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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Definition: Petroleum coke | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

coke coke Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Petroleum coke A residue high in carbon content and low in hydrogen that is the final product of thermal decomposition in the condensation process in cracking (breaking of carbon-carbon bonds). This product is reported as marketable coke or catalyst coke.Coke from petroleum has a heating value of 6.024 million Btu per barrel.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Petroleum coke (often abbreviated Pet coke or petcoke) is a carbonaceous solid derived from oil refinery coker units or other cracking processes. Other coke has traditionally been derived from coal. This coke can either be fuel grade (high in sulphur and metals) or anode grade (low in sulphur and metals). The raw coke directly out of the coker is often

2

Experimental Study on Co-gasification of Coal Liquefaction Residue and Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study on co-gasification of coal liquefaction residue and petroleum coke in carbon dioxide was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The temperature of the experiment was 1173–1323 K, and the isothermal (1273 K) kinetics were ...

Xin Liu; Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Zheng-hua Dai; Fu-chen Wang

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

An active carbon catalyst prevents coke formation from asphaltenes during the hydrocracking of vacuum residue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Active carbons were prepared by the steam activation of a brown coal char. The active carbon with mesopores showed greater adsorption selectivity for asphaltenes. The active carbon was effective at suppressing coke formation, even with the high hydrocracking conversion of vacuum residue. The analysis of the change in the composition of saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes in the cracked residue with conversion demonstrated the ability of active carbon to restrict the transformation of asphaltenes to coke. The active carbon that was richer in mesopores was presumably more effective at providing adsorption sites for the hydrocarbon free-radicals generated initially during thermal cracking to prevent them from coupling and polycondensing.

Fukuyama, H.; Terai, S. [Toyo Engineering Corp., Chiba (Japan). Technological Research Center

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dale Coke: Coke Farm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dale Coke Photo by Benjamin J. Myers.2009. Coke FarmDale Coke grew up on an apricot orchard in California’s

Farmer, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method for producing low and medium BTU gas from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for producing low and medium BTU gas from carbonizable material is described which comprises: partly devolatizing the material and forming hot incandescent coke therefrom by passing a bed of the same part way through a hot furnace chamber on a first horizontally moving grate while supplying a sub-stoichiometric quantity of air to the same and driving the reactions: C + O/sub 2/ = CO/sub 2/; 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO discharging the hot incandescent coke from the end of the first grate run onto a second horizontally moving grate run below the first grate run in the same furnace chamber so as to form a bed thereon, the bed formed on the second grate run being considerably thicker than the bed formed on the first grate run, passing the hot incandescent coke bed on the second grate run further through the furnace chamber in a substantially horizontal direction while feeding air and stream thereto so as to fully burn the coke and in ratio of steam to air driving the following reactions: 2C + O/sub 2/ = 2CO; C + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO; C + 2H/sub 2/O = 2H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/; CO + H/sub 2/O = H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ taking off the ash residue of the burned coke and taking off the gaseous products of the reactions.

Mansfield, V.; Francoeur, C.M.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

6

coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

coking coal [A caking coal suitable for the production of coke for metallurgical use] ? Kokskohle f, verkokbare Kohle

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Coke Gasification - A Solution to Excess Coke Capacity and High Energy Costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effectively to produce medium-Btu (300 Btu/scf) gas which, in turn, can fuel the refinery furnaces to replace natural gas. Coke gasification should prove economical with natural gas price decontrol and the average price projected to rise to over $14.0 per...

Patel, S. S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Study of the sulphur in coal and its distribution between the gases and the residue in coking.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sulphur exists in metallurgical coke as a source of annoyance and difficulties in the economic progress of the metal industries. It ie present in coal… (more)

Wenger, Arthur W.

1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

BTU Accounting for Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

convert utility bills to BTUs? All fuels can be measured in terms of BTU content. Natural gas has a million BTUs per thousand cubic feet; propane - 92,000 BTUs per gallon; fuel oil - 140,000 BTUs per gallon; electricity - 3,413 BTUs per KW hour... BTU ACCOUNTING FOR INDUSTRY Robert O. Redd-CPA Seidman & Seidman Grand Rapids, Michigan Today, as never before, American industry needs to identify and control their most criti cal resources. One of these is energy. In 1973 and again in 1976...

Redd, R. O.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Coking properties of perhydrous low-rank vitrains. Influence of pyrolysis conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generally lead to increased coking potential of coals characterised in the resulting cokes by large sizes equivalent to natural coking coals, since the cokes from these residues are always made of smaller MOD than those obtained for coking coals. For comparison, a similar characterisation, carried out

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

11

Chemicals from Coal Coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals from Coal Coking ... Since 2009, she has been at INCAR-CSIC, researching the preparation and characterization of carbon materials (cokes and fibers) and nanomaterials (nanotubes and graphenes) and their catalytic, environmental, and energy applications. ... He then joined the Fundamental Studies Section of the British Coke (later Carbonization) Research Association, eventually becoming Head of Fundamental Studies. ...

Marcos Granda; Clara Blanco; Patricia Alvarez; John W. Patrick; Rosa Menéndez

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2004-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Delayed coking evolved steadily over the early to mid 1900s to enable refiners to convert high boiling, residual petroleum fractions to light products such as gasoline. Pound for pound, coking is the most energy intensive of any operation in a modern refinery. Large amounts of energy are required to heat the thick, poor-quality petroleum residuum to the 900 to 950 degrees F required to crack the heavy hydrocarbon molecules into lighter, more valuable products. One common misconception of delayed coking is that the product coke is a disadvantage. Although coke is a low valued (near zero economic value) byproduct, compared to transportation fuels, there is a significant worldwide trade and demand for coke as it is an economical fuel. Coke production has increased steadily over the last ten years, with further increases forecast for the foreseeable future. Current domestic production is near 111,000 tons per day. A major driving force behind this increase is the steady decline in crude quality available to refiners. Crude slates are expected to grow heavier with higher sulfur contents while environmental restrictions are expected to significantly reduce the demand for high-sulfur residual fuel oil. Light sweet crudes will continue to be available and in even greater demand than they are today. Refiners will be faced with the choice of purchasing light sweet crudes at a premium price, or adding bottom of the barrel upgrading capability, through additional new investments, to reduce the production of high-sulfur residual fuel oil and increase the production of low-sulfur distillate fuels. A second disadvantage is that liquid products from cokers frequently are unstable, i.e., they rapidly form gum and sediments. Because of intermediate investment and operating costs, delayed coking has increased in popularity among refiners worldwide. Based on the 2000 Worldwide Refining Survey published in the Oil and Gas, the delayed coking capacity for 101 refineries around the world is 2,937,439 barrels/calendar day. These cokers produce 154,607 tons of coke per day and delayed coking accounts for 88% of the world capacity. The delayed coking charge capacity in the United States is 1,787,860 b/cd. Despite its wide commercial use, only relatively few contractors and refiners are truly knowledgeable in delayed-coking design, so that this process carries with it a ''black art'' connotation. Until recently, the expected yield from cokers was determined by a simple laboratory test on the feedstock. As a result of Tulsa University's prior related research, a process model was developed that with additional work could be used to optimize existing delayed cokers over a wide range of potential feedstocks and operating conditions. The objectives of this research program are to: utilize the current micro, batch and pilot unit facilities at The University of Tulsa to enhance the understanding of the coking process; conduct additional micro and pilot unit tests with new and in-house resids and recycles to make current optimization models more robust; conduct focused kinetic experiments to enhance the furnace tube model and to enhance liquid production while minimizing sulfur in the products; conduct detailed foaming studies to optimize the process and minimize process upsets; quantify the parameters that affect coke morphology; and to utilize the knowledge gained from the experimental and modeling studies to enhance the computer programs developed in the previous JIP for optimization of the coking process. These refined computer models will then be tested against refinery data provided by the member companies. Novel concepts will also be explored for hydrogen sulfide removal of furnace gases as well as gas injection studies to reduce over-cracking.

Michael Volk; Keith Wisecarver

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

14

Blast furnace coke quality in relation to petroleum coke addition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The incorporation of petroleum coke as an additive in industrial coking coal blends is a practice often used by steel companies. A suitable blast furnace coke produced by replacing part of the coking coal blend with a suitable petroleum coke (addition of 5 to 15%), was made by Great Lakes Carbon Corporation and successfully tested at several blast furnaces. This coke had lower reactivity, less ash and slightly higher sulfur content than coke made without the addition of petroleum coke. In contrast with these results, it has been reported in a BCRA study that additions of petroleum coke to a strong coking coal, above 5 wt%, increased coke reactivity. These differences may be explained on the basis of the coal or blend characteristics to which petroleum coke is added. Petroleum coke addition seems to give better results if the coal/blend has high fluidity. The present situation in Spain is favorable for the use of petroleum coke. So, a study of laboratory and semi-industrial scale was made to assess the possibility of using petroleum coke as an additive to the typical industrial coal blend coked by the Spanish Steel Company, ENSIDESA. The influence of the petroleum coke particle size was also studied to semi-industrial scale.

Alvarez, R.; Diez, M.A.; Menendez, J.A.; Barriocanal, C.; Pis, J.J. [CSIC, Oviedo (Spain). Inst. Nacional del Carbon; Sirgado, M. [ENSIDESA, Aviles (Spain)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

100% Pet coke or pet coke blends combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is outlined on the combustion of 100 percent petroleum coke or petroleum coke blends. Data are presented on NISCO overviews; fuel (coke) characteristics; delayed coke analysis (1995-96); limestone characteristics/effects; limestone preparation; ash characteristics; vortex finders; agglomerization; and NISCO performance results.

Swindle, D.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit MSN YYYYMM Value Column Order Description Unit FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu FFPRBUS Total Fossil Fuels Production Quadrillion Btu

17

Desulfurization of coke oven gas from the coking of coking coal blended with a sorbent and waste plastic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new way to implement the simultaneous reutilization of solid waste, the desulfurization of coke oven gas (COG), and even the desulfurization of coke by the co-coking of coking coal (CC) and waste plastic (WP).....

Zhao Rongfang; Ye Shufeng; Xie Yusheng…

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Influence of coal preparation and coking conditions on coke reactivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of various technological factors on the high-temperature properties of coke is investigated. It is found that factors facilitating an orderly organic structure of the coke (fine grinding and comp...

D. V. Miroshnichenko

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modified coal batch in coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of volatile products from low-metamorphic poorly clinkering G coal on plasticmass formation in rammed batch during coking is considered. An experimental batch of modified coke has been produced at P...

A. G. Starovoit; E. I. Malyi; M. S. Chemerinskii; M. A. Starovoit…

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Met coke world summit 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following session headings: industry overview and market outlook; coke in the Americas; the global coke industry; and new developments. All the papers (except one) only consist of a copy of the overheads/viewgraphs.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved coking process for normally solid carbonaceous materials wherein the yield of liquid product from the coker is increased by adding ammonia or an ammonia precursor to the coker. The invention is particularly useful in a process wherein coal liquefaction bottoms are coked to produce both a liquid and a gaseous product. Broadly, ammonia or an ammonia precursor is added to the coker ranging from about 1 to about 60 weight percent based on normally solid carbonaceous material and is preferably added in an amount from about 2 to about 15 weight percent.

Billimoria, Rustom M. (Houston, TX); Tao, Frank F. (Baytown, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Coke and Coal Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A. Mott at the University of Sheffield, are concerned with problems affecting the hard coke industry, which enjoys facilities for large-scale experimentation through its member firms such as ... of the body organizing this work visited the Kingston and Fulham Laboratories of the British Coal Utilisation Research Association on September 9. Mr. J. G. Bennett, director of ...

1943-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

23

High coking value pitch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

24

Investigation of Bonding Mechanism of Coking on Semi-coke from Lignite with Pitch and Tar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Bonding Mechanism of Coking on Semi-coke from Lignite with Pitch and Tar ... Study on the coking mechanism of coal and coal tar pitches. ...

Vedat Arslan

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

25

Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gasification may be an attractive alternative for converting heavy oil residue – petroleum coke into valuable synthetic gas. Due to the low reactivity of petroleum coke, it is maybe preferable to convert it in combination with other fuels such as biomass. Co-gasification of petroleum coke and biomass was studied in an atmospheric bubbling fluidised bed reactor and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA) at KTH Royal University of Technology. Biomass ash in the blends was found to have a catalytic effect on the reactivity of petroleum coke during co-gasification. Furthermore, this synergetic effect between biomass and petcoke was observed in the kinetics data. The activation energy Ea determined from the Arrhenius law for pure petcoke steam gasification in the TGA was 121.5 kJ/mol, whereas for the 50/50 mixture it was 96.3, and for the 20/80 blend – 83.5 kJ/mol.

Vera Nemanova; Araz Abedini; Truls Liliedahl; Klas Engvall

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Coke | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

18 18 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278418 Varnish cache server Coke Dataset Summary Description UK National coal (and solid fuels and gases derived from processing coal) are published in Chapter 2 (Solid Fuels and Derived Gases) of the Digest of UK Energy Statistics (DUKES). Included here are the datasets for commodity balances (1998 - 2009); supply and consumption (2005 - 2009) of coal and other fuels (e.g. coke oven gas, blast furnace gas, benzole and tars, etc). Chapter 2 of the report is available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/dukes/308-dukes-2010-ch2.pdf Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC)

27

,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Standard Errors for Table 10.5;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Residual Fuel Oil(b)",,,," Alternative Energy Sources(c)" ,,,"Coal Coke" "NAICS"," ","Total","...

28

Design and construction of coke battery 1A at Radlin coke plant, Poland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the design and construction of coke battery 1A at Radlin coke plant (Poland), coking of rammed coke with a stationary system was employed for the first time. The coke batteries are grouped in blocks. Safety railings are provided on the coke and machine sides of the maintenance areas.

A.M. Kravchenko; D.P. Yarmoshik; V.B. Kamenyuka; G.E. Kos'kova; N.I. Shkol'naya; V.V. Derevich; A.S. Grankin [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Factors influencing coke gasification with carbon dioxide.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Of all coke properties the influence of the catalytic mineral matter on reactivity of metallurgical cokes is least understood. There is limited information about the… (more)

Grigore, Mihaela

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Coke from coal and petroleum  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbonaceous coke is manufactured by the delayed coking of a slurry mixture of from about 10 to about 30 weight percent of caking or non-caking coal and the remainder a petroleum resid blended at below 50.degree. C.

Wynne, Jr., Francis E. (Allison Park, PA); Lopez, Jaime (Pittsburgh, PA); Zaborowsky, Edward J. (Harwick, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis Plus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plus Plus BTU Analysis Plus logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The BTU Analysi Plus program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and commerical studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis Plus was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella.

32

Lowest Pressure Steam Saves More BTU's Than You Think  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Steam is the most transferring heat from But most steam systems LOWEST PRESSURE STEAM SAVES MORE BTU'S THAN YOU THINK Stafford J. Vallery Armstrong Machine Works Three Rivers, Michigan steam to do the process heating rather than...

Vallery, S. J.

33

Research on Coal and Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE third annual report of the Northern Coke Research Committee records the many-sided activities of its staff working in the Armstrong College ... activities of its staff working in the Armstrong College, Newcastle, on problems of the coals and ...

1932-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

34

Characteristics of coking coal burnout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An attempt was made to clarify the characteristics of coking coal burnout by the morphological analysis of char and fly ash samples. Laboratory-scale combustion testing, simulating an ignition process, was carried out for three kinds of coal (two coking coals and one non-coking coal for reference), and sampled chars were analyzed for size, shape and type by image analysis. The full combustion process was examined in industrial-scale combustion testing for the same kinds of coal. Char sampled at the burner outlet and fly ash at the furnace exit were also analyzed. The difference between the char type, swelling properties, agglomeration, anisotropy and carbon burnout were compared at laboratory scale and at industrial scale. As a result, it was found that coking coals produced chars with relatively thicker walls, which mainly impeded char burnout, especially for low volatile coals.

Nakamura, M. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Bailey, J.G. [Univ. of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

Influence of petroleum coking additive on the quality of coal batch, coke, and tar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the shortage of coal with good coking properties, a petroleum coking additive is introduced in coal batch so as to expand the range of plasticity. This additive improves coke quality in every respect, excep...

I. I. Mel’nikov; V. M. Kryachuk; D. A. Mezin; A. A. Gorbunov…

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Evaluation of coal and its influence on coke quality and the coking process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The evaluation of coal batch is considered, along with its influence on coke quality and the coking properties. The quality of the coal available for coking at OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat is ...

G. R. Gainieva; V. I. Byzova; N. N. Nazarov; L. D. Nikitin…

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Estimating Coke and Pepsi's Price and Advertising Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strategy Distributions for Coke (First Quarter 1977) a)Paper No. 789 ESTIMATING COKE AND PEPSI'S PRICE ADVERTISINGEconomics July, 1998 Estimating Coke and Pepsi’s Price and

Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry S.; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Experimental study of elastoplastic mechanical properties of coke drum materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coke drums are vertical pressure vessels used in the delayed coking process in petroleum refineries. Significant temperature variation during the delayed coking process causes the… (more)

Chen, Jie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New coke-sorting system at OAO Koks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new coke-sorting system has been introduced at OAO Koks. It differs from the existing system in that it has no bunkers for all-purpose coke but only bunkers for commercial coke. In using this system with coke from battery 4, the crushing of the coke on conveyer belts, at roller screens, and in the commercial-coke bunkers is studied. After installing braking elements in the coke path, their effectiveness in reducing coke disintegration and improving coke screening is investigated. The granulometric composition and strength of the commercial coke from coke battery 3, with the new coke-sorting system, is evaluated.

B.Kh. Bulaevskii; V.S. Shved; Yu.V. Kalimin; S.D. Filippov [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Utilization of coke and functionalized coke-based composite for uptake of heavy metals from wastewater .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated the functionalization of coke particles and their utilization for the preparation of coke-polymer composite. Looking at the possibility of using it for… (more)

Mdlalose, Lindani Mbalenhle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of fly ash from co-combustion of coal and petroleum coke for use in concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of fly ash (FA) produced from various blends of coal and petroleum coke (pet coke) fired at Belledune Generating Station, New Brunswick, Canada, was conducted to establish its performance relative to FA derived from coal-only combustion and its compliance with CSA A3000. The FA samples were beneficiated by an electrostatic separation process to produce samples for testing with a range of loss-on-ignition (LOI) values. The results of these studies indicate that the combustion of pet coke results in very little inorganic residue (for example, typically less than 0.5% ash) and the main impact on FA resulting from the co-combustion of coal and up to 25% pet coke is an increase in the unburned carbon content and LOI values. The testing of FA after beneficiation indicates that FA produced from fuels with up to 25% pet coke performs as good as FA produced from the same coal without pet coke.

Scott, A.N.; Thomas, M.D.A.

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Property:Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AnnualGenBtuYr AnnualGenBtuYr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/AnnualGenBtuYr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5.3 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 72.5 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 5 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 7 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 17 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 6.5 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1.8 +

43

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: BTU Analysis REG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

REG REG BTU Analysis REG logo. Heat load calculation program that performs comprehensive heat load studies with hardcopy printouts of the results. The REG program is designed for general heating, air-conditioning, and light commercial studies. Since 1987, the BTU Analysis family of programs have been commercially distributed and are marketed through professional organizations, trade advertisements, and word of mouth. They are currently used in six (6) foriegn countries and the U.S. Used in temperate, tropic, artic, and arid climates. They have proved themselves easy to use, accurate and productive again and again. A version of BTU Analysis, was adopted for use in the revised HEATING VENTILATING AND AIR CONDITIONING FUNDAMENTALS by Raymond A. Havrella. Keywords

44

Property:Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CapacityBtuHr CapacityBtuHr Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Geothermal/CapacityBtuHr" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 4 4 UR Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.8 + A Ace Development Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 10.3 + Agua Calientes Trailer Park Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2 + Alive Polarity's Murrietta Hot Spring Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 1 + Americulture Aquaculture Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 2.4 + Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 3 + Aqua Caliente County Park Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility + 0.3 +

45

Russian coking coal in 2008 and 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal resources and coke production in the second half of 2009 ... are considered. The unsuitability of the available coal for the production of high-strength coke is analyzed.

B. P. Kiselev

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Technological value of coal used for coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technological value of coal used for coking is analyzed, with particular attention to clinkering coal, the coke group, and lean additives, as well as G and GZhO coal. A relation is established between the tec...

A. S. Stankevich; V. S. Stankevich

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Oxidized coal in coking: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A literature review shows that the oxidation of coal changes its granulometric composition, packing density, ... clinkering properties, the quality of the resulting coke, and the yield of coking byproducts. On ac...

N. A. Desna; D. V. Miroshnichenko

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Russian coking coal in 2008 and 2009  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution and quality of Russian coal and coke resources are compared for periods before (the ... definition and determination of the technological value of coal. Analysis of coke strength suggests that, i...

B. P. Kiselev

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Coal fractionation by density for coking purposes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scarce coal with good coking properties may be obtained by separating less valuable coal into different density fractions. The use of valuable fractions released in enrichment ensures optimal coking-batch composi...

S. G. Gagarin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The mechanism of coking pressure generation II: Effect of high volatile matter coking coal, semi-anthracite and coke breeze on coking pressure and contraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most important aspects of the cokemaking process is to control and limit the coking pressure since excessive coking pressure can lead to operational problems and oven wall damage. Following on from a previous paper on plastic layer permeability we have studied the effect of contraction of semi-coke on coking pressure and the effect of organic additives on contraction. A link between contraction (or simulated contraction) outside the plastic layer and coking pressure was demonstrated. The interaction between this contraction, local bulk density around the plastic layer and the dependence of the permeability of the plastic layer on bulk density was discussed as possible mechanisms for the generation of coking pressure. The effect of blending either a high volatile matter coal or one of two semi-anthracites with low volatile matter, high coking pressure coals on the coking pressure of the binary blends has been explained using this mechanism.

Merrick Mahoney; Seiji Nomura; Koichi Fukuda; Kenji Kato; Anthony Le Bas; David R. Jenkins; Sid McGuire

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Trends in the automation of coke production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Up-to-date mathematical methods, such as correlation analysis and expert systems, are employed in creating a model of the coking process. Automatic coking-control systems developed by Giprokoks rule out human error. At an existing coke battery, after introducing automatic control, the heating-gas consumption is reduced by {>=}5%.

R.I. Rudyka; Y.E. Zingerman; K.G. Lavrov [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

EIS-0007: Low Btu Coal Gasification Facility and Industrial Park  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement which evaluates the potential environmental impacts that may be associated with the construction and operation of a low-Btu coal gasification facility and the attendant industrial park in Georgetown, Scott County, Kentucky.

53

Clean Production of Coke from Carbonaceous Fines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to produce steel (a necessary commodity in developed nations) using conventional technologies, you must have metallurgical coke. Current coke-making technology pyrolyzes high-quality coking coals in a slot oven, but prime coking coals are becoming more expensive and slot ovens are being shut-down because of age and environmental problems. The United States typically imports about 4 million tons of coke per year, but because of a world-wide coke scarcity, metallurgical coke costs have risen from about $77 per tonne to more than $225. This coke shortage is a long-term challenge driving up the price of steel and is forcing steel makers to search for alternatives. Combustion Resources (CR) has developed a technology to produce metallurgical coke from alternative feedstocks in an environmentally clean manner. The purpose of the current project was to refine material and process requirements in order to achieve improved economic benefits and to expand upon prior work on the proposed technology through successful prototype testing of coke products. The ultimate objective of this project is commercialization of the proposed technology. During this project period, CR developed coke from over thirty different formulations that meet the strength and reactivity requirements for use as metallurgical coke. The technology has been termed CR Clean Coke because it utilizes waste materials as feedstocks and is produced in a continuous process where pollutant emissions can be significantly reduced compared to current practice. The proposed feed material and operating costs for a CR Clean Coke plant are significantly less than conventional coke plants. Even the capital costs for the proposed coke plant are about half that of current plants. The remaining barrier for CR Clean Coke to overcome prior to commercialization is full-scale testing in a blast furnace. These tests will require a significant quantity of product (tens of thousands of tons) necessitating the construction of a demonstration facility. Talks are currently underway with potential partners and investors to build a demonstration facility that will generate enough coke for meaningful blast furnace evaluation tests. If the testing is successful, CR Clean Coke could potentially eliminate the need for the United States to import any coke, effectively decreasing US Steel industry dependence on foreign nations and reducing the price of domestic steel.

Craig N. Eatough

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Coke–pitch interactions during anode preparation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The information on the interactions between coke and pitch is of great value for the aluminum industry. This information can help choose the suitable coke and pitch pairs as well as the appropriate mixing parameters to be used during the production of anodes. In this study, the interaction mechanisms of pitch and coke at the mixing stage were studied by a sessile-drop test using two coal-tar pitches as the liquid and three petroleum cokes as the substrate. The results showed that the coke–pitch interactions are related to both pitch and coke chemical compositions. The contact angle of different coke–pitch systems decreased with increasing time and temperature. At high temperatures, decreasing the pitch viscosity facilitated the spreading of pitch and its penetration into the coke bed. The chemical behavior of petroleum cokes and coal tar pitches were studied using the FT-IR spectroscopy and XPS. The results showed that the wettability behavior of cokes by pitches depends on their physical properties as well as the presence of surface functional groups of coke and pitch which can form chemical bonds.

Arunima Sarkar; Duygu Kocaefe; Yasar Kocaefe; Dilip Sarkar; Dipankar Bhattacharyay; Brigitte Morais; Jérôme Chabot

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Investigation of the effects of heating rate on coking of shale during retorting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The retorting of oil shale distributes organic carbon among three possible products: the liquid product, the noncondensible product, and the residual carbon (coke). The production of coke is detrimental because of the economic effects caused by the loss of organic carbon to this relatively intractable carbon form. Two reference oil shales, a Mahogany zone, Parachute Creek Member, Green River Formation oil shale from Colorado and a Clegg Creek Member, New Albany oil shale from Kentucky, were studied to evaluate the conditions that affect coke production during retorting. The variable that was studied in these experiments was the heating rate during retorting because heating rate has been indicated to have a direct effect on coke production (Burnham and Clarkson 1980). The six heating rates investigated covered the range from 1 to 650/degree/C/h (1.8 to 1169/degree/F/h). The data collected during these experiments were evaluated statistically in order to identify trends. The data for the eastern reference oil shale indicated a decrease in coke formation with increases in the heating rate. The liquid and noncondensible product yields both increased with increasing heating rate. The distribution of products in relation to retort heating rate follows the model suggested by Burnham and Clarkson (1980). Coke production during the retorting of western reference oil shale was found to be constant in relation to heating rate. The liquid product yield increased with increasing heating rate but the trend could not be verified at the 95% confidence level. The coke production observed in these experiments does not follow the prediction of the model. This may indicate that coke formation occurs early in the retorting process and may be limited by the availability of organic materials that form coke. 6 refs., 10 tabs.

Guffey, F.D.; Hunter, D.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Total Consumption of Heat Content of Natural Gas (BTU per Cubic Foot) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

57

Effect of Indian Medium Coking Coal on Coke Quality in Non-recovery Stamp Charged Coke Oven  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The maximum possibility of utilizing the Indian coking coals and inferior grade coking coal for producing metallurgical coke through non-recovery stamp charging technology was investigated. Indian indigenous coals contained low percent of vitrinite ( 15%) compared to imported coking coal. Therefore, the selection of appropriate proportion of different types of coals was a major challenge for coke makers. Coal blend selection criterion based on a single coefficient, named as composite coking potential (CCP), was developed. The use of increased proportion of semi-soft coal (crucible swelling number of 2.5) and high ash (? 15%) indigenous coal in the range of 20%–35% and 20%–65% respectively in the blends resulted in good quality of coke. Plant data of a non-recovery coke oven were used for developing and validating the model. The results showed that the coke strength after reaction (CSR) varied in the range of 63. 7%–67.7% and the M40 value was between 81.8 and 89.3 in both the cases.

H.P. Tiwari; P.K. Banerjee; V.K. Saxena; S.K. Haldar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Using coke-battery flue gas to dry coal batch before coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The utilization of heat from coke-battery flue gases and other potential secondary energy resources in drying coal batch prior to coking is considered. The main factors that influence ... . The reduction in moist...

A. Ya. Eremin; V. G. Mishchikhin; S. G. Stakheev; R. R. Gilyazetdinov…

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Selecting the optimum coke pushing sequence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sequence of pushing coke ovens is one of the most important aspects of battery operation. The sequence must satisfy a number of technical and process conditions: (1) achieve maximum heating-wall life by avoiding destructive expansion pressure in freshly charged ovens and during pushing of the finished coke; (2) ensure uniform brickwork temperature and prevent overheating by compensating for the high thermal flux in freshly charged ovens due to accumulated heat in adjacent ovens that are in the second half of the coking cycle; (3) ensure the most favorable working conditions and safety for operating personnel; (4) provide additional opportunities for repair personnel to perform various types of work, such as replacing coke-machine rails, without interrupting coal production; (5) perform the maximum number of coke-machine operations simultaneously: pushing, charging, and cleaning doors, frames, and standpipe elbows; and (6) reduce electricity consumption by minimizing idle travel of coke machines.

V.T. Krivoshein; A.V. Makarov [ZAO Trest Koksokhimmontazh (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Recycling waste polymers from automotive shredder residue (ASR); application in iron making.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An investigation was performed on characterisation of automotive shredder residue which resulted in application of its polymeric fraction as a substitute for coke, as reducing… (more)

Fahandej Sadi, Seyed Habib

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Technological value of coal concentrates for coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Options are outlined for calculating the technological value of coal and coal concentrates in the context of contractual obligations and the quality of the coke produced.

E. N. Stepanov; G. V. Larin; A. E. Stepanova; I. V. Semiokhina

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Estimating Coke and Pepsi's price and advertising strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Paper No. 789 ESTIMATING COKE AND PEPSI’ PRICE S ANDand Advertising Strategies: Coke and Pepsi) by Amos Golan,Revised, March 1999 Estimating Coke and Pepsi’s Price and

Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Interaction of low-metamorphic coal components in coking batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of low-metamorphic coal components in coking batch during pyrolysis is studied. The characteristics of the resulting coke are presented, and the partial hydrogenation is...

E. I. Malyi; A. S. Koverya; M. A. Starovoit

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

12.2 Coke Production 12.2.1 General  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallurgical coke is produced by the destructive distillation of coal in coke ovens. Prepared coal is heated in an oxygen-free atmosphere (–coked–) until most volatile components in the coal are removed. The material remaining is a carbon mass called coke. Metallurgical coke is used in iron and steel industry processes (primarily in blast furnaces) to reduce iron ore to iron. Over 90 percent of the total coke production is dedicated to blast furnace operations. Foundry coke comprises most of the balance and is used by foundries in furnaces for melting metal and in the preparation of molds. Foundry coke production uses a different blend of coking coals, longer coking times, and lower coking temperatures relative to those used for metallurgical coke. Most coke plants are collocated with iron and steel production facilities, and the demand for coke generally corresponds with the production of iron and steel. There has been a steady decline in the number of coke plants over the past several years for many reasons, including a decline in the demand for iron/steel, increased production of steel by mini-mills (electric arc furnaces that do not use coke), and the lowering of the coke:iron ratio used in the blast furnace (e. g., increased use of pulverized coal injection). There were 18 coke plants operating in the U. S. in 2007.

unknown authors

65

Clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The clinkering properties of rammed coking coal and coal batches are investigated. There is a close relation between the clinkering properties and coke quality.

V. M. Shmal’ko; M. A. Solov’ev

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Strength of the coke fillers of carbon materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between the ultimate compression strengths of coke fillers for carbon materials determined by various techniques and structures, final coke treatment temperatures, etc., are considered.

V.S. Ostrovskii [Research Institute of Structural Graphite Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

New designs in the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent Giprokoks designs for the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems, high-productivity vibrational-inertial screens have been employed. This permits single-stage screening and reduction in capital and especially operating expenditures, without loss of coke quality. In two-stage screening, >80 mm coke (for foundry needs) is additionally separated, with significant improvement in quality of the metallurgical coke (25-80 mm). New designs for the reconstruction of coke-sorting systems employ mechanical treatment of the coke outside the furnace, which offers new scope for stabilization of coke quality and permits considerable improvement in mechanical strength and granulometric composition of the coke by mechanical crushing.

A.S. Larin; V.V. Demenko; V.L. Voitanik [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",3,3,3 " 20-49",5,5,4 " 50-99",6,5,4 " 100-249",5,5,4 " 250-499",7,9,7 " 500 and Over",3,2,2 "Total",2,2,2

69

Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A. [NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Carol G. Cokely's recent Presentations Cokely, C. (2007). Incorporating Service Learing in to the AuD Curriculum. Invited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carol G. Cokely's recent Presentations Cokely, C. (2007). Incorporating Service Learing in to the AuD Curriculum. Invited speaker, Teaching the Management of Hearing Loss, Pittsburgh, PA. Cokely, C, Pittsburgh, PA. Kricos, P.B., Weinstein, B., Lesner, S., Cokely, C., Milstein, D., & Chisolm, T. (2006) How

O'Toole, Alice J.

71

Delayed Coking of Decant Oil and Coal in a Laboratory-Scale Coking Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fact that coke quality varies with the chemical composition of the precursor feedstock creates a significant incentive to examine the process of coking and how it relates to the composition of the feedstock. ... (7)?Derbyshire, F. J.; Odoerfer, G. A.; Rudnick, L. R.; Varghese, P.; Whitehurst, D. D. Fundamental studies in the conversion of coals to fuels of increased hydrogen content. ... Bituminous coal/petroleum co-cokes were produced by coking 4:1 blends of vacuum resid (VR)/coal and decant oil (DO)/coal at temperatures of 465 and 500 °C for reaction times of 12 and 18 h, under autogenous pressure in microautoclave reactors. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

Spatial variation of coke quality in the non-recovery beehive coke ovens.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??More than 50% of hot metal production worldwide takes place in blast furnaces. Coke is the most expensive raw material in the blast furnace. It… (more)

Segers, Magrieta

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Delayed coking of decant oil and coal in a laboratory-scale coking unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe the development of a laboratory-scale delayed coker and present results of an investigation on the recovered liquid from the coking of decant oil and decant oil/coal mixtures. Using quantitative gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, a study was made of the chemical composition of the distillate liquids isolated from the overheads collected during the coking and co-coking process. {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of combined liquids from coking and co-coking did not show any substantial differences. These NMR results of coking and co-coking liquids agree with those of GC/MS. In these studies, it was observed that co-coking with coal resulted in a decrease in the paraffins contents of the liquid. The percentage of cycloparaffins, indenes, naphthalenes, and tetralins did not change significantly. In contrast, alkyl benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the distillate were higher in the co-coking experiments which may have resulted from the distillation of thermally cracked coal macromolecules and the contribution of these molecules to the overall liquid composition. 40 refs., 3 figs., 13 tabs.

Oemer Guel; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute, C205 Coal Utilization Laboratory

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Market boundaries for coking-coal concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction of geographic and commodity boundaries is considered in relation to the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates. In this market, uniform commodities ... construction of the market boundaries....

V. A. Brodskii

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mozambique becomes a major coking coal exporter?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In addition to its potential role as a major international supplier of coking coal, Mozambique will also become a major source of power generation for southern Africa. 3 figs.

Ruffini, A.

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

New and revised standards for coke production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for new and revised standards for coke production in Ukraine and Russia is outlined. Such standards should address improvements in plant operation, working conditions, environmental protection, energy conservation, fire and explosion safety, and economic indices.

G.A. Kotsyuba; M.I. Alpatov; Y.G. Shapoval [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Possibilities of coke manufacture in nonpollutant conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents some possibilities to obtain coke briquettes from anthracite, using as binders petroleum pitch, wheat flour, cement, plaster, ashes from power-plants dried from the electrofilters. Specific thermal post-treatment were proposed for each case, such as: oxidation or heating at low temperatures (under 300 C). As a result the authors obtained coke briquettes to be used in small equipment, with no pollutant pyrogenetic treatment.

Barca, F.; Panaitescu, C.; Vidrighin, C.; Peleanu, I. [Politehnica Univ. Bucharest (Romania); Albastroiu, P. [S.C. ICEM S.A., Bucharest (Romania)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Réactivité de l'anode et désulfuration : effet du niveau de calcination du coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Les propriétés du coke et la performance des anodes sont affectées par le niveau de calcination du coke. Une densité de coke (VBD) élevée implique… (more)

Bergeron-Lagacé, Charles-Luc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Physical, chemical and thermal changes of coals and coal maceral concentrates during coke formation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Research Doctorate - Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) The measured coke reactivity index (CRI) and coke strength after reaction (CSR) determined in experiments based on coke… (more)

Xie, Wei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Giprokoks proposals for improvement in air quality at coke battery 1A of Radlin coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke battery 1A, which uses rammed batch, has gone into production at Radlin coke plant (Poland), on the basis of Giprokoks designs. Up-to-date dust-trapping methods are used for the first time within the aspiration systems in the coal-preparation shop and in improving dust collection within the production buildings.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Mansfield Two-Stage, Low BTU Gasification System: Report of Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The least expensive way to produce gas from coal is by low Btu gasification, a process by which coal is converted to carbon monoxide and hydrogen by reacting it with air and steam. Low Btu gas, which is used near its point of production, eliminates...

Blackwell, L. T.; Crowder, J. T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Investigation of bonding mechanism of coking on semi-coke from lignite with pitch and tar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In coking, the bonding ability of inert macerals by reactive macerals is dependent on various parameters and also is related to the wettability of the inert macerals. In this study, the effect of carbonization temperature on the wettability of semi-cokes produced at various temperatures has been investigated. Soma and Yatagan semicokes represent inert macerals, and pitch was used as a reactive structure in the experiments. The briquetted pitch blocks were located on the semi-cokes and heated from the softening temperature of pitch (60{sup o}C) to 140{sup o}C to observe the wettability. In addition, liquid tar was also used to determine the wettability of semi-cokes. From the standpoint of wettability, the temperature of 900{sup o}C was determined to be the critical point for coke produced from sub-bituminous coals. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Vedat Arslan [Dokuz Eylul University, Izmir (Turkey). Engineering Faculty

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Relationship between the technical parameters of cokes produced from blends of three Polish coals of different coking ability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The demand for metallurgical coke for blast furnaces is forcing the coking industry to look for new sources of coking coals. The physical and chemical parameters of coals used in coking blends determine the quality (reactivity and strength) of the finished cokes. This study examines the technical properties of the cokes produced from various blends of three Polish coals with different coking. These coals were collected from three mines: Zofiówka, Szczyg?owice, and Krupi?ski (Upper Silesian Coal Basin, Poland). The coal charges were coked in the laboratory scale, at temperatures of up to 1000 °C, in an inert atmosphere. The coke reactivity (index CRI) and the coke strength after reaction (CSR) were measured and correlated to the properties of parent coals using statistical analysis. The result of this study shows strong relationships between the concentration of the best coking coal (Zofiówka) in the blend and the CRI and CSR of the resulting coke. The CRI and CSR parameters for cokes obtained from single coals and from their blends show the additive character. This study also confirms the linear relationship between CRI and CSR parameters of the cokes.

A. Koszorek; M. Krzesi?ska; S. Pusz; B. Pilawa; B. Kwieci?ska

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

"Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,"Consumption" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,"Total United States" "Value of Shipments and Receipts" "(million dollars)" " Under 20",2.5,2.5,2.4 " 20-49",5,5,4.3 " 50-99",5.8,5.8,5.3 " 100-249",6.2,6.2,5.3 " 250-499",8.2,8,7.1 " 500 and Over",4.3,3,2.7

85

Interactions among Different Fractions in the Thermoplastic State of Goonyella Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An understanding of thermoplastic behavior in coking coal is essential in ascertaining appropriate procedures for the efficient conversion of slightly coking coals into good quality cokes. ... The conversion of coal into coke is detd. ...

Takahiro Yoshida; Toshimasa Takanohashi; Masashi Iino; Haruo Kumagai; Kenji Kato

2004-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Hydrothermal Treatment of a Sub-bituminous Coal and Its Use in Coking Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Crucible coking determinations suggest that hydrothermal treatment can greatly increase the coke strength and the particle coke strength after reaction toward CO2 and decrease the coke reactivity when the hydrothermally treated coals were used in the coal blends instead of the raw coal. ... While the cokes from the crucible coking experiments were subjected to 800 rotations at a speed of 25 rpm, the weight percent of coke particles (>0.2 ... The coal charges were coked in the lab. ...

Hengfu Shui; Ye Wu; Zhicai Wang; Zhiping Lei; Changhui Lin; Shibiao Ren; Chunxiu Pan; Shigang Kang

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

87

Elegest coal in coking batch at OAO EVRAZ ZSMK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coking of batch with different proportions of Elegest coal from the Ulug-Khemsk Basin is investigated ... production conditions. The mechanical strength of the coke is improved when such coal is used in the b...

V. L. Osetkovskii; M. M. Naimark; V. G. Lupenko; A. E. Bazegskiy…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Modification of poorly clinkering coal for use in coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If coal is modified by the volatile products formed in pyrolysis, high-quality blast-furnace coke may be produced from batch with a smaller proportion of expensive clinkering coal. In such coking, the batch is mo...

E. I. Malyi

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Improving the preparation of coal batch for coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various methods of preparing coal for coking are analyzed. Laboratory experiments are conducted with a view to obtaining higher-quality coke from batch with a high content of poorly clinkering coal.

M. S. Chemerinskii; A. G. Starovoit; E. I. Malyi

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Coking of coal batch with different content of oxidized coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of oxidized coal in coking batch increases the analytical moisture content and ... increases the oxygen content; reduces the gross coke yield and the yield of tar, benzene ... of carbon dioxide, pyrogenet...

D. V. Miroshnichenko; I. D. Drozdnik; Yu. S. Kaftan; N. B. Bidolenko…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Kuznetsk Basin coking coal: Reserves and technological value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reserves of Kuznetsk Basin coking coal are analyzed, in terms of rank composition and scope for coke production. The technological value of the coal is evaluated by the OOO VNITs Ugol...

V. P. Ivanov; V. Yu. Sushkov; A. A. Torgunakov; S. A. Pantykin

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Determining the environmental and thermal characteristics of coke oven batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is proposed for assessing the environmental and thermal characteristics of coke oven batteries and is tested for coke oven batteries 1 and 5 at OAO Zaporozhkoks. On ... the basis of data for the environm...

E. I. Toryanik; A. L. Borisenko; A. S. Malysh; A. A. Lobov…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of coke strength after reaction (CSR) at Dofasco  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to prevent coke degradation without detrimentally affecting blast furnace service life, Dofasco initiated a project to improve coke strength after reaction. The results of the program and Dofasco's prediction model are presented. 9 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

T.W. Todoschuk; J.P. Price; J.F. Gransden

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Fundamentals of Delayed Coking Joint Industry Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coking test facilities include three reactors (or cokers) and ten utilities. Experiments were conducted using the micro-coker, pilot-coker, and stirred-batch coker. Gas products were analyzed using an on-line gas chromatograph. Liquid properties were analyzed in-house using simulated distillation (HP 5880a), high temperature gas chromatography (6890a), detailed hydrocarbon analysis, and ASTM fractionation. Coke analyses as well as feedstock analyses and some additional liquid analyses (including elemental analyses) were done off-site.

Volk Jr., Michael; Wisecarver, Keith D.; Sheppard, Charles M.

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Accepted Manuscript Title: Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accepted Manuscript Title: Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation and Coupled effect. Gascoin, P. Gillard, M. Bouchez, J. Steelant, Fuel Pyrolysis through Porous Media: Coke Formation Coke Formation and Coupled effect on Permeability2 G. Fau1* , N. Gascoin1 , P. Gillard1 , M. Bouchez2

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Working Paper No. 789 ESTIMATING COKE AND PEPSI'S PRICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Paper No. 789 ESTIMATING COKE AND PEPSI'S PRICE AND ADVERTISING STRATEGIES (formerly Estimating Firms'Mixed Price and Advertising Strategies: Coke and Pepsi) by Amos Golan, Larry S. Karp. #12;Estimating Coke and Pepsi's Price and Advertising Strategies Amos Golan* Larry S. Karp** Jeffrey M

Karp, Larry S.

97

Influence of the coking properties of coal batch on coke properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (ZSMK), research is undertaken to improve the optimization of coking batch. The basic approach, proposed by...K opt..., which characterizes the ...

D. A. Zavalishin; L. S. Belaya; G. R. Gainieva; V. G. Lupenko

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Toxicological characterization of the process stream from an experimental low Btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples were obtained from selected positions in the process stream of an experimental low Btu gasifier using a five-stage multicyclone train and...Salmonella mammalian microsome mutagenicity assay) and forin vit...

J. M. Benson; J. O. Hill; C. E. Mitchell…

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Mutagenicity of potential effluents from an experimental low btu coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential waste effluents produced by an experimental low Btu coal gasifier were assessed for mutagenic activity inSalmonella...strain TA98. Cyclone dust, tar and water effluents were mutagenic, but only followin...

J. M. Benson; C. E. Mitchell; R. E. Royer…

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator Erin Boedecker, Session Moderator April 27, 2011 | Washington, DC Energy Demand. Efficiency, and Consumer Behavior 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference Expanded Standards Expanded Standards + Codes -7.6% ≈ 0 Expanded standards and codes case limits combined buildings delivered energy to 21 quadrillion Btu by 2035 2 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2011 -4.8% 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2010 Technology Reference High Technology High technology assumptions with more efficient consumer behavior keep buildings energy to just over 20 quadrillion Btu 3 Erin Boedecker, EIA Energy Conference, April 27, 2011 delivered energy quadrillion Btu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Water protection in coke-plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Reducing dust emissions at OAO Alchevskkoks coke battery 10A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke battery 10A with rammed batch is under construction at OAO Alchevskkoks. The design documentation developed by Giprokoks includes measures for reducing dust emissions to the atmosphere. Aspiration systems with dry dust trapping are employed in the new components of coke battery 10A and in the existing coke-sorting equipment. Two-stage purification of dusty air in cyclones and bag filters is employed for the coke-sorting equipment. This system considerably reduces coke-dust emissions to the atmosphere.

T.F. Trembach; E.N. Lanina [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Relation between the coking-chamber height, the coking pressure, and the packing density of regular or partially briquetted coal batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since coking coal is characterized by both elasticity and ductility in the plastic state, the coal charge of coke furnaces that contains a plastic layer exerts pressure (coking pressure) on the chamber walls. The...

L. V. Kopeliovich; V. I. Sukhorukov; V. I. Shvetsov

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum coke, a byproduct of the petroleum-refining process, is an attractive primary or supplemental fuel for power production primarily because of a progressive and predictable increase in the production volumes of petroleum coke (1, 2). Petroleum coke is most commonly blended with coal in proportions suitable to meet sulfur emission compliance. Petroleum coke is generally less reactive than coal; therefore, the cofiring of petroleum coke with coal typically improves ignition, flame stability, and carbon loss relative to the combustion of petroleum coke alone. Although petroleum coke is a desirable fuel for producing relatively inexpensive electrical power, concerns about the effects of petroleum coke blending on combustion and pollution control processes exist in the coal-fired utility industry (3). The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed a 2-year technical assessment of petroleum coke as a supplemental fuel. A survey questionnaire was sent to seven electric utility companies that are currently cofiring coal and petroleum coke in an effort to solicit specific suggestions on research needs and fuel selections. An example of the letter and survey questionnaire is presented in Appendix A. Interest was expressed by most utilities in evaluating the effects of petroleum coke blending on grindability, combustion reactivity, fouling, slagging, and fly ash emissions control. Unexpectedly, concern over corrosion was not expressed by the utilities contacted. Although all seven utilities responded to the question, only two utilities, Northern States Power Company (NSP) and Ameren, sent fuels to the EERC for evaluation. Both utilities sent subbituminous coals from the Power River Basin and petroleum shot coke samples. Petroleum shot coke is produced unintentionally during operational upsets in the petroleum refining process. This report evaluates the effects of petroleum shot coke blending on grindability, fuel reactivity, fouling/slagging, and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) fly ash collection efficiency.

Kevin C. Galbreath; Donald L. Toman; Christopher J. Zygarlicke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

REDUCING POWER PRODUCTION COSTS BY UTILIZING PETROLEUM COKE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance. Although the blending of petroleum coke with coal may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Table 16. U.S. Coke Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Exports U.S. Coke Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 16. U.S. Coke Exports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 162,796 79,217 201,795 242,013 340,944 -29.0 Canada* 73,859 17,837 112,348 91,696 161,596 -43.3 Mexico 88,535 60,517 86,721 149,052 176,163 -15.4 Other** 402 863 2,726 1,265 3,185 -60.3 South America Total 223 217 591 440 1,158 -62.0 Other** 223 217 591 440 1,158 -62.0 Europe Total 48,972 59,197 - 108,169 6 NM Other** 347 11,743 - 12,090 - - United Kingdom 48,625 47,454 - 96,079 6 NM Asia Total 317 553 633 870 4,778

108

Table 21. U.S. Coke Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Imports U.S. Coke Imports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 21. U.S. Coke Imports (short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 10,284 2,293 159,462 12,577 183,712 -93.2 Canada 3,009 2,293 159,462 5,302 183,712 -97.1 Panama 7,275 - - 7,275 - - South America Total 25,267 13,030 88,424 38,297 106,612 -64.1 Brazil - - 78,595 - 78,595 - Colombia 25,267 13,030 9,829 38,297 28,017 36.7 Europe Total 6,044 40,281 165,027 46,325 485,791 -90.5 Czech Republic - 170 - 170 - - Spain 363 - - 363 - - Ukraine 5,681 40,111 5,047 45,792 53,543 -14.5 United Kingdom

109

Low-Btu coal gasification in the United States: company topical. [Brick producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazelton and other brick producers have proved the reliability of the commercial size Wellman-Galusha gasifier. For this energy intensive business, gas cost is the major portion of the product cost. Costs required Webster/Hazelton to go back to the old, reliable alternative energy of low Btu gasification when the natural gas supply started to be curtailed and prices escalated. Although anthracite coal prices have skyrocketed from $34/ton (1979) to over $71.50/ton (1981) because of high demand (local as well as export) and rising labor costs, the delivered natural gas cost, which reached $3.90 to 4.20/million Btu in the Hazelton area during 1981, has allowed the producer gas from the gasifier at Webster Brick to remain competitive. The low Btu gas cost (at the escalated coal price) is estimated to be $4/million Btu. In addition to producing gas that is cost competitive with natural gas at the Webster Brick Hazelton plant, Webster has the security of knowing that its gas supply will be constant. Improvements in brick business and projected deregulation of the natural gas price may yield additional, attractive cost benefits to Webster Brick through the use of low Btu gas from these gasifiers. Also, use of hot raw gas (that requires no tar or sulfur removal) keeps the overall process efficiency high. 25 references, 47 figures, 14 tables.

Boesch, L.P.; Hylton, B.G.; Bhatt, C.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effect of bulk density of coking coal on swelling pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coking coals are the important raw materials for the iron and steel industries and play an important role on its sustainable development, especially on the stamp-charging coke making with the characteristics of increasing the bulk density. There is a significance on the reasonable usage of the coking coal resource with the reduced production cost, improved efficiency of the economy to develop the stamp-charging coke making technology. Important effects of the density of coking coal on the coking and caking properties were investigated. In the article, the maximum values of swelling pressure and variation of Laowan gas coal and Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, Longhu fat coal and Didao coking coal, which were mined at Shenyang and Qitaihe respectively, were investigated under different bulk densities during the coking. The results showed that when the values of density increased from 0.85 ton/m3 to 1.05 ton/m3, for the Laowan gas coal, swelling pressure variation and even the maximum value changed slightly. The swelling pressure was 3.63 \\{KPa\\} when the density was improved to 1.05 ton/m3; for the Xinjian 1/3 coking coal, the values of swelling pressure changed significantly and the maximum values was 82.88 \\{KPa\\} with the density improved to 1.05 when the coal was heated to 600°C. The coke porosity, which was investigated by automatic microphotometer, decreased from 47.4% to 33.1% with the increasing of the density from 0.85 ton/m3 to 1.05 ton/m3, and the decreased value was 14.3%. Meanwhile, the pore structures of four cokes were characterized by an optical microscope.

Jinfeng Bai; Chunwang Yang; Zhenning Zhao; Xiangyun Zhong; Yaru Zhang; Jun Xu; Bai Xi; Hongchun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

,"Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)",1,"Weekly","12/13/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdw.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:22 PM"

112

Coke profile and effect on methane/ethylene conversion process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to investigate the coke profile with respect to time on stream and the change of product distribution due to… (more)

Al-Solami, Bandar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modélisation thermomécanique d'un piédroit de four à coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Inscrite dans le cadre du projet européen Coke Oven Operating Limits, cette thèse porte sur la modélisation thermomécanique d'un piédroit de cokerie. Le piédroit est… (more)

Landreau, Matthieu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The methods of steam coals usage for coke production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nowadays, high volatile bituminous coals are broadly used for metallurgical coke production in Russia. The share of such coals in the coking blend is variable from 20 to 40% by weight. There are some large coal deposits in Kuznetskii basin which have coals with low caking tendency. The low caking properties of such coals limit of its application in the coking process. At the same time the usage of low caking coals for coke production would allow flexibility of the feedstock for coke production. Preliminary tests, carried out in COAL-C's lab has shown some differences in coal properties with dependence on the size distribution. That is why the separation of the well-caking fraction from petrographically heterogeneous coals and its further usage in coking process may be promising. Another way for low caking coals application in the coke industry is briquettes production from such coals. This method has been known for a very long time. It may be divided into two possible directions. First is a direct coking of briquettes from the low caking coals. Another way is by adding briquettes to coal blends in defined proportion and combined coking. The possibility of application of coal beneficiation methods mentioned above was investigated in present work.

Korobetskii, I.A.; Ismagilov, M.S.; Nazimov, S.A.; Sladkova, I.L.; Shudrikov, E.S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reducing power production costs by utilizing petroleum coke. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the North Antelope mine and a petroleum shot coke were received from Northern States Power Company (NSP) for testing the effects of parent fuel properties on coal-coke blend grindability and evaluating the utility of petroleum coke blending as a strategy for improving electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes are generally harder than coals, as indicated by Hardgrove grindability tests. Therefore, the weaker coal component may concentrate in the finer size fractions during the pulverizing of coal-coke blends. The possibility of a coal-coke size fractionation effect is being investigated because it may adversely affect combustion performance, it may enhance ESP particulate collection efficiency. Petroleum cokes contain much higher concentrations of V relative to coals. Consequently, coke blending can significantly increase the V content of fly ash resulting from coal-coke combustion. Pentavalent vanadium oxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) is a known catalyst for transforming gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}[g]) to gaseous sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}[g]). The presence of SO{sub 3}(g) strongly affects fly ash resistivity and, thus, ESP performance.

Galbreath, K.C.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nippon Coke and Engineering Sumitomo Corp JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name: Nippon Coke and Engineering & Sumitomo Corp JV Place: Tokyo, Japan Zip: 135-6007 Product: Japan-based natural graphite base anode materials joint...

117

Impact of Coal-Coking Effluent on Sediment Microbial Communities: a Multivariate Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...General Microbial Ecology Impact of Coal-Coking Effluent on Sediment Microbial...response to and recovery from coal-coking waste effluent was evaluated for...community response. Impact of coal-coking effluent on sediment microbial...

Gary S. Sayler; Timothy W. Sherrill; Richard E. Perkins; Lawrence M. Mallory; Michael P. Shiaris; Deana Pedersen

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of an Advanced Combined Heat and Power (CHP) System Utilizing Off-Gas from Coke Calcination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Coke calcination is a process that involves the heating of green petroleum coke in order to remove volatile material and purify the coke for further processing. Calcined coke is vital to the...

119

A novel technique for assessing the coking potential of coals/coal blends for non-recovery coke making process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In an effort to broaden the scope of coal selection, the authors have developed a novel procedure based on a coefficient, named as Composite Coking Potential (CCP). CCP value assesses the suitability of a coal/coal blend for producing coke of desired quality; measured by the parameter coke strength after reaction (CSR). The coking potential takes into account of various properties of the coals and their proportions in a given coal blend and convert them into a single value. This technique is having advantage since each of these parameters represents different aspects of the coking phenomena along with inter dependence of some of these parameters also exists. This makes the coal selection process extremely difficult and in majority of the cases, decision is taken based on experience. In this investigation, CCP model has been used for selecting the least expensive coal blends which will comply with the minimum coke quality requirements of blast furnace. The study confirms the inter relations between the CCP and the hot strength of coke i.e. CSR. Actual plant data of a non-recovery coke oven have been used for developing and validation of the model. The technique was successfully used in identifying cheaper coals for producing coke with desired quality.

H.P. Tiwari; P.K. Banerjee; V.K. Saxena

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

DELAYED COKING OF SOLVENT EXTRACTED COAL FOR PRODUCTION OF ANODE GRADE COKE: CHARACTERIZATION OF SOLID AND LIQUID PRODUCTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigates the feasibility of using high temperature solvent extraction of coal to produce feedstock for the production of anode grade coke through delayed… (more)

Karri, Vamsi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Value of Shipments and Receipts" ,"(million dollars)" ," Under 20",3,3,3

122

RELATION BETWEEN TEXTURE AND REACTIVITY IN METALLURGICAL COKES OBTAINED FROM COAL USING PETROLEUM COKE AS ADDITIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactivity to C O2 is, perhaps, the most importam quality parameter used to evaluate the performance of a metallurgical coke in the blast furnace [ 1]. A lot of effort has been made to study how it is influenced by the

J. J. Pis; J. A. Men~ndez; R. Alvarez; M. A. Diez; J. B. Parra

123

Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Adsorptive removal of nitrogen from coal-based needle coke feedstocks using activated carbon.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A low percentage of nitrogen in needle coke feedstocks is desired for the reduction of puffing during the process of graphitization of needle coke. The… (more)

Madala, Sreeja.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Prediction of Coke Quality in Ironmaking Process: A Data Mining Approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coke is an indispensable material in Ironmaking process by blast furnace. To provide good and constant quality coke for stable and efficient blast furance operation… (more)

Hsieh, Hsu-huang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

127

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

128

Effects of preheating and highly heat-conductive brick on coke quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In replacing the coke ovens available currently, the introduction of a combined technique of a preheated coal charging method (preheating temperature:175 C) and the use of highly heat-conductive brick is under examination for raising the productivity of coke ovens. With such background, a study of the effects of this combined technique on the coke quality, especially the coke size was conducted. The experimental results revealed that the primary size of coke produced by the combined technique is noticeably larger than that of the coke made from wet coal and after five revolutions of drum (equivalent to mechanical impact given at a time of dropping from coke oven chamber to wharf), the coke size reduces even compared with an ordinary coke. This may be due to the fact that the coke produced by the combined technique includes a lot of fissures inside the coke lump.

Fukuda, K.; Arima, T. [Nippon Steel Corp., Chiba (Japan). Process Technology, Research Labs.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Research on the evolvement of morphology of coking coal during the coking process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The evolvement of morphology and structure of the coal with different metamorphic degrees during coking process in the vertical furnace was investigated by infrared Image detector. Moreover, the temperature distribution in the radial direction and the crack formation were also studied in heating process. The results show that the amount of crack and the shrinkage level of char decrease with the coal rank rising. In addition, the initial temperature of crack formation for char increases with the coal rank rising.

Xiangyun Zhong; Shiyong Wu; Yang Liu; Zhenning Zhao; Yaru Zhang; Jinfeng Bai; Jun Xu; Bai Xi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Coke formation during pyrolysis of 1,2-dichloroethane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most processes involving hydrocarbons or carbon oxides at high temperatures suffer from the disadvantage of coke formation. The formation of coke deposits during pyrolysis of hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is of significant practical importance. Examples of such processes are the steam cracking of alkanes to produce olefins and the thermal decomposition of 1,2-dichloroethane (EDC) for the production of vinyl chloride monomer (VCM). Even id the rate of coke production is low, the cumulative nature of the solid product will result in reactor fouling. The present work deals with the thermal decomposition of EDC. Coke formation has been studied on metal surfaces in a quartz tubular reactor. The rate of coke deposition was measures on metal foils hanging from one arm of a microbalance. A complete analysis of the product gas was accomplished using on-line gas chromatography. The results show that coke deposition during thermal decomposition of EDC depends on the composition of the feed as well as on the nature of the surface of the metal foil. Small amounts of other components (contamination with other chlorinated hydrocarbons as an example) may have a large influence on the rate of coke formation. The results are discussed in terms of surface composition/morphology of the metal foil and the free radical mechanism for thermal decomposition of FDC.

Holmen, A. [Norwegian Institute of Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Lindvag, O.A. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coke mineral transformations in the experimental blast furnace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Blast furnace efficiency may be improved by optimizing coke reactivity. Some but not all forms of mineral matter in the coke modify its reactivity, but changes in mineral matter that occur within coke while in the blast furnace have not been fully quantified. To determine changes in mineral matter forms in the blast furnace, coke samples from a dissection study in the LKAB experimental blast furnace (EBF) were characterized using SEM/EDS analysis, EPMA (microprobe), and low-temperature ashing/quantitative XRD analysis. Variations in alkali concentration, particularly potassium, dominated the compositional changes. At high concentrations of potassium, the mineral matter was largely potassium-bearing but even more potassium was diffused throughout the coke and not associated with mineral matter. There was little difference in potassium concentration between the core and surface of the coke pieces, suggesting that potassium diffused rapidly through the whole coke. Iron, calcium, silicon, and aluminum concentrations were relatively constant in comparison, although the mineralogy of all elements changed significantly with changing temperature. 23 refs., 20 figs., 9 tabs.

Kelli Kazuberns; Sushil Gupta; Mihaela Grigore; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Mats Hallin; Bo Lindblom; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Surveyor: A System for Generating Coherent Survey Articles for Scientific Topics Rahul Jha and Reed Coke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coke Department of EECS University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 Dragomir Radev Department of EECS

Radev, Dragomir R.

133

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

134

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

135

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhda.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35611,2.49 35976,2.09 36341,2.27 36707,4.31 37072,3.96 37437,3.38 37802,5.47 38168,5.89 38533,8.69 38898,6.73

136

,"Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/16/2013" Daily","12/16/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngwhhdd.htm" ,"Source:" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" 35437,3.82 35438,3.8 35439,3.61 35440,3.92 35443,4 35444,4.01 35445,4.34 35446,4.71 35447,3.91

137

Variation in coke properties within the blast-furnace shop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In active production at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK), samples of melt materials were taken during shutdown and during planned repairs at furnaces 1 and 8. In particular, coke was taken from the tuyere zone at different distances from the tuyere tip. The mass of the point samples was 2-15 kg, depending on the sampling zone. The material extracted from each zone underwent magnetic separation and screening by size class. The resulting coke sample was averaged out and divided into parts: one for determining the granulometric composition and mechanical strength; and the other for technical analysis and determination of the physicochemical properties of the coke.

E.N. Stepanov; I.I. Mel'nikov; V.P. Gridasov; A.A. Stepanova [OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (MMK), Magnitogorsk, (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

An analytical investigation of primary zone combustion temperatures and NOx production for turbulent jet flames using low-BTU fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the production of low-BTU gas from a coal gasification reactor for combustion before introduction to the topping cycle gas turbine (Minchener, 1990). Most low-BTU gases are heavily loaded with sulfur-containing compounds which appear to be a major problem... with direct combustion of coal and low-BTU gases (Caraway, 1995). Environmental standards require the removal of these compounds which can be expensive and hazardous when removed from coal in post-combustion processes. However, gasification of coal results...

Carney, Christopher Mark

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

TRP0033 - PCI Coal Combustion Behavior and Residual Coal Char Carryover in the Blast Furnace of 3 American Steel Companies during Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) at High Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion behavior of pulverized coals (PC), gasification and thermal annealing of cokes were investigated under controlled environments. Physical and chemical properties of PCI, coke and carbon residues of blast furnace dust/sludge samples were characterized. The strong influence of carbon structure and minerals on PCI reactivity was demonstrated. A technique to characterize char carryover in off gas emissions was established.

Veena Sahajwalla; Sushil Gupta

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Graphitized needle cokes and natural graphites for lithium intercalation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examined effects of heat treatment and milling (before or after heat treatment) on the (electrochemical) intercalating ability of needle petroleum coke; natural graphite particles are included for comparison. 1 tab, 4 figs, 7 refs.

Tran, T.D.; Spellman, L.M.; Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Goldberger, W.M. [Superior Graphite Co., Chicago, IL (United States); Kinoshita, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Variation in mineral composition of coal during enrichment and coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The parameters I b and B b used in developing an optimal coking-batch composition are determined from data on ... of the ash in Donetsk Basin and other coal. It is found that, when...

M. L. Ulanovskii; A. N. Likhenko

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Coking properties of coal pitch in coal batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coking properties of coal pitch depend significantly on its fractional composition, ... : 2: 2. This is typical of coal pitch with a softening temperature of 75– ... Such pitch is the best clinkering additive...

S. G. Gagarin; Yu. I. Neshin

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Coal preparation, coking, and slaking in China and Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In China and Japan, measures have been developed to maintain constant coke quality and hence permit economical and stable blast-furnace operation with the injection of coal-dust fuel; and to reduce the cost of th...

I. F. Kurunov; P. V. Lizogub; O. V. Golubev

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coking theory: Internal stress in the coal batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of local internal stress in the coal batch is analyzed on the basis of ... theoretical and experimental data. Its influence on coke quality is demonstrated. The influence of mineralized ... large ...

V. I. Sukhorukov

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Share a Coke - An Investigation of Social Media Marketing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This investigation examines the underlying factors behind audience participation in Coca-Cola’s ‘Share a Coke’ campaign, which became a trend on social media in Denmark in… (more)

Trougaard, Victor Frederic Wagn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: WRI COKING INDEXES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis experiments were conducted with three residua at 400 C (752 F) at various residence times. The wt % coke and gaseous products were measured for the product oils. The Western Research Institute (WRI) Coking Indexes were determined for the product oils. Measurements were made using techniques that might correlate with the Coking Indexes. These included spin-echo proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, heat capacity measurements at 280 C (536 F), and ultrasonic attenuation. The two immiscible liquid phases that form once coke formation begins were isolated and characterized for a Boscan residuum pyrolyzed at 400 C (752 F) for 55 minutes. These materials were analyzed for elemental composition (CHNS), porphyrins, and metals (Ni,V) content.

John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Francis P. Miknis; Thomas F. Turner

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 38. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Census Division June 30, 2013 March 31, 2013 June 30, 2012 Percent Change (June 30) 2013 versus 2012 Middle Atlantic w w w w East North Central 1,313 1,177 1,326 -1.0 South Atlantic w w w w East South Central w w w w U.S. Total 2,500 2,207 2,295 8.9 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants.'

148

SOURCE ACTIVITY TITLE: SOLID FUEL TRANSFORMATION PLANTS Coke Oven Furnaces Coke Oven (Door Leakage and Extinction) NOSE CODE: 104.12 NFR CODE:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ACTIVITIES INCLUDED Coke-production in general can be divided into the following steps: Coal handling and storage, coke oven charging, coal coking, extinction of coke, and coke oven gas purification. Combustion in coke oven furnaces (SNAP 010406) is treated in this chapter as well as door leakage and extinction (SNAP 040201). Figure 1-1 gives a key plan of a coke plant with emission relevant process steps and the byproduct recovery section. Figure 1-1: Key plan of a coke plant (Rentz et al. 1995) C o a l S lu d g e B l a s t F u r n a c e G a s f r o m S t e e l M il l A i r E m is s io n s G a s H o ld e r

Ic Activities; So Nox Nmv

149

Priorities in the design of chemical shops at coke plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent trends in the design of chemical equipment at coke plants are described, through the lens of experience at Giprokoks. The main priorities were to improve the removal of impurities from coke oven gas; to improve equipment design on the basis of new materials; to reduce reagent consumption; to reduce the materials and energy consumed in the construction of new equipment; and to minimize impacts on the environment and worker health. Some technological equipment is briefly characterized.

V.I. Rudyka; Y.E. Zingerman; V.V. Grabko; L.A. Kazak [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

"NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 6.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",,,"Consumption" " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Employment Size" ," Under 50",3,4,4 ," 50-99",5,5,5 ," 100-249",4,4,3

151

Laboratory-Scale Coking of Coal?Petroleum Mixtures in Sealed Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Further evidence for coal?petroleum interactions in this system is exhibited by the fact that (i) the product slates from the co-coking reactions are not linear combinations of the products from the feedstocks reacted individually and (ii) the fluidity profiles of the Powellton?resid mixtures are similar to those for two interacting coking coals. ... The boiling distribution of the oils from co-coking resembles that observed when the Powellton coal was coked in the absence of resid. ... In addition, the co-coking reactions show a “coke jump” that occurs at ?465 °C; this jump is not observed when the coal or petroleum feedstocks are reacted individually. ...

Anne E. Fickinger; Mark W. Badger; Gareth D. Mitchell; Harold H. Schobert

2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

152

Prediction of metallurgical coke strength from the petrographic composition of coal blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turkey, especially Zonguldak on the West Coast of Black Sea region, has large reserves of bituminous coal that can be used either directly or in blends with other coals for metallurgical coke production. It is possible to predict the coking properties of these coals by petrographic analysis. In this study, semi- and non-coking coals were blended with coking bituminous coals in varying proportions and an estimation was made as to their stability factors through petrographic techniques. It was established that semi- and non-coking bituminous coals could be used in the production of metallurgical coke.

Sutcu, H.; Toroglu, I.; Piskin, S. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydrodesulfurization of Fluid Catalytic Cracking Decant Oils for the Production of Low-sulfur Needle Coke Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Needle coke, produced by the delayed coking of fluid catalytic cracking decant oils, is the primary filler used in the production of graphite electrodes. The… (more)

Wincek, Ronald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Preparation and coking properties of coal maceral concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The concentrates with different maceral contents were obtained from Kailuan coking coals with different coal ranks ( R o,ran ? varying from 0.88% to 1.73%) by float–sink separation in lab. Then these concentrates were characterized by proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, petrography analysis and coking index determination. The results show that the vitrinite is characterized as nature of lower carbon content, higher hydrogen content, higher volatile matter and stronger caking property compared to inertinite. The relationships between variation rate of volatile matter and maximum volatile matter and coal ranks are identified, and a linear model is developed for fast determination of the maceral contents. Compared to inertinite-rich concentrate, the blending ratio of vitrinite-rich concentrate is increased by 13%, which is considered to be a potential technique based on maceral separation for expanding the coking coal resources.

Lei Zhang; Wenli Liu; Dongpo Men

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coking Plants, Coal-to-gas Plants, Gas Production and Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This environmental brief covers various coal upgrading technologies, incl. coking and low-temperature carbonization as processes yielding the target products coke and gas plus tar products and diverse...

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Determining the coking properties and technological value of coal and coal mixtures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is developed for determining the coking properties and technological value of coal from newly identified beds or new sections of existing mines. The coking properties are assessed on the basis of predict...

A. S. Stankevich; V. S. Stankevich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Influence of frothing-agent oxidation on coking-coal flotation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxidation of frothing agents (KOBS, OPPG-3, and the tar fraction of peat bitumen) affects coking-coal flotation. The tar fraction of Krapivinsk-peat ... provides the basis for a frothing agent in coking-coal ...

M. Yu. Klimovich; S. I. Zherebtsov; Yu. V. Musin; A. I. Moiseev…

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Calculating the relative value of coal in Russian coking-coal markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to improve the pricing of Russian coking coal, a method is proposed for calculating the relative technological value of purchased coking-coal batches. The basic idea is to compare the parameters of optim...

V. A. Brodskii; E. V. Brodskaya

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Coal resources at OOO Metinvest Holding and their optimal coking at PAO AKKhZ  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal resources at OOO Metinvest Holding are considered, in a climate of increase requirements on coke quality and self-reliance. The parameters of high-quality coke are outlined, and the corresponding require...

V. G. Gusak; V. I. Gavrilyuk; M. S. Magomedov; A. A. Pasternak…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Role of coke characteristics in the regeneration of a catalyst for the MTG process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect on combustion in air of the nature of the coke deposited in HZSM5 zeolites used in the MTG process has been studied. This coke is highly hydrogenated and unstable, and its H/C ratio decreases during combustion or when a previous thermal treatment is carried out. Coke H/C ratio greatly affects its reactivity during combustion; consequently, a severe thermal equilibration treatment is recommended for reproducibility of results. Combustion kinetics of equilibrated coke, when it is released from the catalyst, has been proven to be similar to that of the coke deposited on other catalysts for several processes. Lower coke reactivity for aging and combustion, on being deposited within the HZSM5 zeolite, must be attributed to air-coke contact restrictions due to the location of the coke, which partially impedes the flow of air into the crystals.

Ortega, J.M.; Gayubo, A.G.; Aguayo, A.T.; Benito, P.L.; Bilbao, J. [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

New packing in absorption systems for trapping benzene from coke-oven gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficiency of benzene removal from coke-oven gas in absorption units OAO Alchevskkoks with new packing is assessed.

V.V. Grabko; V.M. Li; T.A. Shevchenko; M.A. Solov'ev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coke in the Cross Hairs: Water, India, and the University of Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coke in the Cross Hairs: Water, India, and the University of Michigan case 1-429-098 July 25, 2010, where "Killer Coke" banners had hung days before. Students were holed away studying for finals, the demonstrations were over and Coke was once again flowing from machines at the Michigan Union. That morning

Edwards, Paul N.

163

The effect of CO? on the flammability limits of low-BTU gas of the type obtained from Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. N. Heffington An experimental study was conducted to determine if relatively large amounts of CO in a low-BTU gas of the type 2 derived from underground gasification of Texas lignite would cause significant... ? Flammability limit data for three actual samples of low-BTU gas obtained from an in-situ coal gasification experiment (Heffington, 1981). The HHC are higher LIST OF TABLES (Cont'd) PAGE hydrocarbons orimarily C H and C H . ----- 34 I 2 6 3 8' TABLE 5...

Gaines, William Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 33. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,051 2,997 3,092 6,048 6,156 -1.8 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,471 5,280 5,296 10,751 10,579 1.6 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

165

Process for converting coal into liquid fuel and metallurgical coke  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of recovering coal liquids and producing metallurgical coke utilizes low ash, low sulfur coal as a parent for a coal char formed by pyrolysis with a volatile content of less than 8%. The char is briquetted and heated in an inert gas over a prescribed heat history to yield a high strength briquette with less than 2% volatile content.

Wolfe, Richard A. (Abingdon, VA); Im, Chang J. (Abingdon, VA); Wright, Robert E. (Bristol, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimating Coke and Pepsi's Price and Advertising Strategies Amos Golan*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Coke and Pepsi's Price and Advertising Strategies Amos Golan* Larry S. Karp** Jeffrey M strategies in prices and advertising for Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola. Separate strategies for each firm variables are prices and advertising. We divide each firm's continuous price-advertising action space

Lansky, Joshua

167

Lummus process turns coal tar pitch to coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lummus Co. has developed a process for converting coal tar pitch to coke and now has a full-scale commercial plant in operation in Japan. The plant, which is owned by Nittetsu Chemical Industrial Co., a subsidiary of Yawata Iron and Steel, is producing ...

1968-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

The development of coke smelting and the industrial revolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abraham Darby and the origins of the industrial revolution in Britain. Alan Macfarlane talks to John about the reasons for the area near Birmingham becoming the epi-centre of the industrial development, and the development of coke furnaces and iron...

Macfarlane, Alan

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coke quality for blast furnaces with coal-dust fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, plans have been developed for the introduction of pulverized coal injection (PCI) at various Russian metallurgical enterprises. The main incentive for switching to PCI is the recent price rises for Russian natural gas. The paper discusses the quality of coke for PCI into blast furnaces.

Y.A. Zolotukhin; N.S. Andreichikov [Eastern Coal-Chemistry Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 23. Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Census Division April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change Middle Atlantic w w w w w w East North Central 3,189 2,679 3,225 5,867 5,993 -2.1 South Atlantic w w w w w w East South Central w w w w w w U.S. Total 5,770 4,962 5,370 10,732 10,440 2.8 w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure. Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-5, 'Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report - Coke Plants

171

The Role of Semifusinite in Plasticity Development for a Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal rank is a factor of great importance in plasticity development during carbonization, since only some bituminous coals swell in a satisfactory manner and then resolidify to produce good commercial cokes. ... Diessel studied the carbonization behavior of the inertinite macerals in Australian coals by carrying out tests up to 1000 °C where the optical characteristics of the coked entities were correlated with their noncoked counterparts. ... For instance, large-scale coking experiments of some Australian coals containing more than 45% inertinite produced good quality coke, while a Carboniferous coal with that high of an inertinite content gave only a very poor coke. ...

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Darrell N. Taulbee; John M. Andrésen; James C. Hower; Colin E. Snape

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

172

Theoretical and experimental foundations for preparing coke for blast-furnace smelting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the preparation of coke for blast-furnace smelting by a method that most fully meets the requirements of blast-furnace technology: screening of the -36 mm fraction, the separation of nut coke of the 15-36 mm fraction, and its charging into the furnace in a mixture with the iron-ore-bearing charge components. An analysis is made of trial use of coke of the Premium class on blast furnace No. 5 at the Enakievo Metallurgical Plant. Use of this coke makes it possible to reduce the consumption of skip coke by 3.2-4.1%.

A.L. Podkorytov; A.M. Kuznetsov; E.N. Dymchenko; V.P. Padalka; S.L. Yaroshevskii; A.V. Kuzin [Enakievo Metallurgical Plant, Enakievo (Ukraine)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coke battery with 51-m{sup 3} furnace chambers and lateral supply of mixed gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic approaches employed in the construction of coke battery 11A at OAO Magnitogorskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat are outlined. This battery includes 51.0-m{sup 3} furnaces and a dust-free coke-supply system designed by Giprokoks with lateral gas supply; it is heated exclusively by low-calorific mixed gas consisting of blast-furnace gas with added coke-oven gas. The 82 furnaces in the coke battery are divided into two blocks of 41. The gross coke output of the battery (6% moisture content) is 1140000 t/yr.

V.I. Rudyka; N.Y. Chebotarev; O.N. Surenskii; V.V. Derevich [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Characterization of Liquids Derived From Laboratory Coking of Decant Oil and Co-Coking of Pittsburgh Seam Bituminous Coal with Decant Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(41-43) Co-coking of decant oil/coal blend produced higher coke and gas yields but less liquid product than those of coking. ... When the same decant oil was blended with the Pittsburgh Seam coal and then delayed co-coked, the overhead liquid contained 2.1% gasoline, 3.6% jet fuel, 4.6% diesel, and 88.8% fuel oil on average. ... It is also possible that catalytic cracking reactions may occur via the coal mineral matter (e.g., clays, which are abundant minerals in coals, can serve as cracking catalysts) (Table 1). ...

Ömer Gül; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Study on the effect of heat treatment and gasification on the carbon structure of coal chars and metallurgical cokes using fourier transform Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differences in the development of carbon structures between coal chars and metallurgical cokes during high-temperature reactions have been investigated using Raman spectroscopy. These are important to differentiate between different types of carbons in dust recovered from the top gas of the blast furnace. Coal chars have been prepared from a typical injectant coal under different heat-treatment conditions. These chars reflected the effect of peak temperature, residence time at peak temperature, heating rate and pressure on the evolution of their carbon structures. The independent effect of gasification on the development of the carbon structure of a representative coal char has also been studied. A similar investigation has also been carried out to study the effect of heat-treatment temperature (from 1300 to 2000{sup o}C) and gasification on the carbon structure of a typical metallurgical coke. Two Raman spectral parameters, the intensity ratio of the D band to the G band (I{sub D}/I{sub G}) and the intensity ratio of the valley between D and G bands to the G band (I{sub V}/I{sub G}), have been found useful in assessing changes in carbon structure. An increase in I{sub D}/I{sub G} indicates the growth of basic graphene structural units across the temperature range studied. A decrease in I{sub V}/I{sub G} appears to suggest the elimination of amorphous carbonaceous materials and ordering of the overall carbon structure. The Raman spectral differences observed between coal chars and metallurgical cokes are considered to result from the difference in the time-temperature history between the raw injectant coal and the metallurgical coke and may lay the basis for differentiation between metallurgical coke fines and coal char residues present in the dust carried over the top of the blast furnace. 41 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

S. Dong; P. Alvarez; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Coke County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coke County, Texas: Energy Resources Coke County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.8277663°, -100.5296115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8277663,"lon":-100.5296115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

177

Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

Shang, Jer Y. (McLean, VA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pricing of Australia's coking coal exports: A regional hedonic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Black coal is Australia's most important export commodity, but the profitability of the domestic coal industry has been low relative to the mining sector average. As a consequence, a key policy issue in Australia has been the extent to which Japan's coal pricing and investment policies have influenced coal market outcomes. In this paper, a regional hedonic pricing model of Australia's coking coal exports is estimated for the period JFY1989 to 1996. Non-Japan regional intercept dummy variables were found to be significantly different from zero, although these varied across coal categories and years. However, the empirical evidence indicates that Japan does not pay significantly lower prices relative to other major export markets for coking coal of a given quality.

Lindsay Hogan; Sally Thorpe; Anthony Swan; Simon Middleton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Coke profile and effect on methane/ethylene conversion process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

balance in catalytic cracking. It is also extremely important in the dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene, because coke formation limits the cycle time before regeneration of the catalyst is needed. There are many add that equally important examples..., methane, ethane, ethylene, propane, iso-butane, butane, iso-pentane, pentane and hexanes. Also, the flow rate of the effluent stream is measured using the bubble meter. The mole percentages of methane and ethylene are subtracted of the effluent stream...

Al-Solami, Bandar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

New environmental concepts in the chemical and coke industries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We know that environmentally pure technologies do not exist. Coke production is no exception to the rule. The article considers the logic of environmental decision making. Attention focuses on a new bank of ecologically appropriate materials whose release to the biosphere must be considered solely in quantititative terms. Qualitativily all these materials are familiar; they are assimilated by populations of microorganisms and tar thus compatible with the biosphere.

A.Yu. Naletov; V.A. Naletov [Mendeleev Russian Chemical-Engineering University (Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Table 17. Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 17. Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Destination April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 240.59 241.38 218.40 240.85 225.80 6.7 Canada* 147.49 330.47 243.04 183.08 286.56 -36.1 Mexico 316.57 211.63 189.12 273.97 171.71 59.6 Other** 612.42 485.63 134.48 525.92 135.04 289.5 South America Total 140.65 156.15 322.70 148.29 250.36 -40.8 Other** 140.65 156.15 322.70 148.29 250.36 -40.8 Europe Total 259.26 255.24 - 257.06 427.83 -39.9 Other**

182

Table 22. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Table 22. Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Quarterly Coal Report, April - June 2013 Year to Date Continent and Country of Origin April - June 2013 January - March 2013 April - June 2012 2013 2012 Percent Change North America Total 263.21 252.66 353.05 261.29 356.01 -26.6 Canada 263.51 252.66 353.05 258.82 356.01 -27.3 Panama 263.09 - - 263.09 - - South America Total 196.86 194.14 175.88 195.94 181.01 8.2 Brazil - - 157.60 - 157.60 - Colombia 196.86 194.14 322.06 195.94 246.68 -20.6 Europe Total 181.55 232.13 385.65 225.53 384.96 -41.4 Czech Republic - 475.91 - 475.91 - - Spain 360.51

183

Influence of the permeability of the coal plastic layer on coking pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten coals of different rank and coking pressure characteristics were chosen in order to study the time of occurrence of the phenomena that take place during the coking of a coal and the way they affect the generation of dangerous coking pressures. Parameters derived from thermoplastic, thermogravimetric and permeability tests were studied together with semicoke contraction and the coking pressure generated by the coals in a movable wall oven. It was found that for safe coals, the maximum evolution of volatile matter occurs near the temperature of maximum fluidity. The position of the maximum rate of volatile matter evolution with respect to the zone of low permeability varies depending on the coking pressure characteristics of the coals. In addition, the relationship between the period of low permeability to the resolidification temperature may serve to indicate the degree of dangerousness of a coal. The fissure pattern of the semicoke was found to be related to the coking pressure and semicoke contraction.

M.D. Casal; E. Díaz-Faes; R. Alvarez; M.A. Díez; C. Barriocanal

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

An Integrated Model of Coal/Coke Combustion in a Blast Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three?dimensional integrated mathematical model of the combustion of pulverized coal and coke is developed. The model is applied to the region of lance?blowpipe?tuyere?raceway?coke bed to simulate the operation of pulverized coal injection in an ironmaking blast furnace. The model integrates two parts: pulverized coal combustion model in the blowpipe?tuyere?raceway?coke bed and the coke combustion model in the coke bed. The model is validated against the measurements in terms of coal burnout and gas composition respectively. The comprehensive in?furnace phenomena are simulated in the raceway and coke bed in terms of flow temperature gas composition and coal burning characteristics. In addition underlying mechanisms for the in?furnace phenomena are analyzed. The model provides a cost?effective tool for understanding and optimizing the in?furnace flow?thermo?chemical characteristics of the PCI process in full?scale blast furnaces.

Y. S. Shen; B. Y. Guo; A. B. Yu; P. Austin; P. Zulli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Site clean up of coal gasification residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal gasification plant residues tested in this research consists of various particle sizes of rock, gravel, tar-sand agglomerates, fine sand and soil. Most of the soils particles were tar free. One of the fractions examined contained over 3000 ppM polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The residues were subjected to high pressure water jet washing, float and sink tests, and soil washing. Subsequent PAH analyses found less than 1 ppM PAHs in the water jet washing water. Soils washed with pure water lowered PAH concentrations to 276 ppM; the use of surfactants decreased PAHs to 47, 200, and 240 ppM for different test conditions. In the 47 ppM test, the surfactant temperature had been increased to 80 C, suggesting that surfactant washing efficiency can be greatly improved by increasing the solution temperature. The coal tar particles were not extracted by the surfactants used. Coke and tar-sand agglomerates collected from the float and sink gravimetric separation were tested for heating value. The tar exhibited a very high heating value, while the coke had a heating value close to that of bituminous coal. These processes are believed to have the potential to clean up coal gasification plant residues at a fairly low cost, pending pilot-scale testing and a feasibility study.

Wilson, J.W.; Ding, Y. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

Horner, M.W.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Assessing the utility of coal’s elementary composition in predicting the yield of coking products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Elementary analysis of the organic mass of coal does not provide sufficient information to predict the yield of coking products, since it does not reflect the...

M. L. Ulanovskii

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China based on grey linear regression composition model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scarce of coking coal resources in China results in its short supply. By establishing a grey linear regression composition model, this paper has greatly improved the inadequacy of grey system prediction model and regression analysis method in trend prediction and finished the prediction of demand trends of coking coal in China with this model. As result of the prediction, it is estimated that in the next decade, the demand for coking coal in China will experience a growth trend; China's demand for coking coal will reach more than 1.535 billion tons by 2015, reach the maximum of 1.639 billion tons by 2020 and drop in 2025.

Hai-Dong Zhou; Qiang Wu; Min Fang; Zhong-Bao Ren; Li-Fei Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Balance of supply and demand in the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various methods are considered for calculating the balance of supply and demand in the Russian market for coking-coal concentrates within the planning (prediction) period....

V. A. Brodskii

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Co-gasification of biomass with coal and oil sands coke in a drop tube furnace.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chars were obtained from individual fuels and blends with different blend ratios of coal, coke and biomass in Drop Tube Furnace at different temperatures. Based… (more)

Gao, Chen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

MOLECULAR COMPOSITION OF NEEDLE COKE FEEDSTOCKS AND MESOPHASE DEVELOPMENT DURING CARBONIZATION.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigates the molecular composition of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) decant oil and its derivatives that are used as feedstocks for delayed coking to… (more)

Wang, Guohua

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Pyrolysis behavior of coal and petroleum coke at high temperature and high pressure.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While pyrolysis of coal is a well-studied thermal process, little is known about pressurized pyrolysis of coal and petroleum coke. This study aims to interpret… (more)

Wagner, David Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development Of Reclamation Substrates For Alberta Oil Sands Using Mature Fine Tailings And Coke.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mature fine tailings and coke are waste products of the oil sands industry with potential for reclamation. A greenhouse study assessed whether substrates of various… (more)

Luna-Wolter, Gabriela L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigating factors that influence carbon dissolution from Coke into Molten iron.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The need for more efficient blast furnaces is even greater now that there are stricter environmental regulations on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Coke within the… (more)

Cham, S. Tsuey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal-flow Inside a Petroleum Coke Rotary Calcining Kiln.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Calcined coke is the best material for making carbon anodes for smelting of alumina to aluminum. Calcining is an energy intensive industry and a significant… (more)

Zhang, Zexuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Coke yield and transport processes in agglomerates of bitumen and solids.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Agglomerate formation is a common phenomenon that can cause operating problems in the fluid coking reactor. When agglomerates form they provide longer diffusion paths of… (more)

Ali, Mohamed Ali Hassan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Characterization of Coke Properties at Tuyere Level of an Operating Blast Furnace.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coke performance in an operating blast furnace is often empirically related to popular bench-scale tests, which are performed at relative much lower temperatures. Due to… (more)

Ye, Zhuozhu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preparation of Activated Carbon from Oil Sands Coke by Chemical and Physical Activation Techniques.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oil sands coke is a by-product resulting from the upgrading of heavy crude bitumen to light synthetic oil. This research investigates the preparation of activated… (more)

Morshed, Golam

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The effect of diabietic acid on the coking of oxidised solvent-extracted coal.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Refcoal is a refined carbon source obtained by extraction of coal with dimethylformamide (DMF). During the coking process, Refcoal goes through a mesophase (fluid) stage… (more)

Ludere, Margaret Tshimangadzo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Integration of stripping of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated fluid coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a wet scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped to remove acidic gases, the stripped vapors of the stripping zone are sent to the gas cleanup stage of the gasification product gas. The improved stripping integration is particularly useful in the combination coal liquefaction process, fluid coking of bottoms of the coal liquefaction zone and gasification of the product coke.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The effects of ash and maceral composition of Azdavay and Kurucasile (Turkey) coals on coking properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, investigations were made as to the effect of the maceral compositions and mineral matter content of Azdavay and Kurucasile coals on the coking property. Chemical and maceral analyses and coking properties were determined for the products of the float-sink procedure. The coking properties were established on the basis of free swelling index and Ruhr dilatometer tests. Maceral analyses showed that as the ash content of a coal containing both high and medium volatile matter increases, its effective maceral proportion decreases, and the coking property is affected in an unfavorable way.

Toroglu, I. [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Faculty of Engineering

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,"Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Other(d)","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(billion cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors" ,,,,,,,,,,, ,"Total United States"

204

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

205

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1",,,,,,,"Coal" 1",,,,,,,"Coal" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"Net",,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,"Electricity(a)","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" ,"Total","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Other","Row" "End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

206

Table A36. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,,,,,"Coal" " Part 1",,,,,,,,"(excluding" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal Coke" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"and" ,,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel","Natural Gas",,"Breeze)",,"RSE" "SIC",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel","(billion","LPG","(1000 Short","Other","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors",

207

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

208

Developing indicators for the assessment and proper management of the different levels of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s generally associated with coke-oven workers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coke ovens may occur in the aluminium, steel, graphite, electrical, and construction industries. In the work area coke-oven workers may be exposed to various chemical… (more)

Wang, Tianyuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

CHARACTERIZATION OF COAL- AND PETROLEUM-DERIVED BINDER PITCHES AND THE INTERACTION OF PITCH/COKE MIXTURES IN PRE-BAKED CARBON ANODES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon anodes are manufactured from calcined petroleum coke (i.e. sponge coke) and recycled anode butts as fillers, and coal tar pitch (SCTP) as the binder.… (more)

Suriyapraphadilok, Uthaiporn

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The effects of petroleum coke amendments on macrophytes and aquatic invertebrates in northern Alberta, Canada constructed wetlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oil-sands operators of Fort McMurray, Alberta produce six million t/y of petroleum coke. The use of coke to stabilize clay-dominated mine tailings in constructed wetlands… (more)

Baker, Leanne F.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Predicting CSR and CRI of coke on the basis of the chemical and petrographic parameters of the coal batch and the coking conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is developed for predicting the postreactive strength CSR and reactivity CRI of coke. The model adequately reflects the dependence of ... on the chemical and petrographic parameters of the coal batch, tak...

A. S. Stankevich; R. R. Gilyazetdinov; N. K. Popova; D. A. Koshkarov

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modification of sub-bituminous coal by steam treatment: Caking and coking properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Chinese sub-bituminous Shenfu (SF) coal was steam treated under atmospheric pressure and the caking and coking properties of the treated coals were evaluated by caking indexes (GRI) and crucible coking characterizations. The results show that steam treatment can obviously increase the GRI of SF coal. When the steam treated coals were used in the coal blends instead of SF raw coal, the micro-strength index (MSI) and particle coke strength after reaction (PSR) of the coke increased, and particle coke reactivity index (PRI) decreased, which are beneficial for metallurgical coke to increase the gas permeability in blast furnace. The quality of the coke obtained from 8% of 200 °C steam treated SF coal in coal blends gets to that of the coke obtained from the standard coal blends, in which there was no SF coal addition in the coal blends. The removal of oxygen groups, especially hydroxyl group thus favoring the breakage of the coal macromolecules and allowing the treated coal formation of much more amount of hydrocarbons, may be responsible for the modified results. The mechanism of the steam treatment was proposed based on the elemental analysis, thermo gravimetric (TG) and FTIR spectrometer characterizations of the steam treated coal.

Hengfu Shui; Haiping Li; Hongtao Chang; Zhicai Wang; Zhi Gao; Zhiping Lei; Shibiao Ren

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Study on Further Treatment of Coal Coking Wastewater by Ultrasound Wave, Fenton's Reagent and Coagulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study on further treatment of coal coking wastewater by ultrasound wave, Fenton's reagent and coagulation was carried out in this paper at the first time, Furthermore, this paper discussed the optimum cooperative reaction condition of their combined ... Keywords: ultrasound wave, coke plant wastewater, Fenton reagent, coagulation

Jun Shi; Liangbo Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal and coke from a macroeconomic perspective, I apply the ...

Li, Yu, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cyanide Leaching from Soil Developed from Coking Plant Purifier Waste as Influenced by Citrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Coking Plant Purifier Waste as Influenced by Citrate...developed from gas purifier waste was investigated. Without...developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking...for the iron and steel industries. Their gas was a by-product...2003). During coal gasification, hydrogen cyanide...

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar

216

Influence of coal on coke properties and blast-furnace operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With unstable coal supplies and properties and a fluctuating content of coking coal in the batch at OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (ZSMK) and of bituminous coal at Kuznetskaya enrichment facility, it is important to optimize the rank composition of the batch for coke production.

G.R. Gainieva; L.D. Nikitin [OAO Zapadno-Sibirskii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

218

Carbonization of Coal Effects of Variation of Rate of Heating during the Carbonization of a Typical Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbonization of Coal Effects of Variation of Rate of Heating during the Carbonization of a Typical Coking Coal ...

William B. Warren

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Carbonization of Coal Evaluation of Effects of Rate of Heating and of Maximum Temperature on Pyrolysis of a Coking Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbonization of Coal Evaluation of Effects of Rate of Heating and of Maximum Temperature on Pyrolysis of a Coking Coal ...

William B. Warren

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Atmospheric Oxidation of Coal at Moderate Temperatures. Effect of Oxidation on the Carbonizing Properties of Representative Coking Coals.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric Oxidation of Coal at Moderate Temperatures. ... Effect of Oxidation on the Carbonizing Properties of Representative Coking Coals. ...

L Schmidt; J Elder; J Davis

1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Acidity deterioration and coke deposition in a HZSM5 zeolite in the MTG process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The total acidity deterioration and the acidity strength distribution of a catalyst prepared from a H-ZSM-5 zeolite has been studied in the MTG process carried out in catalytic chamber and in an isothermal fixed bed integral reactor. The acidity deterioration has been related to coke deposition. The evolution of the acidic structure and of coke deposition has been analysed in situ by diffuse reflectance FTIR in a catalytic chamber. The effect of operating conditions (time on stream and temperature) on acidity deterioration, coke deposition and coke nature has been studied from experiments in a fixed integral reactor. The technique for studying acidity yields a reproducible measurement of total acidity and acidity strength distribution of the catalyst deactivated by coke. The NH3 adsorption-desorption is measured by combination of scanning differential calorimetry and the FTIR analysis of the products desorbed.

A.T. Aguayo; P.L. Benito; A.G. Gayubo; M. Olazar; J. Bilbao

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction of iron oxides in blast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of coal and coke are consumed for heating and reducing iron oxides [2,3]. As a result, BFs have becomeHydrogen production from steam reforming of coke oven gas and its utility for indirect reduction 2012 Available online 18 June 2012 Keywords: Steam reforming Hydrogen and syngas production Coke oven

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

224

Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau (CPM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Modelling of a coke oven heating wall M. Landreau, D. Isler, Centre de Pyrolyse de Marienau with thermomechanical modelling of a coke oven heating wall. The objective is to define the safe limits of coke oven of walls, roof and larry car, pre-stresses (anchoring system), lateral pressure due to coal pushing A 3D

Boyer, Edmond

225

residual magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetization, i.e., the magnetic polarization, that remains in a magnetized material after all attempts to remove the magnetization have been made. Note: An example of residual magnetization is the magnetiza...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Low/medium-Btu coal-gasification-assessment program for potential users in New Jersey. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burns and Roe Industrial Services Corporation and Public Service Electric and Gas in association with Scientific Design Company have completed a technical and economic evaluation of coal gasification. The evaluation also addressed the regulatory, institutional, and environmental issues of coal gasification. Two uses of coal-derived medium Btu (MBU) gas were explored: (1) substitute boiler fuel for electric generation and (2) substitute fuel for industrial customers using natural gas. The summary and conclusions of his evaluation are: The Sewaren Generating Station was selected as potentially the most suitable site for the coal gasification plant. The Texaco process was selected because it offered the best combination of efficiency and pilot plant experience; in addition, it is a pressurized process which is advantageous if gas is to be supplied to industrial customers via a pipeline. Several large industrial gas customers within the vicinities of Sewaren and Hudson Generating Stations indicated that MBG would be considered as an alternate fuel provided that its use was economically justified. The capital cost estimates for a 2000 tons/day and a 1000 tons/day gasification plant installed at Sewaren Generating Station are $115.6 million and $73.8 million, in 1980 dollars, respectively. The cost of supplying MBG to industrial customers is competitive with existing pipeline natural gas on a Btu heating value basis for gasifier capacity factors of 35% or higher.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Characterization of liquids derived from laboratory coking of decant oil and co-coking of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, decant oil and a blend of Pittsburgh seam bituminous coal with decant oil were subjected to coking and co-coking in a laboratory-scale delayed coker. Higher yields of coke and gas were obtained from co-coking than from coking. Coal addition into the feedstock resulted in lighter overhead liquid. GC/MS analyses of gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel show that co-coking of coal/decant oil gave higher quantity aromatic components than that of coking of decant oil alone. Simulated distillation gas chromatography analyses of overhead liquids and GC/MS analyses of vacuum fractions show that when coal was reacted with a decant oil, the coal constituents contributed to the distillable liquids. To address the reproducibility of the liquid products, overhead liquid samples collected at the first, third, and fifth hours of experiments of 6 h duration were evaluated using simulated distillation gas chromatography and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. NMR analyses of the liquid products showed that, even though there were slight changes in the {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C spectra, the standard deviation was low for the time-dependent samples. Simulated distillation gas chromatography showed that the yields of refinery boiling range materials (i.e., gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, and fuel oil cuts) were reproducible between runs. Fractionation of the overhead liquids into refinery boiling range materials (gasoline, jet fuel, diesel, fuel oil fractions) showed that the boiling range materials and chemical compositions of fractions were found to be reproducible. 54 refs., 17 tabs.

Omer Gul; Caroline Clifford; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Gas treatment and by-products recovery of Thailand`s first coke plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke is needed in the blast furnace as the main fuel and chemical reactant and the main product of a coke plant. The second main product of the coke plant is coke oven gas. During treatment of the coke oven gas some coal chemicals like tar, ammonia, sulphur and benzole can be recovered as by-products. Since the market prices for these by-products are rather low and often erratic it does not in most cases justify the investment to recover these products. This is the reason why modern gas treatment plants only remove those impurities from the crude gas which must be removed for technical and environmental reasons. The cleaned gas, however, is a very valuable product as it replaces natural gas in steel work furnaces and can be used by other consumers. The surplus can be combusted in the boiler of a power plant. A good example for an optimal plant layout is the new coke oven facility of Thai Special Steel Industry (TSSI) in Rayong. The paper describes the TSSI`s coke oven gas treatment plant.

Diemer, P.E.; Seyfferth, W. [Krupp Uhde GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Integrated two stage coking and steam cracking process and apparatus therefor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention relates to an improvement in an integrated, two stage coking and steam cracking process for the production of unsaturated light hydrocarbons. A heavy hydrocarbonaceous oil is first coked in a fluidized bed coking zone. The vaporous conversion product is passed to a dilute phase. High temperature cracking in the presence of steam is carried out on the vaporous coker conversion product by injecting into the vapors a stream of hot coke particles at a sufficient temperature and in sufficient amount to raise the coker vapors to steam cracking temperature and supply the endothermic heat of reaction. Solids are separated from product gas in a gas-solids separation zone such as one or more cyclones and sent to the fluid coking zone and the gas is quenched to stop olefin degradation reactions. According to the improvement, relatively low temperature steam is introduced into contact with the separated solids to superheat the steam and cool the solids. Suitably this is effected in a riser on the cyclone dipleg. The solids, after having given up heat to the steam, pass into the coking zone and the superheated steam passes into the dilute phase and serves as part of the dilution steam therefor. Conservation of fuel and mitigation of coke on reactor walls and equipment are advantages of the process.

Oldweiler, M.E.

1983-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, May 1--August 1, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a laser ultrasonic probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. This aim will be met by constructing an optical probe that will be tested using simulated coke deposits that are positioned inside of a bench-scale furnace. Successful development of the optical coke detector will provide industry with the only available method for on-line measurement of coke deposits. The optical coke detector will have numerous uses in the refining and petrochemical sectors including monitoring of visbreakers, hydrotreaters, delayed coking units, vacuum tower heaters, and various other heavy oil heating applications where coke formation is a problem. The coke detector will particularly benefit the olefins industry where high temperature thermal crackers are used to produce ethylene, propylene, butylene and other important olefin intermediates. The ethylene industry requires development of an on-line method for gauging the thickness of coke deposits in cracking furnaces because the current lack of detailed knowledge of coke deposition profiles introduces the single greatest uncertainty in the simulation and control of modern cracking furnaces. The laser ultrasonic coke detector will provide operators with valuable new information allowing them to better optimize the decoking turnaround schedule and therefore maximize production capacity.

NONE

1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Ruthenium Ion Catalyzed Oxidation Reaction Analysis for Further Development of Aromatic Ring Size through the Heat Treatment of Coking Coals at >500 °C  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The strategy for coal blending is based on many empirical viewpoints, while scientific findings are believed to develop new criteria for obtaining high-quality coke from not only coking coals but also coking coals coupled with noncoking coals. ... by TEM and by comparing the microtextures of their cokes. ...

Koh Kidena; Koji Matsumoto; Satoru Murata; Masakatsu Nomura

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2005. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The standard part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrographic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Caking and coking properties of the thermal dissolution soluble fraction of a fat coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the coal blending for coke-making, fat coal has a very important role for the caking and coking properties of the coal blends. In this study, a fat coal was thermally dissolved, and the caking and coking properties of the thermal dissolution soluble factions (TDSFs) from different solvents and temperatures were characterized. It was found that the caking properties of \\{TDSFs\\} were better than that of fat raw coal. The \\{TDSFs\\} obtained from non-polar solvents have a higher caking property than those obtained from polar solvents at the same thermal dissolution (TD) temperature. During TD process, polar solvents can thermally dissolve more polyaromatic compounds into TDSF, thus increasing the softening temperature and decreasing the caking property of the TDSF. For the same TD solvent, the \\{TDSFs\\} obtained from higher temperatures have a lower caking property compared to those obtained from lower temperatures because of more aromatic components and oxygen functional groups entering them. Crucible coking determinations were carried out to evaluate the coking property of the TDSFs. The result suggests that when 5% of TDSF and 5% of non-caking sub-bituminous coal were used instead of the same amount of fat coal and gas coal, respectively in the coal blends, the quality of the coke obtained could get to the level of the coke obtained from the standard coal blends (i.e. without TDSF and sub-bituminous coal). Therefore, the use of TDSF in coal blending for coke-making is one of the effective methods for opening the coking coal resources.

Hengfu Shui; Wenjuan Zhao; Chuanjun Shan; Tao Shui; Chunxiu Pan; Zhicai Wang; Zhiping Lei; Shibiao Ren; Shigang Kang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Characterization of the origin and distribution of the minerals and phases in metallurgical cokes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three industrial metallurgical cokes were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM/EDS). The study highlighted the difficulties and implications of identifying the inherent crystalline mineral phases in cokes using XRD such that increasing the ashing temperature led to the formation of anhydrite and destruction of metallic iron: microwave plasma ashing resulted in minimal alteration of the original coke mineralogy apart from the formation of bassanite and possibly jarosite. A preliminary scheme to characterize coke minerals is presented such that, physically, minerals can be classified as fine ({lt}50 {mu}m), coarse (50-100 {mu}m), and agglomerate ({gt}1000 {mu}m); chemically, minerals can be grouped as refractory, semirefractory, and reactive, while on the basis of distribution they can be described as discrete, disseminated, or pore inclusions. Quartz, cristobalite, mullite, and high melting point Al-silicates were found to be the predominant refractory phases while low melting point Al-silicates, e.g., containing high fluxing elements such as K, and Fe were the main semirefractory phases present in all cokes. A variety of iron containing phases including pyrrhotite, troilite, iron oxides, metallic iron, and iron silicates were also invariably present in all cokes while calcium phases were found to occur as sulfide, silicates, and phosphates. In general, iron and calcium phases can be categorized as reactive phases with few exceptions such as oldhamite (CaS). The study highlighted that most of the cokes possess a similar mineralogy, with the main distinction being in their relative abundance, particle size, and nature of distribution in the coke matrix. The study provides a basis to develop a mechanistic understanding of the influence of minerals on coke reactivity and strength at high temperatures. 41 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

Sushil Gupta; Maria Dubikova; David French; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Materials Science and Engineering

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy efficiency of alternative coke-free metallurgical technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy analysis is undertaken for the blast-furnace process, for liquid-phase processes (Corex, Hismelt, Romelt), for solid-phase pellet reduction (Midrex, HYL III, LP-V in a shaft furnace), for steel production in systems consisting of a blast furnace and a converter, a Midrex unit and an arc furnace, or a Romelt unit and an arc furnace, and for scrap processing in an arc furnace or in an LP-V shaft furnace. Three blast-furnace processes with sinter and coke are adopted as the basis of comparison, as in: the standard blast-furnace process used in Russia; the improved blast-furnace process with coal-dust injection; and the production of vanadium hot metal from vanadium-bearing titanomagnetite ore (with a subsequent duplex process, ferrovanadium production, and its use in the arc furnace).

V.G. Lisienko; A.V. Lapteva; A.E. Paren'kov [Ural State Technical University - Ural Polytechnic Institute, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 March 1922 research-article Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals William A. Bone A. R. Pearson E. Sinkinson W. E. Stockings The Royal Society is...

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A relationship for the evaluation o coking values of coal tar pitches from their physical characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A relationship has been proposed to evaluate the coking values of coal tar pitches from the knowledge of their ... It has been tried on 44 self-prepared coal tar pitches and 18 others obtained from ... -ranging c...

G. Bhatia; R. K. Aggarwal; O. P. Bahl

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

THE PREDICTED COKE STRENGTH AFTER REACTION VALl JES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA COALS, WITH COMPARISONS TCOALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides background to the coke strength after reaction (CSR) test and gives perspective regarding changes in the cokinp coal market. It provides it sumtnary of some of the predicted relationships hctween the ash chemistry of

D. Ryan; B. C. Geological; Survey Branch; John T. Price; Canada Centre For Mineral; Energy Technology

240

Kinetics of catalyst regeneration by coke combustion. II. Influence of temperature rise in the catalyst particles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A grain-pellet model has been used to study the effect of high reaction rates upon the temperature profiles developed during regeneration of coked catalyst particles. The possibility of falsification of kinetic.....

D. Lafarga; C. Royo; A. Monzón; M. Menéndez…

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Industrial experience with the thermal preparation of coal batch before coking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The basic industrial results obtained with thermal preparation of batch, followed by bed coking in horizontal furnaces, are briefly reviewed. Precarbon technology, which, in various forms, has been successfull...

Yu. S. Vasil’ev; A. I. Gordienko; G. V. Dolgarev

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Relationship between coking pressure generated by coal blends and the composition of their primary tars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four coals that develop different pressures during the coking process were selected together with 10 blends (7 binary and 3 ternary) prepared with the same coals. Their semicoke contraction/expansion was measured by means of two tests (the Koppers-INCAR and the sole heated oven) and the variation in coking pressure during coking was determined in a movable wall oven. The coals and blends were then pyrolysed and the tars were analysed by gas chromatography (GC-FID–MS). The additivity law was applied to the properties used to evaluate the dangerousness of the blends and to the composition of the tar produced from the blends. Afterwards, the composition of the tar was studied in relation to contraction/expansion and the coking pressure generated by the coals and blends.

C. Barriocanal; M.A. Díez; R. Alvarez; M.D. Casal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Pyrolysis kinetics of coking coal mixed with biomass under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To investigate the kinetic characteristics of coking coal mixed with biomass during pyrolysis, thermogravimetric (TG) and thermo-balance reactor (TBR) analyses were conducted under non-isothermal and isothermal condition. Yellow poplar as a biomass (B) was mixed with weak coking coal (WC) and hard coking coal (HC), respectively. The calculated activation energies of WC/B blends were higher than those of HC/B blends under non-isothermal and isothermal conditions. The coal/biomass blends show increased reactivity and decreased activation energy with increasing biomass blend ratio, regardless of the coking properties of the coal. The different char structures of the WC/B and HC/B blends were analyzed by BET and SEM.

Ha Myung Jeong; Myung Won Seo; Sang Mun Jeong; Byung Ki Na; Sang Jun Yoon; Jae Goo Lee; Woon Jae Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Synthesis of super plasticizer NF-30 from coal coking by product washing oil and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Super plasticizer was synthesized by using coal coking by product washing oil and industrial naphthalene....2 in exhaust (20%). Compared with NF, NF-30 have some advantages in lower cost, high water reducing rate...

Zifang Xu ???; Mingxu Zhang; Wenpei Hu

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of Adsorption Contact Time on Coking Coal Particle Desorption Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Adsorption Contact Time on Coking Coal Particle Desorption Characteristics ... Esp. in the last decade a large amt. of data has been published characterizing coals from various coal basins world-wide for their gas sorption capacity. ...

Wei Zhao; Yuanping Cheng; Meng Yuan; Fenghua An

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

High-Temperature Stress Relaxation Cracking and Stress Rupture Observed in a Coke Gasifier Failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article discusses the high-temperature metal degradation mechanisms that occurred in the failure of a nine-story tall coke gasifier, located in a refinery power plant. Cracking of gasifier internals, bulging...

Daniel J. Benac; Douglas B. Olson…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Guide to ASTM test methods for the analysis of coal and coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The guide includes brief descriptions of all 56 ASTM test methods that cover the physical, chemical, and spectroscopic analytical techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively identify over 40 chemical and physical properties of coal, coke, their products, and by-products.

R.A. Kishore Nadkarni (ed.)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The development of Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carried-Heat Partial Gasification Combined cycle is a novel combined cycle which was proposed by Thermal Engineering Department ... technology, Coke Carried-Heat Gasification Coal-Fired Combined Cycle, as the imp...

Li Zhao; Xiangdong Xu

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Generation and Coke Formation over a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst under Fuel Rich Conditions† ... Hydrogen production via hydrocarbon steam reforming and water gas shift reactions was investigated over a monolith-supported Pt-based diesel oxidation catalyst. ...

Meshari AL-Harbi; Jin-Yong Luo; Robert Hayes; Martin Votsmeier; William S. Epling

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Current developments at Giprokoks for coke-battery construction and reconstruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approaches developed at Giprokoks for coke-battery construction and reconstruction are considered. Recommendations regarding furnace construction and reconstruction are made on the basis of Ukrainian and world experience.

V.I. Rudyka; Y.E. Zingerman; V.B. Kamenyuka; O.N. Surenskii; G.E. Kos'kova; V.V. Derevich; V.A. Gushchin [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Producing and controlling of the pollutant in the coal`s coking process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of heating and coke shaping, different pollutants and polluting factors will be produced and lost to the environment due to the different coking methods. The paper analyzes the production mechanism, type, emission, average quantity, and damage to the environment of the major pollutants and polluting factors produced in several kinds of coking processes in China at the present. Then, the paper concludes that an assessment for any coking method should include a comprehensive beneficial assessment of economical benefit, environmental benefit and social benefit. The items in the evaluation should consist of infrastructure investment, which includes production equipment and pollution control equipment, production cost, benefit and profit produced by one ton coal, whether the pollution complies with the environmental requirement, extent of the damage, influence to the social development, and etc.

Li, S. [Shanxi Environmental Protection Bureau (China); Fan, Z. [Shanxi Central Environmental Monitoring Station (China)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Three-dimensional simulation of combustion processes in coke-battery furnace chambers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional model of the heating wall in a coke battery is developed by means of the Fluent CFD program. The results of simulation are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The mathematical...

M. V. Isaev; I. A. Sultanguzin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Experimental study on the effects of blast-cap configurations and charge patterns on coke descending in CDQ cooling shaft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coke descending behavior in a CDQ cooling shaft is studied experimentally by means of a tracing method with a digital camera. For three different blast-caps, the law of coke flow is studied under five conditions of coke charge. The experimental results show that, for the sake of the uniformity of the coke burden descending, a blast-cap with elliptical cross-section is a better choice than that with circular cross-section regardless of high or low placement. A coke charge pattern with a flat top burden surface is preferable to that with peak-valley surface, a double-peak superior to a one-peak. Trajectory and average velocity distribution of coke behavior depend weakly on whether the coke is continuously fed or not as the discharging began. The blast-caps have local effects on the descending coke and hardly affect whether the cokes flow smoothly or not in the case of coke burden with enough depth.

Y.H. Feng; X.X. Zhang; M.L. Wu [University of Science & Technology, Beijing (China). School of Mechanical Engineering

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cryogenic fractionator gas as stripping gas of fines slurry in a coking and gasification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In an integrated coking and gasification process wherein a stream of fluidized solids is passed from a fluidized bed coking zone to a second fluidized bed and wherein entrained solid fines are recovered by a scrubbing process and wherein the resulting solids-liquid slurry is stripped with a stripping gas to remove acidic gases, at least a portion of the stripping gas comprises a gas comprising hydrogen, nitrogen and methane separated from the coker products.

DeGeorge, Charles W. (Chester, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of thermal treatment on coke reactivity and catalytic iron mineralogy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron minerals in coke can catalyze its gasification and may affect coke behavior in the blast furnace. The catalytic behavior of iron depends largely upon the nature of the iron-bearing minerals. To determine the mineralogical changes that iron could undergo in the blast furnace, cokes made from three coals containing iron present in different mineral forms (clays, carbonates, and pyrite) were examined. All coke samples were heat-treated in a horizontal furnace at 1373, 1573, and 1773 K and then gasified with CO{sub 2} at 1173 K in a fixed bed reactor (FBR). Coke mineralogy was characterized using quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of coke mineral matter prepared by low-temperature ashing (LTA) and field emission scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (FESEM/EDS). The mineralogy of the three cokes was most notably distinguished by differing proportions of iron-bearing phases. During heat treatment and subsequent gasification, iron-containing minerals transformed to a range of minerals but predominantly iron-silicides and iron oxides, the relative amounts of which varied with heat treatment temperature and gasification conditions. The relationship between initial apparent reaction rate and the amount of catalytic iron minerals - pyrrhotite, metallic iron, and iron oxides - was linear and independent of heat treatment temperature at total catalyst levels below 1 wt %. The study showed that the coke reactivity decreased with increasing temperature of heat treatment due to decreased levels of catalytic iron minerals (largely due to formation of iron silicides) as well as increased ordering of the carbon structure. The study also showed that the importance of catalytic mineral matter in determining reactivity declines as gasification proceeds. 37 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Byong-chul Kim; Sushil Gupta; David French; Richard Sakurovs; Veena Sahajwalla [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coke gasification: the influence and behavior of inherent catalytic mineral matter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasification of coke contributes to its degradation in the blast furnace. In this study, the effect of gasification on the inherent catalytic minerals in cokes and their reciprocal influence on gasification are investigated. The catalytic mineral phases identified in the cokes used in this study were metallic iron, iron sulfides, and iron oxides. Metallic iron and pyrrhotite were rapidly oxidized during gasification to iron oxide. The catalysts had a strong influence on the apparent rates at the initial stages of reaction. As gasification proceeds, their effect on the reaction rate diminishes as a result of reducing the surface contact between catalyst and carbon matrix because of carbon consumption around the catalyst particles; with extended burnout the reactivity of the coke becomes increasingly dependent on surface area. The reaction rate in the initial stages was also influenced by the particle size of the catalytic minerals; for a given catalytic iron level, the cokes whose catalytic minerals were more finely dispersed had a higher apparent reaction rate than cokes containing larger catalytic particles. Iron, sodium, and potassium in the amorphous phase did not appear to affect the reaction rate. 40 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

Mihaela Grigore; Richard Sakurovs; David French; Veena Sahajwalla [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Bangor, NSW (Australia)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fundamentals of Petroleum Residue Cracking Gasification for Coproduction of Oil and Syngas ... Thus, the terminology of heavy oil or heavy residue can be also used to indicate all such heavy petroleum oils. ... Notwithstanding, for the RCG process it is ideal to develop the catalyst that has moderate cracking activity for heavy residues or heavy oils but meanwhile good activity for catalyzing the deposited coke gasification so that the gasification can be at reasonably low temperatures to maintain the catalytic activity for cracking heavy fractions. ...

Yuming Zhang; Deping Yu; Wangliang Li; Yin Wang; Shiqiu Gao; Guangwen Xu

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

258

Characterization of tuyere-level core-drill coke samples from blast furnace operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suite of tuyere-level coke samples have been withdrawn from a working blast furnace during coal injection, using the core-drilling technique. The samples have been characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy (FT-RS), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) spectroscopy. The 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) extracts of the cokes sampled from the 'bosh', the rear of the 'bird's nest', and the 'dead man' zones were found by SEC to contain heavy soot-like materials (ca. 10{sup 7}-10{sup 8} apparent mass units). In contrast, NMP extracts of cokes taken from the raceway and the front of the 'bird's nest' only contained a small amount of material of relatively lower apparent molecular mass (up to ca. 10{sup 5} u). Since the feed coke contained no materials extractable by the present method, the soot-like materials are thought to have formed during the reactions of volatile matter released from the injectant coal, probably via dehydrogenation and repolymerization of the tars. The Raman spectra of the NMP-extracted core-drilled coke samples showed variations reflecting their temperature histories. Area ratios of D-band to G-band decreased as the exposure temperature increased, while intensity ratios of D to G band and those of 2D to G bands increased with temperature. The graphitic (G), defect (D), and random (R) fractions of the carbon structure of the cokes were also derived from the Raman spectra. The R fractions decreased with increasing temperature, whereas G fractions increased, while the D fractions showed a more complex variation with temperature. These data appear to give clues regarding the graphitization mechanism of tuyere-level cokes in the blast furnace. 41 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

S. Dong; N. Paterson; S.G. Kazarian; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Predicting the yield of coking byproducts on the basis of elementary and petrographic analysis of the coal batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mathematical models are developed for predicting the yield of coking byproducts on the basis of elementary and petrographic analysis of the coal batch.

M. B. Golovko; I. D. Drozdnik; D. V. Miroshnichenko; Yu. S. Kaftan

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Australia–Japan coking coal trade: A hedonic analysis under benchmark and fair treatment pricing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given Japan's dominant position in the Asia–Pacific regional coal market and the continuing relatively low profitability of Australia's coal industry, the influence of the Japanese steel mills on coal pricing arrangements between Australia and Japan remains an issue in Australia. In Japanese fiscal year (JFY) 1996, the Japanese steel mills replaced benchmark pricing with the “fair treatment” pricing system whereby coal contract information is kept confidential. In this paper, Quandt's switching regime model is used to test for structural change in hedonic pricing relationships in the important Australia–Japan coking coal trade between JFY 1992 and 1997. There is statistical evidence of significant structural change in JFY 1996 for hard coking coal and in JFY 1995 for semisoft coking coal (when soft coking coal was merged with the semisoft category). The goodness of fit of the regressions is lower in each recent period. It is concluded that price discovery in the annual coal negotiations, particularly for hard coking coal, is relatively more difficult under fair treatment pricing.

Anthony Swan; Sally Thorpe; Lindsay Hogan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Relationship between coking coal quality and its micro-Raman spectral characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Micro-Raman spectroscopy examination of 20 samples of coking coals (Rr = 0.84–1.43%) was performed. Spectral parameters were correlated with the basic rank and technological properties of coals. The G band FWHM and the AG/AALL ratio decrease with the volatile matter content (Vdaf) decrease and the all maceral reflectance scan (Rscan) value increase. The correlations between these parameters are stronger than those, between the G band FWHM and the AG/AALL ratio, and the mean random vitrinite reflectance (Rr). Coking properties are weakly related to the Raman spectral characteristics of coal. Based on the Raman parameters G band FWHM and the AG/AALL ratio, it may be possible to evaluate the volatile matter content (Vdaf) and the all maceral reflectance scan (Rscan) value for coking coals.

Rafa? Morga; Iwona Jelonek; Krystyna Kruszewska

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coking phenomena in the pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride into vinyl chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrolysis of ethylene dichloride (EDC) into vinyl chloride (VCM) which is the monomer for polyvinyl chloride, one of the most popular polymers, has been established commercially for quite a time. The process around 500{degrees}C has been proved to give VCM of high purity at very high selectivity about 99% and a reasonable conversion about 50%. However, the coking is a major problem in the long run, requiring decoking treatment every two months. The present paper describes features of carbons produced in the pyrolysis process. Coke of respective features was found in the reactor, the transfer line, the heat exchanger and the rapid quencher. Typical pyrolytic carbon, anisotropic coke produced in the liquid phase, isotropic carbon was produced on the reactor wall as low as 500{degrees}C. The mechanisms for their formation are discussed.

Sotowa, Chiaki; Korai, Yozo; Mochida, Isao [Kyushu Univ., Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Catalyst deactivation by coking in the MTG process in fixed and fluidized bed reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The validity of a kinetic model for describing the deactivation of a catalyst based on a HZSM5 zeolite has been studied by carrying out reaction in fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The kinetic model takes into account that activity is dependent on the concentration of the lumps of oxygenates, of light olefins and of the remaining products and shows that coke formation capability follows this order. The difference between the deactivation kinetic constants calculated for the fixed and fluidized bed reactors is explained by the effect of the steam produced in the reaction, where coke stripping attenuates deactivation. Future improvements in the deactivation kinetic model must take into account coke stripping by the steam produced in the reaction.

Andrés T. Aguayo; Ana G. Gayubo; JoséM. Ortega; Martin Olazar; Javier Bilbao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Study on the Respirable Particulate Matter Generated from the Petroleum Coke and Coal Mixed-Fired CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dust generated from the fuel combustion is one of the important sources for air pollution. This paper has made a comprehensive research on the particulate matter generated from the petroleum coke and coal mixed-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) ... Keywords: petroleum coke, respirable particulate matter, air pollution, circulating fluidized bed boiler

Yan Ma; Hao Bai; Lihua Zhao; Yang Ma; Daqiang Cang

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Sorption characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aluminum smelter residues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature carbon oxidation in primary aluminum smelters results in the release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) into the environment. The main source of PAH are the anodes, which are composed of petroleum coke (black carbon, BC) and coal tar pitch. To elucidate the dominant carbonaceous phase controlling the environmental fate of PAH in aluminum smelter residues (coke BC and/or coal tar), the sorptive behavior of PAHs has been determined, using passive samplers and infinite-sink desorption methods. Samples directly from the wet scrubber were studied as well as ones from an adjacent 20-year old storage lagoon and roof dust from the smelter. Carbon-normalized distribution coefficients of native PAHs were 2 orders of magnitude higher than expected based on amorphous organic carbon (AOC)/water partitioning, which is in the same order of magnitude as reported literature values for soots and charcoals. Sorption isotherms of laboratory-spiked deuterated phenanthrene showed strong (about 100 times stronger than AOC) but nonetheless linear sorption in both fresh and aged aluminum smelter residues. The absence of nonlinear behavior typical for adsorption to BC indicates that PAH sorption in aluminum smelter residues is dominated by absorption into the semi-solid coal tar pitch matrix. Desorption experiments using Tenax showed that fresh smelter residues had a relatively large rapidly desorbing fraction of PAH (35-50%), whereas this fraction was strongly reduced (11-16%) in the lagoon and roof dust material. Weathering of the coal tar residue and/or redistribution of PAH between coal tar and BC phases could explain the reduced availability in aged samples. 38 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Gijs D. Breedveld; Emilien Pelletier; Richard St. Louis; Gerard Cornelissen [Norwegian Geotechnical Institute, Oslo (Norway)

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Preparation and evaluation of hydrotreating catalysts based on activated carbon derived from oil sand petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel Ni–Mo/activated carbon (AC) hydrotreating catalysts were prepared and evaluated for upgrading heavy vacuum gas oil (HVGO). The AC supports were derived from Alberta oil sand petroleum coke, i.e. fluid coke and/or delayed coke, hereafter referred to as OSP coke, through a chemical process. The BET surface area was as high as 2194 m2/g for the fluid coke derived AC and 2357 m2/g for the delayed coke derived AC. Both \\{ACs\\} contained a large number of micropores with pore volume as high as 1.2 cm3/g. Ni and Mo based active component precursors could be easily loaded on the activated carbon supports by chemical impregnation of nickel nitrate and ammonium molybdate followed by calcination in nitrogen at 773 K without further modification or oxidation treatment to the activated carbons. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation showed highly porous surface structure of the bare activated carbon supports and well dispersed metal (oxide) precursor nanoparticles of 30–50 nm loaded on the AC supports. For comparison, two reference catalysts were also prepared by the same procedure but using commercial activated carbon and porous alumina as supports. After catalyst activation by sulfiding, the hydrotreating performance of the prepared catalysts was evaluated in a magnetically stirred autoclave with a HVGO feedstock to examine their hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) activities. Two commercial hydrotreating catalysts were also tested and compared under similar conditions with the same feed. The results showed that the catalysts based on the activated carbon supports prepared from OSP coke had better hydrotreating performance than the other catalysts. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization of the catalysts after activation showed that small particles of nanostructure (2–5 nm in size) were evenly embedded in the carbon matrix except for some bigger particles that were located on the catalyst surface. Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy revealed that these particles were composed of Ni, Mo and S elements. The dispersed nanoparticles formed the active sites and were responsible for the observed high HDS and HDN activity. Elemental analysis and surface characterization of the spent catalysts showed that the formation of coke precursors was favored on the alumina supported catalyst, which resulted in catalyst deactivation.

Yu Shi; Jinwen Chen; Jian Chen; Robb A. Macleod; Marek Malac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Contribution to kinetic modeling of catalyst deactivation by coke in the MTG process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adequacy of a kinetic model for deactivation of a catalyst based on a H-ZSM5 used in the transformation of methanol into hydrocarbons has been proven. The model takes into account the pronounced effect on coke deposition of the concentration of reaction lumps and coke preferable deposition at the reactor inlet by degradation of oxygenates (methanol and dimethylether) on the catalyst acid sites. The kinetic model is in agreement with the experimental results of fixed and fluidized bed reactors within the 300-400 {degrees}C range. The deactivation is slightly smaller in fluidized bed but contribution of catalyst attrition to deactivation must be considered. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Gayubo, A.G.; Ortega, J.M.; Benito, P.L.; Aguayo, A.T.; Bilbao, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Mechanism of physical transformations of mineral matter in the blast furnace coke with reference to its reactivity and strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examinations of polished and dry cut sections of feed and tuyere coke revealed some possible mechanisms for the physical influence of mineral compounds on the reactivity and strength of coke. It was observed that rounded particles of mineral phases that are exposed to the pore walls and surface of coke at high temperature create an inorganic cover, thus reducing the surface available for gas-solid reactions. The particles of mineral matter that have a low melting point and viscosity can affect the coke at earlier stages in the blast furnace process, acting in the upper parts of the blast furnace (BF). The temperature-driven redistribution of mineral phases within the coke matrix probably leads to the creation of weak spots and in general to anisotropy in its properties, thus reducing its strength. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Stanislav S. Gornostayev; Jouko J. Haerkki [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Laboratory of Process Metallurgy

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Model for Gasification of Residual Fuels from Petroleum Refineries Using the Equation Oriented (EO) Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An attractive way to use residual fuels from petroleum refineries (vacuum residue and petcoke) is their gasification to produce syngas, which contains mainly H2, CO and small quantities of CH4, CO2, as well as nitrogen and sulfur compounds. ... Vacuum residue and petroleum coke (petcoke) are, respectively, heavy liquid and solid byproducts from crude oil refining, they are often used as fuel in boilers for power production, natural gas has been more commonly used in the past few years in power generation; reducing the market for both vacuum residue and petcoke. ... Regarding petroleum refinery residuals Uson et al.(1) developed a model for cogasification of coal, petcoke and biomass, based on reaction kinetics. ...

Jorge E. Marin-Sanchez; Miguel A. Rodriguez-Toral

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

270

Rates of Microbial Transformation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Water and Sediments in the Vicinity of a Coal-Coking Wastewater Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sediments in the Vicinity of a Coal-Coking Wastewater Discharge Stephen E...collected in the vicinity of a coal-coking treated wastewater discharge from...sediments in the vicinity of a coal-coking wastewater discharge. | To facilitate...

Stephen E. Herbes

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Dissolution of refractories for gasification process of petroleum coke for the steel industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of energizing gases such as H2 and CO by gasification process of solid fuels is a technology that has increased in recent years since it is an efficient and clean process. To enable the production of gases, it is necessary to use refractory materials capable of withstanding high temperatures, thermal shock and contact with aggressive media. Nowadays, there is not published literature on refractory materials used for furnaces lining for petroleum coke gasification at high temperatures (?1900 °C). Therefore, this paper deals with the study of alumina and magnesium aluminate/alumina-based refractories as candidates for the furnace lining used in the petroleum coke gasification for steel production. Refractory samples were made with some designed formulations which were subjected to chemical interactions with pellets made of petroleum coke and petroleum coke ash at 1650 °C for 4 h. After completing the tests, the formulations were cut transversely and were characterized by SEM-EDS and XRD to evaluate the resistance to slag penetration and formation of low melting point phases. The results show that slag penetration and corrosion in the refractory formulations occur due to the formation of hibonite, spinels (Ni2+, Fe2+, Mg2+)(Al, Fe)2O4 and gehlenite phases. However, these phases together stop the molten slag penetration.

R. Puente-Ornelas; C.J. Lizcano-Zulaica; A.M. Guzmán; P.C. Zambrano; T.K. Das-Roy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effect of Iron Species and Calcium Hydroxide on High-Sulfur Petroleum Coke CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of iron species on petroleum coke CO2 gasification was studied in the present work. The effects of the temperature (1173–1673 K), the catalyst types, catalyst loading (ranging from 0 to 5 wt %), and composition during the gasification of ...

Zhi-jie Zhou; Qi-jing Hu; Xin Liu; Guang-suo Yu; Fu-chen Wang

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

274

The behaviors and fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coking wastewater treatment plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The occurrence, behaviors and fate of 18 \\{PAHs\\} were investigated in a coking wastewater treatment plant in Songshan coking plant, located in Shaoguan, Guangdong Province of China. It was found that the target compounds occurred widely in raw coking wastewater, treated effluent, sludge and gas samples. In raw coking wastewater, high molecular weight (MW) \\{PAHs\\} were the dominant compounds, while 3–6 ring \\{PAHs\\} predominated in the final effluent. The dominant compounds in gas samples were phenathrene, fluoranthene and pyrene, while they were fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene and benzo[k]fluoranthene for sludge. The process achieved over 97% removal for all the PAHs, 47–92% of eliminations of these target compounds in liquid phase were achieved in biological stage. Different behaviors of \\{PAHs\\} were observed in the primary tank, anaerobic tank, aerobic tank, hydrolytic tank and coagulation tank units, while heavier and lower ones were mainly removed in anaerobic tank and aerobic tanks, respectively. Regarding the fate of PAHs, calculated fractions of mass losses for low MW \\{PAHs\\} due to transformation and adsorption to sludge accounted for 15–50% and 24–49%, respectively, while the rest was less than 1%. For high MW PAHs, the mass losses were mainly due to adsorption to sludge and separation with tar (contributing 56–76% and 22–39%, respectively), and the removal through transformation was less.

Wanhui Zhang; Chaohai Wei; Xinsheng Chai; Jingying He; Ying Cai; Man Ren; Bo Yan; Pingan Peng; Jiamo Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Coke deposits formation and products selectivities for the MTG process in a fluidized bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were carried out in a demonstrative scale fluidized bed reactor for methanol conversion to gasoline (MTG). We investigated the kinetics of the coke deposits formation and their influence on the products selectivities. New reaction indexes were advanced for on line monitoring of the catalyst activity.

Grigore Pop; Gavril Musca; Eleonora Chirila; Rodica Boeru; Gheorghe Niculae; Natalia Natu; Gheorghe Ignatescu; Sorin Straja

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Investigation of Vanadium Compounds in Ashes from a CFBC Firing 100 Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Vanadium Compounds in Ashes from a CFBC Firing 100 Petroleum Coke ... The ash pits have since gone through an extensive remedial process. ... The other metals investigated (i.e., Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb) also were present predominantly as sulfates. ...

L. Jia; E. J. Anthony; J. P. Charland

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optimization of experimental conditions for recovery of coking coal fines by oil agglomeration technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The significance of coking coal in the metallurgical sector as well as the meager coking coal reserves across the globe increase the necessity to recover coking coal fines from the fine coking coal slurries generated from coal preparation and utilization activities. Oil agglomeration studies were carried out by varying the experimental conditions for maximum recovery of coking coal fines i.e., yield of the agglomerates. The various operational parameters studied were oil dosage, agitation speed, agglomeration time and pulp density. By using Taguchi experimental design, oil dosage (20%), agitation speed (1100 rpm), agglomeration time (3 min) and pulp density (4.5%) were identified as the optimized conditions. A confirmation experiment has also been carried out at the optimized conditions. The percentage contribution of each parameter on agglomerate yield was analyzed by adopting analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical method as well as multiple linear regression analysis. The order of influence of the parameters on the agglomerate yield is of the following order: pulp density > oil dosage > agitation speed > agglomeration time. A mathematical model was developed to fit the set of experimental conditions with the yield obtained at each test run and also at the optimized conditions. The experimentally obtained yield was compared with the predicted yield of the model and the results indicate a maximum error of 5% between the two. A maximum yield of 90.42% predicted at the optimized conditions appeared to be in close agreement with the experimental yield thus indicating the accuracy of the model in predicting the results.

G.H.V.C. Chary; M.G. Dastidar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

280

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 2. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," "," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row"

282

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

283

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)"

284

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

285

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

286

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

287

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

288

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

289

Table A4. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

290

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",," ",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","Natural Gas(e)","LPG","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Factors"

291

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

292

Table E1.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" .1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

293

" Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," "," ","Residual","Distillate"," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

294

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel Purposes by" Nonfuel Purposes by" " Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Coke"," "," " " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000 ","Other(d)","Row"

295

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," "," ",,,," "," ",,," ",," ",," ",,"Shipments" "NAICS"," ",,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke and"," ",,"of Energy Sources"

296

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",,,," "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

297

Table 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

298

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

299

Table A3. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Combustible Energ  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonfuel" Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu) " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke "," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"

300

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Table A1. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Pu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 " 1 " " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

302

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

303

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)"

304

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE"

305

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" 1.3 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources"

306

Table A1. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","RSE" "SIC"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate "," "," "," ","Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry"," Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","LPG","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

307

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

308

Table 1.2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" 2 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","Shipments","RSE" "NAICS"," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","of Energy Sources","Row"

309

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)"

310

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

311

Table N1.1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" 1. First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," "," ",," "," ",," "," ","Coke and"," ","Shipments"," " " "," ",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)","LPG and","Coal","Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE"

312

Spectroscopic studies on the formation of coke on individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking particles: the effect of poisoning metal compounds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The formation of coke on individual Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst particles was studied using UV/Vis microspectroscopy and confocal fluorescence microscopy, with n-hexane cracking as… (more)

Goetze, J.G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Deposition and characteristics of coke over a H-ZSM5 zeolite-based catalyst in the MTG process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of reaction conditions in the transformation of methanol into gasoline (temperature, time on stream, and contact time) on the deposition and nature of coke (composition, H/C ratio) and on its location in the porous structure of a H-ZSM5 zeolite-based catalyst has been studied in an isothermal fixed-bed integral reactor. The distribution of the coke within the porous structure of the catalyst is similar to that proposed for other reactions on H-ZSM5 zeolites, and the highly hydrogenated character of coke and its instability is noteworthy. Coke deposition has been related to catalyst acidic site deterioration and to a kinetic model for catalyst deactivation in an integral reactor.

Benito, P.L.; Gayubo, A.G.; Aguayo, A.T.; Olazar, M.; Bilbao, J. [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica] [Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Production of Syngas via Partial Oxidation and CO2 Reforming of Coke Oven Gas over a Ni Catalyst ... The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. ...

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng

2008-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Reducing the sulfur content of coke by increasing the content of thermally conditioned g coal in the batch  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In periods of economic growth, Ukrainian coke plants face a shortage of Zh and K coal, because of the high demand. In periods of economic stagnation, conversely, there is an excess of Zh coal, on account of the d...

E. I. Malyi

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

3D Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Natural Coke Steam Gasification in General and Improved Fluidized Beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal characteristics of natural coke steam gasification in a fluidized bed were three-dimensionally (3D) simulated based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method using Fluent code. ... However, this technology seems difficult to carry out due to its abradability, hard ignition, hot burst, and so on. ... In short, all the results in this work have a significance to provide the theoretical basis for the design, operational optimization, and scale-up of the natural coke steam gasification process. ...

Ya-li Tang; Dai-jun Liu; Yu-hong Liu; Qian Luo

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

319

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

320

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

"Table A22. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," 2. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Groups and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

322

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

323

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

324

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

325

Table A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" A9. Total Primary Consumption of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","(cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

326

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

327

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Linings with optimum heat-emission surfaces for cars receiving and transporting incandescent coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The least reliable components of the cars which receive and transport incandescent coke are the lining plates. This applies to both the quenching cars used for wet quenching and the hot-coke cars used in the dry cooling process. Technical advances have been described whereby the life of car linings is prolonged by increasing heat emission from the lining plate surfaces. As the heat emission level is enhanced the mean plate temperature is lowered and the lining life thereby prolonged; moreover, the between-servicings period is prolonged. This involves providing fins on the non-working (outer) plate surfaces. The problem of optimizing the size and shape of the fins with reference to heat emission remains unsolved: the requirement is maximum heat emission from plates of a given weight, or conversely minimum plate weight for a given heat emission level. 6 refs., 3 figs.

Kotlyar, B.D.; Pleshkov, P.I.; Gadyatskii, V.G. [and others

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Unsteady-state kinetic simulation of naphtha reforming and coke combustion processes in the fixed and moving catalyst beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The work is dedicated to the construction of kinetics models for the naphtha reforming process and the adjacent process of catalyst regeneration by coke combustion. The proposed kinetic model for the reforming process is based on the use of common rate equations for the groups of similar reactions with account of difference in reaction rates for individual homologs within these groups by simple correlations with thermodynamic properties (first of all – with the values of Gibbs free energy) of individual reactions and by other simplification methods. Such approach gives the way to construct the kinetics models optimal from the point of view of compromise between accuracy and simplicity. The proposed naphtha reforming model is characterized with the high level of kinetic scheme detailization (62 individual and group reactants and 146 individual reactions), at the same it is rather simple and provides the accurate description of the experimental data using only 22 kinetic parameters. This model is thermodynamically consistent and provides accurate description of experimental data in a wide range of process parameters. Account of catalyst deactivation by coke deposition in the model gives the way to simulate transient reforming process performance both in fixed and moving catalyst beds. Kinetics of coke combustion for catalysts with moderate coke content (up to 3% mass) may described by simple kinetic equation with apparent reaction rate orders closed to unit for relative coke content and to 1/2 for oxygen. Demonstration simulations of naphtha reforming and coke combustion processes are presented.

Andrey N. Zagoruiko; Alexander S. Belyi; Mikhail D. Smolikov; Alexander S. Noskov

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Operating temperature effects on nozzle coking in a cottonseed oil fueled diesel engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPERATING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOZZLE COKING IN A COTTONSEED OIL FUELED DIESEL ENGINE A Thesis CHARLES MICHAEL YARBROUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree cf... MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering OPERATING TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON NOZZLE CORING IN A COTTONSEED OIL FUELED DIESEL ENGINE A Thesis by CHARLES MICHAEL YARBROUGH Approved as to style and content by: ayne A. Le...

Yarbrough, Charles Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

331

Profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation for power plants in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently coal-based power plants produce about 70% of the total electricity generated in India, where non-coking (steam) coals are utilized mostly without any preparation. A massive capacity addition of at least 140,000 MWe is required (over the 81,000 MWe of current installed capacity) during the next 15 years to meet growing energy demand. Such a rapid expansion of power generation capacity poses a serious challenge to the environment (at emission controls) and transportation infrastructure in India. Furthermore, the high ash content of indigenous coals and concentration of coal mines in central and northeastern India away from urban centers exacerbate the problem. Thus, coal preparation is envisioned to play a major role in shaping the energy future of India. Under the Indo-US Coal Preparation Program, the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) is coordinating coal preparation activities for the US Agency for International Development. In this context, a detailed analysis of the washability characteristics of non-coking coals was performed using the PETC Coal Preparation Plant Simulator (CPPS) to identify coal preparation strategies for India. Based on these strategies, a profitability analysis of non-coking coal preparation has been conducted considering coal preparation and transportation costs, and coal quality impacts on power plant operations. This paper summarizes the results of this analysis and quantifies the significance of coal preparation for the Indian power sector.

Gollakota, S.V.; Rao, S.N. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center; Staats, G.E. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

An example of alkalization of SiO{sub 2} in a blast furnace coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scanning electron microscopy and an electron-microprobe analysis of a sample of blast furnace (BF) coke have revealed alkalization (5.64 wt % Na{sub 2}O + K{sub 2}O) and Al saturation (17.28 wt % Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) of SiO{sub 2} by BF gases. The K/Na{sub at} value of 1.15 in the new phase (alteration zone) reflects close atomic proportions of the elements and suggests that the abilities to incorporate K and Na during the process are almost equal. This Al saturation and alkalization of SiO{sub 2} indicates an active role for Al along with alkali metals in BF gases. The average width of the altered area in the SiO{sub 2} grain is about 10 m, which suggests that SiO{sub 2} particles of that size can be transformed fully to the new phase, provided that at least one of their faces is open to an external pore (surface of the coke) or internal pore with circulating BF gases. The grains that exceed 10 {mu}m can only be partly altered, which means that smaller SiO{sub 2} grains can incorporate more alkali metals and Al (during their transformation to the Al and alkali-bearing phase) than a similar volume of SiO{sub 2} concentrated in larger grains. Thermodynamic calculations for 100 g{sub solid}/100 g{sub gas} and temperatures 800-1800{sup o}C have shown that the BF gases have very little or no effect on the alkalization of SiO{sub 2}. If the alteration process described in this paper proves to be a generalized phenomenon in blast furnace cokes, then the addition of fine-grained quartz to the surface of the coke before charging a BF can be useful for removing of some of the Al and alkali from the BF gases and reduce coke degradation by alkalis, or at least improve its properties until the temperature reaches approximately 2000{sup o}C. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

S.S. Gornostayev; P.A. Tanskanen; E.-P. Heikkinen; O. Kerkkonen; J.J. Haerkki [University of Oulu, Oulu (Finland). Laboratory of Process Metallurgy

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Co-coking of Hydrotreated Decant Oil/Coal Blends: Effect of Hydrotreatment Severity on the Yield Distribution and Quality of Distillate Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coke yield from delayed co-coking of hydrotreated DOs and coal blends was observed to be in the range of 15.9–24.4%. ... The coal used in this study (EI-106) was a 50:50 blend of the Powellton and Eagle seams, both very similar coals of high-volatile A bituminous rank from West Virginia. ... One of the hydrotreated DOs (EI-133) was coked alone. ...

Ömer Gül; Leslie R. Rudnick; Harold H. Schobert

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Valorization of Automotive Shredder Residues in metallurgical furnaces Project REFORBA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and the electric arc furnace (EAF) routes, P1 could be used as substitute for coal or coke, and P2 could replace with raw materials cheaper than coke. As additional potential benefits the amount of CO2 generated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Conversion of forest residues to a methane-rich gas. Detailed economic feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic evaluation of the application of the multi-solid fluid reactor design to wood gasification was completed. The processing options examined include plant capacity, production of a high-Btu (1006 Btu/SCF HHV) gas versus an intermediate-Btu gas (379 Btu/SCF HHV), and operating pressure. 9 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Usiing NovoCOS cleaning equipment in repairing the furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries 4 & 5 at OAO Koks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience with a new surface-preparation technology for the ceramic resurfacing of the refractory furnace-chamber lining in coke batteries is described.

S.G. Protasov; R. Linden; A. Gross [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Application of artificial neural network to study the performance of jig for beneficiation of non-coking coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-coking coal is the major resource of energy in India. Apart from its utilization in energy sector, the other major application of this coal is in metallurgical sector. The resource of high quality of non-coking coal is not available as per demand; as a result beneficiation of non-coking coal is now becoming essential. Jigging is one of the economical physical beneficiation processes for Indian high ash non-coking coal. At present scenario in coal washery in India, below 3 mm size is not being processed. Attempt has been taken to beneficiate the fine size non-coking coal fractions generated at different sizes of bed materials, feed rates and water rates using laboratory Denver mineral jig. The performance of jig was evaluated in term of Ep and imperfection value. Furthermore artificial neural network (ANN) model has been developed for determining combustible recovery and ash percent of the concentrate. The ANN architecture is made up of three layers (input – hidden – output). A back propagation algorithm was used for training of the ANN model. It has been observed that the predicted values by ANN model are in good agreement with the experimental results.

Lopamudra Panda; A.K. Sahoo; A. Tripathy; S.K. Biswal; A.K. Sahu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Proposal of a novel multifunctional energy system for cogeneration of coke, hydrogen, and power - article no. 052001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel multifunctional energy system (MES), which cogenerates coke, hydrogen, and power, through the use of coal and coke oven gas (COG). In this system, a new type of coke oven, firing coal instead of COG as heating resource for coking, is adopted. The COG rich in H{sub 2} is sent to a pressure swing adsorption (PSA) unit to separate about 80% of hydrogen first, and then the PSA purge gas is fed to a combined cycle as fuel. The new system combines the chemical processes and power generation system, along with the integration of chemical conversion and thermal energy utilization. In this manner, both the chemical energy of fuel and thermal energy can be used more effectively. With the same inputs of fuel and the same output of coking heat, the new system can produce about 65% more hydrogen than that of individual systems. As a result, the thermal efficiency of the new system is about 70%, and the exergy efficiency is about 66%. Compared with individual systems, the primary energy saving ratio can reach as high as 12.5%. Based on the graphical exergy analyses, we disclose that the integration of synthetic utilization of COG and coal plays a significant role in decreasing the exergy destruction of the MES system. The promising results obtained may lead to a clean coal technology that will utilize COG and coal more efficiently and economically.

Jin, H.G.; Sun, S.; Han, W.; Gao, L. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Split and collectorless flotation to medium coking coal fines for multi-product zero waste concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The medium coking coal fines of ? 0.5 mm from Jharia coal field were taken for this investigation. The release analysis of the composite coal reveals that yield is very low at 10.0% ash, about 25% at 14% ash and 50% at 17% ash level. The low yield is caused by the presence of high ash finer fraction. The size-wise ash analysis of ? 0.5 mm coal indicated that ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm fraction contains less ash than ? 0.15 mm fraction. Thus, the composite feed was split into ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm and ? 0.15 mm fractions and subjected to flotation separately. The low ash bearing fraction (? 0.5 + 0.15 mm) was subjected to two stages collectorless flotation to achieve the concentrate with 10% ash. The cleaner concentrate (18.9%) with 10% ash was recovered which has an application in metallurgical industries. The concentrate of 30.2% yield with 12.5% ash could be achieved in one stage collectorless flotation which is suitable for use in coke making as sweetener. As the ? 0.15 mm fraction contains relatively high ash, collector aided flotation using sodium silicate was performed to get a concentrate of 23.6% yield with about 17% ash. The blending of this product with cleaner tail obtained from ? 0.5 + 0.15 mm produces about 35.0% yield with 17% ash and that can be utilized for coke making. The reject from the two fractions can be used for conventional thermal power plant or cement industries using a 23.5% ash after one stage collector aided flotation and the final tailings produced content ash of 61.6% can be used for fluidization combustion bed (FBC). This eventually leads to complete utilization of coal.

Shobhana Dey; K.K. Bhattacharyya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Co-gasification of Biomass with Coal and Oil Sand Coke in a Drop Tube Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From this work, a synergistic effect was observed for blends of coal with petcoke and an increase in the production of H2 and CO was obtained. ... Finally, blending biomass with coal?petcoke blends did not produce any significant change in H2 production, although slight variations were observed in the production of CO and CO2. ... In addn., co-gasification tests of binary blends of a bituminous coal with different types of biomass (up to 10%) and petroleum coke (up to 60%), as well as ternary blends of coal-petcoke-biomass (45-45-10%) were conducted to study the effect of blending on gas prodn. ...

Chen Gao; Farshid Vejahati; Hasan Katalambula; Rajender Gupta

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Matrix endor studies of the carbonization of West Canadian coking coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cretaceous bituminous coals of known rank R?0 max vitrinite reflectance) have been examined by ESR (electron spin resonance) and ENDOR (electron nuclear double resonance) techniques. Both highly oxidised (outcrop) and unoxidised mine?run Balmer coal from the Crowsnest field have been subjected to heat treatment (200?900°C) and the matrix proton ENDOR signal studied as a function of applied microwave and rf power. Changes in ENDOR line shape and intensity are described with particular emphasis on the presoftening region of the unoxidised coal. A comparative study of the carbonization of hvb and 1vb coking coal from the Crowsnest is reported.

P. R. West; S. E. Cannon

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Form EIA-5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Users Manual Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality - Coke Plants Document Number: 001 Version: 2.0 June 2011 i June 2011 Document History Number Date Section Description 1 2 June 2011 June 2011 Document initiation Revised screen shots and remove external user references. Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Document Changes/Maintenance POC: Primary POC: Tejasvi Raghuveer Phone: (202) 586-8926 Email: Tejasvi.Raghuveer@eia.gov Project References: Coal Internet Data Collection (CIDC) User's Manual, September 2007 ii June 2011 Content 1. General System Overview ................................................................................. 1

343

Theoretical and experimental investigations into the particular features of the process of converting coal gas hydrocarbons on incandescent coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prospects of the use of reducing gases in ferrous metallurgy and the possibilities for using them as a basis for coke production have been presented by the authors of the present article in the past. In the present report, the authors present certain results of theoretical and experimental investigations into the process of converting coal gas hydrocarbons on incandescent coke. The modification of the present-day method of thermodynamically calculating stable compositions of coking products, which was developed by the authors, has made it possible to apply it to specific chemical systems and process conditions not met with before, such as the conversion of hydrocarbons in mixtures of actual industrial gases (coal gas and blast furnace gas) in the presence of carbon and considerable amounts of hydrogen.

Zubilin, I.G.; Umanskii, V.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Use of resin-bearing wastes from coke and coal chemicals production at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coke and coal chemicals plant at the Novokuznetsk Metallurgical Combine is making trial use of a technology that recycles waste products in 'tar ponds.' Specialists from the Ekomash company have installed a recycling unit in one area of the plant's dump, the unit including an inclined conveyor with a steam heater and a receiving hopper The coal preparation shop receives the wastes in a heated bin, where a screw mixes the wastes with pail of the charge for the coking ovens. The mixture subsequently travels along a moving conveyor belt together with the rest of the charge materials. The addition of up to 2% resin-bearing waste materials to the coal charge has not had any significant effect on the strength properties of the coke.

Kul'kova, T.N.; Yablochkin, N.V.; Gal'chenko, A.I.; Karyakina, E.A.; Litvinova, V.A.; Gorbach, D.A.

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Methane steam reforming at low temperature: Effect of light alkanes’ presence on coke formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steam reforming of natural gas for the production of hydrogen at low operation temperature offers significant financial and environmental advantages. However, the presence of higher hydrocarbons as minor components of natural gas can significantly affect the formation of coke and thus the effectiveness of the catalyst. In this study, the effect of the presence of C2–C3 alkanes in the feedstock on the carbon accumulation during low temperature steam reforming of methane is investigated over Ni and Rh catalysts supported on lanthanum doped ceria–zirconia mixed oxide. Both catalysts showed high resistance to coke formation and especially in the case of Rh/La/CeO2–ZrO2, the carbon accumulation detected was low even after 10 h on stream in steam reforming of all mixtures of hydrocarbons tested. The presence of higher alkanes in methane increased the amount of carbon on Ni(10)CeZrLa compared to pure methane as well as the nature of the carbonaceous species. Increase in the C-number of the additive alkane had almost no influence on the total amount of carbon formed (C/H feed ratio = constant) but favored the formation of filamentous carbon.

Sofia D. Angeli; Fotis G. Pilitsis; Angeliki A. Lemonidou

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A new technology for producing hydrogen and adjustable ratio syngas from coke oven gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 15 billion Nm{sup 3} coke oven gas (COG) is emitted into the air in Shanxi Province in China as air pollutants. It is also a waste of precious chemical resources. In this study, COG was purified respectively by four methods including refrigeration, fiberglass, silica gel, and molecular sieve. Purified COG was separated by a prism membrane into two gas products. One consists mainly of H{sub 2} ({gt}90 vol %) and the other is rich in CH{sub 4} ({gt}60 vol %) with their exact compositions to vary with the membrane separation pressure and outlet gas flow ratio. The gas rich in CH{sub 4} was partially oxidized with oxygen in a high-temperature fixed-bed quartz reactor charged with coke particles of 10 mm size. At 1200-1300{sup o}C, a CH{sub 4} conversion of {gt}99% could be obtained. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the synthesis product gas can be adjusted in the range 0.3-1.4, very favorable for further C1 synthesis. 10 refs., 17 figs., 1t ab.

Jun Shen; Zhi-zhong Wang; Huai-wang Yang; Run-sheng Yao [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Department of Chemical Engineering

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Features of hydrotreating catalytic cracking feed and heavy slow coking gas oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A possible means of more extensive processing of crude oil is the use, in catalytic cracking, of heavy coking gas oils (HCGOs), a feature of which is a higher content of polycyclic aromatic compounds and resins by comparison with straight-run vacuum distillates. The presence of these compounds in catalytic cracking feed causes a reduction in the product yield and increased coke formation. Therefore, one of the problems of hydrotreating feedstock of this kind is the hydrogenation of polycyclic arenes. Processes of extensive desulphurization and denitration occur in parallel, since the sulphur and nitrogen compounds of HCGO are chiefly condensed benzoderivatives of thiophene, pyridine and carbazole, and largely concentrated in heavy aromatic and resinous fractions. The composition of the saturated part of the cracking feed plays a large role in achieving the optimum yields of gaseous and gasoline fractions. Thus an increase in the proportion of cyclanes in the feed raises the gasoline yield. In this way, an investigation of the hydrocarbon conversions during the hydrotreatment of cracking feed is of great importance. The present paper sets out the results for studying the change in the group-structural characteristics of the hydrogenation products of a mixture containing 30% HCGOs according to data of {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy. 7 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Yefremov, N.I.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Frolov, P.A.; Chagovets, A.N.; Kalabin, G.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Petroleum Coke  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81,811 82,516 82,971 84,053 85,190 84,889 1986-2013 East Coast (PADD 1) 12,198 10,887 9,316 9,766 9,003 7,430 1986-2013 Midwest (PADD 2) 15,005 15,507 16,480 16,834 17,611 17,597...

350

Charcoal from agricultural residues as alternative reducing agent in metal recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical carbonization units have the target to produce a charcoal which is in nearly all cases used as energy carrier for the production of heat in different forms. These often very old and not efficient processes are in most cases operated at temperatures between 350 and 500 °C and generate a charcoal with only medium quality. To realize an application of charcoals as CO2-neutral reducing agent in metallurgical processes special high quality charcoals are needed, which meet metallurgical requirements - fixed carbon content of more than 85%, low ash amount and low content of volatiles. Therefore carbonization processes at higher temperature are required. The performed carbonization experiments with agricultural residues at temperatures up to 1000 °C show the possibility of the production of a charcoal which meets the requirements of various metallurgical processes and can act in these industry sector as reducing agent and substitute the so far used fossil coals and cokes. This was realized with some first reduction tests of heavy metal containing residues where charcoals showed a better performance than petroleum coke typically used in such reduction processes. The charcoal application in metal production and recycling processes as substitute of fossil carbon carriers leads to an enormous potential of saved fossil based CO2-emissions because of the high energy and reducing agent demands in these industry sector. So the metal industry has the opportunity to fulfill environmental regulations and restrictions to reduce their CO2-footprint and guarantee the supply of metals in Central Europe in future.

Thomas Griessacher; Jürgen Antrekowitsch; Stefan Steinlechner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Coke Oven (excluding or LPG and Natural Gas from Local

352

Co-Gasification of Biomass Wastes and Coal?Coke Blends in an Entrained Flow Gasifier: An Experimental Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study of entrained flow, air-blown cogasification of biomass and a coal?coke mixture has been performed in order to evaluate the effect of the relative fuel/air ratio (ranging between 2.5 and 7.5), the reaction temperature (ranging between ...

Juan J. Hernández; Guadalupe Aranda-Almansa; Clara Serrano

2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

353

Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Microcarbon residue yield and heteroatom partitioning between volatiles and solids for whole vacuum resids and their liquid chromatographic fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five petroleum >1000{degrees}F resids were separated into compound type fractions using liquid chromatography. The coking tendency of each compound type was assessed using the microcarbon residue (MCR) test (ASTM D 4530). Heteroatom (N, S, Ni, V) partitioning between MCR solids versus volatiles was determined through analysis of the starting fractions and the corresponding MCR solids. The weighted sum of MCR solid yields over all compound types in a given resid was typically in good agreement with the MCR yield of the whole resid. This finding agrees with prior studies indicating coke yield to be an additive property. Sulfur partitioning was also an additive property, was predictable from MCR yield, and was nearly independent of the initial form (sulfide, thiophenic, sulfoxide) present. Nitrogen and nickel partitioning were nonadditive and therefore composition dependent. Partitioning of vanadium into solids was essentially quantitative for all resids and their fractions. MCR solid yield was generally dependent only on H/C ratio. However, there is some evidence indicating secondary dependence on hydrocarbon structure; i.e., that naphthenic rings reduce MCR in proportion to H/C by virtue of their effective hydrogen transfer properties. Deposition of N and Ni into MCR solids over the fractions was often appreciably less than that of the whole resids, thereby indicating that interaction among various compound types was required for maximum incorporation of those elements into coke.

Green, J.B.; Shay, J.Y.; Reynolds, J.W.; Green, J.A.; Young, L.L.; White, M.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of pitches and cokes from solvent-extracted coal materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three initial coal-extracted (C-E) samples were received from the West Virginia University (WVU) Chemical Engineering Department. Two samples had been hydrogenated to obtain pitches that satisfy Theological requirements. One of the hydrogenated (HC-E) samples had been extracted by toluene to remove ash and higher molecular weight aromatic compounds. We were unable to measure the softening point and viscosity of the non-hydro treated solid extract sample, Positive characteristics in the HC-E materials were softening points of 113-119{degrees}C, low sulfur and ash. The oxygen and nitrogen content of the HC-E samples may limit future usage in premium carbon and graphite products. Coking values were similar to petroleum pitches. Laboratory anode testing indicates that in combination with standard coal-tar pitch, the HC-E material can be used as a binder pitch.

McHenry, E.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Comparative study of the performance of conventional and column flotation when treating coking coal fines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations were carried out on coking coal fines by conventional cell and column flotation techniques. The effects of different operating parameters were evaluated for both conventional and column flotation. The coal fines were collected from Bhojudih washery, India. These coal fines averaged 24.4% ash, 19.8% volatile matter and 53.8% fixed carbon on a dry basis. A commercial grade sodium silicate, light diesel oil and pine oil were used as depressant, collector and frother respectively. The flotation performance was compared with release analysis. The conventional flotation results indicated that a clean coal with 14.4% ash could be obtained at 78.0% yield with 88.4% combustible recovery. The ash of the clean coal could be further reduced to 10.1% at 72.0% yield with 85.6% combustible recovery by using column flotation. The column flotation results were close to those obtained by release analysis.

M.S. Jena; S.K. Biswal; S.P. Das; P.S.R. Reddy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fouling in a 160 MWe FBC boiler firing coal and petroleum coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 160 MWe fluidized bed combustor (FBC) boiler owned and operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) has recently been co-fired with coal and petroleum coke (up to 50%). However, it has suffered some fouling problems. On examination of the deposits it became clear that, in only a few cases could the fouling be partially attributed to alkali metals, and even in those cases the primarily limestone-derived materials were almost quantitatively sulphated to a level which was sufficient to cause strength development by itself. In other cases, it appeared that the fouling mechanism was carbonation of the free lime component of the deposit followed by sulphation. Finally, in a few deposits which were less sulphated than bed materials and fly ash, strength development appeared to have occurred by conversion of the free lime in the deposits to Ca(OH)2, followed by carbonation. This type of agglomeration has not been reported previously in a FBC.

E.J. Anthony; A.P. Iribarne; J.V. Iribarne; R. Talbot; L. Jia; D.L. Granatstein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cyanide leaching from soil developed from coking plant purifier waste as influenced by citrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils in the vicinity of manufactured gas plants and coal coking plants are often highly contaminated with cyanides in the form of the compound Prussian blue. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of citrate on the leaching of iron-cyanide complexes from an extremely acidic soil (pH 2.3) developed from gas purifier waste near a former coking plant. The soil contained 63 g kg{sup -1} CN, 148 g kg{sup -1} Fe, 123 g kg{sup -1} S, and 222 g kg{sup -1} total C. Analysis of the soil by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy revealed the presence of Prussian blue, gypsum, elemental sulfur, jarosite, and hematite. For column leaching experiments, air-dried soil was mixed with purified cristabolite sand at a ratio of 1:3 and packed into chromatography columns. The soil was leached with dilute (0.1 or 1 mM) CaCl{sub 2} solutions and the effluent was collected and analyzed for total and dissolved CN, Ca, Fe, SO{sub 4}, pH, and pe. In the absence of citrate, the total dissolved CN concentration in the effluent was always below current drinking water limits (< 1.92 {mu}M), indicating low leaching potential. Adding citrate at a concentration of 1 mM had little effect on the CN concentrations in the column effluent. Addition of 10 or 100 mM citrate to the influent solution resulted in strong increases in dissolved and colloidal CN concentrations in the effluent.

Tim Mansfeldt; Heike Leyer; Kurt Barmettler; Ruben Kretzschmar [Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum (Germany). Soil Science and Soil Ecology Group, Faculty of Geosciences

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Materials - Recycling - Shredder Residue  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Recovering Materials from Shredder Residue Obsolete automobiles, home appliances and other metal-containing scrap are shredded for the recovery of metals. More than 50% of the material shredded is automobiles. In the United States, shredders generate about 5 million tons of shredder residue every year. Similar amounts are produced in Europe and in the Pacific Rim. Because recycling shredder waste has not been profitable, most of it ends up in landfills; smaller amounts are incinerated. Argonne researchers have developed and tested a process to recover polymers and metals from shredder residue. A 2-ton/hr pilot plant, consisting of a mechanical separation facility and a six-stage wet density/froth flotation plant, was built at Argonne. In the mechanical part of the plant, the shredder waste was separated into five primary components: a polymer fraction (about 45% by weight), a residual metals concentrate (about 10% by weight), a polyurethane foam portion (about 5% by weight), an organic-rich fraction (about 25% by weight) and a metal oxides fraction (about 15% by weight). The polymer fraction was then separated further in the wet density/froth flotation system to recover individual plastic types or compatible families of polymers.

360

Influence of coal thermoplastic properties on coking pressure generation: Part 2 – A study of binary coal blends and specific additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of coal blends and pitch/coal blends were evaluated using rheometry, thermogravimetric analysis and microscopy to confirm and further elucidate the coking pressure mechanism previously proposed by Duffy et al. (2007) [1]. We confirm that blending a low rank, high fluidity, low coking pressure coal, with a high rank, low fluidity, high coking pressure coal can significantly reduce the coking pressure associated with the latter. Interestingly, blending does not necessarily result in a fluidity that is midway between that of the two coals; sometimes the fluidity of the blend is less than that of the low fluidity coal, especially when the coals are significantly different in rank. This occurs because the increase in complex viscosity (?*) through resolidification of the low rank, high fluidity coal counteracts the reduction in ?* resulting from softening of the high rank, low fluidity coal. It has also been confirmed that the ?* of the resultant blend can be estimated from the ?* of each component coal using a logarithmic additivity rule commonly employed for polymer blends. Polarised light microscopy has indicated that the degree of mixing between coals of different rank is minimal, with fusion restricted to the particle surface. It is therefore inappropriate to think of such a coal blend in the same way as a single coal, since each component coal behaves relatively independently. This limited fusion is important for understanding the coking pressure mechanism for blends. It is proposed here that the lower rank coal, which softens at lower temperature, is able to expand into the interparticle voids between the high rank coal that is yet to soften, and these voids can create channels for volatiles to traverse. Then, and importantly, when the high rank coal begins to expand, the pore structure developed in the resolidified structures of the low rank coal can facilitate removal of volatiles, while the resolidified material may also act as a suitable sorbent for volatile matter. This is considered to be the primary mechanism by which coal blending is able to alleviate coking pressure, and applies to addition of inert material also. Addition of a coal tar pitch was found to increase fluidity but also to extend the thermoplastic range to lower temperatures. This caused an increase in the swelling range, which was accompanied by a long plateau in ?*, a feature which has previously been observed for certain high fluidity, high pressure coals. Elasticity and ?* at the onset of expansion were also higher for both the pitch impregnated coals and the high pressure blends, which supports previous findings for singly charged high pressure coals, and confirms the potential use of such criteria for identifying potentially dangerous coals/blends.

John J. Duffy; Merrick R. Mahoney; Karen M. Steel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Environmental Monitoring program. Volume 1 - sampling progrom report. Baseline Sampling Program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This innovative coke oven gas cleaning system combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE provided cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct and Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. It also requires the preparation of a final report on the results of the Baseline Compliance and Supplemental Sampling Programs that are part of the EMP and which were conducted prior to the startup of the innovative coke oven gas cleaning system. This report is the Baseline Sampling Program report.

Stuart, L.M.

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Evaluating coking resources. 2. State standard GOST 25543-88 as a coding system for coal and coal mixtures in evaluating their technological properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The codification of coal in State Standard 25543-88 is compared with the international codification of coal of medium and high rank. The ranking of coking coal on the basis of State Standard GOST...

Yu. A. Zolotukhin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

364

Comparative Study of Gasification Performance between Bituminous Coal and Petroleum Coke in the Industrial Opposed Multiburner Entrained Flow Gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SUMMARY : Co-gasification performance of coal and petroleum coke (petcoke) blends in a pilot-scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier was studied exptl. ... Two different coals, including a subbituminous coal (Coal A) and a bituminous coal (Coal B), individually blended with a petcoke in the gasifier were considered. ... results suggested that, when the petcoke was mixed with Coal A over 70%, the slagging problem, which could shorten the operational period due to high ash content in the coal, was improved. ...

Zhonghua Sun; Zhenghua Dai; Zhijie Zhou; Jianliang Xu; Guangsuo Yu

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

The association of XRCC1 haplotypes and chromosomal damage levels in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretically, a haplotype has a higher level of heterozygosity than individual single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and the association study based on the haplotype may have an increased power for detecting disease associations compared with SNP-based analysis. In this study, we investigated the effects of four haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNP) and the inferred haplotype pairs of the X-ray cross-complementing group 1 (XRCC1) gene on chromosome damage detected by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay. The study included 141 coke-oven workers with exposure to a high level of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 66 nonexposed controls. The frequencies of total MN and MNed cells were borderline associated with the Arg{sup 194}Trp polymorphism (P = 0.053 and P = 0.050, respectively) but not associated with the Arg{sup 280}His, Arg{sup 399}Gln and Gln{sup 632}Gln polymorphisms among coke-oven workers. Five haplotypes, including CGGG, TGGG, CAGG, CGAG, and CGGA, were inferred based on the four htSNPs of XRCC1 gene. The haplotype CGGG was associated with the decreased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells, and the haplotypes TGGG and CGAG were associated with the increased frequencies of total MN and MNed cells with adjustment for covariates among coke-oven workers. This study showed that the haplotypes derived from htSNPs in the XRCC1 gene were more likely than single SNPs to correlate with the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced chromosome damage among coke-oven workers.

Shuguang Leng; Juan Cheng; Linyuan Zhang; Yong Niu; Yufei Dai; Zufei Pan; Bin Li; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). National Institute of Occupational Health and Poison Control

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Recovery of flexible polyurethane foam from shredder residue.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a patented, continuous process for the recovery of flexible polyurethane foam (PUF) from auto shredder residue (ASR). To test the process, Argonne researchers conceived of, designed, and built a continuous foam washing and drying system that was pilot-tested at a shredder facility for six months. Economic analysis of the process, using manufacturers' quotes and operating data from Argonne's pilot plant, indicates a payback of less than two years for a plant producing about 1,000 ton/yr of foam. Samples of clean foam were shipped to three major foam reprocessors; all three indicated that the quality of the PUF recovered by the Argonne process met their requirements. Tests of the recovered foam by an independent testing laboratory showed that the recycled foam met the specifications for several automotive applications, including carpet padding, headliner, and sound-suppression support materials. Recovery of foam reduces the mass and the volume of material going to the landfill by about 5% and 30%, respectively. Annually, recovery will save about 1.2 x 10{sup 12} Btu of energy, cut the amount of solid waste being landfilled by about 150,000 tons, and eliminate the emission of about 250 tons of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air.

Daniels, E. J.; Jody, b. J.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

367

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

368

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

369

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)" "End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu

370

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

371

Characterization of fly ashes from circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) boilers cofiring coal and petroleum coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemistry, mineralogy, morphology, and particle size distribution were investigated in fly ashes from the burning of Datong (ShanXi, China) bituminous coal and the cofiring of Mideast high-sulfur petroleum coke (PC) with 30:70 (cal %) and 50:50 (cal %) blends of Datong bituminous coal in two commercial CFBC boilers. With the exception of CaO, the amounts of major oxides in the fly ashes from cofiring PC and coal were close to those of the common coal fly ashes. The PC-coal fly ashes were enriched in Ni, V, and Mo, implying these trace elements were mainly derived from PC. Ni and V, along with several other elements, such as Cr, Cu, Se, Pb, U, Th, and possibly As and Cd, increased in content with a decrease in temperature of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). The results of chemistry, mineralogy, and morphology studies suggested that the desulfurization rate of the CFBC boilers at current conditions was low, and the PC tends to coarsen the fly ash particles and increase the loss on ignition (LOI) values, making these fly ashes unsuitable for use as a cement additive or a mineral admixture in concrete. Further studies on the combustion status of the CFBC boilers are needed if we want to be able to increase the desulfurization rate and produce high-quality fly ashes for broader and full utilization. 22 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Feihu Li; Jianping Zhai; Xiaoru Fu; Guanghong Sheng [Nanjing University, Nanjing (China). State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control & Resource Reuse, School of the Environment

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Coking” of zeolites during methanol conversion: Basic reactions of the MTO-, MTP- and MTG processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deactivation of acidic zeolite catalysts during methanol conversion is investigated for elucidating how spatial constraints interfere mechanistically. Detailed product composition – including retained organic matter – is determined in a time resolved mode. At 270–300 °C with H-ZSM-5, first unsaturated hydrocarbons are formed—methane being the indicative co-product. Then the reaction rate increases auto-catalytically, but soon declines because of exhaustive pore filling. The retained organic matter consists mainly of ethyl-trimethyl-benzene- and isopropyl-dimethyl-benzene molecules. Alkylation of benzene rings with ethene and propene produces the deactivating molecules. At 475 °C, alkylation of benzene rings with olefins has shifted to the reverse, reactivating the H-ZSM-5 catalyst. Coke forms slowly on the surface of H-ZSM-5 crystallites. Spatial constraints suppress the formation of 2-ring aromatics. With the wide pore zeolite H-Y, fast deactivation is noticed—bigger aromatic molecules can be formed and are retained. Methanol reactions on the protonic catalyst sites are visualized as CH3+ attack for methylation and dehydrogenation, methane being the hydrogen-rich co-product. Methanol conversion on zeolites H-ZSM-58, H-EU-1 and H-Beta is comparatively investigated. Zone ageing is discussed for favorable reactor design. It is shown, how a multi-compound product composition is the source of information for elucidating complex reaction mechanisms.

Hans Schulz

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Effects of HyperCoal addition on coke strength and thermoplasticity of coal blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ashless coal, also known as HyperCoal (HPC), was produced by thermal extraction of three coals of different ranks (Gregory caking coal, Warkworth steam coal, and Pasir subbituminous coal) with 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) at 360, 380, and 400{sup o}C. The effects of blending these HPCs into standard coal blends were investigated. Blending HPCs as 5-10% of a standard blend (Kouryusho:Goonyella:K9) enhanced the thermoplasticity over a wide temperature range. For blends made with the Pasir-HPC, produced from a noncaking coal, increasing the extraction temperature from 360 to 400{sup o}C increased the thermoplasticity significantly. Blends containing Warkworth-HPC, produced from a slightly caking coal, had a higher tensile strength than the standard blend in semicoke strength tests. The addition of 10% Pasir-HPC, extracted at 400{sup o}C, increased the tensile strength of the semicokes to the same degree as those made with Gregory-HPC. Furthermore, all HPC blends had a higher tensile strength and smaller weight loss during carbonization. These results suggest that the HPC became integrated into the coke matrix, interacting strongly with the other raw coals. 14 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Toshimasa Takanohashi; Takahiro Shishido; Ikuo Saito [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba (Japan). Energy Technology Research Institute

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Removal of ash from Indian Assam coking coal using sodium hydroxide and acid solutions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mineral matter (ash) removal from Assam coking coal by leaching with different concentrations of sodium hydroxide and acid (HCl, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, HNO{sub 3}, and HF) solutions has been investigated at a temperature of 75 C. The parameters tested were concentration of NaOH, type of acid, concentration of acids, and number of acid leaching steps. Total ash removed increased with increase of NaOH and acid concentrations up to the range studied. For the same experimental conditions, treatment of caustic leached coal in HCl acid resulted in better demineralization than in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or HNO{sub 3} acid. In the NaOH-HNO{sub 3} leaching method, a higher concentration (>20%) of HNO{sub 3} acid had an adverse effect on the de-ashing of coal. The NaOH-HF leaching process has been found to be the most effective method of coal de-ashing. The two acid treatment steps (HCl-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/HCl-HNO{sub 3}) after caustic leaching are the next most effective methods of coal de-ashing. The removal of mineral matter (including S) from coal is expected to decrease the graphite reactivity and thus the atmospheric pollution (due to the generation of smaller quantities of CO and SO{sub 2} gases).

Kumar, M.; Shankar, R.H.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

376

Released: May 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

377

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

378

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)"

379

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," ",," ",," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)",,"NGL(d)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

380

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" " ","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Table 2.2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

382

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

383

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

384

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)","Row"

385

Table N8.2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" 2. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

386

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

387

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

388

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

389

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

390

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

391

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Row"

392

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 Table 2.2 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for All Purposes, 2006 (Trillion Btu ) NAICS 1 Code Manufacturing Group Coal Coal Coke and Breeze 2 Natural Gas Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 3 and NGL 4 Residual Fuel Oil Net Electricity 5 Other 6 Shipments of Energy Sources 7 Total 8 311 Food ................................................................................. 147 1 638 16 3 26 251 105 (s) 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products ..................................... 20 0 41 1 1 3 30 11 -0 107

393

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

394

Released: November 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," " "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," " "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)"

395

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 3. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Row"

396

Released: March 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" 2 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," " "NAICS"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," " "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)"

397

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1" 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)",,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS"

398

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

399

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 1. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)","Row"

400

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"

402

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","RSE" " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Row"

403

Table 2.3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" 3 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," "," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

404

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)"

405

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected","Wood and Other","Biomass","Components" ,,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,"Electricity","Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas","Components",,"Steam","Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",,,," "

406

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)","Factors"

407

Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; " " Column: All Energy Sources Collected;" " Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues" " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related",," ",," "

408

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," "," " " "," ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal",,"RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal"," ","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)","Factors"

409

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)"," Gas(c)","NGL(d)","(million","(million ","Other(e)","Row"

410

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type and End Use," Type and End Use," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" "SIC",,"Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","(million kWh)","(1000 bbls)","(1000 bbls)","cu ft)","(1000 bbls)","tons)","Factors"

411

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" 2. Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,,"RSE" "SIC"," "," ","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke"," ","Row" "Code(a)","Major Group and Industry","Total","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

412

" Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" S4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

413

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million"

414

" Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" N4.1. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes (3-Digit Only); Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ",," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)","Row"

415

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Row"

416

" Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)"

417

"Table A11. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" 1. Total Primary Consumption of Combustible Energy for Nonfuel" " Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment," 1991 " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" " "," "," "," ","Natural"," "," ","Coke"," "," " " ","Total","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","(trillion","Row"

418

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal","RSE" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal","Row" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Factors"

419

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

420

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS",,,"Net","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Comparison of 3 MeV C{sup +} Ion-Irradiation Effects between The Nuclear Graphites made of Pitch and Petroleum Cokes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently, all the commercially available nuclear graphite grades are being made from two different cokes, i.e., petroleum coke or coal-tar pitch coke, and a coal-tar pitch binder. Of these, since the coke composes most of the graphite volume, i.e., > 70 %, it is understood that a physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical property as well as an irradiation-induced property change will be strongly dependent on the type of coke. To obtain first-hand information on the effects of the coke type, i.e., petroleum or pitch, on the irradiation sensitivity of graphite, specimens made of IG-110 of petroleum coke and IG-430 of pitch coke were irradiated up to {approx} 19 dpa by 3 MeV C{sup +} at room temperature, and the irradiation-induced changes in the hardness, Young's modulus, Raman spectrum, and oxidation properties were characterized. Results of the TEM show that the size and density of the Mrozowski cracks appeared to be far larger and higher in the IG-110 than the IG-430. Results of the hardness test revealed a slightly higher increase in the IG-430 than the IG-110 by around 10 dpa, and the Raman spectrum measurement showed a higher (FWHM){sub D}/(FWHM){sub G} value for IG-430 for 0.02 {approx} 0.25 dpa. Both the hardness and Raman measurement may imply a higher irradiation sensitivity of the IG-430 than the IG-110. Results of the Young's modulus measurements showed a large data scattering, which prevented us from estimating the differences between the grades. Oxidation experiments using a TG-DTA under a flow of dry air/He = 2.5 % (flow rate: 40 CC/min) at 750 and 1000 deg C show that the IG-110 of the petroleum coke exhibits a far higher oxidation rate than the IG-430. The discrepancy between the oxidation rate of the two grades increased with an increase in the oxidation temperature and the dose. Oxidized surface pore area was larger for IG-110. Judging from the results obtained from the present experimental conditions, the irradiation sensitivity appeared to be dependent on the degree of graphitization (thus, the perfection of graphite structure), and the differences in the oxidation property of the grades appeared to be largely affected by the structure of the Mrozowski cracks. Differences in the size and density of the Mrozowski cracks between the grades were attributed to the differences in the thermal conductivity of the grades. (authors)

Se-Hwan, Chi; Gen-Chan, Kim; Jong-Hwa, Chang [Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration Project, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Detection of natural oxidation of coking coal by TG-FTIR—mechanistic implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The natural oxidation/weathering of coal continues to be a subject of interest both scientifically and industrially, in part due to the complexity of the molecular processes at hand as well as to the commercial implications involved. It is widely recognized that coking can be adversely affected by weathering whereas, combustion processes appear to be enhanced as result of oxidation. Combustion techniques are commonly used in the analysis of coal, and organic compounds in general, for the determination of elemental hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen. For oxygen, the method in common practice involves the determination by difference from directly determined values for moisture, ash, sulphur, hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen. This has led us to consider the use of thermogravimetry coupled to gas analysis by infrared spectroscopy (TG-FTIR) to measure organic oxygen in coal directly. Although this technique, developed by Solomon and coworkers, has been extensively used by our group and others, it appears not to have been considered for this particular purpose. Recently, we have shown that TG-FTIR is capable of measuring all the organic oxygen in both fresh and oxidized coal by simultaneous measurement of the three main oxygen-containing gases H2O, CO and CO2 evolved during rapid pyrolysis. This gives us a way of measuring quantitatively the oxygen introduced into the coal matrix during oxidation and at least a partial capability of establishing oxygen speciation. We have found, using TG-FTIR, that the early stages of coal oxidation results in the appearance of O-containing functional groups not present in the original coal. The nature of these functional groups is directly related to the oxidation reaction mechanism. These results will be presented and discussed in detail.

J.A. MacPhee; L. Giroux; J.-P. Charland; J.F. Gransden; J.T. Price

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A scanning electron microscope study on agglomeration in petroleum coke-fired FBC boilers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ten samples originating from different boiler FBC systems burning petroleum coke and one laboratory sample were chosen to perform a study on the development, structure, and composition of deposits formed by agglomeration in various locations. The work focused on examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The possibility of a contribution of liquid phases in the adherence to solid surfaces and in agglomeration was discussed and checks by SEM, EDX, and analysis by neutron activation were performed; no evidence could be found either for liquid phases or for any role of vanadium or alkaline element compounds. The agglomerations result from the continued sintering of CaSO4 particles until they build up a strong framework that is indefinitely extended, into which particles of different and complex compositions are bound, without contributing to the cohesion. Chemical sintering occurring by the sulphation of CaO into CaSO4 appears to be an important contribution while CaO is still available, but sintering also occurs by mass transfer mechanisms and continues after the depletion of CaO. Deposits formed in regions only reached by fly ash (convection section), and also in in-bed deposits, grow from particles <50 ?m, mostly in the range of 10 ?m or less. In regions collecting bed ash (e.g., J-valves), the deposit grows from the sintering together of particles on the order of 100–300 ?m (originally bed ash particles), which themselves appear as conglomerates of extensively sintered smaller particles.

J.V Iribarne; E.J Anthony; A Iribarne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A new mechanism for FBC agglomeration and fouling when firing 100% petroleum coke  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a preliminary study of the problem of agglomeration development in the petroleum coke combustion ashes, samples from different locations in a combustor from an industrial CFBC boiler were analyzed. Various oxides and calcium compounds of vanadium were found, in all cases, amounting to a total of 0.1--0.2% of V. These compounds do not accumulate (i.e. their concentration in the deposit does not increase) in the course of the FBC operation. The deposits show abnormally high conversion to CaSO{sub 4}, in some cases with very little content of free CaO, and a new mechanism of agglomeration similar to chemical reaction sintering is proposed. Different possible mechanisms leading to the formation of agglomerates were examined and the hypothesis that currently seems to best fit with the data is that the agglomeration phenomenon is due to a ``molecular cramming`` effect caused by the nearly quantitative conversion of the CaO to CaSO{sub 4}. While the absence of fuel derived ash, which would normally provide discontinuities in the deposits allowing them to break up, instead permits the buildup of massive monolithic deposits in various parts of the CFBC primary reactor loop. This explanation is also consistent with the ability of Mg compounds to mitigate the problem, but it suggests that the effect of these compounds is to prevent the buildup of the deposits by providing ``inert material`` rather than by capturing vanadium oxides as has heretofore been supposed. Further systematic investigations are planned to definitively rule out a vanadate capture mechanisms and to explore whether sulfidization as opposed to sulfation plays any part in the buildup of these deposits.

Anthony, E.J. [CANMET, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Natural Resources Canada; Iribarne, A.P.; Iribarne, J.V. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Effect of Pyrolysis and CO2 Gasification Pressure on the Surface Area and Pore Size Distribution of Petroleum Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Normalization of the reaction rate by the surface area indicated that the effect of the pressure on the physical characteristics of the petcoke was the main but not sole factor in the change of the reaction rate with the gasification pressure. ... As refiners are pushed toward producing cleaner transportation fuels from poorer quality crudes, the production of petroleum coke (petcoke) is increasing as a byproduct of heavy oil upgrading units. ... (1, 2) The majority of petcoke produced in Canada is currently stockpiled on the site of the plant. ...

Maryam Malekshahian; Josephine M. Hill

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

426

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Table G1. Heat contents Fuel Units Approximate heat content Coal 1 Production .................................................. million Btu per short ton 20.136 Consumption .............................................. million Btu per short ton 19.810 Coke plants ............................................. million Btu per short ton 26.304 Industrial .................................................. million Btu per short ton 23.651 Residential and commercial .................... million Btu per short ton 20.698 Electric power sector ............................... million Btu per short ton 19.370

427

Characteristics of a commercially aged Ni-Mo/Al2O3 hydrotreating catalyst: component distribution, nature of coke and effects of regeneration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information concerning the morphology and behavior of active components on commercially aged catalyst, the effects of regeneration conditions on activity, and insights into the nature of coke and contaminant metal deposits could lead to improved catalysts and operating conditions , yielding significant economic returns. Spent Ni-Mo/Al2O3 hydrotreating catalyst from a commercial hydrotreater was examined using TGA, SEM, STEM, XPS, and a microreactor. Information concerning intraparticle distributions of active components, characteristics of the coke and metal deposits, and catalytic activity for fresh, spent and regenerated catalyst was used to draw general conclusions concerning hydrotreating catalyst deactivation. It was found that catalytic activity was reduced and the nature of the hydrogenation function was altered due to bulk migration and agglomeration of molybdenum. This process was found to be accelerated by high-temperature regeneration. Results also indicated that iron deposits might catalyze formation of coke. Tentative generalizations and suggestions on improved reactor operation are presented.

Bogdanor, J.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2 2002 3 2006 3 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time. 3. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil, coal or coke.

429

Effects of genetic polymorphisms of metabolic enzymes on cytokinesis-block micronucleus in peripheral blood lymphocyte among coke-oven workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploring the associations between genetic polymorphisms of metabolic enzymes and susceptibility to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced chromosomal damage is of great significance for understanding PAH carcinogenesis. Cytochrome P450, glutathione S-transferase, microsomal epoxide hydrolase, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase, and N-acetyltransferase are PAH-metabolizing enzymes. In this study, we genotyped for the polymorphisms of these genes and assessed their effects on cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) frequencies in peripheral blood lymphocytes among 141 coke-oven workers and 66 non-coke-oven worker controls. The geometric means of urinary 1-hydroxypyrene levels in coke-oven workers and the controls were 12.0 and 0.7 {mu}mol/mol creatinine, respectively. The CBMN frequency (number of micronuclei per 1,000 binucleated lymphocytes) was significantly higher in coke-oven workers (9.5 {+-} 6.6) than in the controls. Among the coke-oven workers, age was positively associated with CBMN frequency; the mEH His{sup 113} variant genotype exhibited significantly lower CBMN frequency than did the Tyr{sup 113}/Tyr{sup 113} genotype; the low mEH activity phenotype exhibited a lower CBMN frequency than did the high mEH activity phenotype; the GSTP1 Val{sup 105}/Val{sup 105} genotype exhibited a higher CBMN frequency than did the GSTP1 Ile{sup 105}/Ile{sup 105} or Ile{sup 105}/Val{sup 105} genotypes; the joint effect of high mEH activity phenotype and GSTM1 null genotype on CBMN frequencies was also found. Gene-environment interactions between occupational PAH exposure and polymorphisms of mEH and/or GSTM1 were also evident. These results indicate that the mEH, GSTP1, and GSTM1 polymorphisms may play a role in sensitivity or genetic susceptibility to the genotoxic effects of PAH exposure in the coke-oven workers.

Shuguang Leng; Yufei Dai; Yong Niu; Zufei Pan; Xiaohua Li; Juan Cheng; Fengsheng He; Yuxin Zheng [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing (China). National Institute for Occupational Health and Poison Control

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Experimental Investigation of Natural Coke Steam Gasification in a Bench-Scale Fluidized Bed: Influences of Temperature and Oxygen Flow Rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, natural coke was restricted in application and research due to its hot burst, difficult ignition, and abradability. ... disordering as a cause is now a real possibility on the basis of correlated optical and x-ray diffraction data from samples analyzed from within a thermal aureole of a Tertiary dyke emplaced in Permian coal-bearing strata. ... The thermal characteristics of natural coke steam gasification in a fluidized bed were three-dimensionally (3D) simulated based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method using Fluent code. ...

Wen-guo Xiang; Chang-sui Zhao; Ke-liang Pang

2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

431

Physicochemical characterization of coke-plant soil for the assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon availability and the feasibility of phytoremediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coke oven site soil was characterized to assess the particle association and availability of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We identified various carbonaceous materials including coal, coke, pitch, and tar decanter sludge. Most of the PAHs were associated with the polymeric matrix of tar sludge or hard pitch as discrete particles, coatings on soil mineral particles, or complex aggregates. The PAH availability from these particles was very low due to hindered diffusive release from solid tar or pitch with apparent diffusivities of 6 x 10{sup -15} for phenanthrene, 3 x 10{sup -15} for pyrene, and 1 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}/s for benzo(a)pyrene. Significant concentrations of PAHs were observed in the interior of solid tar aggregates with up to 40,000 mg/kg total PAHs. The release of PAHs from the interior of such particles requires diffusion over a substantial distance, and semipermeable membrane device tests confirmed a very limited availability of PAHs. These findings explain the results from three years of phytoremediation of the site soil, for which no significant changes in the total PAH concentrations were observed in the test plot samples. The observed low bioavailability of PAHs probably inhibited PAH phytoremediation, as diffusion-limited mass transfer would limit the release of PAHs to the aqueous phase.

Ahn, S.; Werner, D.; Luthy, R.G. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen [Peking University, Beijing (China). Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, College of Environmental Sciences

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hanford Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hanford Hanford Tank Waste Residuals DOE HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 Chris Kemp, DOE ORP Bill Hewitt, YAHSGS LLC Hanford Tanks & Tank Waste * Single-Shell Tanks (SSTs) - ~27 million gallons of waste* - 149 SSTs located in 12 SST Farms - Grouped into 7 Waste Management Areas (WMAs) for RCRA closure purposes: 200 West Area S/SX T TX/TY U 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) - ~26 million gallons of waste* - 28 DSTs located in 6 DST Farms (1 West/5 East) * 17 Misc Underground Storage Tanks (MUST) * 43 Inactive MUST (IMUST) 200 East Area A/AX B/BX/BY C * Volumes fluctuate as SST retrievals and 242-A Evaporator runs occur. Major Regulatory Drivers * Radioactive Tank Waste Materials - Atomic Energy Act - DOE M 435.1-1, Ch II, HLW - Other DOE Orders * Hazardous/Dangerous Tank Wastes - Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (TPA) - Retrieval/Closure under State's implementation

434

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

435

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

436

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

437

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

438

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

439

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

440

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

442

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

443

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

444

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

445

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

446

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

447

Essential Substrate Residues for Action of Endopeptidases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Endopeptidases, which are influenced in their specificity primarily by basic residues of arginine or lysine are treated in seven sections, according to the position of the essential residue: ...

Prof. Dr. Borivoj Keil

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

DISSOLUTION OF NEPTUNIUM OXIDE RESIDUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a dissolution flowsheet for neptunium (Np) oxide (NpO{sub 2}) residues (i.e., various NpO{sub 2} sources, HB-Line glovebox sweepings, and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) thermogravimetric analysis samples). Samples of each type of materials proposed for processing were dissolved in a closed laboratory apparatus and the rate and total quantity of off-gas were measured. Samples of the off-gas were also analyzed. The quantity and type of solids remaining (when visible) were determined after post-dissolution filtration of the solution. Recommended conditions for dissolution of the NpO{sub 2} residues are: Solution Matrix and Loading: {approx}50 g Np/L (750 g Np in 15 L of dissolver solution), using 8 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), 0.025 M potassium fluoride (KF) at greater than 100 C for at least 3 hours. Off-gas: Analysis of the off-gas indicated nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) as the only identified components. No hydrogen (H{sub 2}) was detected. The molar ratio of off-gas produced per mole of Np dissolved ranged from 0.25 to 0.4 moles of gas per mole of Np dissolved. A peak off-gas rate of {approx}0.1 scfm/kg bulk oxide was observed. Residual Solids: Pure NpO{sub 2} dissolved with little or no residue with the proposed flowsheet but the NpCo and both sweepings samples left visible solid residue after dissolution. For the NpCo and Part II Sweepings samples the residue amounted to {approx}1% of the initial material, but for the Part I Sweepings sample, the residue amounted to {approx}8 % of the initial material. These residues contained primarily aluminum (Al) and silicon (Si) compounds that did not completely dissolve under the flowsheet conditions. The residues from both sweepings samples contained minor amounts of plutonium (Pu) particles. Overall, the undissolved Np and Pu particles in the residues were a very small fraction of the total solids.

Kyser, E

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

449

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DEGRADATION OF HYDRODESULFURIZING CATALYSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clogged by the formation of coke through hydrogenation andcontained 0.5 percent coke residue. Light Vacuum Resid forcovered with a black layer of coke. This coke layer was seen

Whittle, D.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fluid catalytic cracking of heavy petroleum fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is claimed for fluid catalytic cracking of residuum and other heavy oils comprising of gas oil, petroleum residue, reduced and whole crudes and shale oil to produce gasoline and other liquid products which are separated in various streams in a fractionator and associated vapor recovery equipment. The heat from combustion of coke on the coked catalyst is removed by reacting sulfur-containing coke deposits with steam and oxygen in a separate stripper-gasifier to produce a low btu gas stream comprising of sulfur compounds, methane, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from about 1100/sup 0/F. To about 2200/sup 0/F. The partially regenerated catalyst then undergoes complete carbon removal in a regeneration vessel. The regenerated catalyst is recycled for re-use in the cracking of heavy petroleum fractions. The liquid products are gasoline, distillates, heavy fuel oil, and light hydrocarbons.

McHenry, K.W.

1981-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

Co-gasification of Biomass and Non-biomass Feedstocks: Synergistic and Inhibition Effects of Switchgrass Mixed with Sub-bituminous Coal and Fluid Coke During CO2 Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-gasification of biomass, namely, switchgrass, with coal and fluid coke was performed to investigate the availability of the gasification catalysts to the mixed feedstock, especially alkali and alkaline earth elements, naturally present on switchgrass. ...

Rozita Habibi; Jan Kopyscinski; Mohammad S. Masnadi; Jill Lam; John R. Grace; Charles A. Mims; Josephine M. Hill

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

7-55E An office that is being cooled adequately by a 12,000 Btu/h window air-conditioner is converted to a computer room. The number of additional air-conditioners that need to be installed is to be determined.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to be determined. Assumptions 1 The computers are operated by 4 adult men. 2 The computers consume 40 percent to the amount of electrical energy they consume. Therefore, AC Outside Computer room 4000 Btu/h ( ( ) ( Q Q Q Q. Analysis The unit that will cost less during its lifetime is a better buy. The total cost of a system

Bahrami, Majid

453

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 7.2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components Coal Components Coke Electricity Components Natural Gas Components Steam Components Total Wood Residues Bituminous Electricity Diesel Fuel Motor Natural Gas Steam and Wood-Related and Electricity from Sources and Gasoline Pulping Liquor Natural Gas from Sources Steam from Sources Waste Gases Waste Oils Industrial Wood Byproducts and Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Electricity from Local Other than Distillate Diesel Distillate Residual Blast Furnace

454

Further investigation of the impact of the co-combustion of tire-derived fuel and petroleum coke on the petrology and chemistry of coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentucky cyclone-fired unit burns coal and tire-derived fuel, sometimes in combination with petroleum coke. A parallel pulverized combustion (pc) unit at the same plant burns the same coal, without the added fuels. The petrology, chemistry, and sulfur isotope distribution in the fuel and resulting combustion products was investigated for several configurations of the fuel blend. Zinc and Cd in the combustion products are primarily contributed from the tire-derived fuel, the V and Ni are primarily from the petroleum coke, and the As and Hg are probably largely from the coal. The sulfur isotope distribution in the cyclone unit is complicated due to the varying fuel sources. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) array in the pc unit shows a subtle trend towards heavier S isotopic ratios in the cooler end of the ESP.

Hower, J.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Elswick, E.R.; Roberts, J.M.; Brandsteder, K.; Trimble, A.S.; Mardon, S.M. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Effects of polymerization and briquetting parameters on the tensile strength of briquettes formed from coal coke and aniline-formaldehyde resin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the utilization of aniline (C{sub 6}H{sub 7}N) formaldehyde (HCHO) resins as a binding agent of coke briquetting was investigated. Aniline (AN) formaldehyde (F) resins are a family of thermoplastics synthesized by condensing AN and F in an acid solution exhibiting high dielectric strength. The tensile strength sharply increases as the ratio of F to AN from 0.5 to 1.6, and it reaches the highest values between 1.6 and 2.2 F/AN ratio; it then slightly decreases. The highest tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette (23.66 MN/m{sup 2}) was obtained from the run with 1.5 of F/AN ratio by using (NH4){sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} catalyst at 310 K briquetting temperature. The tensile strength of F-AN resin-coke briquette slightly decreased with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.10%, and then it sharply decreased to zero with increasing the catalyst percent to 0.2%. The effect of pH on the tensile strength is irregular. As the pH of the mixture increases from 9.0 to 9.2, the tensile strength shows a sharp increase, and the curve reaches a plateau value between pH 9.3 and 9.9; then the tensile strength shows a slight increase after pH = 9.9.

Demirbas, A.; Simsek, T. [Selcuk University, Konya (Turkey)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Residual stresses in annealed zircaloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron diffraction has been used to measure the lattice constants of single crystal and rod-textured polycrystalline Zircaloy-2 in the temperature range 300-900 K. While the single crystal remains strain-free during heating or cooling, large residual grain-interaction strains occur in the polycrystalline sample as the result of compatibility being maintained among grains with anisotropic thermal expansion coefficients. These residual thermal strains have been determined as a function of temperature from the difference between the single and polycrystal lattice constants. Analysis of the data has been done using a polycrystalline deformation model, QUEST, which accounts for anisotropic elasticity, plasticity and thermal expansion, and for crystallographic texture of the sample. It is found that slow cooling from 900 K introduces residual stresses of the order of 100 MPa in the polycrystalline sample. The calculations demonstrate that these residual stresses can explain not only the difference in the proportional limits in tension and compression (strength differential) but also differences in the initial work hardening behaviour when Zircaloy-2 is deformed in tension or compression.

Tome, C.; Faber, J.; MacEwen, S.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Production of syngas via partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas over a Ni catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partial oxidation and CO{sub 2} reforming of coke oven gas (COG) to syngas was investigated on differently sized Ni catalysts in a fluidized-bed reactor. It was found that the catalytic performance of Ni depends strongly on its particle size. The small-sized Ni catalyst exhibited higher activity and higher selectivity in the partial oxidation of COG. The conversion of CH{sub 4} was kept at 80.7% at a lower temperature (750{sup o}C) and a wide space velocity (from 8000 to 80 000 h{sup -1}). CO{sub 2} reforming of COG is also an efficient route for syngas production. The H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the COG-derived syngas could be controlled by manipulating the concentration of O{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} added in the feed. The yield of produced syngas increases with an increase in temperature. 19 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Jianzhong Guo; Zhaoyin Hou; Jing Gao; Xiaoming Zheng [Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China). Institute of Catalysis, Department of Chemistry

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

Study on one-dimensional steady combustion of highly densified biomass briquette (bio-coke) in air flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combustion experiments on cylindrical bio-coke (BIC), a highly densified biomass briquette, have been conducted to observe whether quasi-one-dimensional steady combustion can be attained in room temperature air flow. In the experiments, the air flow velocity was the main test condition and the fuel consumption rate when the bottom surface of the BIC sample burned was evaluated as the regression rate of the combustion zone at the bottom surface. In addition, one-dimensional calculations based on an energy equation at the combustion zone were conducted to understand the mechanism that results in steady combustion and predict the effect of water and volatile matter content in BIC on the extinction limit. The results showed that steady combustion of the BIC sample could be attained in 4.67 m/s or more, and, in contrast, extinction was observed in 3.82 m/s or less. The critical regression rate explained by the combustion zone temperature was shown, and the reason combustion becomes unsteady could be explained by the energy balance at the combustion zone. Though the main reason for extinction was radiation heat loss, the heat loss by water and volatile matter was not negligible. Therefore, the effect of water and volatile matter content on steady combustion must be considered.

Takero Nakahara; Hui Yan; Hiroyuki Ito; Osamu Fujita

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Evaluation of residue drum storage safety risks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was conducted to determine if any potential safety problems exist in the residue drum backlog at the Rocky Flats Plant. Plutonium residues stored in 55-gallon drums were packaged for short-term storage until the residues could be processed for plutonium recovery. These residues have now been determined by the Department of Energy to be waste materials, and the residues will remain in storage until plans for disposal of the material can be developed. The packaging configurations which were safe for short-term storage may not be safe for long-term storage. Interviews with Rocky Flats personnel involved with packaging the residues reveal that more than one packaging configuration was used for some of the residues. A tabulation of packaging configurations was developed based on the information obtained from the interviews. A number of potential safety problems were identified during this study, including hydrogen generation from some residues and residue packaging materials, contamination containment loss, metal residue packaging container corrosion, and pyrophoric plutonium compound formation. Risk factors were developed for evaluating the risk potential of the various residue categories, and the residues in storage at Rocky Flats were ranked by risk potential. Preliminary drum head space gas sampling studies have demonstrated the potential for formation of flammable hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in some residue drums.

Conner, W.V.

1994-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Residue management at Rocky Flats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past plutonium production and manufacturing operations conducted at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) produced a variety of plutonium-contaminated by-product materials. Residues are a category of these materials and were categorized as {open_quotes}materials in-process{close_quotes} to be recovered due to their inherent plutonium concentrations. In 1989 all RFETS plutonium production and manufacturing operations were curtailed. This report describes the management of plutonium bearing liquid and solid wastes.

Olencz, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

462

Transforms for prediction residuals in video coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Typically the same transform, the 2-D Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), is used to compress both image intensities in image coding and prediction residuals in video coding. Major prediction residuals include the motion ...

Kam??l?, Fatih

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil)residual fuel oil, petroleum coke, and waste and other oil22 CHP plants. For petroleum coke, CALEB only reports final

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Annual Energy Outlook 2011: With Projections to 2035  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Table G1. Heat Rates Fuel Units Approximate Heat Content Coal 1 Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.933 Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.800 Coke Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 26.327 Industrial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.911 Residential and Commercial . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 21.284 Electric Power Sector . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton 19.536 Imports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . million Btu per short ton

465

Production of low BTU gas from biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and transported with little difficulty. It was decided to use a fluidized bed reactor for the gasification. Fluidized bed reactors offer many advantages when utilized as a medium for gasifi- cation of solid fuels. Some of them are excellent mixing... carbon and graphite. The results showed the equilibrium constant to be a function of temperature alone, independent of carbon source, particle size and other physical properties of the carbon. Brink (1976) studied the pyrolysis and gasifi- cation...

Lee, Yung N.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

Smith, Lance (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Karim, Hasan (Simpsonville, SC); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

467

Process to recycle shredder residue  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Numerical modeling of the aerodynamics, heat exchange, and combustion of a polydisperse ensemble of coke-ash particles in ascending axisymmetric two-phase flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional stationary model of motion, heat and mass exchange, and chemical reaction of polydisperse coke and ash particles in ascending gas-suspension flow has been constructed with allowance for the turbulent and pseudo turbulent mechanisms of transfer in the dispersed phase. The system of equations that describes motion and heat transfer in the solid phase has been closed at the level of the equations for the second moments of velocity and temperature pulsations, whereas the momentum equations of the carrying medium have been closed using the equation for turbulent gas energy, which allows for the influence of the particles and heterogeneous reactions.

B.B. Rokhman [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine). Institute of Coal Power Technologies

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

469

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 PARTICULATES #1PARTICULATES #1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 10 Packaging derived fuel (PDF) 5 - 15 Auto shredder residue (ASR) ~25 Petroleum coke, "petcoke" ~1

Zevenhoven, Ron

470

Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Savannah Savannah River Savannah River Tank Waste Residuals HLW Corporate Board November 6, 2008 1 November 6, 2008 Presentation By Sherri R. Ross Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office The Issue * How clean is clean? * Ultimate Challenge - Justify highly radioactive radionuclides have been removed to the maximum extent practical? 2 removed to the maximum extent practical? - Building compelling regulatory documentation that will withstand intense scrutiny §3116 Requirements 1. Does not require disposal in deep geological repository 2. Highly radioactive radionuclides removed to the maximum extent practical 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 3 3. Meet the performance objectives in 10 CFR Part 61, Subpart C 4. Waste disposed pursuant to a State-approved closure plan or permit Note: If it is anticipated that Class C disposal limits will be exceeded, additional

471

Residual stress patterns in steel welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Root, J.H.; Swainson, I. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Innovative coke oven gas cleaning system for retrofit applications. Quarterly environmental monitoring report No. 3, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC), in conjunction with the Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project at its Sparrows Point, Maryland Coke Oven Plant. This project combines several existing technologies into an integrated system for removing impurities from Coke Oven Gas (COG) to make it an acceptable fuel. DOE is providing cost-sharing under a Cooperative Agreement with BSC. This Cooperative Agreement requires BSC to develop and conduct an Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) for the Clean Coal Technology project and to report the status of the EMP on a quarterly basis. This report is the third quarterly status report of the EMP. It covers the Environmental Monitoring Plan activities for the full year of 1991 from January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991, including the forth quarter. See Sections 2, 3 and 4 for status reports of the Project Installation and Commissioning, the Environmental Monitoring activities and the Compliance Monitoring results for the period. Section 5 contains a list of Compliance Reports submitted to regulatory agencies during the period. The EMP describes in detail the environmental monitoring activities to be performed during the project execution. The purpose of the EMP is to: (1) document the extent of compliance of monitoring activities, i.e. those monitoring required to meet permit requirements, (2) confirm the specific impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act documentation, and (3) establish an information base for the assessment of the environmental performance of the technology demonstrated by the project.

Not Available

1992-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

473

Syngas production by CO2 reforming of coke oven gas over Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Syngas production by CO2 reforming of coke oven gas (COG) was studied in a fixed-bed reactor over Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts. The catalysts were prepared by sol–gel technique and tested by XRF, BET, XRD, H2-TPR, TEM and TG–DSC. The influence of nickel loadings and calcination temperature of the catalysts on reforming reaction was measured. The characterization results revealed that all of the catalysts present excellent resistance to coking. The catalyst with appropriate nickel content and calcination temperature has better dispersion of active metal and higher conversion. It is found that the Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalyst with 10 wt% nickel loading provides the best catalytic activity with the conversions of CH4 and CO2 both more than 95% at 800 °C under the atmospheric pressure. The Ni/La2O3–ZrO2 catalysts show excellent catalytic performance and anti-carbon property, which will be of great prospects for catalytic CO2 reforming of COG in the future.

Wei Tao; Hongwei Cheng; Weilin Yao; Xionggang Lu; Qiuhua Zhu; Guangshi Li; Zhongfu Zhou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1186,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,107 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",317,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,30

476

Table A12. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type" Type" " and End Use, 1994: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"Net Demand","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code(a)","End-Use Categories","for Electricity(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.5,1.4,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",3132,441,152,6141,99,1198,2.4

477

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,,"Distillate" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and",,"LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2886,79,130,5211,69,868

478

" Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" 4. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes" " by Selected Energy Sources, 1994" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"RSE" ,,"Row" "Selected Energy Sources","Total","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " " Renewable Resources",10,10 " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4 "Coke and Breeze",449,8 "Residual Fuel Oil",490,3

479

Table A39. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 9. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type, Census" " Region, and End Use, 1991: Part 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding","RSE" ,"for","Residual","and",,,"Coal Coke","Row" "End-Use Categories","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6

480

Table A38. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,"Net Demand","Residual","Distillate",,,"(excluding","RSE" "SIC",,"for Electri-","Fuel","Fuel Oil and","Natural",,"Coal Coke","Row" "Code","End-Use Categories","city(b)","Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","LPG","and Breeze)","Factors" "20-39","ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS" ,"RSE Column Factors:",0.4,1.7,1.5,0.7,1,1.6 ,"TOTAL INPUTS",2799,414,139,5506,105,1184,3 ,"Boiler Fuel",32,296,40,2098,18,859,3.6 ,"Total Process Uses",2244,109,34,2578,64,314,4.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "btu coke residual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 5b. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 5b. Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Million Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 19982 20022 20062 Total 3 17 16 13 Net Electricity 4 2 2 2 Natural Gas 5 5 4 Coal 7 6 4 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. Denominators represent the entire steel industry, not those based mainly on electric, natural gas, residual fuel oil or coal.

482

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1113,258,12,22,579,5,182,2,54 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",346,57,"*",1,121,"*",126,0,41

483

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

484

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." "NAICS",,,,,,"Residual","Distillate",,,"LPG and",,,"Coke" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)",,"NGL(e)",,"Coal","and Breeze","Other(f)" ,,"Total United States" 311,"Food",1124,,251,,26,16,635,,3,,147,1,45 3112," Grain and Oilseed Milling",316,,53,,2,1,118,,"*",,114,0,28

485

Table A37. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" "Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:","NF",0.4,1.6,1.5,0.7,1,1.6,"NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",15027,2370,414,139,5506,105,1184,5309,3 "Boiler Fuel","--","W",296,40,2098,18,859,"--",3.6

486

Table A20. Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All P  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy for All Purposes by Census" " Region, Census Division, and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke",,"Shipments" " "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(e)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","of Energy Sources","RSE" " ","Total(b)","Electricity(c)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(d)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(f)","Produced Onsite(g)","Row"

487

Table A13. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" 3. Selected Combustible Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation and Net Demand for Electricity by Fuel Type," " Census Region, Census Division, and End Use, 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,"Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke" ,"for","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)",,"and Breeze)","RSE" ,"Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 short","Row"

488

Table A11. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generatio  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2" 2" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,,,,"Coal" ,,,,"Distillate",,,"(excluding" ,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" ,,"Net","Residual","and Diesel",,,"and",,"Row" "End-Use Categories","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Fuel(b)","Natural Gas(c)","LPG","Breeze)","Other(d)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column Factors:"," NF",0.5,1.3,1.4,0.8,1.2,1.2," NF" "TOTAL INPUTS",16515,2656,441,152,6141,99,1198,5828,2.7 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel"," --",28,313,42,2396,15,875," --",4

489

Residual Gas Mobility in Ormen Lange.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The topic of this report is "Mobility of Residual Gas in Ormen Lange" and it has been prepared as a part of the course… (more)

Undeland, Elisabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Methods of separating particulate residue streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Christopher T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

491

“From Coal to Coke  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN the Sixth Coal Science Lecture, organized by the British ... Science Lecture, organized by the British Coal Utilization Research Association, and given at the Institution of Civil Engineers on October 16, ...

1957-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

492

Assessment of secondary crop residues. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the first of three reports assessing the feasibility of converting secondary agricultural residues to energy in the form of either methane gas or ethyl alcohol. Secondary agricultural residues are defined in this study as those residues resulting from biomass processing to produce primary products; e.g., whey from cheese processing, vegetable processing wastes, residues from paper pulping, etc. This report summarizes the first two phases of this study, data compilation, and evaluation. Subsequent reports will analyze the technical and economic feasibility of converting these residues to energy and the implementability of this technology. The industries for which data has been compiled in this report include vegetable, fruit, seafood, meat, poultry, and dairy processing and the pulp, paper, and paperboard industry. The data collected include raw product input, final processed product output, residue types, and quantity, residue concentration, biodegradability, seasonality of production, and geographic distribution of processing facilities. In general, these industries produce a relatively solid residue ranging in total solids concentration from 10 to 50% and a dilute liquid residue with an organic content (measured as COD or BOD) ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand mg/l. Due to the significant quantities of residues generated in each of the industries, it appears that the potential exists for generating a substantial quantity of energy. For a particular industry this quantity of energy can range from only one percent upwards to nearly thirty-five percent of the total processing energy required. The total processing energy required for the industries included in this study is approximately 2.5 quads per year. The potential energy which can be generated from these industrial residues will be 0.05 to 0.10 quads per year or approximately 2 to 4 percent of the total demand.

Ashare, E.; Leuschner, A.P.; West, C.E.; Langton, B.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Predicting protein residue–residue contacts using deep networks and boosting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure prediction, protein residue-residue contacts...i.e. homologous proteins with known structure...train large boosted ensembles of DN classifiers achieving...advanced search of the Protein Data Bank filtering...contained fewer than 20% disordered residues (i.e. coordinates......

Jesse Eickholt; Jianlin Cheng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Seismic Travel-Time Residuals and Plates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......United States, Canada and Greenland under the auspices of Project Vela Uniform (Long Range Seismic Measurements 1966). Arrival...1 that if we plot residuals on the focal sphere, we are at liberty to ascribe these residuals to source effects, receiver effects......

D. Davies; D. P. McKenzie

1969-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

a a Table 7a. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Value Of Production 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Btu per constant 2000 dollar 1 ) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 2 331111) 1998 3 2002 4 2006 4 Total NA 19,716 12,179 Electricity NA 3,839 2,846 Natural Gas NA 8,052 5,301 Coal NA 747 228 Residual Fuel NA 21 309 Coke and Breeze NA 6,496 3,025 Notes: 1. Value of production is deflated by the chain-type price indices for iron and steel mills shipments. 2. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 3. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

496

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-table 7b.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Table 7b. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption per Ton of Steel, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (1000 Btu per ton) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1331111) 1998 2 2002 3 20063 Total NA 11,886 9,210 Electricity NA 2,315 2,152 Natural Gas NA 4,855 4,009 Coal NA 450 172 Residual Fuel NA 13 234 Coke and Breeze NA 3,916 2,287 Notes:1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 1998 data unavailable due to disclosure avoidance procedures in place at the time.

497

file://C:\Documents and Settings\bh5\My Documents\Energy Effici  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS 1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity 3 NA 185 175 Natural Gas NA 388 326 Coal NA 36 14 Residual Fuel NA 1 19 Coke and Breeze NA 313 186 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2.'Total' includes all energy sources listed below and all other energy that was purchased or transferred in. 3.'Electricity' consists of quantities of electricity that were purchased or transferred in, and is equivalent

498

Energy Information Administration - Energy Efficiency-Table 3.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Efficiency > Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy, 1998 and 2002 > Table 3 Energy Efficiency > Iron and Steel Manufacturing Energy, 1998 and 2002 > Table 3 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 3. Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total2 NA 950 749 Net Electricity3 NA 185 175 Natural Gas NA 388 326 Coal NA 36 14 Residual Fuel NA 1 19 Coke and Breeze NA 313 186 Notes: 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills.

499

Laser ultrasonic furnace tube coke monitor. Quarterly technical progress report. Report No. 5 for reporting period May 1, 1999 through August 1, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall aim of the project is to demonstrate the performance and practical use of a probe for measuring the thickness of coke deposits located within the high-temperature tubes of a thermal cracking furnace. The objective of work during this period was to enhance the sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio of the probe measurement. Testing identified that the primary source of signal noise was traced to imperfections in the sacrificial stand-off, which was formed using a casting procedure. Laminations, voids, and impurities contained in the casting result in attenuation and dispersion of the ultrasonic signal. This report describes the work performed to optimize the signal conductance of the sacrificial stand-off.

NONE

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Hydrogen production by reforming of simulated hot coke oven gas over nickel catalysts promoted with lanthanum and cerium in a membrane reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalysts of Ni/Mg(Al)O promoted with lanthanum and cerium were tested in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor by catalytic partial oxidation of simulated hot coke oven gas (COG) with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. Analysis of the catalysts suggested that the hydrotalcite precursor after thermal treatment lead to a good dispersion of nickel forming the solid solution NiO-MgO and spinel (Ni,Mg)Al{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The promoted catalysts had higher oxygen permeation flux, better catalytic activity, and better resistance to carbon formation, which will be promising catalysts in the catalytic partial oxidation reforming of hot COG. 29 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Hongwei Cheng; Xionggang Lu; Yuwen Zhang; Weizhong Ding [Shanghai University, Shanghai (China). Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z