assessment portions of the feasibility study. The site evaluation was completed in March of 1981 with the submittal of the first of several reports to Minnegasco. This report describes the existing social and economic conditions of the proposed project area in northern Minnesota. The baseline data presented will be used to assess the significance of potential project impacts in subsequent phases of the feasibility study. Wherever possible, the data base was established using 1980 Bureau of Census statistics. However, where the 1980 data were not yet available, the most recent information is presented. 11 figures, 46 tables.

  8. Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products and Generalized Petlyuk Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Consumption in Multicomponent Distillation. 3. More Than Three Products products (where normally M e N). We derive the expressions for a generalized extended Pet- lyuk arrangement for the generalized Pet- lyuk column with more than three products. The Vmin diagram was presented in part 1

  9. A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

  10. Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that...

  11. Microbial production and consumption of marine dissolved organic matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Jamie William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine phytoplankton are the principal producers of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the organic substrate responsible for secondary production by heterotrophic microbes in the sea. Despite the importance of DOM in ...

  12. ESL Monthly Energy Consumption Report (MECR) Production Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Sweeny, J.; Song, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    being monitored . Chapter 1 is an overview of the MECR production process . In Chapter 2 and 3, detail instructions on how to produce the ESL MECR and T AMU MECR. Examples and parts of programming scripts are presented to illustrate the process... of MECR files are provided in the attached CDROM. March 2005 Energy Systems L<1b oratory, Texas A&M University ESL-TR-05-03-01 MECR Production Manual, p3 Table of Contents LIST OF FIGURES...

  13. World production, consumption and international trade of rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Anwaruzzaman

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Considerable quantities ars used in the brewing industry. The Sake of Japan V. D. Wickiaer and N. K. Bennett, op. oit . , p. 3. Table 2. World acreage and production of rice and wheat& 1909 through 1954. " Year Wheat "1909-13 "1925-29 1930-34 "1935... farm products. Table 10. Rice& Rough: Acreage relatives of the continents from 1925 to 1954, taking total world average for 1909-33 as 100? Continent 1909-13 1925-29 1930-34 1935-39 1940~ 194~9 1950-54 Asia Africa North Amerioa Europe South...

  14. Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases into our harbors. Meeting our society's surging demand for commodities

  15. Future U.S. water consumption : The role of energy production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates how meeting domestic energy production targets for both fossil and renewable fuels may affect future water demand. It combines projections of energy production developed by the U.S. Department of Energy with estimates of water consumption on a per-unit basis (water-consumption coefficients) for coal, oil, gas, and biofuels production, to estimate and compare the domestic freshwater consumed. Although total domestic freshwater consumption is expected to increase by nearly 7% between 2005 and 2030, water consumed for energy production is expected to increase by nearly 70%, and water consumed for biofuels (biodiesel and ethanol) production is expected to increase by almost 250%. By 2030, water consumed in the production of biofuels is projected to account for nearly half of the total amount of water consumed in the production of all energy fuels. Most of this is for irrigation, and the West North Central Region is projected to consume most of this water in 2030. These findings identify an important potential future conflict between renewable energy production and water availability that warrants further investigation and action to ensure that future domestic energy demand can be met in an economically efficient and environmentally sustainable manner.

  16. Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

  17. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  18. Environmental Permitting of a Low-BTU Coal Gasification Facility 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawczyk, C.; Stewart, J. T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that merits serious consideration since only relatively small modifications to the existing oil or gas burner system may be required, and boiler derating can be minimized. The environmental permitting and planning process for a low-Btu coal gasification...

  19. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VII. IMPACTS OF OIL CONSUMPTION . . . . . . .and the location of oil consumption necessitates that crudere?neries. VII. IMPACTS OF OIL CONSUMPTION The combustion of

  20. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  1. Consumptive water use in the production of ethanonl and petroleum gasoline.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Mintz, M.; Wang, M.; Arora, S.; Energy Systems

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of energy feedstocks and fuels requires substantial water input. Not only do biofuel feedstocks like corn, switchgrass, and agricultural residues need water for growth and conversion to ethanol, but petroleum feedstocks like crude oil and oil sands also require large volumes of water for drilling, extraction, and conversion into petroleum products. Moreover, in many cases, crude oil production is increasingly water dependent. Competing uses strain available water resources and raise the specter of resource depletion and environmental degradation. Water management has become a key feature of existing projects and a potential issue in new ones. This report examines the growing issue of water use in energy production by characterizing current consumptive water use in liquid fuel production. As used throughout this report, 'consumptive water use' is the sum total of water input less water output that is recycled and reused for the process. The estimate applies to surface and groundwater sources for irrigation but does not include precipitation. Water requirements are evaluated for five fuel pathways: bioethanol from corn, ethanol from cellulosic feedstocks, gasoline from Canadian oil sands, Saudi Arabian crude, and U.S. conventional crude from onshore wells. Regional variations and historic trends are noted, as are opportunities to reduce water use.

  2. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis by SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augus t, l 9 70 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics 1973 PROJECTIONS OF CONSUMPTION, PRODUCTION, PRICES AND CROP VALUES FOR TEXAS WINTER LETTUCE AND EARLY SPRING ONIONS A Thesis SAMUEL ROGER FURRH Ap...

  3. Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYrCapacityBtuHr

  4. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

  5. EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

  6. High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

  7. Cost and Energy Consumption Optimization of Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Consumption Reduction in Machining, Master of Science at the University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA.

  8. Optimal consumption in a growth model with the Cobb-Douglas production function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    } be a consumption policies per capita such that ct is progressively measurable w.r.t. the filtration Ft = (Bs, s t), 0 ct 1, 0 t T, (1.3) and we denote by A the class of all consumption policies {ct} per capita. 3 t [0, T], 0 c(t) 1, ctzt/yt = the totality of consumption rate per person, F(z, y) = the Cobb

  9. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, J. M.; Fung, J. W.; Mo, G.; Deng, F.; West, T. O.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO2 observations at 210 stations to infer CO2 fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated usingmore »a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr-1, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr-1. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr-1 because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.« less

  10. Atmospheric inversion of surface carbon flux with consideration of the spatial distribution of US crop production and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M. [Nanjing Univ., Jiangsu (China); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Fung, J. W. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Mo, G. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Deng, F. [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); West, T. O. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to improve quantification of the spatial distribution of carbon sinks and sources in the conterminous US, we conduct a nested global atmospheric inversion with detailed spatial information on crop production and consumption. County-level cropland net primary productivity, harvested biomass, soil carbon change, and human and livestock consumption data over the conterminous US are used for this purpose. Time-dependent Bayesian synthesis inversions are conducted based on CO? observations at 210 stations to infer CO? fluxes globally at monthly time steps with a nested focus on 30 regions in North America. Prior land surface carbon fluxes are first generated using a biospheric model, and the inversions are constrained using prior fluxes with and without adjustments for crop production and consumption over the 2002–2007 period. After these adjustments, the inverted regional carbon sink in the US Midwest increases from 0.25 ± 0.03 to 0.42 ± 0.13 Pg C yr?¹, whereas the large sink in the US southeast forest region is weakened from 0.41 ± 0.12 to 0.29 ± 0.12 Pg C yr?¹. These adjustments also reduce the inverted sink in the west region from 0.066 ± 0.04 to 0.040 ± 0.02 Pg C yr?¹ because of high crop consumption and respiration by humans and livestock. The general pattern of sink increases in crop production areas and sink decreases (or source increases) in crop consumption areas highlights the importance of considering the lateral carbon transfer in crop products in atmospheric inverse modeling, which provides a reliable atmospheric perspective of the overall carbon balance at the continental scale but is unreliable for separating fluxes from different ecosystems.

  11. Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:Docket Number JumpAnnualGenBtuYr Jump to:

  12. BTU International DUK International JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR NewBTU

  13. Just oil? The distribution of environmental and social impacts of oil production and consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, D; Connolly, S

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF OIL product, product that does notthe quantity of oil products that escapes from pipelines. ”transport of crude oil and petroleum products accounted for

  14. Piston ring pack design effects on production spark ignition engine oil consumption : a simulation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senzer, Eric B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most significant contributors to an engine's total oil consumption is the piston ring-pack. As a result, optimization of the ring pack is becoming more important for engine manufacturers and lubricant suppliers. ...

  15. OPTIMIZATION OF SUGAR CONSUMPTION IN THE FERMENTATION OF TEMULOSE FOR ETHANOL PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalka, Jacquelyn

    2007-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . mobilis and C. shehatae were performed in triplicate for unamended, pH adjusted, and yeast extract amended Temulose at a sugar concentration of 20%. Fermentations with unamended Temulose showed little or no sugar consumption whatsoever, although the high...

  16. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  17. 1973 projections of consumption, production, prices and crop values for Texas winter lettuce and early spring onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrh, Samuel Roger

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ved as to style and content by Ch irman of Committee) / (Head of epartment) (Member n (Member) Mem r (Member) August, 1970 ABSTRACT 1973 Projections of Consumption, Production, Prices and Crop Values for Texas Winter Lettuce and Early Spring... On' ons. (August 1970) Samuel Roger Furrh, B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Marshall R. Godwin The purpose of this study was to provide information to Texas winter lettuce and early spring oni. on producers that would aid them...

  18. Vol. 30 no. 14 2014, pages 20912092 BIOINFORMATICS MESSAGE FROM THE ISCB doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu117

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radivojac, Predrag

    .1093/bioinformatics/btu117 Advance Access publication March 3, 2014 The automated function prediction SIG looks back

  19. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

  20. Enabling Clean Consumption of Low Btu and Reactive Fuels in Gas Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | Department ofEmily KnouseEnSys Energy Report on

  1. Cost and Energy Consumption Optimization of Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaz, Nancy; Dornfeld, David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product Manufacture in a Flexible Manufacturing System Nancypart production under flexible process routings is studiedMachining; Cost; Energy; Flexible Manufacturing INTRODUCTION

  2. Recent regulatory experience of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume III. Supporting case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, E.; Hart, D.; Lethi, M.; Park, W.; Rifkin, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MITRE Corporation conducted a five-month study for the Office of Resource Applications in the Department of Energy on the regulatory requirements of low-Btu coal gasification. During this study, MITRE interviewed representatives of five current low-Btu coal gasification projects and regulatory agencies in five states. From these interviews, MITRE has sought the experience of current low-Btu coal gasification users in order to recommend actions to improve the regulatory process. This report is the third of three volumes. It contains the results of interviews conducted for each of the case studies. Volume 1 of the report contains the analysis of the case studies and recommendations to potential industrial users of low-Btu coal gasification. Volume 2 contains recommendations to regulatory agencies.

  3. Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

  4. Power consumption, discharge capacitance and light emission as measures for thrust production of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriegseis, J. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Grundmann, S. [Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Tropea, C. [Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Aerodynamics, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany); Center of Smart Interfaces, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Flughafenstr. 19, D-64347 Greisheim (Germany)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new procedure of determining the time resolved capacitance of a plasma actuator during operation is introduced, representing a simple diagnostic tool that provides insight into the phenomenological behavior of plasma actuators. The procedure is demonstrated by presenting example correlations between consumed electrical energy, size of the plasma region, and the operating voltage. It is shown that the capacitance of a plasma actuator is considerably increased by the presence of the plasma; hence a system that has previously been impedance matched can be considerably de-tuned when varying the operating voltage of the actuator. Such information is fundamental for any attempts to increase the energy efficiency of plasma-actuator systems. A combined analysis of the capacitance, light emission, size of the plasma region, force production, and power consumption is presented.

  5. Analysis of wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farmers in central Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mwangi, A.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on wood-energy production and consumption strategies among small-scale farm households in central Kenya. The specific objective were: (1) to determine how households had responded to specific wood-energy policies; (2) to identify factors associated with household adoption or non-adoption of the strategies. Different programs aimed at addressing wood-energy shortages in Kenya were initiated or strengthened during the 1980s: fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting; development and dissemination of improved stoves and fireplaces; promotion of increased accessibility to wood-energy substitutes. Household adoption levels for policy-supported strategies have remained low despite promotion. Survey data from two villages in Nyeri district were collected to determine the factors associated with adoption of the Kenya Ceramic Jiko, the [open quotes]Kuni Mbili[close quotes] stove/fireplace, kerosene stoves, electric cookers, and fuelwood or multipurpose tree planting. Adoption rates varied from as low as 1 percent for electricity to 43 percent for the Kenya Ceramic Jiko. Important policy variables included extension visits per year, income levels, years of formal education received by head of household, access to different fuels, area of farm-land owned, household size, and locational characteristics of the villages. Policy recommendations included: use of research results to direct policy; improvement of information flows between policy makers, extension agents, and technology-users; increased support of agroforestry; and better program coordination. Recommendations for further research included: examining more areas where efficiency gains in energy production and consumption can be made, extending the study to cover the drier parts of central Kenya, and conducting regular case studies in order to better understand the adoption process over time.

  6. Regional overview of Latin American and Caribbean energy production, consumption, and future growth. Report series No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Latin American and Caribbean region - comprising Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean - is relatively well endowed with energy resources, although the distribution of these resources is uneven across countries. The region produces more energy than it consumes, and the surplus energy, which amounts to 3.6 million barrels of oil equivalent per day (boe/d), is mostly oil. While the region`s total oil (crude and products) exports decreased from 4.4 million barrels per day (b/d) in 1981 to 3.8 million b/d in 1992, its net oil exports increased from about 1.6 million b/d in 1981 to 2.8 million b/d in 1992. In 1993, the surplus oil in Latin America and the Caribbean remained at 2.8 million b/d. This report analyzes the key issues of the Latin American and Caribbean energy industry and presents the future outlook for oil, gas, coal, hydroelectricity, and nuclear power developments in the region. In addition, the status of biomass energy, geothermal, and other noncommercial energy in the region will be briefly discussed in the context of overall energy development. The rest of the report is organized as follows: Section II assesses the current situation of Latin American and Caribbean energy production and consumption, covering primary energy supply, primary energy consumption, downstream petroleum sector development, and natural gas utilization. Section III presents the results of our study of future energy growth in Latin America. Important hydrocarbons policy issues in the region are discussed in Section IV, and a summary and concluding remarks are provided in Section V.

  7. EIS-0016: Cumulative Production/Consumption Effects of the Crude Oil Price Incentive Rulemakings, Programmatic

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this Final Statement to FEA-FES-77-7 to assess the environmental and socioeconomic implications of a rulemaking on crude oil pricing incentives as pertains to the full range of oil production technologies (present as well as anticipated.)

  8. Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

  9. Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moret, Bernard

    Vol. 30 ISMB 2014, pages i9­i18 BIOINFORMATICS doi:10.1093/bioinformatics/btu259 Evaluating synteny

  10. Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Sangran

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    75% coal 60% coal 50% coal Energy consumption in each step75% coal 60% coal 50% coal Energy input in feedstock andTotal energy Fossil energy Coal Natural gas Petroleum (Btu/

  11. Consumption-based accounting of CO2 emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, S. J; Caldeira, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gross world product, E is global energy consumption, Authorworld GDP, f = F/E is carbon intensity of energy consumption,

  12. Role of hydrogen in blast furnaces to improve productivity and decrease coke consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, J.C.; Brown, F.C.; Chin, D.L.; Stevens, G.; Clark, R.; Smith, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrogen contained in blast furnace gases exerts a variety of physical, thermochemical, and kinetic effects as the gases pass through the various zones. The hydrogen is derived from two sources: (1) the dissociation of moisture in the blast air (ambient and injected with hot blast), and (2) the release from partial combustion of supplemental fuels (including moisture in atomizing water, steam, or transport air, if any). With each atom of oxygen (or carbon), the molar amounts of hydrogen released are more than six times higher for natural gas than for coal, and two times higher for natural gas than for oil. Injection of natural gas in a blast furnace is not a new process. Small amounts of natural gas--about 50--80 lb or 1,100--1,700 SCF/ton of hot metal--have been injected in many of the North American blast furnaces since the early 1960s, with excellent operating results. What is new, however, is a batter understanding of how natural gas reacts in the blast furnace and how natural gas and appropriate quantities of oxygen can be used to increase the driving rate or combustion rate of carbon (coke) in the blast furnace without causing hanging furnace and operating problems. The paper discusses the factors limiting blast furnace productivity and how H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can increase productivity.

  13. Reduces electric energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BENEFITS · Reduces electric energy consumption · Reduces peak electric demand · Reduces natural gas consumption · Reduces nonhazardous solid waste and wastewater generation · Potential annual savings products for the automotive industry, electrical equipment, and miscellaneous other uses nationwide. ALCOA

  14. POTENTIAL MARKETS FOR HIGH-BTU GAS FROM COAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booz, Allen, and Hamilton, Inc.,

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has become increasilngly clear that the energy-related ilemna facing this nation is both a long-term and deepening problem. A widespread recognition of the critical nature of our energy balance, or imbalance, evolved from the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973. The seeds of this crisis were sown in the prior decade, however, as our consumption of known energy reserves outpaced our developing of new reserves. The resultant increasing dependence on foreign energy supplies hs triggered serious fuel shortages, dramatic price increases, and a pervsive sense of unertainty and confusion throughout the country.

  15. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  16. An Evaluation of Low-BTU Gas from Coal as an Alternate Fuel for Process Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebeker, C. J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price gap between oil and natural gas and coal continues to widen, Monsanto has carefully searched out and examined opportunities to convert fuel use to coal. Preliminary studies indicate that the low-btu gas produced by fixed-bed, air blown...

  17. Scaleable production and separation of fermentation-derived acetic acid. Final CRADA report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, S. W.; Energy Systems

    2010-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of U.S. acetic acid production is used in manufacturing vinyl acetate monomer (VAM) and is economical only in very large production plants. Nearly 80% of the VAM is produced by methanol carbonylation, which requires high temperatures and exotic construction materials and is energy intensive. Fermentation-derived acetic acid production allows for small-scale production at low temperatures, significantly reducing the energy requirement of the process. The goal of the project is to develop a scaleable production and separation process for fermentation-derived acetic acid. Synthesis gas (syngas) will be fermented to acetic acid, and the fermentation broth will be continuously neutralized with ammonia. The acetic acid product will be recovered from the ammonium acid broth using vapor-based membrane separation technology. The process is summarized in Figure 1. The two technical challenges to success are selecting and developing (1) microbial strains that efficiently ferment syngas to acetic acid in high salt environments and (2) membranes that efficiently separate ammonia from the acetic acid/water mixture and are stable at high enough temperature to facilitate high thermal cracking of the ammonium acetate salt. Fermentation - Microbial strains were procured from a variety of public culture collections (Table 1). Strains were incubated and grown in the presence of the ammonium acetate product and the fastest growing cultures were selected and incubated at higher product concentrations. An example of the performance of a selected culture is shown in Figure 2. Separations - Several membranes were considered. Testing was performed on a new product line produced by Sulzer Chemtech (Germany). These are tubular ceramic membranes with weak acid functionality (see Figure 3). The following results were observed: (1) The membranes were relatively fragile in a laboratory setting; (2) Thermally stable {at} 130 C in hot organic acids; (3) Acetic acid rejection > 99%; and (4) Moderate ammonia flux. The advantages of producing acetic acid by fermentation include its appropriateness for small-scale production, lower cost feedstocks, low energy membrane-based purification, and lower temperature and pressure requirements. Potential energy savings of using fermentation are estimated to be approximately 14 trillion Btu by 2020 from a reduction in natural gas use. Decreased transportation needs with regional plants will eliminate approximately 200 million gallons of diesel consumption, for combined savings of 45 trillion Btu. If the fermentation process captures new acetic acid production, savings could include an additional 5 trillion Btu from production and 7 trillion Btu from transportation energy.

  18. The Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption of buildings to a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    's area (Gross Square Feet or GSF). The report card accounts for all forms of energy used in a building.e. kBtu) and is divided by the building's area to proved a unit of energy intensity which is expressedThe Building Energy Report Card is used to compare the actual annual energy consumption

  19. Determination of performance characteristics of a one-cylinder diesel engine modified to burn low-Btu (lignite) gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blacksmith, James Richard

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A86YI University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DETERMINATION OF PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS OF A ONE-CYLINDER DIESEL ENGINE MODIFIED TO BURN LOW-BTU (LIGNITE) GAS A Thesis by JAMES RICHARD BLACKSMITH...

  20. Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification assessment program for specific sites of two New York utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this study is to investigate the technical and economic aspects of coal gasification to supply low- or medium-Btu gas to the two power plant boilers selected for study. This includes the following major studies (and others described in the text): investigate coals from different regions of the country, select a coal based on its availability, mode of transportation and delivered cost to each power plant site; investigate the effects of burning low- and medium-Btu gas in the selected power plant boilers based on efficiency, rating and cost of modifications and make recommendations for each; and review the technical feasibility of converting the power plant boilers to coal-derived gas. The following two coal gasification processes have been used as the basis for this Study: the Combustion Engineering coal gasification process produces a low-Btu gas at approximately 100 Btu/scf at near atmospheric pressure; and the Texaco coal gasification process produces a medium-Btu gas at 292 Btu/scf at 800 psig. The engineering design and economics of both plants are described. Both plants meet the federal, state, and local environmental requirements for air quality, wastewater, liquid disposal, and ground level disposal of byproduct solids. All of the synthetic gas alternatives result in bus bar cost savings on a yearly basis within a few years of start-up because the cost of gas is assumed to escalate at a lower rate than that of fuel oil, approximately 4 to 5%.

  1. Understanding Utility Rates or How to Operate at the Lowest $/BTU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, J. N.

    . The lower the energy rating (KW/Ton or KW/HP or KW/BTU) the more efficient the equipment and the less demand draw on the electric power plants, thereby reducing the need to build new power plants. To encourage DSM, utilities give rebates for high...: Bob Allwein, Oklahoma Natural Gas Company. Dick Landry, Gulf States Utility. Curtis Williford, Entex Gas Company. Bret McCants, Central Power and Light Company. Frank Tanner, Southern Union. Patric Coon, West Texas utilities. ESL-IE-93...

  2. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Other Sectors Consumers (BTU

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15 Feb-15(BTU perper

  3. Voltage Collapse and ODE Approach to Power Flows: Analysis of a Feeder Line with Static Disorder in Consumption/Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chertkov, M; Turtisyn, K; Chernyak, V; Lebedev, V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a model of a distribution feeder connecting multiple loads to the sub-station. Voltage is controlled directly at the head of the line (sub-station), however, voltage anywhere further down the line is subject to fluctuations, caused by irregularities of real and reactive distributed power consumption/generation. The lack of a direct control of voltage along the line may result in the voltage instability, also called voltage collapse - phenomenon well known and documented in the power engineering literature. Motivated by emerging photo-voltaic technology, which brings a new source of renewable generation but also contributes significant increase in power flow fluctuations, we reexamine the phenomenon of voltage stability and collapse. In the limit where the number of consumers is large and spatial variations in power flows are smooth functions of position along the feeder, we derive a set of the power flow Ordinary Differential Equations (ODE), verify phenomenon of voltage collapse, and study the ef...

  4. Markets for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification: an analysis of 13 site specific studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1978 the US Department of Energy (DOE), through its Office of Resource Applications, developed a commercialization plan for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. Several initial steps have been taken in that process, including a comprehensive study of industrial markets, issuance of a Notice of Program Interest, and funding of proposals under the Alternate Fuels Legislation (P.L. 96-126). To assist it in the further development and administration of the commercialization plan, the Office of Resource Applications has asked Booz, Allen and Hamilton to assess the market prospects for low- and medium-Btu coal gasification. This report covers the detailed findings of the study. Following the introduction which discusses the purpose of the study, approach used for the assignment and current market attitudes on coal gasification, there are three chapters on: systems configurations and applications; economic and finanical attractiveness; and summary of management decisions based on feasibility study results. The final chapter briefly assesses the management decisions. The general consensus seems to be that coal gasification is a technology that will be attractive in the future but is marginal now. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  5. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  6. Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

  7. Macro-System Model: A Federated Object Model for Cross-Cutting Analysis of Hydrogen Production, Delivery, Consumption and Associated Emissions; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruth, M.; Diakov, V.; Goldsby, M. E.; Sa, T. J.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is commonly accepted that the introduction of hydrogen as an energy carrier for light-duty vehicles involves concomitant technological development of infrastructure elements, such as production, delivery, and consumption, all associated with certain emission levels. To analyze these at a system level, the suite of corresponding models developed by the United States Department of Energy and involving several national laboratories is combined in one macro-system model (MSM). The macro-system model is being developed as a cross-cutting analysis tool that combines a set of hydrogen technology analysis models. Within the MSM, a federated simulation framework is used for consistent data transfer between the component models. The framework is built to suit cross-model as well as cross-platform data exchange and involves features of 'over-the-net' computation.

  8. Energy Consumption ESPRIMO E7935 E80+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    Computers is also taking significant effort to reduce the energy consumption in data centres by providingEnergy Consumption ESPRIMO E7935 E80+ White Paper Issue: September 2008 In order to strengthen all important energy information about their products. With the publication of energy consumption

  9. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  10. Production of Medium BTU Gas by In Situ Gasification of Texas Lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar, T. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The necessity of providing clean, combustible fuels for use in Gulf Coast industries is well established; one possible source of such a fuel is to perform in situ gasification of Texas lignite which lies below stripping depths. If oxygen (rather...

  11. MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - Householdshort version)6/09/2015Values shownLower

  12. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  13. The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, William Russell

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... time when I was in need. Finally, the Center for Energy and Mineral Resources and the Texas Engineering Experiment Station for support related to this research. TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS LIST OF TABLES LIST OF FIGURES V1...

  14. Indexes of Consumption and Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumptionper Thousand Cubic4 15.

  15. Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . ....

  16. Use of tamarisk as a potential feedstock for biofuel production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Norman, Kirsten

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the energy and water use of saltcedar (or tamarisk) as biomass for biofuel production in a hypothetical sub-region in New Mexico. The baseline scenario consists of a rural stretch of the Middle Rio Grande River with 25% coverage of mature saltcedar that is removed and converted to biofuels. A manufacturing system life cycle consisting of harvesting, transportation, pyrolysis, and purification is constructed for calculating energy and water balances. On a dry short ton woody biomass basis, the total energy input is approximately 8.21 mmBTU/st. There is potential for 18.82 mmBTU/st of energy output from the baseline system. Of the extractable energy, approximately 61.1% consists of bio-oil, 20.3% bio-char, and 18.6% biogas. Water consumptive use by removal of tamarisk will not impact the existing rate of evapotranspiration. However, approximately 195 gal of water is needed per short ton of woody biomass for the conversion of biomass to biocrude, three-quarters of which is cooling water that can be recovered and recycled. The impact of salt presence is briefly assessed. Not accounted for in the baseline are high concentrations of Calcium, Sodium, and Sulfur ions in saltcedar woody biomass that can potentially shift the relative quantities of bio-char and bio-oil. This can be alleviated by a pre-wash step prior to the conversion step. More study is needed to account for the impact of salt presence on the overall energy and water balance.

  17. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  18. Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David P.

    In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

  19. West Virginia Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0Feet) Decreases

  20. Nevada Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotal ConsumptionThousand CubicfromDryFoot)

  1. Optimization of Water Consumption in Second Generation Bioethanol Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimization of Water Consumption in Second Generation Bioethanol Plants Mariano Martína optimization of second generation bioethanol production plants from lignocellulosic switchgrass when using

  2. Washington Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYearFuel Consumption0 0 0Feet) DecadetoYear Jan

  3. Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarkets EnergyConsumption5 15EnvironmentalErin

  4. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 3. Market analysis. Task 8. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to identify and characterize the market potential for the plant by-products - BTX (mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene), phenol, ammonia, sulfur, and sodium sulfate - and to assign value to them. Although traditionally a growth industry, the chemicals market has been generally weakened by the recession, and is experiencing back to back years of declining production. This is due to bad health of specific end uses, such as fertilizer from ammonia. In the long run, this trend is expected to moderate. It is felt that the proposed peat plant has a favorable position in the markets of each of its by-products. This is due to the synergism with nearby industries which are major consumers of these by-products. In the case of sulfur and ammonia, the Red River agricultural area is a large potential market. For sodium sulfate, phenols and perhaps BTX, the nearby paper and timber products industries are large potential markets. The values for these by-products used in the financial analysis were intentionally conservative. This is because of the uncertainty in the quantity and quality. More tests are needed in an integrated facility in order to determine these factors and the variability of each. This is particularly true of the by-product oils which could vary significantly with operating conditions and may even require alternate processing schemes. 18 references, 9 figures, 14 tables.

  5. Fuel-cycle assessment of selected bioethanol production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Hong, H.; Energy Systems

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large amount of corn stover is available in the U.S. corn belt for the potential production of cellulosic bioethanol when the production technology becomes commercially ready. In fact, because corn stover is already available, it could serve as a starting point for producing cellulosic ethanol as a transportation fuel to help reduce the nation's demand for petroleum oil. Using the data available on the collection and transportation of corn stover and on the production of cellulosic ethanol, we have added the corn stover-to-ethanol pathway in the GREET model, a fuel-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory. We then analyzed the life-cycle energy use and emission impacts of corn stover-derived fuel ethanol for use as E85 in flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). The analysis included fertilizer manufacturing, corn farming, farming machinery manufacturing, stover collection and transportation, ethanol production, ethanol transportation, and ethanol use in light-duty vehicles (LDVs). Energy consumption of petroleum oil and fossil energy, emissions of greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide [CO{sub 2}], nitrous oxide [N{sub 2}O], and methane [CH{sub 4}]), and emissions of criteria pollutants (carbon monoxide [CO], volatile organic compounds [VOCs], nitrogen oxide [NO{sub x}], sulfur oxide [SO{sub x}], and particulate matter with diameters smaller than 10 micrometers [PM{sub 10}]) during the fuel cycle were estimated. Scenarios of ethanol from corn grain, corn stover, and other cellulosic feedstocks were then compared with petroleum reformulated gasoline (RFG). Results showed that FFVs fueled with corn stover ethanol blends offer substantial energy savings (94-95%) relative to those fueled with RFG. For each Btu of corn stover ethanol produced and used, 0.09 Btu of fossil fuel is required. The cellulosic ethanol pathway avoids 86-89% of greenhouse gas emissions. Unlike the life cycle of corn grain-based ethanol, in which the ethanol plant consumes most of the fossil fuel, farming consumes most of the fossil fuel in the life cycle of corn stover-based ethanol.

  6. Energy-consumption modelling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, E.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

  7. Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised: 6 November 1991 Trends in the Consumption of Energy-Intensive Basic Materials on the consumption, rather than production, of materials. Earlier analyses of trends in basic materials consumption materials consumption patterns on energy use is the recognition that physical units (kilograms) are more

  8. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

  9. System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scheffer, K.D.

    1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

  10. Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

  11. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  12. New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office(Billion CubicProductionFoot) Decade Year-0 Year-1

  13. Mississippi Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of Fossil Energy,off) Shale ProductionExpectedCubic

  14. Texas Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality", 2013,Iowa"Dakota"Year JanExpected Future Production (Billion

  15. Research needs and data acquisition to apply US technology to foreign coals: Annual report, July 1, 1986-June 30, 1987. [Production and consumption of each indexed country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, S.; Kulkarni, A.; Saluja, J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive data on the coal resources, characteristics, demand and supply, coal production and plans for coal utilization to meet the energy needs in the countries of the Pacific Basin and Asia have been gathered. Two databases have been prepared based on this information which are compatible with the database on domestic coals available at NCTDC, PETC on coal resources and characteristics. Coal technologies and coal preparation methods currently in use in the Pacific Basin and Asia have also been addressed. In the second phase of this project, an assessment of the information obtained will be conducted and, wherever possible, this data will be compared with domestic data on coals and coal conversion practices so as to highlight similarities or differences. High quality and useful data will be enumerated in the form of graphs, tables and matrices for quick review. Conclusions from this data will depict work areas of potential mutual interest and areas of technology transfer. US products and services which can be exported will be emphasized.

  16. Profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a plurality of compute nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Peters, Amanda E.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a compute node that include: receiving an application for execution on a compute node; identifying a hardware power consumption profile for the compute node, the hardware power consumption profile specifying power consumption for compute node hardware during performance of various processing operations; determining a power consumption profile for the application in dependence upon the application and the hardware power consumption profile for the compute node; and reporting the power consumption profile for the application.

  17. Profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a compute node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Peters, Amanda E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for profiling an application for power consumption during execution on a compute node that include: receiving an application for execution on a compute node; identifying a hardware power consumption profile for the compute node, the hardware power consumption profile specifying power consumption for compute node hardware during performance of various processing operations; determining a power consumption profile for the application in dependence upon the application and the hardware power consumption profile for the compute node; and reporting the power consumption profile for the application.

  18. MFR PAPER 1012 Increased U.S. fish consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Figure 1.-Per capita consumption 01 lishery products in the U.S. (pounds per capita, edible weight- after (Figure I). Per capita consumption of fish in the United States also is con istent with levels In the \\\\orld In 1972. con...umer\\ JI\\- po ed of the equl\\alent of ahout n,' Tabl e 1 - Per capita fllh conl

  19. Energy consumption testing of innovative refrigerator-freezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, M.T.; Howell, B.T.; Jones, W.R. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Long, D.L. [Statistical Solutions, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The high ambient temperature of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and the AHAM/DOE Refrigerator-Freezer Energy Consumption Standards is intended to compensate for the lack of door openings and other heat loads. Recently published results by Meier and Jansky (1993) indicate labeled consumption overpredicting typical field consumption by 15%. In-house field studies on conventional models showed labeled consumption overpredicting by about 22%. The Refrigerator-Freezer Technology Assessment (RFTA) test was developed to more accurately predict field consumption. This test has ambient temperature and humidity, door openings, and condensation control set at levels intended to typify Canadian household conditions. It also assesses consumption at exactly defined compartment rating temperatures. Ten conventional and energy-efficient production models were laboratory tested. The RFTA results were about 30% lower than labeled. Similarly, the four innovative refrigerator-freezer models, when field tested, also had an average of 30% lower consumption than labeled. Thus, the results of the limited testing suggest that the RFTA test may be a more accurate predictor of field use. Further testing with a larger sample is recommended. Experimental results also indicated that some innovative models could save up to 50% of the energy consumption compared with similar conventional units. The technologies that contributed to this performance included dual compressors, more efficient compressors and fan motors, off-state refrigerant control valve, fuzzy logic control, and thicker insulation. The larger savings were on limited production models, for which additional production engineering is required for full marketability.

  20. Pricing Conspicuous Consumption Products in Recession Periods ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    cally used in chemical engineering, e.g., to avoid irreversible reactions in ... Our basic problem is based on an economic setting with a recession period followed.

  1. Screening Prosopis (Mesquite or Algarrobo) for Biofuel Production on Semiarid Lands1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    salars is because of its capability to extract water from the atmosphere, or from its ability to develop with 600 mm total water applica- tion. Dry matter production of 14,000 kg/ha has been obtained at projected harvested costs of $23.00 per ton or $1.35 per million Btu and com- pare favorably with natural gas, heating

  2. Co-production of electricity and alternate fuels from coal. Final report, August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Calderon process and its process development unit, PDU, were originally conceived to produce two useful products from a bituminous coal: a desulfurized medium BTU gas containing primarily CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O; and a desulfurized low BTU gas containing these same constituents plus N{sub 2} from the air used to provide heat for the process through the combustion of a portion of the fuel. The process was viewed as a means for providing both a synthesis gas for liquid fuel production (perhaps CH{sub 3}OH, alternatively CH{sub 4} or NH{sub 3}) and a pressurized, low BTU fuel gas, for gas turbine based power generation. The Calderon coal process comprises three principle sections which perform the following functions: coal pyrolysis in a continuous, steady flow unit based on coke oven technology; air blown, slagging, coke gasification in a moving bed unit based on a blast furnace technology; and a novel, lime pebble based, product gas processing in which a variety of functions are accomplished including the cracking of hydrocarbons and the removal of sulfur, H{sub 2}S, and of particulates from both the medium and low BTU gases. The product gas processing unit, based on multiple moving beds, has also been conceived to regenerate the lime pebbles and recover sulfur as elemental S.

  3. Margins up; consumption down

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mantho, M.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

  4. CSV File Documentation: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4Consumption The State Energy Data System

  5. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug SepDecadeEnergy Consumption

  6. Reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda E. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes that include: executing, by each compute node, an application, the application including power consumption directives corresponding to one or more portions of the application; identifying, by each compute node, the power consumption directives included within the application during execution of the portions of the application corresponding to those identified power consumption directives; and reducing power, by each compute node, to one or more components of that compute node according to the identified power consumption directives during execution of the portions of the application corresponding to those identified power consumption directives.

  7. Monthly energy review: September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during June 1996 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.5% decrease from the level of production during June 1995. Energy consumption during June 1996 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.7% above the level of consumption during June 1995. Net imports of energy during June 1996 totaled 1.6 quadrillion Btu, 4.5% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Statistics are presented on the following topics: energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  8. Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

  9. Exceeding Energy Consumption Design Expectations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castleton, H. F.; Beck, S. B. M.; Hathwat, E. A.; Murphy, E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) the building consumed 208.7 kWh m-2 yr-1, 83% of the expected energy consumption (250 kWh m-2 yr-1). This dropped further to 176.1 kWh m-2 yr-1 in 2012 (70% below expected). Factors affecting building energy consumption have been discussed and appraised...

  10. Energy and materials flows in the production of olefins and their derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.; Shen, S.Y.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production of olefins and their derivatives uses almost 3.5% of the oil and gas consumed annually in the United States. It is estimated that their production requires an input energy of 2 Q, which is 50% of the energy used in the production of all petrochemicals. Substantial amounts of this energy could be recovered through recycling. For example, recycling of a single plastic product, polyester soft drink bottles, could have recovered about 0.014 Q in 1979. (About 1.4 Q is used to produce plastic derivatives of olefins). Petrochemical processes use fuels as feedstocks, as well as for process energy, and a portion of this energy is not foregone and can be recovered through combustion of the products. The energy foregone in the production of ethylene is estimated to be 7800 Btu/lb. The energy foregone in plastics production ranges from 12,100 Btu/lb for the new linear low-density polyethylene to 77,200 Btu/lb for nylon 66, which is about 60% of the total energy input for that product. Further investigation of the following areas could yield both material and energy savings in the olefins industry: (1) recycling of petrochemical products to recover energy in addition to that recoverable through combustion, (2) impact of feedstock substitution on utilization of available national resources, and (3) effective use of the heat embodied in process steam. This steam accounts for a major fraction of the industry's energy input.

  11. Impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on National Energy Consumption Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, D. B.; Hadley, S. W.; Chin, S-M.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Pub. L. No. 109-58; EPAct 2005) amended the Uniform Time Act of 1966 (Pub. L. No. 89-387) to increase the portion of the year that is subject to Daylight Saving Time. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 extended the duration of Daylight Saving Time in the spring by changing its start date from the first Sunday in April to the second Sunday in March, and in the fall by changing its end date from the last Sunday in October to the first Sunday in November. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) EPAct 2005 also called for the Department of Energy to evaluate the impact of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy consumption in the United States and to submit a report to Congress. (15 U.S.C. 260a note) This report presents the results of impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on the national energy consumption in the United States. The key findings are: (1) The total electricity savings of Extended Daylight Saving Time were about 1.3 Tera Watt-hour (TWh). This corresponds to 0.5 percent per each day of Extended Daylight Saving Time, or 0.03 percent of electricity consumption over the year. In reference, the total 2007 electricity consumption in the United States was 3,900 TWh. (2) In terms of national primary energy consumption, the electricity savings translate to a reduction of 17 Trillion Btu (TBtu) over the spring and fall Extended Daylight Saving Time periods, or roughly 0.02 percent of total U.S. energy consumption during 2007 of 101,000 TBtu. (3) During Extended Daylight Saving Time, electricity savings generally occurred over a three- to five-hour period in the evening with small increases in usage during the early-morning hours. On a daily percentage basis, electricity savings were slightly greater during the March (spring) extension of Extended Daylight Saving Time than the November (fall) extension. On a regional basis, some southern portions of the United States exhibited slightly smaller impacts of Extended Daylight Saving Time on energy savings compared to the northern regions, a result possibly due to a small, offsetting increase in household air conditioning usage. (4) Changes in national traffic volume and motor gasoline consumption for passenger vehicles in 2007 were determined to be statistically insignificant and therefore, could not be attributed to Extended Daylight Saving Time.

  12. Consumption conundrums unravelled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horrell, Sara; Humphries, Jane; Sneath, Ken

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shammas, Preindustrial Consumer. 6 Clay, Economic Expansion, p.31. 7 Berg, ‘Imitation’, ‘Pursuit’. 8 Weatherill, Consumer Behaviour; Shammas, Preindustrial Consumer; Overton et al, Production; French, Middle Sort. 9 Lemire, Force. 3 However... , historically as today, reflects a subset of the goods that people owned selected at least in part by portability but also determined by what thieves wanted either for their own use or to sell on. Thus changes over time in the composition of stolen property...

  13. Calendar Year 2007 Program Benefits for U.S. EPA Energy Star Labeled Products: Expanded Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Marla

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    $/MBtu) Electric Heat Rate (Btu/kWh) kWh = kilowatthour; TWh= terawatthour; MBtu = Million Btu; MtC = Metric tons ofon heavy load. Idle Rate (Btu/h) Table 6-9. Energy Star

  14. Producing Quail for Home Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornberry, Fredrick D.

    1998-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Hobby and backyard producers are becoming interested in producing quail for home consumption. This publication gives tips on housing and brooding, nutrition, lighting, cannibalism, health and slaughter. It includes three recipes....

  15. Energy consumption of building 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopeman, Lisa Maria

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

  16. Progressive consumption : strategic sustainable excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonham, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph MacLeod)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trends in the marketplace show that urban dwellers are increasingly supporting locally produced foods. This thesis argues for an architecture that responds to our cultures consumptive behaviors. Addressing the effects of ...

  17. The Wealth-Consumption Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verdelhan, Adrien Frederic

    We derive new estimates of total wealth, the returns on total wealth, and the wealth effect on consumption. We estimate the prices of aggregate risk from bond yields and stock returns using a no-arbitrage model. Using these ...

  18. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rating of at least 4000 Btu per hour per gallon of storedpackaged boiler that has an input rating from 300,000 Btu/hrto 12,500,000 Btu/hr (and at least 4,000 Btu/hr per gallon

  19. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  1. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  2. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Table C22. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace...

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  10. Data Center Power Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Consumption Data Center Power Consumption Presentation covers the FUPWG Fall Meeting, held on November 28-29, 2007 in San Diego, California. fupwgsandiegomainers.pdf More...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  12. New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption New York: Weatherizing Westbeth Reduces Energy Consumption August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The New York State Homes and...

  13. Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

  14. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

  15. Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A C EUIs (cooling, ventilation, and gas heating). The annualCooling kWh/ft Ventilation kWh/ft Heating kBtu/ft CoolingMiscellaneous DOE-2 Ventilation kWh/ft Heating kBtu/ft EDA

  16. Title Goes Here In This PositionMillersville University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    Electricity consumption is responsible for 66% of emissions 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 Scope 1 Consumption: 61,734 BTU/GSF UD's Electric Consumption: 59,396 BTU/GSF 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250 Consumption & Tech. Rating Total BTU/GSF Fossil Consumption: 29,362 BTU/GSF Electric Consumption: 77,495 BTU

  17. Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

  18. 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-20 7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed/h. Then noting that each available air conditioner provides 4,000 Btu/h cooling, the number of air- conditioners

  19. International Energy Annual, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  20. Budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Inglett, Todd A

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes that include: assigning an execution priority to each of one or more applications; executing, on the plurality of compute nodes, the applications according to the execution priorities assigned to the applications at an initial power level provided to the compute nodes until a predetermined power consumption threshold is reached; and applying, upon reaching the predetermined power consumption threshold, one or more power conservation actions to reduce power consumption of the plurality of compute nodes during execution of the applications.

  1. Budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Peters, Amanda E; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for budget-based power consumption for application execution on a plurality of compute nodes that include: assigning an execution priority to each of one or more applications; executing, on the plurality of compute nodes, the applications according to the execution priorities assigned to the applications at an initial power level provided to the compute nodes until a predetermined power consumption threshold is reached; and applying, upon reaching the predetermined power consumption threshold, one or more power conservation actions to reduce power consumption of the plurality of compute nodes during execution of the applications.

  2. Comparative analysis of energy consumption trends in cohousing and alternate housing arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason R. (Jason Robert), 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sizes of both single-family and multifamily homes have grown steadily in the United States over the last fifty years. During this time, despite more efficient production processes, energy consumption in the country ...

  3. In the Soup: Caustic Ingestion from the Improper Consumption of a Self-Heating Soup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Matthew; Hafner, John William

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consumption of a Self-Heating Soup Matthew Hanson, MD John® Hillside made several self-heating food product canisters,with no readily available heating source to have hot soups

  4. Essays on aggregate and individual consumption fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Youngjin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis consists of three essays on aggregate and individual consumption fluctuations. Chapter 1 develops a quantitative model to explore aggregate and individual consumption dynamics when the income process exhibits ...

  5. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  6. Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Ethanol Consumption by Rat Dams During Gestation, Lactation and Weaning Increases Ethanol examined effects of ethanol consumption in rat dams during gestation, lactation, and weaning on voluntary ethanol consumption by their adolescent young. We found that exposure to an ethanol-ingesting dam

  7. DYNAMIC MANAGEMENT OF POWER CONSUMPTION Tajana Simunic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Chapter 1 DYNAMIC MANAGEMENT OF POWER CONSUMPTION Tajana Simunic HP Labs Abstract Power consumption by adapting to changes in environment are proposed: dynamic power management and dynamic voltage scaling. Dynamic power management (DPM) algorithms aim to reduce the power consumption at the system level

  8. Mathematical models of natural gas consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scitovski, Rudolf

    Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

  9. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1 consumption, questions are being asked about the energy contribution of computing equipment. Al- though studies have documented the share of energy consumption by this type of equipment over the years, research

  10. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer, it may impair the ability of the sensor network to function. Therefore, minimizing energy consumption energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  11. Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey...

  12. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    49 3.3.3. Pre-installation electricity consumption of CSIE. Kahn (2011). Electricity Consumption and Durable Housing:on Electricity Consumption .

  13. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-pend TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-EfficiencyTrends and Energy Consumption ..TV Technology Trends and Energy Consumption. 1.2.3. Factors

  14. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

  15. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency inEnergy Consumption ..26 3.1.3. 3D TV Energy Consumption and Efficiency

  16. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources a significant effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 15

  17. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.0 pounds

  18. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.5 pounds

  19. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 73 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

  20. Per Capita Consumption The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Consumption 84 The NMFS calculation of per capita consumption is based to estimate per capita consumption. Data for the model are derived primarily from second- ary sources effect on the resulting calculation. U.S. per capita consumption of fish and shellfish was 16.3 pounds

  1. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  2. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  3. First BTU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County, Minnesota:Island, NewFirmGreen

  4. BTU LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon CaptureAtria PowerAxeonBCHP ScreeningBLMBSABTBTR

  5. Monthly energy review, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    US total energy consumption in July 1990 was 6.7 quadrillion Btu Petroleum products accounted for 42 percent of the energy consumed in July 1990, while coal accounted for 26 percent and natural gas accounted for 19 percent. Residential and commercial sector consumption was 2.3 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector accounted for 35 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Industrial sector consumption was 2.4 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. The industrial sector accounted for 36 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Transportation sector consumption of energy was 1.9 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 1 percent from the July 1989 level. The sector consumed 29 percent of July 1990 total consumption, about the same share as in July 1989. Electric utility consumption of energy totaled 2.8 quadrillion Btu in July 1990, up 2 percent from the July 1989 level. Coal contributed 53 percent of the energy consumed by electric utilities in July 1990, while nuclear electric power contributed 21 percent; natural gas, 12 percent; hydroelectric power, 9 percent; petroleum, 5 percent; and wood, waste, geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy, about 1 percent.

  6. Monthly energy review, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during February 1994 totaled 5.3 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2% increase over February 1993. Coal production increased 9%, natural gas rose 2.5%, and petroleum decreased 3.6%; all other forms of energy production combined were down 3%. Energy consumption during the same period totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.1% above February 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 5.8%, petroleum 5.2%, and coal 2.3%; consumption of all other energy forms combined decreased 0.7%. Net imports of energy totaled 1.4 quadrillion Btu, 16.9% above February 1993; petroleum net imports increased 10.1%, natural gas net imports were down 4.9%, and coal net exports fell 43.7%. This document is divided into: energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, international energy, appendices (conversion factors, etc.), and glossary.

  7. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water  from   Production  of  Crude  Oil,  Natural  Gas,  water  required  for  production  of  crude  oil  through  consumption  for  production   of  crude  oil  in  the  

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Organic/Inorganic Photovoltaic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guvenc, Ali Bilge

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 Figure 1-3 World energy consumption (in British Thermal5 Figure 1-4 World energy consumption (in Btu) according toforms and (b) world energy consumption (in Btu) according to

  9. Energy consumption in thermomechanical pulping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marton, R.; Tsujimoto, N.; Eskelinen, E.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various components of refining energy were determined experimentally and compared with those calculated on the basis of the dimensions of morphological elements of wood. The experimentally determined fiberization energy of spruce was 6 to 60 times larger than the calculated value and that of birch 3 to 15 times larger. The energy consumed in reducing the Canadian standard freeness of isolated fibers from 500 to 150 ml was found to be approximately 1/3 of the total fiber development energy for both spruce and birch TMP. Chip size affected the refining energy consumption; the total energy dropped by approximately 30% when chip size was reduced from 16 mm to 3 mm in the case of spruce and approximately 40% for birch. 6 refs.

  10. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

  11. Permitting of Consumptive Uses of Water (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Local water management districts are required to establish programs and regulations to provide for the permitting of consumptive uses of water. Such permitting programs are subject to the...

  12. Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    have the end use, not consumption specifically for that particular end use. HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning. Due to rounding, data may not sum to...

  14. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of...

  15. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","331...

  16. ,"New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

  17. Monthly energy review, April 1993. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during January 1993 totaled 5.7 quadrillion Btu, a 3.3-percent decrease compared with the level of production during January 1992. Coal production decreased 9.9 percent, petroleum production dropped 3.9 percent, and natural gas production increased 0.5 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 4.9 percent from the level of reduction during January 1992. Energy consumption during January 1993 totaled 7.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.4 percent above the level of consumption during January 1992. Coal consumption increased 2.2 percent, natural gas consumption was up 1.3 percent, and petroleum consumption dropped 2.8 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 5.1 percent compared with the level 1 year earlier.

  18. Monthly energy review, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during January 1993 totaled 5.7 quadrillion Btu, a 3.3-percent decrease compared with the level of production during January 1992. Coal production decreased 9.9 percent, petroleum production dropped 3.9 percent, and natural gas production increased 0.5 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 4.9 percent from the level of reduction during January 1992. Energy consumption during January 1993 totaled 7.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.4 percent above the level of consumption during January 1992. Coal consumption increased 2.2 percent, natural gas consumption was up 1.3 percent, and petroleum consumption dropped 2.8 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 5.1 percent compared with the level 1 year earlier.

  19. Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Estimated 2011 Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    Comparison of Georgia and US Per Capita Fruit, Vegetable, Livestock, and Poultry Consumption, 2011 Capita) Data System 4 Value= Per capita consumption (column 3) multiplied by Georgia Population (9 Estimated 2011 Georgia Population (9,687,653)1 2011 Farm Gate Production (lbs)2 2010 Per Capita US

  20. Energy consumption of personal computer workstations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The explosive growth of the information age has had a profound effect on the appearance of today`s office. Although the telephone still remains an important part of the information exchange and processing system within an office, other electronic devices are now considered required equipment within this environment. This office automation equipment includes facsimile machines, photocopiers, personal computers, printers, modems, and other peripherals. A recent estimate of the installed base indicated that 42 million personal computers and 7.3 million printers are in place, consuming 18.2 billion kWh/yr-and this installed base is growing (Luhn 1992). From a productivity standpoint, it can be argued that this equipment greatly improves the efficiency of those working in the office. But of primary concern to energy system designers, building managers, and electric utilities is the fact that this equipment requires electric energy. Although the impact of each incremental piece of equipment is small, installation of thousands of devices per building has resulted in office automation equipment becoming the major contributor to electric consumption and demand growth in commercial buildings. Personal computers and associated equipment are the dominant part of office automation equipment. In some cases, this electric demand growth has caused office buildings electric and cooling systems to overload.

  1. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lb process heat: 1. 23 X 10 4 BTU electricity 5500 BTUe CaC1scf sludge 18.61b water 161b Btu/scf WASTE PROCESSING sewer~l9ZZ X 10 DEELAIQB BTU/yr) I MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 3.

  2. SYNTHESIS GAS UTILIZATION AND PRODUCTION IN A BIOMASS LIQUEFACTION FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figueroa, C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Estimates for a Medium BTU Gasification Plant Using A4.6 D /Dt / D Sus 0.7 (=) Btu/H 2 hr °F h ~ _3_,.5. ,..-thennal conductivity (=) Btu-ft/ ft2 hroF l)_ "' p particle

  3. Using Iterative Compilation to Reduce Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gheorghita, Valentin

    or to re- duce power. Most transformations require loop re- structuring. Although a large number.v.gheorghita,h.corporaal,a.a.basten}@tue.nl Keywords: Iterative Compilation, Program Optimization, Energy Consumption, Program Transformation. Abstract. This is emphasized by new demands added to compilers, like reducing static code size, energy consumption or power

  4. World synthetic rubber consumption is growing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide consumption of new rubber, both synthetic and natural, has increased. This report includes a prediction of even more growth in the rubber market which was made by the International Institute of Synthetic Rubber Producers (IISRP), based in Houston. Figures are given for worldwide consumption.

  5. Firewood consumption in a Nepali village

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, J.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    People's dependence on firewood as a primary source of energy is causing serious deforestation problems in many developing countries. Reliable information on firewood consumption rates is needed to develop afforestation plans and to control deforestation. This study compares three methods used to determine firewood consumption in a Nepali village. Cultural and environmental factors that affect firewood consumption in the village are also examined. The weight survey proved to be the most accurate method used. The less precise daily recall and annual recall surveys overestimated actual firewood consumption by factors of 1.76 and 1.95, respectively. Overestimates are attributed to both physical and social factors. In view of the good agreement between daily and annual recall surveys, and the much greater ease of conducting the latter, annual recall surveys are recommended as the most practical method of monitoring firewood consumption rates. Validating the survey with occasional weighted measurements is suggested as a means of improving accuracy.

  6. Fuel consumption analyses for urban traffic management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, D.P.; Akcelik, R.; Biggs, D.C.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A primary output from the fuel consumption research conducted by the Australian Road Research Board (ARRB) is the ARRB Special Report, Guide to Fuel Consumption Analyses. This article briefly summarizes the background of the guide, describes its major features, and considers its relevance to urban traffic management decision. The guide was a result of a technical audit of studies relating to energy consumption in traffic and transport systems. A brief summary of the audit process and findings is given. The guide is intended primarily as an aid to effective use of fuel consumption models in the design of traffic management schemes. The forms of four interrelated fuel consumption models of the guide are described and their likely transferability to various situations is indicated. Each traffic and fuel consumption model is appropriate to a particular scale of traffic system. This link is shown for several selected traffic models. As an example, a discussion of the importance of accurate fuel consumption estimates for the case of priority control at a particular intersection is given.

  7. Changing patterns of world energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, S.H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The substantial increases in oil prices since 1973 have had tremendous impacts on world energy, and particularly on oil consumption. These impacts have varied across regions and energy types. As shown in a table, from 1960 through 1973 the real price of internationally traded crude oil, as measured in constant US dollars, changed very little. In this stable oil price environment, Free World energy consumption grew at 5.3% per year and oil use rose at 7.5% per year, increasing its share of Free World energy consumption from 43 to 56%. 6 tables.

  8. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  9. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  10. Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, X.; Tan, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys the present situation of building energy consumption in Shanghai and points out the problems of insufficient energy consumption statistics based on the survey data. We analyze the relationships of energy consumption between...

  11. Increasing Underwater Vehicle Autonomy by Reducing Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chyba, Monique

    : Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Minimum Energy Consumption, Optimal Control, Experiments. 1 IntroductionIncreasing Underwater Vehicle Autonomy by Reducing Energy Consumption M. Chybaa , T. Haberkornd , S, we concern ourselves with finding a control strategy that minimizes energy consumption along

  12. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency inTV Shipments on Energy Consumption.. 22 Figure 3-1.Estimates of Annual Energy Consumption in 3D mode of 3D TVs

  13. Research on Building Energy Consumption Situation in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, X.; Tan, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys the present situation of building energy consumption in Shanghai and points out the problems of insufficient energy consumption statistics based on the survey data. We analyze the relationships of energy consumption between...

  14. Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium between predicted and actual building energy consumption can be attributed to uncertainties introduced in energy consumption due to actual weather and building operational practices, using a simulation

  15. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    household (2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to...

  16. Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Justin David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

  17. GIS-based energy consumption mapping 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balta, Chrysi

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to provide a methodology to map energy consumption of the housing stock at a city level and visualise and evaluate different retrofitting scenarios. It is based on an engineering, bottom-up approach. It makes use...

  18. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:04:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035NM2" "Date","New...

  19. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"3292015 10:01:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM2" "Date","New...

  20. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  1. ,"New York Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:12:03 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035NY2" "Date","New York...

  2. ,"New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:08:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY2" "Date","New...

  3. Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issler, Paulo Floriano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption . . . . . 1.5.3 EIS and the timing of durablefor the CRRA case (? = 2, EIS = 0.5). The right and leftof intertemporal substitution (EIS). When the economy is

  4. 1. -HOUSING AND ENVIRONMENT Colostrum consumption, thermoregulation and heat production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Comparison of four air conditioning systems in fattening pig-houses C. TEXIER, R. GRANIER B. DE LA FARGE tested with each air conditioning system. The animals were housed by groups of ten on a surface of 0.8 M2'Institut Technique du Porc o to compare in summer (3 trials) and in winter (2 trials) the four following air

  5. Population dynamics, production, and prey consumption of fathead minnows (Pimephales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) in prairie wetlands: a bioenergetics approach W.G. Duffy Abstract: I assessed the population dynamics of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) in prairie wetlands and developed a bioenergetics model to estimate

  6. World production, consumption and international trade of rice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Anwaruzzaman

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    crop used for that purpose. Rice stands almost unique in the form in vhioh it is oonsumed as food. It is generally boiled or steamers, and eaten vithout undergoing any further ohange. Other cereals& such as wheat and barley, undergo various changes...

  7. The water consumption of energy production: an international comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, David H.

    Producing energy resources requires significant quantities of fresh water. As an energy sector changes or expands, the mix of technologies deployed to produce fuels and electricity determines the associated burden on ...

  8. ESL Monthly Energy Consumption Report (MECR) Production Manual 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Sweeny, J.; Song, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Finite Hilbert Basis Set (FHBS) method to calculate the angular and energy distribution of ejected electrons in an ion-atom collision is presented. This method has been applied to the p + H collision at 20 keV impact ...

  9. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  10. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  11. Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

    MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT OF REFINERY ENERGY CONSUMPTION Roger O. Pelham Richard D. Moriarty Patrie D. Hudgens Profimatics, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California ABSTRACT Since 1972, the u.s. refining industry has made much progress in reduci... ng energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and man age the daily use...

  12. Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption Eric Niemeyer, Operations Superintendent Drilling Specialties Company A division of Chevron Phillips Chemical Company LP ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity..., LA. May 20-23, 2014 A presentation of the paper “Continuous Improvement Energy Projects Reduce Energy Consumption” by Bruce Murray and Allison Myers ESL-IE-14-05-31 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans...

  13. Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle applications compare a baseline, contemporary vehicle...

  14. HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY CONDITIONS HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION SIMULATING REAL-WORLD DRIVING IN LABORATORY...

  15. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  16. Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combinatio...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors Fact 705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors The National Highway...

  17. Novel Ultra-Low-Energy Consumption Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Low-Energy Consumption Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Novel Ultra-Low-Energy Consumption Ultrasonic Clothes Dryer Preliminary measured drying time of fabric sample using ultrasonic...

  18. Fact #861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles Fact 861 February 23, 2015 Idle Fuel Consumption for Selected Gasoline and Diesel Vehicles...

  19. Introduction to Benchmarking: Starting a Benchmarking Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    plant Btu per pound of product Manufacturer Btu per pound of product processed Refinery Btu per number of beds occupied Hotel or hospital Kilowatt-hours per square foot...

  20. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  1. Reduction in Unit Steam Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gombos, R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 the company's Arch-Brandenburg facility faced increased steam costs due to high natural gas prices and decreased production due to shutdown of a process. The facility was challenged to reduce unit steam consumption to minimize the effects...

  2. 4-1-09_Final_Testimony_(Gruenspecht).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about 1,142 trillion British thermal units (Btu), more than 1 percent of total U.S. energy consumption of 101.9 quadrillion Btu. The components of farm energy consumption are...

  3. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    dataWhile total liquid fuels consumption falls, consumption of domestically produced biofuels increases significantly, from 1.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011 to 2.1 quadrillion Btu in...

  4. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracking adopters and their consumption over time would shed additional light on the dynamics of solar

  5. Understanding energy consumption: Beyond technology and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilhite, H.; Shove, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes two years of efforts among a cross-disciplinary group of senior researchers to bring social and cultural perspectives to modeling of household energy consumption. The work has been organized by the Center for Energy Studies of the University of Geneva. The researchers represent both the physical and social sciences, several institutions and a number of countries. The initiative was based on an acknowledgement of the failure of technical and economic models to explain consumption or more importantly, how consumption patterns change. Technical and economic models most often either ignore social and cultural issues or reduce them to parameters of other variables. An important objective for the Geneva Group has been to engage modelers and social scientists in a dialogue which brings social and cultural context to the fore. The process reveals interesting insights into the frictions of cross-disciplinary interaction and the emergence of new perspectives. Various classical modeling approaches have been discussed and rejected. Gradually, a framework has emerged which says something about the appropriate institutions and actors which contribute to consumption patterns; about how they are related; and finally about how the interinstitutional relationships and the consumption patterns themselves change. A key point of convergence is that a complete understanding of energy end-use will not be possible from an analysis directed at the point of end use alone. The analysis must incorporate what happens inside institutions like manufacturers, retailers, and public policy organizations as well as how those organizations interact with consumers, including media and advertising. Progress towards a better understanding of energy consumption requires a greater engagement of social scientists with these heretofore little explored actors an relationships.

  6. Increasing Energy Efficiency and Reducing Emissions from China's Cement Kilns: Audit Report of Two Cement Plants in Shandong Province, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conversion: 1 kwh = 10,500 Btu for power production Averageelectricity and at 10,500 Btu/kwh or 2,646 kcal/kHz energyHCs Unit Nm3/hr Nm3/hr cfh Btu/scf MM Btu/hr GJ/hr Btu/scf

  7. Estimates of US biofuels consumption, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the sixth in the series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration to quantify the amount of biofuel-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It provides preliminary estimates of 1990 US biofuels energy consumption by sector and by biofuels energy resource type. The objective of this report is to provide updated annual estimates of biofuels energy consumption for use by congress, federal and state agencies, and other groups involved in activities related to the use of biofuels. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  9. Secure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shehab, Mohamed

    Secure Distributed Solution for Optimal Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid Mohammad Emails: {mrahman4, lbai2, mshehab, ealshaer}@uncc.edu Abstract--The demand-side energy management is crucial to optimize the energy usage with its production cost, so that the price paid by the users

  10. A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption Anna Nagurney and Dmytro Matsypura Department of Finance and Operations Management Isenberg School, Berlin, Germany, pp. 3-27. Abstract: A supply chain network perspective for electric power production

  11. International Journal of Chemistry; 2013[02] ISSN 2306-6415 Preservation Ways and Energy Consumption in Oil Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Samimi

    Abstract: Preservation increase and energy return is one of the effective tools in saving. Studies show that energy consumption for each productive crude oil barred is dependence on the refinery complicated in reconfiguration of forge. Energy recovery increase in refinery over time that is due to economic factors like consumption fuel increase, it means that return increase is consistent with fuel price. It developed use of crude oil capability, distillation products in modern refinery. Modern refinery recovery dead to 10 to 15 % saving in energy consumption, Modern refinery.can developed energy return in several ways such as: Thermal exchange increase between processes streams, effective hydro exchange in process units, use of heaters with high thermal return and use of gas turbines with preheated air and produce steam of waste thermal. This paper investigates management ways and energy consumption recovery in different parts of oil refinery.

  12. Reduced Energy Consumption for Melting in Foundries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ 336 ­ 007 TM 06 ­ 07 Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management Technical University at the Technical University of Denmark, DTU. The project has been financed by the Danish transmission system-melted, and hence reduce the energy consumption for melting in foundries. Traditional gating systems are known

  13. Public perceptions of energy consumption and savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    on Environmental Decisions, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027; b Department of Psychology, Ohio StatePublic perceptions of energy consumption and savings Shahzeen Z. Attaria,1 , Michael L. De February 12, 2010) In a national online survey, 505 participants reported their percep- tions of energy

  14. Global Inequality in Energy Consumption from 1980 to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Scott; Yakovenko, Victor M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita around the world using data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for 1980-2010. We find that the Lorenz curves have moved up during this time period, and the Gini coefficient G has decreased from 0.66 in 1980 to 0.55 in 2010, indicating a decrease in inequality. The global probability distribution of energy consumption per capita in 2010 is close to the exponential distribution with G=0.5. We attribute this result to the globalization of the world economy, which mixes the world and brings it closer to the state of maximal entropy. We argue that global energy production is a limited resource that is partitioned among the world population. The most probable partition is the one that maximizes entropy, thus resulting in the exponential distribution function. A consequence of the latter is the law of 1/3: the top 1/3 of the world population consumes 2/3 of produced energy. We also find similar results for the global pro...

  15. QUAUTE DES PRODUITS — QUALITY OF PRODUCTS Processing ability of pork products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    QUAUTE DES PRODUITS — QUALITY OF PRODUCTS Processing ability of pork products B. JACQUET-de-Gaulle, 94700 Maisons-Alfort The first part is devoted to the economics of pig meat products as well in terms of national consumption as in terms of production of fresh, processed and cured products, canned meat

  16. Monthly energy review, October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during July 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.8-percent increase from the level of production during July 1993. Coal production increased 8.3 percent, natural gas production rose 2.8 percent, and petroleum production decreased 1.9 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 1.1 percent from the level of production during July 1993. Energy consumption during July 1994 totaled 7.1 quadrillion Btu, 0.8 percent above the level of consumption during July 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 3.2 percent, petroleum consumption rose 0.7 percent, and coal consumption was down 1.6 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 2.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during July 1994 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 11.3 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 8.4 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 8.4 percent. Net exports of coal fell 14.6 percent from the level in July 1993. This report is divided into: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices; international energy; appendices (conversion factors); and glossary.

  17. Monthly energy review, May 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an overview of the May energy statistics by the Energy Information Administration. The contents of the report include an energy overview, US energy production, trade stocks and prices for petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy. Energy production during February 1997 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu, a 1.9% decrease from the level of production during February 1996. Coal production increased 1.2%, natural gas production decreased 2.9%, and production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 2.1%. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.3% from the level of production during February 1996. Energy consumption during February 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 4.0% below the level of consumption during February 1996. Consumption of petroleum products decreased 4.4%, consumption of natural gas was down 3.5%, and consumption of coal fell 2.2%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 6.7% from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during February 1997 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.1% above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 12.7% and net imports of natural gas were up 7.4%. Net exports of coal fell 12.1% from the level in February 1996. 37 figs., 75 tabs.

  18. Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

  19. Study of Air Infiltration Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Mingsheng

    SYSTEMATIC ERROR DUE TO THE STEADY-STATE COMBINED MODELS 127 SIMULATION AND NUMERICAL RESULTS 141 APPLICATION 150 SUMMARy 157 METHODOLOGy 158 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION 159 DISCRETIZATION OF THE DIFFERENTIAL EQUATION 161 EXTERNAL NODE EQUATIONS 164... temperature. Clearly, the room heater does not need to heat the air from the outside temperature to the room temperature because it has already captured part of the conduction heat flowing through the wall. To properly estimate house energy consumption...

  20. Analysis of the results of Federal incentives used to stimulate energy production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program analyzed the Federal incentives used to stimulate nuclear, hydro, coal, gas, oil, and electricity production in order to supply what was learned to the selection of an incentives strategy to induce new energy production from renewable resources. Following the introductory chapter, Chapter 2 examines the problem of estimating effects from a theoretical perspective. Methods of quantifying and identifying the many interactive effects of government actions are discussed. Chapter 3 presents a generic analysis of the result of Federal incentives. Chapters 4 through 9 deal with incentives to energy forms - nuclear, hydro, coal, oil, gas, and electricity. Chapter 10 summarizes the estimated results of the incentives, which are presented in terms of their quantity and price impacts. The incentive costs per million Btu of induced energy production is also discussed. Chapter 11 discusses the parity issue, that is an equivalence between Federal incentives to renewable resources and to traditional energy resources. Any analysis of incentives for solar needs will profit from an analysis of the costs of solar incentives per million Btu compared with those for traditional energy forms. Chapter 12 concludes the analysis, discussing the history of traditional energy incentives as a guide to solar-energy incentives. 216 references, 38 figures, 91 tables.

  1. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    since 2007, this is offset by increasing consumption from the rest of the world. China has seen a rapid increase in petroleum consumption over the last decade while India...

  2. The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Parhys L

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

  3. Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obraczka, Katia

    1 Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms Cintia B. Margi 1156 High Street Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract--- This paper approaches energy consumption charac­ terization in mobile computing platforms by assessing energy con­ sumption of ''basic'' application

  4. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    real-world thermostat settings and heat energy consumptionto real-world behaviours. The actual energy consumption goesworld data indicates that the houses heated during the night had higher annual heat energy consumption.

  5. The Analysis and Assessment on Heating Energy Consumption of SAT 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article introduced the fuel-energy consumption and outdoor temperatures of three heating terms from year 1999 to 2002 of SAT's fuel-boiler heating system. It demonstrated the relationship between the consumption and the temperatures by using...

  6. Home, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    , habitual, and irrational. Implications for the design of energy-conserving interactions with technology investigate the relationships among "normal" domestic interactions with technology, energy consumptionHome, Habits, and Energy: Examining Domestic Interactions and Energy Consumption James Pierce1

  7. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    USA MODELLING THE IMPACT OF USER BEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTIONUSA The second point of interest to research was modelling the excess energy consumptionUSA Figure 3. Actual heating and hot water energy consumption

  8. The Analysis and Assessment on Heating Energy Consumption of SAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article introduced the fuel-energy consumption and outdoor temperatures of three heating terms from year 1999 to 2002 of SAT's fuel-boiler heating system. It demonstrated the relationship between the consumption and the temperatures by using...

  9. Federal Energy Consumption and Progress Made toward Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) tracks Federal agency energy consumption and progress toward achieving energy laws and requirements.

  10. Monthly Energy Review, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Energy production during November 1997 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 0.3-percent decrease from the level of production during November 1996. Natural gas production increased 2.8 percent, production of crude oil and natural gas plant liquids decreased 1.7 percent, and coal production decreased 1.6 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 1.1 percent from the level of production during November 1996. Energy consumption during November 1997 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 0.1 percent above the level of consumption during November 1996. Consumption of natural gas increased 1.5 percent, consumption of coal fell 0.3 percent, while consumption of petroleum products decreased 0.2 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during November 1997 totaled 1.7 quadrillion Btu, 8.6 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 6.3 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 1.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 17.8 percent from the level in November 1996.

  11. Power Consumption Prediction and Power-Aware Packing in Consolidated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    prediction and enforcement of appropriate limits on power consumption--power budgets--within the data center-term energy consumption within that level and 2) a sustained budget to capture any restrictions on sustained as the well-being of our environ- ment. Trends from such platforms suggest that the power consumption in data

  12. Getting to Green: Understanding Resource Consumption in the Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grinter, Rebecca Elizabeth

    of collecting data on being green. Author Keywords Sustainability, residential resource consumption, domestic energy [19], increasing awareness of resource consumption in the workplace [20] and building homes manage their energy consumption. Next, we outline our methods and findings from a qualitative study of 15

  13. Automated Analysis of Performance and Energy Consumption for Cloud Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Jean-Guy

    load tests and profile system performance and energy consumption data. Using StressCloud, we have, increasing data storage and computation needs significantly raise the energy consumption of large cloud consumption directly contributes to data centres' operational costs, especially as the energy unit cost

  14. Experimental Measurements of the Power Consumption for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Javier

    consumption. Therefore, in order to give some recommendations to de- velopers and optimize the energy spent of the energy consumption should be performed for the most common operations in a sensor node. This knowledge common operations: (i) CPU change state and (ii) data transfer radio. CPU change state. The consumption

  15. Minimizing Energy Consumption in Body Sensor Networks via Convex Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poovendran, Radha

    energy consumption while limiting the latency in data transfer. In this paper, we focus on pollingMinimizing Energy Consumption in Body Sensor Networks via Convex Optimization Sidharth Nabar energy consumption and latency. We show that this problem can be posed as a geometric program, which

  16. Classification of Energy Consumption in Buildings with Outlier Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    . Then a canonical variate analysis is employed to describe latent variables of daily electricity consumption is used to predict the daily electricity consumption profiles. A case study, based on a mixed use consumption data within a buildings energy management system. Electrical peak load forecasting plays

  17. 2008 Erik Hinterbichler DESIGNING A BETTER ENERGY CONSUMPTION INDICATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karahalios, Karrie G.

    in which HCI can contribute to energy conservation is in interfaces for residential energy consumption on the effects of energy consumption feedback in the home. From this analysis, we created a theoretical framework© 2008 Erik Hinterbichler #12;DESIGNING A BETTER ENERGY CONSUMPTION INDICATOR INTERFACE

  18. Per Capita Annual Utilization and Consumption of Fish and Shellfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Capita Annual Utilization and Consumption of Fish and Shellfish in Hawaii, 1970-77 Table I was 5.82 kg (12.8 pounds). It has been speculated that the per capita consumption of fishery prod- ucts is that the per capita consumption rate in Hawaii for 1977 was about 77 percent higher than the U.S. average

  19. Effects of household dynamics on resource consumption and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    influence per capita consumption7,8 and thus biodiversity through, for example, consumption of wood for fuel, and resultant higher per capita resource con- sumption in smaller households15­19 pose serious challenges on resource consumption and biodiversity Jianguo Liu*, Gretchen C. Daily, Paul R. Ehrlich & Gary W. Luck

  20. A Realistic Power Consumption Model for Wireless Sensor Network Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hempstead, Mark

    . Recent analyses of WSN energy efficiency have been widely based on a sensor node power consumption model1 A Realistic Power Consumption Model for Wireless Sensor Network Devices Qin Wang, Mark Hempstead}@eecs.harvard.edu Abstract-- A realistic power consumption model of wireless communication subsystems typically used in many

  1. Profiling, Prediction, and Capping of Power Consumption in Consolidated Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    an upper bound on long-term energy consumption within that level and (ii) a sustained budget to capture any-being of our environment. Trends from such platforms suggest that the power consumption in high-performance comProfiling, Prediction, and Capping of Power Consumption in Consolidated Environments Jeonghwan Choi

  2. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Modeling fuel consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rate and pattern. Fuel consumption is the basic process that leads to heat absorbing emissions called evaluated with an independent, quality assured, fuel consumption data set. Furthermore, anecdotal evidenceWildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Modeling fuel consumption Roger D. Ottmar U

  3. On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoller, Scott

    On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Zhichao Li, Radu Grosu, Priya Sehgal {zhicli,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption that can balance out performance and energy use. This paper considers the energy consumption

  4. On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    On the Energy Consumption and Performance of Systems Software Appears in the proceedings of the 4th,grosu,psehgal,sas,stoller,ezk}@cs.stonybrook.edu ABSTRACT Models of energy consumption and performance are necessary to understand and identify system. This paper considers the energy consumption and performance of servers running a relatively simple file

  5. Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilevich, Eli

    Reducing the Energy Consumption of Mobile Applications Behind the Scenes Young-Woo Kwon and Eli, an increasing number of perfective maintenance tasks are concerned with optimizing energy consumption. However, optimizing a mobile application to reduce its energy consumption is non-trivial due to the highly volatile

  6. The Impact of Distributed Programming Abstractions on Application Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilevich, Eli

    The Impact of Distributed Programming Abstractions on Application Energy Consumption Young-Woo Kwon of their energy consumption patterns. By varying the abstractions with the rest of the functionality fixed, we measure and analyze the impact of distributed programming abstractions on application energy consumption

  7. Energy Consumption in Coded Queues for Wireless Information Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Energy Consumption in Coded Queues for Wireless Information Exchange Jasper Goseling, Richard J customers. We use this relation to ob- tain bounds on the energy consumption in a wireless information, for example, from the observations in [3] that using network coding can reduce the energy consumption

  8. Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Cornbased Ethanol Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimization of Energy and Water Consumption in Corn­based Ethanol Plants Elvis Ahmetovi). First, we review the major alternatives in the optimization of energy consumption and its impact for the water streams. We show that minimizing energy consumption leads to process water networks with minimum

  9. Energy Consumption Characteriation of Heterogeneous Servers School of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    Energy Consumption Characteriation of Heterogeneous Servers Xiao Zhang School of Computer Science Machine between servers to save energy. An accurate energy consumption model is the basic of energy management. Most past studies show that energy consumption has linear relation with resource utilization. We

  10. GENETIC HEURISTICS FOR REDUCING MEMORY ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN EMBEDDED SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schott, René - Institut de Mathématiques Élie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    GENETIC HEURISTICS FOR REDUCING MEMORY ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN EMBEDDED SYSTEMS Maha IDRISSI AOUAD.loria.fr/zendra Keywords: Energy consumption reduction, Genetic heuristics, memory allocation management, optimizations on heuristic methods for SPMs careful management in order to reduce memory energy consumption. We propose

  11. Modeling energy consumption in cellular networks L. Decreusefond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Modeling energy consumption in cellular networks L. Decreusefond Telecom Paristech, LTCI Paris Abstract--In this paper we present a new analysis of energy consumption in cellular networks. We focus on the distribution of energy consumed by a base station for one isolated cell. We first define the energy consumption

  12. Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Andrew Gearhart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Kernels Andrew Gearhart Electrical Engineering not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the sponsors. #12;Bounds on the Energy Consumption Fall 2014 #12;Bounds on the Energy Consumption of Computational Kernels Copyright 2014 by Andrew Scott

  13. Optimizing Communication Energy Consumption in Perpetual Wireless Nanosensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weigle, Michele

    Optimizing Communication Energy Consumption in Perpetual Wireless Nanosensor Networks Shahram}@cs.odu.edu Abstract--This paper investigates the effect of various param- eters of energy consumption. Finding the optimum combination of parameters to minimize energy consumption while satisfying the Qo

  14. Household activities through various lenses: crossing surveys, diaries and electric consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Daubin, Mathieu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison between electricity consumption and behavioralU.S. residential electricity consumption” Energy Policy, 42(of the residential electricity consumption. ” Energy Policy,

  15. One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsven, Phillip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    estimates of gas and electricity consumption were preparedestimates the gas and electricity consumption in a typicalthat lacked electricity consumption data were discarded for

  16. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andcan be measured using energy consumption per capita values.

  17. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  18. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China, 2008,The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andfor Residential Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,

  19. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid:A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai, Ma; Guoqiang, Hu; Spanos, Costas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  20. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2001). "Residential Energy Consumption Survey." 2006, fromCommercial Building Energy Consumption Survey." from http://Scale window-related energy consumption to account for new

  1. Current Status and Future Scenarios of Residential Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The China Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Human andof Residential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan ZhouResidential Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou*,

  2. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

  3. Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison o f energy consumption i n housing (1998) (Trends i n household energy consumption (Jyukankyo Research4) Average (N=2976) Energy consumption [GJ / household-year

  4. One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsven, Phillip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the total annual energy consumption. The behavior patternsin total residential energy consumption per home, even whenthe variability in energy consumption can vary by factors of

  5. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F.; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Table 2 Housing Unitsresidential vehicular energy consumption is graphed as aon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption with vehicles, but

  6. Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-Cooperative Game Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Game- Theoretic Energy Consumption Scheduling for theIn this paper, energy consumption scheduling based on non-Energy Consumption Scheduling in Smart Grid: A Non-

  7. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China’sof China’s total energy consumption mix. However, accuratelyof China’s total energy consumption, while others estimate

  8. Monthly energy review, June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during March 1994 totaled 5.9 quadrillion Btu, a 3.7-percent increase from the level of production during March 1993. Coal production increased 15.7 percent, petroleum production fell 4.1 percent, and natural gas production decreased 1.1 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were up 0.5 percent from the level of production during March 1993. Energy consumption during March 1994 totaled 7.5 quadrillion Btu, 1.3 percent below the level of consumption during March 1993. Natural gas consumption decreased 3.6 percent, petroleum consumption fell 1.6 percent, and coal consumption remained the same. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 3.7 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during March 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 6.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 3.2 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 15.7 percent. Net exports of coal rose 2.1 percent from the level in March 1993.

  9. Monthly energy review, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during April 1994 totaled 5.5 quadrillion Btu, a 2.2-percent increase from the level of production during April 1993. Coal production increased 11.8 percent, petroleum production fell 4.0 percent, and natural gas production decreased 0.3 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 2.9 percent from the level of production during April 1993. Energy consumption during April 1994 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 1.4 percent above the level of consumption during April 1993. Petroleum consumption increased 3.9 percent, coal consumption rose 1.1 percent, and natural gas consumption decreased 1.5 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 0.4 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during April 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 8.7 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 4.5 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 18.5 percent. Net exports of coal fell 9.2 percent from the level in April 1993.

  10. Monthly energy review, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during May 1994 totaled 5.6 quadrillion Btu, a 2.4-percent increase from the level of production during May 1993. Coal production increased 13.3 percent, natural gas production rose 1.7 percent, and petroleum production decreased 2.5 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 8.3 percent from the level of production during May 1993. Energy consumption during May 1994 totaled 6.6 quadrillion Btu, 3.6 percent above the level of consumption during May 1993. Natural gas consumption increased 8.7 percent, coal consumption rose 4.6 percent, and petroleum consumption was up 3.6 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.8 percent from the level 1 year earlier. Net imports of energy during May 1994 totaled 1.5 quadrillion Btu, 14.3 percent above the level of net imports 1 year earlier. Net imports of petroleum increased 8.4 percent, and net imports of natural gas were up 23.2 percent. Net exports of coal fell 16.8 percent from the level in May 1993.

  11. Site Energy Reduction Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagen, P. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

  12. Rate of Industrial Conservation - Petroleum Refining, Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Manufacture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prengle, H. W. Jr.; Golden, S. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are the goals and expectations for decreases in industrial energy use during the next 10-20 years? The specific energy consumption (SEC) of a plant or industry, measured in BTU of fuel used/ton of product produced, can be used to monitor the energy conserved...

  13. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Percentage Btu Region map map showing electricity regions The chart above compares coal consumption in March 2014 and March 2015 by region and shows that coal consumption for...

  15. 2013 BUILDING ENERGY EFFICIENCY STANDARDS CALIFORNIA CODE OF REGULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the product in Btu/h. If the unit's capacity is less than 7000 Btu/h, use 7000 Btu/h in the calculation. If the unit's capacity is greater than 15,000 Btu/h, use 15,000 Btu/h in the calculation. b Replacement units and with mechanical cooling capacity at AHRI conditions of greater than or equal to 54,000 Btu/hr, shall include

  16. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity Use as an Indicator ofEnergy Consumption2003

  18. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey,

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarkets EnergyConsumption5 15 1 Short-Term5 15t

  19. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 2 CBECS Surveyabout

  20. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Manufacturing Energy Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 2 CBECS SurveyaboutSurvey

  1. Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption Survey (CBECS) Data 2 CBECS

  2. Illinois Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (Million381 -260 74 127

  3. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, the authors will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. This quarter pellet production work commenced and planning for collection and processing of a preparation plant fines fraction is underway.

  4. Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 December 1993--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. During the second quarter, froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) tests on 34 project samples were completed at {minus}100, {minus}200, and {minus}400 mesh particle sizes. Products from the FF/RA tests were analyzed for ash, moisture, and some for total S and heating value (BTU), and the resulting data are being used to construct a series of washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected. Composite samples, each having 80% of the total BTU (or combustibles), were prepared for the {minus}100 and {minus}200 mesh FF/RA tests and submitted for trace element analysis. The composite samples for the {minus}400 mesh FF/RA tests will be submitted soon, and the analytical results are expected to be available in 3--4 months. The trace element data on the composite samples will indicate the potential for the removal of each element from the coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particle sizes.

  5. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  6. Monthly Energy Review, August 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monthly Energy Review presents current data on production, consumption, stocks, imports, exports, and prices of the principal energy commodities in the United States. Also included are data on international production of crude oil, consumption of petroleum products, petroleum stocks, and production of electricity from nuclear-powered facilities. The United States produced 9.5% more energy during the first 8 months of 1984 than during the same period in 1983, and US energy consumption was up 6.6%. Net imports of all energy were 13.4% higher, with net imports of petroleum up 15.0% compared to those imports in the first 8 months of 1983. Energy production during August 1984 totaled 5.8 quadrillion Btu, a 9.8% increase compared to the level of production during August 1983. Coal production increased 22.3%, natural gas production was up 7.3%, and petroleum production increased 1.7%. Production of all other forms of energy combined increased 4.8% compared to production 1 year earlier. Energy consumption during August 1984 totaled 6.1 quadrillion Btu, 2.8% above the level of consumption during August 1983. Petroleum consumption increased 4.2%, natural gas consumption was up 2.4, and coal consumption increased 0.1%. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined increased 4.8% compared to consumption during August 1983. Net imports of energy during August 1984 totaled 0.6 quadrillion Btu, 24.4% below the level of net imports during August 1983. Net imports of petroleum decreased 21.8% while net imports of natural gas increased 4.0%. Net exports of coal were down 1.6% compared to the level in August 1983.

  7. Survey of electrochemical production of inorganic compounds. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical generation of inorganic compounds, excluding chlorine/caustic, has been critically reviewed. About 60 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y fossil fuel equivalent will be used in the year 2000 for the electrosynthesis of inorganic compounds. Significant energy savings in chlorate production can result from the development of suitable electrocatalysts for lowering the cathodic overpotential. Perchlorates, electrolytic hypochlorite, electrolytic manganese dioxide, fluorine and other miscellaneous compounds use relatively small amounts of electrical energy. Implementation of caustic scrubber technology for stack gas cleanup would result in appreciable amounts of sodium sulfate which could be electrolyzed to regenerate caustic. Hydrogen peroxide, now produced by the alkyl anthraquinone process, could be made electrolytically by a new process coupling anodic oxidation of sulfate with cathodic reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Ozone is currently manufactured using energy-inefficient silent discharge equipment. A novel energy-efficient approach which uses an oxygen-enhanced anodic reaction is examined.

  8. EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Early Release

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Btu in 2010 to 15.7 quadrillion Btu in 2025, due to projected increases in the fuel economy of highway vehicles. Projected energy consumption for LDVs increases after 2025, to...

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Topics

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    changes affect not only the level of energy use, but also the mix of fuels used. Energy consumption per capita declined from 337 million Btu in 2007 to 308 million Btu in 2009,...

  10. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Of the selected countriesregions shown, Europe has consistently had the highest consumption of renewable electricity. However, China has shown dramatic growth in the...

  11. On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Problem, Branch-and-Bound, Electrical Vehicle, Energy Consumption. ... Electrical vehicle uses an electrical energy source for its displacement which can.

  12. Strategies for Decreasing Petroleum Consumption in the Federal Fleet (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putsche, V.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation offers strategies federal agency fleets can use to reduce petroleum consumption and build or gain access to alternative fuel infrastructure.

  13. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

  14. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","12015","1151989" ,"Release...

  15. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  16. Optimization Online - Electricity markets with flexible consumption as ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quentin Louveaux

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 1, 2015 ... Electricity markets with flexible consumption as nonatomic congestion games. Quentin Louveaux (q.louveaux ***at*** ulg.ac.be) Sébastien ...

  17. Long-term energy consumptions of urban transportation: A prospective...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    can significantly curb the trajectories of energy consumption and the ensuing carbon dioxide emissions, if and only if they are implemented in the framework of appropriate...

  18. administration gasohol consumption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chris Wells; Young Mie Kim; Hernando Rojas 2012-01-01 3 Overview of the Electrical Energy Segment of the Energy Information Administration Manufacturing Consumption Report...

  19. Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    come from space heating within homes (Boardman, 2007). If weassociated with heating the home must be an imperative. Theheating and hot water energy consumption of the homes (Zack

  20. ,"New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

  1. ,"New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release Date:","2272015"...

  2. Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    recently published final fuel consumption standards for heavy vehicles called "vocational" vehicles. A vocational vehicle is generally a single-unit work vehicle over 8,500 lbs...

  3. On Minimizing the Energy Consumption of an Electrical Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelkader Merakeb

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 20, 2011 ... The problem that we focus on, is the minimization of the energy consumption of an electrical vehicle achievable on a given driving cycle.

  4. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy...

  5. assessing cigarette consumption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kevin M. Murphy 1994-01-01 5 ASSESSMENT OF DRINKING WATER QUALITY AND DETERMINANTS OF HOUSEHOLD POTABLE WATER CONSUMPTION IN SIMADA Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  6. Clean Production Management of Breweries: the realities of implementing clean production management in Tsingtao Brewery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chaonan

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years?China's beer industry has rapid growth?but because of high energy consumption and high emissions in the production process, its environmental pollution became more serious and aroused concern. Beer companies must promote management...

  7. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  8. BTU International Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 Jump to: JumpBPL Global JumpBSST LLCBTMBTU

  9. Monthly energy review, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy production during Feb 95 totaled 5.4 quadrillion Btu (Q), 3.1% over Feb 94. Energy consumption totaled 7.4 Q, 0.7% below Feb 94. Net imports of energy totaled 1.3 Q, 5.6% below Feb 94. This publication is divided into energy overview, energy consumption, petroleum, natural gas, oil and gas resource development, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, energy prices, and international energy.

  10. LifeCycle Water Consumption of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Arturo A.

    ­ LCAbased policies ­ CA LCFS 3. But a good GHG LCA does not a responsible product make "Sustainability Heat loss into soil "Vapor pressure deficit" Solar radiation Wind speed Constant related to humidity

  11. Reducing water freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants : approaches used outside the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal-fired power plants consume huge quantities of water, and in some water-stressed areas, power plants compete with other users for limited supplies. Extensive use of coal to generate electricity is projected to continue for many years. Faced with increasing power demands and questionable future supplies, industries and governments are seeking ways to reduce freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants. As the United States investigates various freshwater savings approaches (e.g., the use of alternative water sources), other countries are also researching and implementing approaches to address similar - and in many cases, more challenging - water supply and demand issues. Information about these non-U.S. approaches can be used to help direct near- and mid-term water-consumption research and development (R&D) activities in the United States. This report summarizes the research, development, and deployment (RD&D) status of several approaches used for reducing freshwater consumption by coal-fired power plants in other countries, many of which could be applied, or applied more aggressively, at coal-fired power plants in the United States. Information contained in this report is derived from literature and Internet searches, in some cases supplemented by communication with the researchers, authors, or equipment providers. Because there are few technical, peer-reviewed articles on this topic, much of the information in this report comes from the trade press and other non-peer-reviewed references. Reducing freshwater consumption at coal-fired power plants can occur directly or indirectly. Direct approaches are aimed specifically at reducing water consumption, and they include dry cooling, dry bottom ash handling, low-water-consuming emissions-control technologies, water metering and monitoring, reclaiming water from in-plant operations (e.g., recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, reclaiming water from flue gas desulfurization [FGD] systems), and desalination. Some of the direct approaches, such as dry air cooling, desalination, and recovery of cooling tower water for boiler makeup water, are costly and are deployed primarily in countries with severe water shortages, such as China, Australia, and South Africa. Table 1 shows drivers and approaches for reducing freshwater consumption in several countries outside the United States. Indirect approaches reduce water consumption while meeting other objectives, such as improving plant efficiency. Plants with higher efficiencies use less energy to produce electricity, and because the greater the energy production, the greater the cooling water needs, increased efficiency will help reduce water consumption. Approaches for improving efficiency (and for indirectly reducing water consumption) include increasing the operating steam parameters (temperature and pressure); using more efficient coal-fired technologies such as cogeneration, IGCC, and direct firing of gas turbines with coal; replacing or retrofitting existing inefficient plants to make them more efficient; installing high-performance monitoring and process controls; and coal drying. The motivations for increasing power plant efficiency outside the United States (and indirectly reducing water consumption) include the following: (1) countries that agreed to reduce carbon emissions (by ratifying the Kyoto protocol) find that one of the most effective ways to do so is to improve plant efficiency; (2) countries that import fuel (e.g., Japan) need highly efficient plants to compensate for higher coal costs; (3) countries with particularly large and growing energy demands, such as China and India, need large, efficient plants; (4) countries with large supplies of low-rank coals, such as Germany, need efficient processes to use such low-energy coals. Some countries have policies that encourage or mandate reduced water consumption - either directly or indirectly. For example, the European Union encourages increased efficiency through its cogeneration directive, which requires member states to assess their

  12. GreenSlot: Scheduling Energy Consumption in Green Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GreenSlot: Scheduling Energy Consumption in Green Datacenters Íñigo Goiri UPC/BSC and Rutgers Univ grid (as a backup). GreenSlot predicts the amount of solar energy that will be available in the near future, and schedules the workload to maximize the green energy consumption while meet- ing the jobs

  13. Balancing Image Quality and Energy Consumption in Visual Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Vincent W. L.

    Balancing Image Quality and Energy Consumption in Visual Sensor Networks Kit-Yee Chow, King by hop through the sensor network. To reduce the energy used in transmission, the size of the images studies the tradeoff between image quality and energy consumption. We study the scenario that a number

  14. Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obraczka, Katia

    1 Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms Cintia B. Margi 1156 High Street Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract-- This paper approaches energy consumption charac- terization in mobile computing platforms by assessing energy con- sumption of "basic" application-level tasks

  15. MA STER'S THESIS Optimisation of fresh water consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patriksson, Michael

    MA STER'S THESIS Optimisation of fresh water consumption for Doggy AB using simulation Maja Olsson Göteborg Sweden 2005 #12;Thesis for the Degree of Master of Science Optimisation of fresh water consumption Göteborg 2005 #12;Abstract Doggy AB is the only Swedish producer of tinned pet food. In the food process

  16. Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

  17. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  18. Managing Power Consumption in Networks on Chips Tajana Simunic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Managing Power Consumption in Networks on Chips Tajana Simunic HP Labs & Stanford University 1501 power consumption for NOCs. Power management problem is formulated using closed-loop control concepts, with the estimator tracking changes in the system parameters and recalculating the new power management policy

  19. An Energy and Power Consumption Analysis of FPGA Routing Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilton, Steve

    An Energy and Power Consumption Analysis of FPGA Routing Architectures Peter Jamieson, Elec of energy and power consumption using an updated power estimation framework compatible with VPR 5.0. The goal of this research is to help FPGA vendors find the best FPGA architectures. Initially, we make some

  20. Hybrid Heuristics for Optimizing Energy Consumption in Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schott, René - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    Hybrid Heuristics for Optimizing Energy Consumption in Embedded Systems Maha IDRISSI AOUAD1 , Ren energy reduction becomes crucial for many embed- ded systems designers. In this paper, we propose Hybrid to BEH). Keywords: Energy consumption reduction, Genetic algorithms, hybrid heuristics, memory allocation

  1. Profiling, Prediction, and Capping of Power Consumption in Consolidated Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urgaonkar, Bhuvan

    . Trends from such platforms suggest that the power consumption in data centers accounts for 1Profiling, Prediction, and Capping of Power Consumption in Consolidated Environments Jeonghwan Choi Consolidation of workloads has emerged as a key mech- anism to dampen the rapidly growing energy expenditure

  2. Smoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    for autonomous demand side management within one house. The DRS devices are able to sense and control the peak energy consumption or demand. We assume that several appliances within one building access to oneSmoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid Shaojie Tang , Qiuyuan Huang

  3. Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Statistical Mechanics of Money, Income, Debt, and Energy Consumption Physics Colloquium Presented in financial markets. Globally, data analysis of energy consumption per capita around the world shows@american.edu Similarly to the probability distribution of energy in physics, the probability distribution of money among

  4. An Indirect Route for Ethanol Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eggeman, T.; Verser, D.; Weber, E.

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The ZeaChem indirect method is a radically new approach to producing fuel ethanol from renewable resources. Sugar and syngas processing platforms are combined in a novel way that allows all fractions of biomass feedstocks (e.g. carbohydrates, lignins, etc.) to contribute their energy directly into the ethanol product via fermentation and hydrogen based chemical process technologies. The goals of this project were: (1) Collect engineering data necessary for scale-up of the indirect route for ethanol production, and (2) Produce process and economic models to guide the development effort. Both goals were successfully accomplished. The projected economics of the Base Case developed in this work are comparable to today's corn based ethanol technology. Sensitivity analysis shows that significant improvements in economics for the indirect route would result if a biomass feedstock rather that starch hydrolyzate were used as the carbohydrate source. The energy ratio, defined as the ratio of green energy produced divided by the amount of fossil energy consumed, is projected to be 3.11 to 12.32 for the indirect route depending upon the details of implementation. Conventional technology has an energy ratio of 1.34, thus the indirect route will have a significant environmental advantage over today's technology. Energy savings of 7.48 trillion Btu/yr will result when 100 MMgal/yr (neat) of ethanol capacity via the indirect route is placed on-line by the year 2010.

  5. A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    's goal is to investigate the weekly per capita indoor water use of three households in Davis, CaliforniaA Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Borg, Edwards, Kimpel A Study of Individual Household Water Consumption Maisie Borg, Orion Edwards & Sarah Kimpel Abstract Over the past several decades

  6. ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrell, G.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6/yr Operating Cost $/ton ¢/10 6 Btu Selling Price 12% DCF$/ton ¢/10 6 Btu Production (Million Tons Per Year)ash, 3.38% sulfur, 12,821 Btu/lb **15,900 Btu/lb, 1% sulfur.

  7. Introducing Energy Performances in Production Management: Towards Energy Efficient Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Introducing Energy Performances in Production Management: Towards Energy Efficient Manufacturing.taisch}@polimi.it Abstract. Energy consumption is one of the main economic, environmental and societal issues. As stated by recent researches, manufacturing plays a major role in energy consumption. To react to this situation

  8. Home Energy Management: Products & Trends Janelle LaMarche, Katherine Cheney, Kurt Roth, and Olga Sachs, Fraunhofer Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    thermostats, and feedback devices seeking to manage residential energy consumption profiles to reduce peak. Residential energy consumption currently accounts for approximately 22% of the nation's total energy demand. This product class also includes various types of user interfaces providing energy consumption feedback

  9. Where are your BTUs? Watt are you doing about it?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    (1015 BTUs) EIA AER 2007 #12;YOUR BTU Consumption Rate USA P C it E C tiUSA Per Capita Energy Consumption 6.2% Drop EIA AER 2007 #12;More People, More Energy 350 USA Population Growth 1949-2007 250 300 #12;OUR BTU Consumption Rate USA E C tiUSA Energy Consumption EIA AER 2007 #12;You vs Your

  10. Industrial Productivity Assessment Or One of the Best Ways to Save Energy is to Find Ways to Produce More Product!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, D.

    The success of an energy program is often judged by measuring the change in energy consumption over time. It can be argued that a more valid method would measure the change in energy consumption per pound (or other unit) of product since this takes...

  11. A Glance at China’s Household Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shui, Bin

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Known for its scale, China is the most populous country with the world’s third largest economy. In the context of rising living standards, a relatively lower share of household consumption in its GDP, a strong domestic market and globalization, China is witnessing an unavoidable increase in household consumption, related energy consumption and carbon emissions. Chinese policy decision makers and researchers are well aware of these challenges and keen to promote green lifestyles. China has developed a series of energy policies and programs, and launched a wide?range social marketing activities to promote energy conservation.

  12. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products technical evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.; Sharp, L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the AMAX Research and Development Center are cooperating in the development of a Mild Gasification process that will rapidly devolatilize coals of all ranks at relatively low temperatures between 930{degree} and 1470{degree}F (500{degree}and 800{degree}C) and near atmospheric pressure to produce primary products that include a reactive char, a hydrocarbon condensate, and a low-Btu gas. These will be upgraded in a ``coal refinery`` system having the flexibility to optimize products based on market demand. Task 2 of the four-task development sequence primarily covered bench-scale testing on a 10-gram thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a 1 to 4-lb/hr continuous fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). Tests were performed to determine product yields and qualities for the two major test coals-one a high-sulfur bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin (Indiana No. 3) and the other a low-sulfur subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (Wyodak). Results from Task 3, on product upgrading tests performed by AMAX Research and Development (R&D), are also reported. Task 4 included the construction, operation of a Process Research Unit (PRU), and the upgrading of the products. An economic evaluation of a commercial facility was made, based on the data produced in the PRU, CFBR, and the physical cleaning steps.

  13. Development of an advanced, continuous mild gasification process for the production of co-products technical evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ness, R.O. Jr.; Runge, B.; Sharp, L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) and the AMAX Research and Development Center are cooperating in the development of a Mild Gasification process that will rapidly devolatilize coals of all ranks at relatively low temperatures between 930[degree] and 1470[degree]F (500[degree]and 800[degree]C) and near atmospheric pressure to produce primary products that include a reactive char, a hydrocarbon condensate, and a low-Btu gas. These will be upgraded in a coal refinery'' system having the flexibility to optimize products based on market demand. Task 2 of the four-task development sequence primarily covered bench-scale testing on a 10-gram thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and a 1 to 4-lb/hr continuous fluidized-bed reactor (CFBR). Tests were performed to determine product yields and qualities for the two major test coals-one a high-sulfur bituminous coal from the Illinois Basin (Indiana No. 3) and the other a low-sulfur subbituminous coal from the Powder River Basin (Wyodak). Results from Task 3, on product upgrading tests performed by AMAX Research and Development (R D), are also reported. Task 4 included the construction, operation of a Process Research Unit (PRU), and the upgrading of the products. An economic evaluation of a commercial facility was made, based on the data produced in the PRU, CFBR, and the physical cleaning steps.

  14. Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

  15. Air-Conditioning Effect Estimation for Mid-Term Forecasts of Tunisian Electricity Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Air-Conditioning Effect Estimation for Mid-Term Forecasts of Tunisian Electricity Consumption Tunisian electricity consumption (the residential sector represents 68% of this class of consumers). Nevertheless, with the Tunisian electricity consumption context, models elaborating which take account weather

  16. Impacts of Electric Vehicles on Primary Energy Consumption and Petroleum Displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Quanlu; Delucchi, Mark A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These studiesprojected electricity consumption EVs and theMPG) and EV electricity consumption (in Kwh per mile).weight of increases. 3.2. Electricity Consumption EVs of To

  17. Estimates of Energy Consumption by Building Type and End Use at U.S. Army Installations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, S.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Figure 5-5. 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by EndkWh/ft ) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Useof Total) 1993 Electricity Consumption Estimates by End Use

  18. A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    A regression approach to infer electricity consumption of legacy telecom equipment [Extended and communications technology accounts for a significant fraction of worldwide electricity consumption. Given inferring the electricity consumption of different components of the installed base of telecommu- nications

  19. Development of Energy Consumption Database Management System of Existing Large Public Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Y.; Zhang, J.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statistic data of energy consumption are the base of analyzing energy consumption. The scientific management method of energy consumption data and the development of database management system plays an important role in building energy...

  20. Energy Consumption, Efficiency, Conservation, and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in Japan's Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings Total energy consumption trends for the JapaneseFigure 9. Total energy consumption trends i n the JapaneseFigure 10. Energy consumption intensity trends i n Japanese

  1. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridley, David G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity, oil and coal consumption, offset by increasedsaved in electricity, oil and gas consumption, offset by 2.4energy consumption by fuel type. Natural gas, oil and some

  2. The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption References Bento,Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption UCI-ITS-WP-05-1 Thomason Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption Thomas F. Golob

  3. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China Nan Zhou,Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China* Nan Zhou, 1whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed

  4. Distributed Energy Consumption Control via Real-Time Pricing Feedback in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Kai; Hu, Guoqiang; Spanos, Costas J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on game- theoretic energy consumption scheduling for theK }). We denote the energy consumption of consumers as l kwhere l i k is the energy consumption of consumer i (i ? N )

  5. Monthly energy review, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains statistical information and data analysis of energy production and consumption within the major energy industries of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy and oil and gas resource development. Energy production during October 1993 totaled 5.5-quadrillion Btu, a 3.0 percent decrease from the level of production during October 1992. Coal production decreased 5.6 percent, petroleum production decreased 3.4 percent, and natural gas production increased 1.9 percent. All other forms of energy production combined were down 6.0 percent from the level of production during October 1992. Energy consumption during October 1993 totaled 6.7 quadrillion Btu, 0.9 percent above the level of consumption during October 1992. Natural gas consumption increased 6.5 percent, coal consumption rose 2.9 percent, and petroleum consumption was down 1.3 percent. Consumption of all other forms of energy combined decreased 5.5 percent from the level of 1 year earlier.

  6. 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of...

  7. TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Won Young

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    size on the market, which could also increase average energymarket will somewhat offset the increases in energy consumption that would otherwise be expected from increasing sales and screen sizes.

  8. METHODOLOGY AND APPLICATIONS IN IMPUTATION, FOOD CONSUMPTION AND OBESITY RESEARCH 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyureghian, Gayaneh

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Obesity is a rapidly growing public health threat as well as an economic problem in the United States. The recent changes in eating habits, especially the relative increase of food away from home (FAFH) consumption over ...

  9. Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

  10. Monitoring and optimization of energy consumption of base transceiver stations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spagnuolo, Antonio; Vetromile, Carmela; Formosi, Roberto; Lubritto, Carmine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and development of the mobile phone network has led to an increased demand for energy by the telecommunications sector, with a noticeable impact on the environment. Monitoring of energy consumption is a great tool for understanding how to better manage this consumption and find the best strategy to adopt in order to maximize reduction of unnecessary usage of electricity. This paper reports on a monitoring campaign performed on six Base Transceiver Stations (BSs) located central Italy, with different technology, typology and technical characteristics. The study focuses on monitoring energy consumption and environmental parameters (temperature, noise, and global radiation), linking energy consumption with the load of telephone traffic and with the air conditioning functions used to cool the transmission equipment. Moreover, using experimental data collected, it is shown, with a Monte Carlo simulation based on power saving features, how the BS monitored could save energy.

  11. Power Consumption Characterization of a Graphics Processing Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skadron, Kevin

    .......................................................... 1 ENERGY AMBIGUITY OF MODERN GRAPHICS PROCESSORS ................. 2 POWER CONSUMPTIONPower Consumption Characterization of a Graphics Processing Unit A Thesis in STS 402 Presented.....................................................................................................................VI CHAPTER ONE: THE NEED FOR A POWER CHARACTERIZATION............... 1 HISTORY OF GRAPHICS PROCESSORS

  12. Broad Initiatives/Sharp Focus- Cuts Electricity Consumption 15%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gialanella, V.

    Analysis of electrical consumption can payout in reduced energy costs. Continuous monitoring of electrical usage coupled with improvements and optimization in system(s) operations can have a favorable impact on annual operating expenditures. Further...

  13. Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Joseph Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy technologies, solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies hold significant potentialenergy consumption: Potential savings and environmental impact." Renewable andpotential new value stream from NEM solar is monetization of the renewable energy

  14. ,"New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:38:10 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNY2"...

  15. ,"New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:38:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNY2"...

  16. Fact #749: October 15, 2012 Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    map below shows the amount of petroleum and natural gas consumed in the transportation sector by state for 2010. The pie charts for each state are scaled based on total consumption...

  17. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Clouds, rain, thunderstorms… at Solar Decathlon Village? Oh my, you may say. But less-than-ideal weather conditions are no match for this year's teams, thanks to smart grid technology that is helping them monitor their energy consumption.

  18. Reducing 3G energy consumption on mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Shuo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 3G wireless interface is a significant contributor to battery drain on mobile devices. This paper describes the design, implementation, and experimental evaluation of methods to reduce the energy consumption of the 3G ...

  19. Efficiency alone as a solution to increasing energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haidorfer, Luke

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical analysis was performed to determine the effect of efficiency on the total US energy consumption of automobiles and refrigerators. Review of literature shows that there are many different opinions regarding ...

  20. Smoothing consumption across households and time : essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnan, Cynthia Georgia

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies two strategies that households may use to keep their consumption smooth in the face of fluctuations in income and expenses: credit (borrowing and savings) and insurance (state contingent transfers between ...

  1. Journal of Cleaner Production 13 (2005) 1931 www.elsevier.com/locate/jclepro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Daniel

    and products of service. Brake pads are true products of consumption, because they are released to biological be expec- ted to be increasingly used for cars. However, cars also contain some consumption parts polyethylene terephthalate (PET) [3]. Brake pads (syn- onym ``brake linings'') are polymer matrix composites

  2. China's Top-1000 Energy-Consuming Enterprises Program: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest Industrial Enterprises in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Lynn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring of Direct Energy Consumption in Long-Term2007. “Constraining Energy Consumption of China’s LargestProgram: Reducing Energy Consumption of the 1000 Largest

  3. Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Building Operations and Weather for a Medium-Size Office Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Liping

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in Energy Consumption Introduced by Buildingand actual building energy consumption can be attributed touncertainties in energy consumption due to actual weather

  4. The relationship between alcohol consumption and sexual activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theis-Cole, Deborah Elaine

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND SEXUAL ACTIVITY A Thesis By DEBORAH ELAINE THEIS-COLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Educational Psychology THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION AND SEXUAL ACTIVITY A Thesis By Deborah Elaine Theis-Cole Approved as to style and content by: Arthur . Roach (Chair of Committee) Maurice E...

  5. The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs Danish consumption and emissions, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The greenhouse gases HFCs, PFCs and SF6 Danish consumption and emissions, 2007 Tomas Sander Poulsen AND EMISSION OF F-GASES 7 1.1.1 Consumption 7 1.1.2 Emission 7 1.1.3 Trends in total GWP contribution from F 21 4 EMISSION OF F-GASES 23 4.1.1 Emissions of HFCs from refrigerants 23 4.1.2 Emissions of HFCs from

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear JanProduction 1980 198188,970

  7. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the...

  8. Demonstration of the potential for energy conservation in several food-processing plants. Final report, December 15, 1977-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okos, M.R.; Marks, J.S.; Baker, T.

    1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed energy audit was performed on an operating fluid milk plant with a 1979 production of 12.33 million gallons. Approximately 52% of the fuel energy was lost to inefficient boiler operation. About 40% of the electrical demand is from refrigeration compressors. A detailed evaluation was made of various energy saving options. The process heat requirements can be economically decreased to 8.4 billion Btu from the present 26.4 billion Btu's. Similarly it was found that 1.15 million kWh of electricity could be saved based on the 1979 consumption load. Using various heat recovery options, it was found, while maintaining the normal investment criterion, the boiler fuel requirement could be decreased to less than 1 billion Btu's per year.

  9. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changedenergy consumption has grown more rapidly than GDP in the last five years. If the recent trend

  10. Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patinkin, L.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

  11. An Update on Ethanol Production and Utilization in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thailand has continued to promote domestic biofuel utilization. Production and consumption of biofuel in Thailand have continued to increase at a fast rate due to aggressive policies of the Thai government in reducing foreign oil import and increasing domestic renewable energy utilization. This paper focuses on ethanol production and consumption, and the use of gasohol in Thailand. The paper is an update on the previous paper--Biofuel Infrastructure Development and Utilization in Thailand--in August 2008.

  12. A new route for energy efficiency diagnosis and potential analysis of energy consumption from air-conditioning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma,R.J.; Yu,N.Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 A new route for energy efficiency diagnosis and potential analysis of energy consumption from air-conditioning system Rong-Jiang Ma Nan-Yang Yu PhD candidate Professor School of Mechanical Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong... in buildings is to save energy without compromising comfort, health and productivity levels. In other words, the idea is to consume less energy while providing equal or improved building services, that is, being more energy efficient (Pérez-Lombard et al...

  13. A Rational Approach to Improving Productivity in Recombinant Pichia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    A Rational Approach to Improving Productivity in Recombinant Pichia pastoris Fermentation Marc C. d the implementation of a rational, model-based approach to improve process productivity. A set of glyc- erol methanol consumption rate, the specific recombinant protein for- mation rate, and the productivity based

  14. Photon Consumption in Minihalos during Cosmological Reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Haiman; Tom Abel; Piero Madau

    2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    At the earliest epochs of structure formation in cold dark matter (CDM) cosmologies, the smallest nonlinear objects are the numerous small halos that condense with virial temperatures below 10,000 K. Such ``minihalos'' are not yet resolved in large-scale three-dimensional cosmological simulations. Here we employ a semi-analytic method, combined with three-dimensional simulations of individual minihalos, to examine their importance during cosmological reionization. We show that, depending on when reionization takes place, they potentially play an important role as sinks of ionizing radiation. If reionization occurs at sufficiently high redshifts (z_r > 20), the intergalactic medium is heated to 10,000 K and most minihalos never form. On the other hand, if z_r 10 percent) of all baryons have already collapsed into minihalos, and are subsequently removed from the halos by photoevaporation as the ionizing background flux builds up. We show that this process can require a significant budget of ionizing photons; exceeding the production by a straightforward extrapolation back in time of known quasar and galaxy populations by a factor of up to 10 and 3, respectively.

  15. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  16. Energy and materials flows in the iron and steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sparrow, F.T.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past energy-consumption trends and future energy-conservation opportunities are investigated for the nation's iron and steel industry. It is estimated that, in 1980, the industry directly consumed approximately 2.46 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy (roughly 3% of total US energy consumption) to produce 111 million tons of raw steel and to ship 84 million tons of steel products. Direct plus indirect consumption is estimated to be about 3.1 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. Of the set of conservation technologies identified, most are judged to be ready for commercialization if and when the industry's capital formation and profitability problems are solved and the gradual predicted increase in energy prices reduces the payback periods to acceptable levels.

  17. Energy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefèvre, Laurent

    Energy Consumption Library Data Acquisition Tool Data Monitoring Tool Energy Profiler 3 ConclusionsEnergy Consumption Tools Pack Leandro Fontoura Cupertino, Georges DaCosta, Amal Sayah, Jean Consumption Tools Pack 1 / 23 #12;Outline 1 Introduction Motivation Our proposal 2 Energy Consumption Tools

  18. Demonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the sources of consumption. Automated monitoring of the electricity consumption in a house is quite a recent or numbers, but simply alert residents that something relevant to their electricity consumption is chang- ingDemonstration Of A Monitoring Lamp To Visualize The Energy Consumption In Houses Christophe Gisler1

  19. Optimal and Autonomous Incentive-based Energy Consumption Scheduling Algorithm for Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    consumption scheduling (ECS) devices in smart meters for autonomous demand side management within equipment [3]. Load management, also known as demand side manage- ment [4]­[6], has been practiced since consumption management in buildings: reducing consumption and shifting consumption [2]. The former can be done

  20. uFLIP: Understanding the Energy Consumption of Flash Devices Matias Bjrling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    uFLIP: Understanding the Energy Consumption of Flash Devices Matias Bjørling IT University Abstract Understanding the energy consumption of flash devices is important for two reasons. First, energy about the energy consumption of flash devices beyond their approximate aggregate consumption (low power

  1. A Measurement-Based Model of Energy Consumption for PLC Modems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Measurement-Based Model of Energy Consumption for PLC Modems Wafae Bakkali(,§), Mohamed Tlich- ysis of the energy consumption of commercial broadband PLC modems is reported. Energy consumption that quantifies the energy consumption associated to Ethernet frames and PLC Physical Blocks (PBs) processing

  2. Mixed-Criticality Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems: Energy Consumption vs Deadline Misses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mixed-Criticality Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems: Energy Consumption vs Deadline Misses Vincent that using the best compromise, the energy consumption can be reduced up to 17% while the percentage the energy consumption of MC systems. The energy consumption of embedded real-time systems is indeed

  3. Balancing Peer and Server Energy Consumption in Large Peer-to-Peer File Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Lachlan

    Balancing Peer and Server Energy Consumption in Large Peer-to-Peer File Distribution Systems}@swin.edu.au Abstract--Network induced energy consumption is a significant fraction of all ICT energy consumption. It is shown that using peer-to-peer and naively minimizing the transfer time results in energy consumption

  4. International energy annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  5. Scrap-tire consumption in New England and New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barad, A.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of scrap tires is one facet of the current solid waste dilemma that is currently receiving an increasing amount of attention in the northeast. Above-ground disposal in tire stockpiles has become a common phenomenon. One way to avoid continued stockpiling of scrap tires, and to reduce the number and size of existing piles, is to find ways to consume the tires. The economics of scrap tire consumption in the region has not yet been examined in great detail. The main goal of the paper is to describe the current pattern of scrap tire use and disposal in New England and New Jersey, and the changes expected in the near future. In the course of this description, various economic, regulatory and other factors emerge as significant forces shaping the consumption and disposal pattern. The concluding sections of the paper highlight some of these factors and identify policy options available to increase scrap tire consumption in the region.

  6. Estimation of food consumption. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  7. Illinois Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (MillionTotal Consumption

  8. Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (MillionTotal ConsumptionYear

  9. Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal Consumption (MillionTotal ConsumptionYearYear

  10. Effect of standard of living on energy consumption and the CO{sub 2} greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung-Yee Shu [Hung Kuang Inst. of Nursing and Medical Technology, Taichung (Taiwan, Province of China); Ming-Chin Chang; Shaw, H. [New Jersey Inst. of Technology, Newark, NJ (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Per capita energy growth patterns were lumped into 6 global regions of similar sociopolitical background, and used to project the rate of growth of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The 6 key global regions specifically considered were: (1) North America (U.S. and Canada) [NA], (2) Middle East (North Africa and Persian Gulf States) [ME], (3) Commonwealth of Independent States and Eastern Europe [CISEE], (4) China and other centrally planned Asiatic economies [CPAE], (5) Industrialized Countries (including Western Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, Japan, and South Africa) [IC], (6) Less Developed Countries (including all of South and Central America, Central Africa, and the rest of Asia) [LDC]. LDC population will grow 2.7 times from 50 to 67% of world population from 1990 to 2100. Over the same period, world population will grow from 5.2 to 11.9 billion people, and energy use from 15 to 60 TW. LDC energy use will grow disproportionately faster from 20 to 40%, and that in IC will slow from 30 to 22% of world energy. Data on the gross domestic product (GDP) from the World Bank were used as surrogates for standard of living (SOL) to relate world energy consumption with SOL. Per capita energy consumption varied linearly with per capita GDP for the LDC, but was independent of GDP for IC. The per capita energy consumption was multiplied by the population to project the total world energy consumption. We projected that non-fossil energy sources consisting mostly of nuclear energy will overtake fossil energy consisting mostly of coal derived products in the year 2075. The growth of CO{sub 2} emissions from 6 to 18.2 GtC/a will result in an average global temperature increase of 3{degrees}C due to this source only. However, CO{sub 2} is only about half the problem. When all infrared absorbing gases are considered, an average increase of 5.6 {degrees}C is projected for 2100. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation sector energy demand Growth in transportation energy consumption flat across projection figure data The transportation sector consumes 27.1 quadrillion Btu of energy...

  12. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,1876.378052,1886.589233,1896.617065,1906.307617,1915.627686,1924.664062,1933.551636 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.73735809,...

  13. Annual Energy Outlook 2012

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Reference case Table A5. Commercial sector key indicators and consumption (quadrillion Btu per year, unless...

  14. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,96.27132416,97.48834229,98.7328186,100.0090332,101.3084106,102.6172562,103.9295502 " Energy Consumption Intensity" " (thousand Btu per square foot)" " Delivered Energy...

  15. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,96.26745605,97.52584839,98.82666779,100.167244,101.5404816,102.9384232,104.3544464 " Energy Consumption Intensity" " (thousand Btu per square foot)" " Delivered Energy...

  16. Report: An Updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,1876.765991,1887.016235,1897.062622,1906.736938,1916.007446,1924.966064,1933.756714 " Energy Intensity" " (million Btu per household)" " Delivered Energy Consumption",95.73736572,...

  17. Appendix A

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7. Renewable energy consumption by sector and source (quadrillion Btu) Sector and source Reference case Annual growth 2012-2040 (percent) 2011 2012 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040...

  18. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  19. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other...

  20. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    item/1pz2528w If energy consumption data are not availablewith both energy consumption data (in kWh or kBtu) andaffects energy consumption, and use occupant data to

  1. MARINE BIOMASS SYSTEM: ANAEROBIC DIGESTION AND PRODUCTION OF METHANE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Kendall F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge Processing Gas Scrubber Intermediate BTU Gas (System) 3 TPD 55.779 TPD I Scrubber H2 0 = 48 T Waste SludgeSystem Solids 28.11T (To Scrubber) 48 TPD) Fluidized Bed

  2. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricity Generation (1015BTU)Electricity Generation and Capacity for Po'". :cr Plant Typeelectricity generation energy will form the major por- tion of water requirements Since coast, almost all the power for future plants

  3. Modeling Hard-Disk Power Consumption John Zedlewski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    of a note- book computer with a powerful lithium-ion battery, these levels of energy consumption are quite-30% of the overall power drain [4]. In an MP3 player running on AAA batteries, on the other hand, every Joule

  4. Vending Machine Energy Consumption and VendingMiser Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritter, J.; Hugghins, J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an effort to decrease the amount of non-critical energy used on the Texas A&M campus, and to assist Dixie Narco in evaluating the efficiency of their vending machines, the Texas A&M Energy Systems Laboratory investigated the power consumption...

  5. annual energy consumption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy consumption First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Sample Annual and Monthly Energy...

  6. assess energy consumption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assess energy consumption First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The Analysis and Assessment...

  7. Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    Visible Inequality, Status Competition and Conspicuous Consumption: Evidence from India Punarjit representative micro data from India. I ...nd that a decrease in the level of visible inequality, ceteris paribus in one's social status due to parallel action of others. From a policy perspective, my ...ndings

  8. Self Control, Revealed Preference and Consumption Choice Wolfgang Pesendorfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the behavior generated by the time-inconsistency approach but, unlike time-inconsistent models, allows for self-controlSelf Control, Revealed Preference and Consumption Choice Faruk Gul and Wolfgang Pesendorfer Princeton University November 2002 Abstract We provide a time consistent model that addresses the preference

  9. The Impact on Energy Consumption of Daylight Saving Clock Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Simon I.

    The Impact on Energy Consumption of Daylight Saving Clock Changes S. I. Hilla, , F. Desobrya , E. W demonstrating po- tential energy savings which could be obtained were Great Britain to maintain Daylight Savings result from an extension of Daylight Saving Time (DST) over the months currently on Greenwich Mean Time

  10. Energino: a Hardware and Software Solution for Energy Consumption Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ­aware and energy­efficient protocols and algorithms for wireless networks. However, there is considerable dearth for designing energy efficient network protocols and architectures for broadband wireless access networks efficient protocols and algorithms for wireless networks. Nevertheless, energy consumption models used

  11. Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    decisions by offering design requirements and establishing building codes. Over the last decade, muchPreliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use

  12. Survey: Techniques for Efficient energy consumption in Mobile Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Survey: Techniques for Efficient energy consumption in Mobile Architectures Sean Maloney University@cs.ucsb.edu March 16th, 2012 Abstract As the world becomes more dependent on mobile technologies, battery life battery life is a delicate balance of give and take between longer battery life and more functionality

  13. How Efficient Can We Be?: Bounds on Algorithm Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    How Efficient Can We Be?: Bounds on Algorithm Energy Consumption Andrew Gearhart #12;Relation design use feedback to "cotune" compute kernel energy efficiency #12;Previous Work: Communication Lower-optimal" algorithms #12;Communication is energy inefficient! · On-chip/Off-chip gap isn't going to improve much Data

  14. BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    BURNING BURIED SUNSHINE: HUMAN CONSUMPTION OF ANCIENT SOLAR ENERGY JEFFREY S. DUKES Department of as a vast store of solar energy from which society meets >80% of its current energy needs. Here, using of ancient solar energy decline, humans are likely to use an increasing share of modern solar resources. I

  15. Constant Sustainable Consumption Rate in Optimal Growth with Exhaustible Resources*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    's criterion of maximum sustainable consumption rate, previously formulated as a minimum-resource-extraction or not the constant unit resource extraction cost vanishes. The related problem of maximizing the terminal capital appetite for the earth's finite stock of nonrenew- able resources, such as fossil fuel and minerals, have

  16. Evolutionary Tuning of Building Models to Monthly Electrical Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    % of the world's primary energy and contributes 21% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions (DOE Buildings Data Book 2011). The largest sector of energy consumption is the ~119 million buildings in the US which New, PhD Theodore Chandler Member ASHRAE ABSTRACT Building energy models of existing buildings

  17. World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 2050

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -U" relation with a within- sample peak between carbon dioxide emissions (and energy use) per capita and perWorld Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 Ñ 2050 Richard Schmalensee, Thomas M capita income. Using the income and population growth assumptions of the Intergovernmental Panel

  18. Optimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    properties of the battery under bursty discharge conditions are exploited. In this paper, we exploitOptimal Allocation of Bandwidth for Minimum Battery Consumption Qinghua Zhao, Pamela C. Cosman, a power amplifier utilizes battery energy more efficiently with a higher transmission power. For a given

  19. November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    and district heating scheme* data. Year Energy Consumption (KWh) Percentage Change 2005/06 65,916,243 N/A 2006 buildings are connected to the Nottingham District Heating Scheme. This service meets all the heating requirements by combusting municipal waste to produce hot water. The process significantly saves carbon

  20. A method for evaluating transport energy consumption in suburban areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marique, Anne-Francoise, E-mail: afmarique@ulg.ac.be; Reiter, Sigrid, E-mail: Sigrid.Reiter@ulg.ac.be

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban sprawl is a major issue for sustainable development. It represents a significant contribution to energy consumption of a territory especially due to transportation requirements. However, transport energy consumption is rarely taken into account when the sustainability of suburban structures is studied. In this context, the paper presents a method to estimate transport energy consumption in residential suburban areas. The study aimed, on this basis, at highlighting the most efficient strategies needed to promote awareness and to give practical hints on how to reduce transport energy consumption linked to urban sprawl in existing and future suburban neighborhoods. The method uses data collected by using empirical surveys and GIS. An application of this method is presented concerning the comparison of four suburban districts located in Belgium to demonstrate the advantages of the approach. The influence of several parameters, such as distance to work places and services, use of public transport and performance of the vehicles, are then discussed to allow a range of different development situations to be explored. The results of the case studies highlight that traveled distances, and thus a good mix between activities at the living area scale, are of primordial importance for the energy performance, whereas means of transport used is only of little impact. Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work give also significant energy savings. The method can be used when planning new areas or retrofitting existing ones, as well as promoting more sustainable lifestyles regarding transport habits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method allows to assess transport energy consumption in suburban areas and highlight the best strategies to reduce it. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Home-to-work travels represent the most important part of calculated transport energy consumption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy savings can be achieved by reducing distances to travel through a good mix between activities at the local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of transport used in only of little impact in the studied suburban neighborhoods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Improving the performance of the vehicles and favoring home-work can significant energy savings.

  1. A New Approach to Optimizing Fired Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Optimizing the heater operation will prolong heater life and reduce NOx emissions. INTRODUCTION Petroleum Refining is the most energy intensive industry in the USA and accounts for 7.5% of the total energy consumption in the country. Energy... in the refining industry is around 7.1 Quadrillion Btu/year. Petroleum refining relies heavily on refining by- products as energy sources. About 6% of the petroleum is used as fuel. The situation is very similar in the Petrochemical and Fertilizer Industry...

  2. Millisecond Oxidation of Alkanes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This factsheet describes a project whose goal is to commercialize a production process for propylene and acrylic acid from propane using a catalytic auto-thermal oxydehydrogenation process operating at short contact times. Auto-thermal oxidation for conversion of propane to propylene and acrylic acid promises energy savings of 20 trillion Btu per year by 2020. In addition to reducing energy consumption, this technology can reduce manufacturing costs by up to 25 percent, and reduce a variety of greenhouse gas emissions.

  3. Reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda A. (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application that include: beginning, by each compute node, performance of a blocking operation specified by the parallel application, each compute node beginning the blocking operation asynchronously with respect to the other compute nodes; reducing, for each compute node, power to one or more hardware components of that compute node in response to that compute node beginning the performance of the blocking operation; and restoring, for each compute node, the power to the hardware components having power reduced in response to all of the compute nodes beginning the performance of the blocking operation.

  4. Reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Peters, Amanda E. (Cambridge, MA); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian E. (Rochester, MN)

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption while synchronizing a plurality of compute nodes during execution of a parallel application that include: beginning, by each compute node, performance of a blocking operation specified by the parallel application, each compute node beginning the blocking operation asynchronously with respect to the other compute nodes; reducing, for each compute node, power to one or more hardware components of that compute node in response to that compute node beginning the performance of the blocking operation; and restoring, for each compute node, the power to the hardware components having power reduced in response to all of the compute nodes beginning the performance of the blocking operation.

  5. Reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Peters, Amanda E.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for reducing power consumption during execution of an application on a plurality of compute nodes that include: powering up, during compute node initialization, only a portion of computer memory of the compute node, including configuring an operating system for the compute node in the powered up portion of computer memory; receiving, by the operating system, an instruction to load an application for execution; allocating, by the operating system, additional portions of computer memory to the application for use during execution; powering up the additional portions of computer memory allocated for use by the application during execution; and loading, by the operating system, the application into the powered up additional portions of computer memory.

  6. A work bibliography on native food consumption, demography and lifestyle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C.E.; Lee, W.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to provide a bibliography for the Native American tribe participants in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project to use. The HEDR Project's primary objective is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals could have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Eight Native American tribes are responsible for estimating daily and seasonal consumption of traditional foods, demography, and other lifestyle factors that could have affected the radiation dose received by tribal members. This report provides a bibliography of recorded accounts that tribal researchers may use to verify their estimates. The bibliographic citations include references to information on the specific tribes, Columbia River plateau ethnobotany, infant feeding practices and milk consumption, nutritional studies and radiation, tribal economic and demographic characteristics (1940--1970), research methods, primary sources from the National Archives, regional archives, libraries, and museums.

  7. Changing Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages and Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in energy consumption. Patterns of Consumption--Historic Trends Electricity & Gas We'll start with historicChanging Trends: A Brief History of the US Household Consumption of Energy, Water, Food, Beverages analysis of consumption patterns of different commodities in the U.S. shed light on the consumption

  8. To appear in: Mobile Networks and Applications 0 (2000) ?{? 1 An Energy-consumption Model for Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To appear in: Mobile Networks and Applications 0 (2000) ?{? 1 An Energy-consumption Model consumption behavior of a mobile ad hoc network. The model was used to examine the energy consumption of two. Keywords: mobile ad hoc networks, routing, energy consumption 1. Introduction Energy consumption

  9. State energy data report: Consumption estimates, 1960--1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The State Energy Data Report presents estimates of annual energy consumption at the state and national levels by major economic sector and by principal energy type for 1960 through 1987. Included in the report are documentation describing how the estimates were made for each energy source, sources of all input data, and a summary of changes from the State Energy Data Report published in April 1988.

  10. Recirculation of Factory Heat and Air to Reduce Energy Consumption 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiel, G. R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ---- -- - ------ RECIRCULATION OF FACTORY HEAT AND AIR TO REDUCE ENERGY CONSUMPTION Gregory R. Thiel Eltron Mfg. Inc. Fort Thomas, KY. ABSTRACT Two methods for achieving substantial energy savings through recirculation techniques are discussed... challenging conditions: Because they are constructed to op erate "dripping wet", Eltron' s pro prietary "Conductive Precipitate" models can resume normal air clean ing operation immediately after each water washing cycle. They are the only...

  11. North Carolina Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawalsElements)Total Consumption (Million

  12. Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D.; Khan, S.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing washability data on trace elements in Illinois coals were generated using float-sink methods, which are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on product (as-shipped) coals from modern preparation plants. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability (release analysis) data on as-shipped Illinois coals using a froth flotation/release analysis (FF/RA) procedure. The results generated by this project will promote industrial utilization of Illinois coals and help assess the effect of new environmental requirements on the use of these coals in utility steam generation. During the third quarter, preparation and submission of all samples for chemical analysis were completed. Analyses of the samples produced by cleaning 34 as-shipped coals using FF/RA were completed for ash, moisture, S, heating value (BTU), and F, and some for Mn and oxide composition. The rest of the analytical work is in progress. The analytical data are being used to evaluate removal of ash, S, and trace elements from the as-shipped coals at the chosen flotation conditions and particles sizes. Available data on the FF/RA of five as-shipped coals at {minus}100, {minus}200, {minus}400 mesh sizes indicate that ash and F rejections increase with decreasing particle size. For the {minus}400 mesh tests, 70--90% of the ash and 35--74% of F were rejected at a BTU or combustibles recovery of 80%. One of the as-shipped coals was previously subjected to FF/RA tests at {minus}100 and {minus}400 mesh sizes to investigate mass balances achievable for the procedure. Preliminary results on ash and F contents of complete set of flotation products from the two tests indicate a mass balance of 95 to 100%.

  13. Models for estimation of car fuel consumption in urban traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, D.C.; Akcelik

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes four fuel-consumption models. The models are interrelated and form part of the same modeling framework. A simpler model is derived from a more complicated model keeping the vehicle characteristic such as mass, drag function, and energy efficiency as explicit parameters at all model levels. Because vehicle characteristics are likely to change over time and from country to country, this is a particularly useful model property. For simplicity here, only the instantaneous fuel-consumption model is described in any detail. However, because of the derivation procedure, many of the features and properties of this model are present in the more aggregate models. Easy-to-use functions and graphs are given for the more aggregate models based on a ''default car'' in urban driving conditions. All parameters related to the speed profile and driving environment were calibrated using on-road data collected in Sydney, Australia. Use of the models is illustrated by estimating the fuel consumption for the microtrip.

  14. Fuel consumption prediction methodology for early stages of naval ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gheriani, Eran (Eran Y.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, fuel consumption has increased in importance as a design parameter in Navy ships. Economical fuel consumption is important not only for operating cost measures but also for ship endurance tankage requirements. ...

  15. Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline Engine Equipped with a Lean-NOx Trap Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline...

  16. Experimental study of lube oil characteristics in the PCV system and effects on engine oil consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Oscar, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engine oil consumption is an important source of hydrocarbon and particulate emissions in modem automobile engines. Great efforts have been made by automotive manufacturers to minimize the impact of oil consumption on ...

  17. Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus Emissions and Fuel Consumption Test Results from a Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Bus 2010 DOE Vehicle...

  18. Energy for 500 Million Homes: Drivers and Outlook for Residential Energy Consumption in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of primary energy, not including biomass fuels which areResidential Energy Consumption by Fuel (with Biomass) FigurePrimay Energy Consumption by Fuel (without Biomass) 8 of 17

  19. Global Forest Products Trade by Ed Pepke, EFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change policies: escalation of wood energy production, consumption and trade 3. Globalization of forest, 22 June 2011 Ed.Pepke@efi.int 1 Global forest products market trends by Dr. Ed Pepke Senior Timber European Forest Institute Contents I. Introduction II. Global market drivers III. Global trade trends IV

  20. One of These Homes is Not Like the Other: Residential Energy Consumption Variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelsven, Phillip

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior patterns in which American households use energy causes wide variations in total residential energy consumption per home,

  1. Use of advanced cluster analysis to characterize seafood consumption patterns and methyle mercury exposures among

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the central nervous system (Alessandri et al., 2004). At the same time, fish consumption is also the primary

  2. Relationship between Heavy Vehicle Speed Limit and Fleet Fuel Consumption on Minor Roads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, G.; Morrison, G.; Midgley, W.; Cebon, D.

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    e s/M in ) Link Data Calibrated Model 13 3. Fuel Consumption Model Figure 7 outlines the basic structure of the fuel consumption model. Figure 7: General flow diagram of the fuel consumption model. Energy Consumption Model The energy... flow rates tend to be low. As traffic approaches bound flow (at the top of the chart), vehicle interactions increase and faster fleet vehicles begin to platoon behind the slowest vehicles. The extent to which traffic is slowed depends on the speeds...

  3. A High-Fidelity Energy Monitoring and Feedback Architecture for Reducing Electrical Consumption in Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Xiaofan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption, typical load (power) profile, and time spent inby plug-load meters provides detailed power profiles of

  4. Hybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application to Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    implemented in Canada, what would be the response of the industrial sector in terms of energy consumptionHybrid modeling of industrial energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions with an application for modeling industrial energy consumption, among them a series of environmental and security externalities

  5. Power consumption modeling in optical multilayer Ward Van Heddeghem, Filip Idzikowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    , Germany Abstract -- The evaluation and reduction of energy consumption of backbone telecommunication% of power over a non-bypass scenario. Keywords -- Green ICT, energy-efficiency, power consumption, core for policy makers to assess the importance of ICT power consumption in comparison to other sectors

  6. Balancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    at the Census block group level for 2005 3. Energy consumption data from 2005 Census Mesic Landscaping XericBalancing Energy and Water Consumption in an Urban Desert Environment: A Case Study on Phoenix, AZ effect, water scarcity, and energy consumption. The transformation of native landscapes into built

  7. Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data Kay Cao applies the system of equations approach to energy consumption modelling using the ABS 2008-09 Energy of equations, energy consumption modelling, elasticity of substitution JEL codes: C51, D24 * Please do

  8. Energy Consumption in Data Analysis for On-board and Distributed Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kargupta, Hilol

    Energy Consumption in Data Analysis for On-board and Distributed Applications Ruchita Bhargava Energy consumption is an important issue in the growing number of data mining and machine learning of the energy consumption characteristics of dif- ferent data analysis techniques. The paper com- pares

  9. A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based on Large Datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Parallel Statistical Learning Approach to the Prediction of Building Energy Consumption Based consumption of buildings based on historical performances is an important approach to achieve energy efficiency. A simulation method is here introduced to obtain sufficient clean historical consumption data

  10. Models for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    ; Energy consumption; Data collection; Neural networks; Dynamic models; Statics; Water treatment plants. Author keywords: Wastewater pump models; Energy consumption; Pump energy; Data mining; Head influenceModels for Optimization of Energy Consumption of Pumps in a Wastewater Processing Plant Zijun Zhang

  11. Modelling Business Energy Consumption using Agent-based Simulation Modelling Jason Wong and Kay Cao1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to develop a prototype agent based simulation model for business energy consumption, using data from the 2008 presents a framework of the model for estimating business energy consumption. Section V discusses the dataModelling Business Energy Consumption using Agent-based Simulation Modelling Jason Wong and Kay Cao

  12. EnergyBox: A Trace-driven Tool for Data Transmission Energy Consumption Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EnergyBox: A Trace-driven Tool for Data Transmission Energy Consumption Studies Ekhiotz Jon VergaraFi transmissions at the user end. We recognize that the energy consumption of data transmission is highly. EnergyBox enables efficient energy consumption studies using real data, which com- plements the device

  13. Analyzing the Impact of Useless Write-Backs on the Endurance and Energy Consumption of PCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youtao

    . This can reduce the static power consumption to negligible levels. The energy required to read data fromAnalyzing the Impact of Useless Write-Backs on the Endurance and Energy Consumption of PCM Main-effective and energy-efficient alternative to traditional DRAM main memory. Due to the high energy consumption

  14. MIND: A Black-Box Energy Consumption Model for Disk Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    consumption is becoming a growing concern in data centers. Many energy-conservation techniques have beenMIND: A Black-Box Energy Consumption Model for Disk Arrays Zhuo Liu1,2 , Jian Zhou1 , Weikuan Yu2 with power conservation techniques. Accurate energy consumption and performance statistics are then collected

  15. Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galef Jr., Bennett G.

    Research Report Effects of ethanol consumption by adult female rats on subsequent consumption January 2004 Abstract We used a two-bottle choice test to measure voluntary ethanol consumption by adolescent rats that had lived with ethanol-consuming or water-consuming adult conspecifics. We found

  16. Forecast of the electricity consumption by aggregation of specialized experts; application to Slovakian and French

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forecast of the electricity consumption by aggregation of specialized experts; application-term forecast of electricity consumption based on ensemble methods. That is, we use several possibly independent´erieure and CNRS. hal-00484940,version1-19May2010 #12;Forecast of the electricity consumption by aggregation

  17. Domestic electricity consumption is con-tinuously increasing and now accounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domestic electricity consumption is con- tinuously increasing and now accounts for about one third") enable detailed electricity consumption infor- mation to be captured, processed, and communicated electricity consumption infor- mation in real-time, enabling occupants to better understand their electricity

  18. Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps -Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    Prediction of Electric Load using Kohonen Maps - Application to the Polish Electricity Consumption on Kohonen maps is proposed. This method is applied to the prediction of the Polish electricity consumption of the electric load is specific. For each day, we have 24 values (or more) of the electricity consumption

  19. Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politécnica de Madrid, Universidad

    Safe Upper-bounds Inference of Energy Consumption for Java Bytecode Applications (Extended Abstract relying on autonomous on-board data analysis. Intermediate Representation Resource Usage Analysis Energy- mize energy consumption. Several approaches have been developed for estimating the en- ergy consumption

  20. The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , when attributed on a consumption basis, California's per capita emissions are over 25 percent higherThe CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions: A Multi-Regional Input-Output (MRIO) Approach: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The CO2 Content of Consumption Across US Regions