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Sample records for bs baghouse shake

  1. Shake, Rattle, and Roll

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shake National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit Shake, Rattle, and Roll Los Alamos scientists analyze North Korea's January 2016 "hydrogen bomb" test to determine the details-location, yield, and type-of the explosion. March 22, 2016 Shake, Rattle, and Roll South Korean protesters burned placards of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un during an anti-North Korea rally on January 7, 2016, in Seoul, South Korea. Kim Jong-Un claimed that North Korea had

  2. Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

  3. SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results Structural Mechanics - SRS...

  4. FVE BS sro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FVE BS sro Jump to: navigation, search Name: FVE BS sro Place: Letohrad, Czech Republic Zip: 561 51 Product: Czech PV developer operating a 1.6MW PV plant in the Czech Republic....

  5. Relating B_S Mixing and B_S to mu+mu- with New Physics (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Relating BS Mixing and BS to mu+mu- with New Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Relating BS Mixing and BS to mu+mu- with New Physics We perform...

  6. Relating B_S Mixing and B_S to mu+mu- with New Physics (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Relating BS Mixing and BS to mu+mu- with New Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Relating BS Mixing and BS to mu+mu- with New Physics You are...

  7. SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Free-Field Results

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Results Structural Mechanics - SRS October 4, 2011 1 Objective This study presents a methodology for validating SASSI for use with a...

  8. Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Jay Amin - Structural Mechanics, Principal Engineer Shawn Carey, PhD, PE - Structural Mechanics, ...

  9. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Lawson, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    A process for recovering zinc-rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered by distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10 C, separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream. 1 figure.

  10. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon; Lawson, Daniel B.

    1994-01-01

    A process for recovering zinc/rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10.degree. C., separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream.

  11. Synthesis and crystal structure of the isotypic rare earth thioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}], and Nd[BS{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunger, Jens; Borna, Marija [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kniep, Ruediger, E-mail: kniep@cpfs.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared from mixtures of the rare earth (RE) metals together with amorphous boron and sulfur summing up to the compositions CeB{sub 3}S{sub 6}, PrB{sub 5}S{sub 9} and NdB{sub 3}S{sub 6}. The following preparation routes were used: solid state reactions with maximum temperatures of 1323 K and high-pressure high-temperature syntheses at 1173 K and 3 GPa. Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were also obtained from rare earth chlorides RECl{sub 3} and sodium thioborate Na{sub 2}B{sub 2}S{sub 5} by metathesis type reactions at maximum temperatures of 1073 K. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The thioborates are isotypic and crystallize in the orthorhombic spacegroup Pna2{sub 1} (No. 33; Z=4; Ce: a=7.60738(6)A, b=6.01720(4)A, c=8.93016(6)A; Pr: a=7.56223(4)A, b=6.00876(2)A, c=8.89747(4)A; Nd: a=7.49180(3)A, b=6.00823(2)A, c=8.86197(3)A) . The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of undulated kagome nets, which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species. - Abstract: Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure The isotypic orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared using different preparation routes. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of corrugated kagome nets (sketched with blue dotted lines), which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species.

  12. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.60.5(stat.)0.3(syst.)0.6(fs))10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)Bs(*) in bb events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.110-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  13. First Observation of Bs0→J/ψη and Bs0→J/ψη'

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, J.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; et al

    2012-05-03

    We report first observations of Bs0→J/ψη and Bs0→J/ψη'. The results are obtained from 121.4 fb⁻¹ of data collected at the Υ(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB e⁺e⁻ collider. We obtain the branching fractions B(Bs0→J/ψη)=[5.10±0.50(stat)±0.25(syst)+1.14-0.79(NB(*)sB¯¯¯(*)s)]×10⁻⁴, and B(Bs0→J/ψη')=[3.71±0.61(stat)±0.18(syst)+0.83-0.57(NB(*)sB¯¯¯(*)s)]×10⁻⁴. The ratio of the two branching fractions is measured to be (B(Bs→J/ψη'))/(B(Bs→J/ψη))=0.73±0.14(stat)±0.02(syst).

  14. Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Profile | Department of Energy Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Jay Amin - Structural Mechanics, Principal Engineer Shawn Carey, PhD, PE - Structural Mechanics, Structural Lead Rucker Williams, PE - Geotechnical Engineering Lead October 22, 2014 PDF icon Seismic Ground Motion Response Using

  15. IDIQ BS Exhibit A General Conditions (Rev. 3.3, 9-27-13)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on claims shall be paid at the rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States pursuant to Public Law 92-41 (85 Stat. 97). IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.3, 92713)...

  16. Measurement of the Bs0 Lifetime in Fully and Partially Reconstructed Bs0 -> Ds- (phi pi-)X Decays in pp? Collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-12-29

    The authors present a measurement of the Bs0 lifetime in fully and partially reconstructed Bs0 = Ds0(??-)X decays in 1.3 fb-1 collected in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 Tev by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They measure ?(Bs0) = 1.518 0.041 (stat.) 0.027 (syst.) ps. The ratio of this result and the world average B0 lifetime yields ?(Bs0)/?(B0) = 0.99 0.03, which is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  17. Measurement of the Bs0 Lifetime in Fully and Partially Reconstructed Bs0 -> Ds- (phi pi-)X Decays in pp¯ Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-12-29

    The authors present a measurement of the Bs0 lifetime in fully and partially reconstructed Bs0 = Ds0(φπ-)X decays in 1.3 fb-1 collected in pp¯ collisions at √s = 1.96 Tev by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They measure τ(Bs0) = 1.518 ± 0.041 (stat.) ± 0.027 (syst.) ps. The ratio of this result and the world average B0 lifetime yields τ(Bs0)/τ(B0) = 0.99 ± 0.03, which is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  18. Some Important Aspects of Physical Modelling of Liquefaction in 1-g Shaking Table

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Md. Jahangir; Towhata, Ikuo

    2008-07-08

    Physical modeling of liquefaction in 1-g shaking table and dynamic centrifuge test become very popular to simulate the ground behavior during earthquake motion. 1-g shaking table tests require scaled down model ground which can be prepared in three methods; water sedimentation, moist tamping and dry deposition method. Moist tamping and dry deposition method need saturation of model ground which is expensive and very difficult to achieve. Some model tests were performed in 1-g shaking table to see the influence of preparation method of model ground. Wet tamping and water sedimentation method of ground preparation were compared in these tests. Behavior of level ground and slope were also examined. Slope and level ground model test increased the understanding of excess pore pressure generation in both cases. Wet tamping method has a possibility of not being fully saturated. Pore pressure transducers should be fixed vertically so that it can not settle down during shaking but can move with ground. There was insignificant difference in acceleration and excess pore pressure responses between wet tamping and water sedimentation method in case of level ground. Spiky accelerations were prominent in slope prepared by water sedimentation method. Spiky accelerations were the result of lateral displacement induced dilatancy of soil.

  19. Improved Method for CKM Constraints in Charmless Three-body B and Bs Decays

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Improved Method for CKM Constraints in Charmless Three-body B and Bs Decays Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved Method for CKM Constraints in Charmless Three-body B and Bs Decays Recently Ciuchini, Pierini and Silvestrini proposed a method for constraining CKM parameters in B {yields} K{pi}{pi} and B{sub s} {yields} K{pi}{pi} through phase measurements of amplitudes involving I = 3/2 K*{pi} final states. We show that complementary

  20. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 0.010 (stat) 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 more0.019 (stat) 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 0.013 (stat) 0.007 (syst).less

  1. Applied quantum chemistry: Spectroscopic detection and characterization of the F{sub 2}BS and Cl{sub 2}BS free radicals in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Bing; Clouthier, Dennis J.; Sheridan, Phillip M.

    2015-03-28

    In this and previous work [D. J. Clouthier, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 244309 (2014)], the spectroscopic signatures of the X{sub 2}BY (X = H, halogen, Y = O, S) free radicals have been predicted using high level ab initio theory. The theoretical results have been used to calculate the electronic absorption and single vibronic level (SVL) emission spectra of the radicals under typical jet-cooled conditions. Using these diagnostic predictions, the previously unknown F{sub 2}BS and Cl{sub 2}BS free radicals have been identified and characterized. The radicals were prepared in a free jet expansion by subjecting precursor mixtures of BF{sub 3} or BCl{sub 3} and CS{sub 2} vapor to an electric discharge at the exit of a pulsed molecular beam valve. The B{sup ~2}A{sub 1}X{sup ~} {sup 2}B{sub 2} laser-induced fluorescence spectra were found within 150 cm{sup ?1} of their theoretically predicted positions with vibronic structure consistent with our Franck-Condon simulations. The B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state emits down to the ground state and to the low-lying A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} excited state and the correspondence between the observed and theoretically derived SVL emission Franck-Condon profiles was used to positively identify the radicals and make assignments. Excited state Coriolis coupling effects complicate the emission spectra of both radicals. In addition, a forbidden component of the electronically allowed B{sup ~}X{sup ~} band system of Cl{sub 2}BS is evident, as signaled by the activity in the b{sub 2} modes in the spectrum. Symmetry arguments indicate that this component gains intensity due to a vibronic interaction of the B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state with a nearby electronic state of {sup 2}B{sub 2} symmetry.

  2. Semi-inclusive studies of semileptonic B-s decays at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswald, Christian; Urquijo, P.; Dingfelder, J.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, David M.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bozek, A.; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chang, M-C; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Ferber, T.; Frost, O.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Gaur, Vipin; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, A.; Getzkow, D.; Gillard, R.; Glattaur, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Grzymkowska, O.; Hara, Takanori; Hasenbusch, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Huschle, Matthias J.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kapusta, P.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, T.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, D. H.; Lee, I. S.; Li, Y.; Gioi, LL; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Moon, H K.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nanut, T.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Pedlar, Todd; Pesantez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petric, M.; Piilonen, Leo E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Rozanska, M.; Ryu, S.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, ME; Shapkin, M.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, CP; Shibata, TA; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Solovieva, E.; Stanic, S.; Staric, M.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, Umberto; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, Xiaolong; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Youngmin; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-10-22

    We present an analysis of the semi-inclusive decays B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu and B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu, where X denotes a final state that may consist of additional hadrons or photons and l is an electron or muon. The studied Bs decays are contained in the 121.4 fb(-1) Upsilon(5S) data sample collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e(+)e(-) collider. The branching fractions of the decays are measured to be B(B-s -> D(s)(-)Xl(+)nu) = [8.2 +/- 0.2(stat) +/- 0.6(syst) +/- 1.4(ext)] % and B(B-s -> D-s*(-)Xl(+)nu) = [5.4 +/- 0.4(stat) +/- 0.4(syst) +/- 0.9(ext)] %, where the first two uncertainties are statistical and systematic and the last is due to external parameters. The measurement also provides an estimate of the B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*()) production cross section, sigma(e(+)e(-) -> B-s(()*())(B) over bar (()(s)*())) = 53.8 +/- 1.4(stat) +/- 4.0(syst) +/- 3.4(ext)] pb, at the center-of-mass energy root s = 10.86 GeV.

  3. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs0→ΦΦ Decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-12-22

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs0 decay into two light vector mesons, Bs0→ΦΦ, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.348±0.041(stat)±0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs0→ΦΦ)=[2.32±0.18(stat)±0.82(syst)]×10⁻⁵. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.007±0.064(stat)±0.018(syst) and Av=-0.120±0.064(stat)±0.016(syst).

  4. First principle calculations of effective exchange integrals: Comparison between SR (BS) and MR computational results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Kizashi; Nishihara, Satomichi; Saito, Toru; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamada, Satoru; Isobe, Hiroshi; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2015-01-22

    First principle calculations of effective exchange integrals (J) in the Heisenberg model for diradical species were performed by both symmetry-adapted (SA) multi-reference (MR) and broken-symmetry (BS) single reference (SR) methods. Mukherjee-type (Mk) state specific (SS) MR coupled-cluster (CC) calculations by the use of natural orbital (NO) references of ROHF, UHF, UDFT and CASSCF solutions were carried out to elucidate J values for di- and poly-radical species. Spin-unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF) based coupled-cluster (CC) computations were also performed to these species. Comparison between UHF-NO(UNO)-MkMRCC and BS UHF-CC computational results indicated that spin-contamination of UHF-CC solutions still remains at the SD level. In order to eliminate the spin contamination, approximate spin-projection (AP) scheme was applied for UCC, and the AP procedure indeed corrected the error to yield good agreement with MkMRCC in energy. The CC double with spin-unrestricted Brueckner's orbital (UBD) was furthermore employed for these species, showing that spin-contamination involved in UHF solutions is largely suppressed, and therefore AP scheme for UBCCD removed easily the rest of spin-contamination. We also performed spin-unrestricted pure- and hybrid-density functional theory (UDFT) calculations of diradical and polyradical species. Three different computational schemes for total spin angular momentums were examined for the AP correction of the hybrid (H) UDFT. HUDFT calculations followed by AP, HUDFT(AP), yielded the S-T gaps that were qualitatively in good agreement with those of MkMRCCSD, UHF-CC(AP) and UB-CC(AP). Thus a systematic comparison among MkMRCCSD, UCC(AP) UBD(AP) and UDFT(AP) was performed concerning with the first principle calculations of J values in di- and poly-radical species. It was found that BS (AP) methods reproduce MkMRCCSD results, indicating their applicability to large exchange coupled systems.

  5. Geology and ground shaking: The April 25--26, 1992 Cape Mendocino earthquake sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moley, K.; Dengler, L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The authors present a simplified geologic map of Humboldt and Del Norte Counties, California and compare it to Modified Mercalli Intensities (MMI) produced by the April 25, 1992 M[sub S] = 7.1, and April 26 Ms = 6.6, and Ms = 6.7 Cape Mendocino earthquakes. The generalized geology was compiled from California Division of Mines and Geology Regional Geology Maps, and area geologic mapping by the USGS and Humboldt State University. Six rock/sediment groups are distinguished by considering lithology, consolidation, compaction, bedding orientation and degree of shearing: (1) landslides and glacial deposits; (2) bay muds and fill, alluvium, lake deposits and beach sand; (3) quaternary marine and non-marine deposits; (4) unstable bedrock; (5) moderately stable bedrock; (6) intrusions. Intensity values for the Saturday earthquake were calculated from over 2,000 surveys to individuals and businesses in the northcoast area by an algorithm based on a weighted sum of survey responses. Numerical data was compiled for over 100 locations in the region. The intensity VIII and greater zone encompassed an area of about 500 km[sup 2] including the communities of Petrolia, Ferndale and Rio Dell. Ground motion generally decays with distance in a roughly radial pattern. A different approach was taken to estimate the pattern of shaking in the two Sunday earthquakes. These earthquakes occurred when most respondents were sleeping and their perception of ground motion was likely to be affected.

  6. Measurement of CP violation in $B_s^0\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decays using the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leo, Sabato

    2015-01-01

    We report on the final measurement of the CP-violating $B_s^0$ mixing phase $\\beta_s^{J/ψφ}$ in √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected with the Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Using a sample corresponding to 9.6 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, we fit the decay-time evolution of $B_s^0$ → J/ψ (→ μ+ μ-) φ (→ K+ K) decays in which the b-quark content at production and the CP parity of the final state are identified. The interference of decays with and without mixing renders the $B_s^0$ mixing phase observable. The phase is determined to be -0.06 < $\\beta_s^{J/ψφ}$ < 0.30 at 68% confidence level. The decay-width difference between heavy and light $B_s^0$ eigenstates, and the average $B_s^0$ lifetime are also determined to be ΔΓs = 0.068 ± 0.027 ps-1 and $\\tau_s$ = 1.528 ± 0.021 ps, respectively. These results are among the world’s most precise from a single experiment, and compatible with standard model predictions.

  7. ONE SHAKE GATE FORMER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalibjian, R.; Perez-Mendez, V.

    1957-08-20

    An improved circuit for forming square pulses having substantially short and precise durations is described. The gate forming circuit incorporates a secondary emission R. F. pentode adapted to receive input trigger pulses amd having a positive feedback loop comnected from the dynode to the control grid to maintain conduction in response to trigger pulses. A short circuited pulse delay line is employed to precisely control the conducting time of the tube and a circuit for squelching spurious oscillations is provided in the feedback loop.

  8. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lingyun; Pan, Shilie; Wang, Ying; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Xiaoxia; Han, Shujuan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. • Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, exist in the title compound. • Spectral properties and thermal analysis of Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} were reported. - Abstract: A new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}, has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. The compound crystallizes in the space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 (No. 96) of the tetragonal system with a = 10.148(4) Å, c = 16.689(14) Å, V = 1718.8(17) Å{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5−}, a central BO{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing all its four vertices with neighboring sulfate tetrahedra, exist in the title compound, and then the rubidium atoms are situated in the voids of the resulting structure. The IR spectrum confirms the presence of BO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} units. The UV–vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum exhibits a band gap of about 3.99 eV. The TG-DSC analysis suggests that Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} is an incongruent melting compound.

  9. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the B→K(*)μ⁺μ⁻Decay and First Observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ Decay

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-04-18

    We reconstruct the rare decays B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻, B⁰→K*(892)⁰μ⁺μ⁻, and Bs0→Φ(1020)μ⁺μ⁻ in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb⁻¹ collected in pp¯ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. Using 121±16 B⁺→K⁺μ⁺μ⁻ and 101±12 B⁰→K*⁰μ⁺μ⁻ decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B⁺ and B⁰ decay modes, and the K*⁰ longitudinal polarization fraction in the B⁰ decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the predictions, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy.more » We also report the first observation of the Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻ decay and measure its branching ratio BR(Bs0→Φμ⁺μ⁻)=[1.44±0.33±0.46]×10⁻⁶ using 27±6 signal events. This is currently the most rare Bs0 decay observed.« less

  10. In search of the X{sub 2}BO and X{sub 2}BS (X = H, F) free radicals: Ab initio studies of their spectroscopic signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouthier, Dennis J.

    2014-12-28

    The F{sub 2}BO free radical is a known, although little studied, species but similar X{sub 2}BY (X = H, D, F; Y = O, S) molecules are largely unknown. High level ab initio methods have been used to predict the molecular structures, vibrational frequencies (in cm{sup −1}), and relative energies of the ground and first two excited electronic states of these free radicals, as an aid to their eventual spectroscopic identification. The chosen theoretical methods and basis sets were tested on F{sub 2}BO and found to give good agreement with the known experimental quantities. In particular, complete basis set extrapolations of coupled-cluster single and doubles with perturbative triple excitations/aug-cc-pVXZ (X = 3, 4, 5) energies gave excellent electronic term values, due to small changes in geometry between states and the lack of significant multireference character in the wavefunctions. The radicals are found to have planar C{sub 2v} geometries in the X{sup ~2}B{sub 2} ground state, the low-lying A{sup ~2}B{sub 1} first excited state, and the higher B{sup ~2}A{sub 1} state. Some of these radicals have very small ground state dipole moments hindering microwave measurements. Infrared studies in matrices or in the gas phase may be possible although the fundamentals of H{sub 2}BO and H{sub 2}BS are quite weak. The most promising method of identifying these species in the gas phase appears to be absorption or laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy through the allowed B{sup ~}-X{sup ~} transitions which occur in the visible-near UV region of the electromagnetic spectrum. The ab initio results have been used to calculate the Franck-Condon profiles of the absorption and emission spectra, and the rotational structure of the B{sup ~}-X{sup ~}0{sub 0}{sup 0} bands has been simulated. The calculated single vibronic level emission spectra provide a unique, readily recognizable fingerprint of each particular radical, facilitating the experimental identification of new X{sub 2}BY species in the gas phase.

  11. Shakes Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Coordinates: 56.71765648, -132.0025034 Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean...

  12. Analysis of Bs flavor oscillations at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonardo, Nuno T

    2006-09-01

    The search for and study of flavor oscillations in the neutral B{sub s}B{sub s} meson system is an experimentally challenging task. It constitutes a flagship analysis of the Tevatron physics program. In this dissertation, they develop an analysis of the time-dependent B{sub s} flavor oscillations using data collected with the CDF detector. The data samples are formed of both fully and partially reconstructed B meson decays: B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{pi}({pi}{pi}) and B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}lv. A likelihood fitting framework is implemented and appropriate models and techniques developed for describing the mass, proper decay time, and flavor tagging characteristics of the data samples. The analysis is extended to samples of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons, which are further used for algorithm calibration and method validation. The B mesons lifetimes are extracted. The measurement of the B{sup 0} oscillation frequency yields {Delta}m{sub d} = 0.522 {+-} 0.017 ps{sup -1}. The search for B{sub s} oscillations is performed using an amplitude method based on a frequency scanning procedure. Applying a combination of lepton and jet charge flavor tagging algorithms, with a total tagging power {epsilon}'D{sup 2} of 1.6%, to a data sample of 355 pb{sup -1}, a sensitivity of 13.0 ps{sup -1} is achieved. They develop a preliminary same side kaon tagging algorithm, which is found to provide a superior tagging power of about 4.0% for the B{sub s} meson species. A study of the dilution systematic uncertainties is not reported. From its application as is to the B{sub s} samples the sensitivity is significantly increased to about 18 ps{sup -1} and a hint of a signal is seen at about 175. ps{sup -1}. They demonstrate that the extension of the analysis to the increasing data samples with the inclusion of the same side tagging algorithm is capable of providing an observation of B{sub s} mixing beyond the standard model expectation. They show also that the improved knowledge of {Delta}m{sub s} has a considerable impact on constraining the CKM matrix elements.

  13. A PFUZLIMIK4RY ASSESSMENT OF EARTHQUAKE GROUND SHAKING HAZARD...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Report prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Yucca Mountain Project, Chapter 4, variably paged. Wong, I.G., Green, R.K., Olig, S.S., and Youngs, R.R., 1995, Assessing ...

  14. Picture of the Week: Jamming to the earthquake shake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations of jammed systems study particle configurations leading to jamming in both static systems and systems under shear-a motion similar to what happens during an earthquake....

  15. SASSI Analytical Methods Compared with SHAKE Free-Field Results

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4-18019 September, 2015 Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States Jean-Paul Watson, Ross Guttromson, Cesar Silva-Monroy, Robert Jeffers, Katherine Jones, James Ellison, Charles Rath, Jared Gearhart, Dean Jones, Tom Corbet, Charles Hanley, La Tonya Walker Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed

  16. Search for Bs Mixing with Inclusive Leptons at SLD (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    exploiting the high psub T lepton and the semileptonic decay topology. No significant mixing signal was found and the following ranges of the oscillation frequency of Bsub ...

  17. Measurement of b_s oscillations at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salamanna, G.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2006-09-01

    The first precise measurement of the B{sub s}{sup 0} - {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} with the CDFII experiment is summarized in this talk. The measurement is performed with 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Fermilab Tevatron hadron collider. They find a signal consistent with flavor oscillations; the probability that such a signal is originated by random fluctuations is 0.2%. They measure {Delta}m{sub s} = 17.31{sub -0.18}{sup +0.33}(stat.) {+-} 0.07(syst.)ps{sup -1}. After a brief theoretical overview, the author describes the experimental technique and shows the results of the CDF analysis and the |V{sub td}/V{sub ts}| value we infer from this measurement.

  18. IEA RECaBS Interactive REcalculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    include the economic values of various externalities - air emissions, system integration, security of supply, employment - in your calculations. It provides the basis for...

  19. Press Pass - Press Release - CDF B_s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    official: They have discovered the quick-change behavior of the B-sub-s meson, which switches between matter and antimatter 3 trillion times a second. BATAVIA, Illinois -...

  20. Press Pass - Press Release - CDF B_s

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States are Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain,...

  1. Search for Bs Mixing with Inclusive Leptons at SLD (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the large polarized forward-backward asymmetry of the b quark as well as information ... Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; ASYMMETRY; B QUARKS; DECAY; ...

  2. Fine particle (2.5 microns) emissions: regulations, measurement, and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. McKenna; James H. Turner; James P. McKenna, Jr.

    2008-09-15

    Contents: Introduction; Health effects; Air monitoring; Emission control methods - fabric filter/baghouses, electrostatic precipitators, wet scrubbers; Environmental technology verification and baghouse filtration products; Cost considerations; and Nanoparticulates.

  3. Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-01-20

    We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

  4. Measurement of the ratio B(Bs0→J/ψf0(980))/B(Bs0→J/ψϕ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2016-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1240030 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 756; Journal ...

  5. Measurement of the ratio B(Bs0→J/ψf0(980))/B(Bs0→J/ψϕ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 756; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0370-2693 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Netherlands ...

  6. Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2008-11-12

    On August 8, 2005, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) increased the Section 48 investment tax credit (ITC) for commercial photovoltaic (PV) systems from 10% to 30% of the project's 'tax credit basis' (i.e., the dollar amount to which the ITC applies), and also created in Section 25D of the Internal Revenue Code a new 30% ITC (capped at $2,000) for residential solar systems. Both changes went into effect on January 1, 2006, for an initial period of two years, and in late 2006 both credits were extended 'as is' for an additional year (through 2008). In early 2006, Berkeley Lab published an LBNL/CESA case study that examined the financial impact of EPAct 2005's solar tax credits on PV system owners, in light of the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, as well as the fact that most PV systems in the U.S. also receive cash incentives from state-, local-, or utility-administered PV programs, and that these cash incentives may reduce the value of federal tax credits in certain situations. That case study was subsequently revised in February 2007 to reflect new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) guidance. The findings of that case study, which are briefly recapped in the next section, remained relevant up until October 2008, when the Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008 extended both solar credits for an unprecedented eight years, removed the $2,000 cap on the residential credit, and eliminated restrictions on the use of both credits in conjunction with the Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT). These significant changes, which apply to systems placed in service on or after January 1, 2009, will increase the value of the solar credits for residential system owners in particular, and are likely to spur significant growth in residential, commercial, and utility-scale PV installations in the years ahead. In light of these substantial changes to the solar ITC, this report takes a fresh look at the value of these revised credits, focusing specifically on the Section 25D residential credit. After first setting the stage by briefly reviewing our previous findings, the document proceeds to cover four specific areas in which the removal of the $2,000 cap on the residential ITC will have significant implications for PV program administrators, PV system owners, and the PV industry that go beyond the obvious market growth potential created by these more-lucrative federal incentives. These four areas include: (1) The financial implications of whether or not residential cash rebates are considered to be taxable income; (2) The role of low-interest loan programs and other forms of 'subsidized energy financing' under an uncapped ITC; (3) The degree to which taxable and nontaxable rebate levels might be reduced in response to the extra value provided by an uncapped ITC; and (4) The impact of an uncapped ITC on third-party financing and ownership models that are just beginning to emerge in the residential sector. The document concludes by highlighting a common thread that runs throughout: the need for PV program managers to understand whether or not their rebates are considered to be taxable income before they can react in an appropriate manner to the recent changes in federal solar policy and, if financing programs are offered, the need to understand whether the IRS considers these programs to be 'subsidized'. Finally, we note that this paper is based on current law; future legislative changes to the ITC could, of course, alter the conclusions reached here.

  7. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CELL WALLS (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: IDENTIFYING GENES CONTROLLING FERULATE CROSS-LINKING FORMATION IN GRASS CELL WALLS DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This proposal focuses on cell wall feruloylation and our long term goal is to identify and isolate novel genes controlling feruloylation and to characterize the phenotype of mutants in this pathway, with a spotlight on

  8. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, 6/14/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 19 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) ......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ....... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................ 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun

  9. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.4, 12/15/14) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 12/15/14) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 20 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) ......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ....... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................ 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun

  10. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.5, 3/6/15) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 3/6/15) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 20 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) ......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ....... 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................ 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun

  11. IDIQ BS Exhibit A General Conditions (Rev. 3.3, 9-27-13)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 9/27/13) Exhibit A General Conditions Page 1 of 19 EXHIBIT "A" GENERAL CONDITIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS GC Title Page GC-1 DEFINITIONS (Aug 2012) ......................................................................................................... 3 GC-2A AUTHORIZED REPRESENTATIVES, COMMUNICATIONS AND NOTICES (Jan 2010) ........ 3 GC-3 INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR (Jun 2009) ............................................................................ 4 GC-4 SUBCONTRACT INTERPRETATION (Jun

  12. Materials Data on Ba(BS2)2 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. CGRaBS: An All-Sky Survey of Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; COSMIC GAMMA SOURCES; GAMMA RADIATION; ASTROPHYSICS ...

  14. Search for Violation of $CPT$ and Lorentz Invariance in $${B_s^0}$$ Meson Oscillations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2015-06-12

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We measure the CPT-violating asymmetry in the decay B0s → µ±D±s as a function of celestial direction and sidereal phase. We find no evidence for CPT-violating effects and place limits on the direction and magnitude of flavor-dependent CPTand Lorentz-invariance violating coupling coefficients. We find 95% confidence intervals of Δa⊥ < 1.2 × 10-12 GeV and (-0.8 < ΔaT -more » 0.396ΔaZ < 3.9) × 10-13 GeV.« less

  15. Search for Violation of CPT and Lorentz Invariance in B-s(0)...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We present the first search for CPT-violating effects in the mixing of B0s mesons using the full Run II data set with an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb-1 of proton-antiproton ...

  16. Measurement of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^{(*)+} D_s^{(*)-}$ Branching Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-04-01

    The decays B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}s are reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. All decay modes are observed with a significance of more than 10 {sigma}, and we measure the B{sub s}{sup 0} production rate times B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching ratios relative to the normalization mode B{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}d{sup -} to be 0.183 {+-} 0.021 {+-} 0.017 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, 0.424 {+-} 0.046 {+-} 0.035 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {+-}} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}, 0.654 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.065 for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup *+} D{sub s}{sup *-}, and 1.261 {+-} 0.095 {+-} 0.112 for the inclusive decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+}D{sub s}{sup (*)-}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. These results are the most precise single measurements to date and provide important constraints for indirect searches for non-standard model physics in B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing.

  17. Search for the rare decay Bs0→μ+μ-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp⁻ collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s → μ⁺μ⁻) < 5.1 x 10-8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  18. Measurement of the polarization amplitudes of the Bs -> PhiPhi decay at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorigo, Mirco; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2009-10-01

    In this thesis we present the first measurement of the polarization amplitudes for the charmless B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} {yields} [K{sup +}K{sup -}][K{sup +}K{sup -}] decay of the B{sub s} meson. The result is achieved using an unbinned Maximum Likelihood fit to the data collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) in Run II (CDFII), in a period starting from March 2001 till April 2008, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.9 fb{sup -1}. The resulting yield consists of 300 signal events selected by the Two Track Trigger (TTT). Furthermore, our work puts in evidence an original topic, that was never observed until now: an unexpected dependence of the signal acceptance on the proper decay time (t) of the B{sub s} mesons. This specific issue, which is most likely a general feature induced by any signal selection based on the lifetime information, is supposed to be related to the on-line TTT and off-line selections based on the impact parameter. The involved fit, indeed, reproduces the biases observed in large statistics Monte Carlo (MC) samples. The thesis presents the same analysis performed for the B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay as well, which is used as a control sample. The polarizations amplitudes we find are consistent with the published ones; this result contributes to enforce the reliability of the analysis. This work is considered ready to begin the procedure for official approval by the CDF collaboration pending the finalization of the systematic uncertainty which has not yet been fully completed.

  19. B(s) Mixing, Delta Gamma(s) and CP Violation at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2008-05-01

    The authors discuss the results from the Tevatron experiments on mixing and CP violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0}-{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} system, with particular emphasis to the updated measurements of the decay-width difference {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} and the first measurement of the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s} using flavor tagging information. They also briefly review the charge asymmetry measurements in semileptonic B{sub s}{sup 0} decays and in B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays.

  20. Microsoft Word - IDIQ BS Appendix SFA-1 (Rev. 3.1, 5-22-15).doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for U.S.-Flag Air Carriers (Jun 2003) Applies if performance of subcontract may involve international air transportation. FAR 52.247-64 Preference for Privately Owned U.S.- Flag...

  1. Materials Data on Ca(BS2)2 (SG:205) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Rb4(BS)9 (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on Sr(BS2)2 (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. {CP} Violation in Flavor Tagged $B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi$ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhoul, Khaldoun; /MIT

    2009-06-01

    In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference of decay without net mixing and decay with net mixing, that is, B{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi} and B{sub s} {yields} {bar B}{sub s} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The time-dependent angular analysis is used to extract the decay widths of the heavy and light B{sub s} eigenstates and the difference between these decay widths {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} {triple_bond} {Lambda}{sub s}{sup L}-{Lambda}{sub s}{sup H}. Initial-state flavor tagging is used to determine the matter-antimatter content of the B{sub s} mesons at production time. We combine flavor tagging with the angular analysis, which statistically determines the contributions of the CP-even and CP-odd components at decay time, to measure the CP-violating phase {beta}{sub s}. The phase {beta}{sub s} is expressed in terms of elements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix as {beta}{sub s} {triple_bond} arg (-V{sub ts}V*{sub tb}/V{sub cs}V*{sub cb}), and is predicted by the Standard Model to be close to zero, {beta}{sub s}{sup SM} = 0.02. In the measurement of {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.7 fb{sup -1} of luminosity, collected at the CDF experiment from proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. In the measurement of {beta}{sub s}, we use a dataset corresponding to 1.3 fb{sup -1} of collected luminosity. We measure {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s} = (0.071{sub -0.059}{sup +0.064} {+-} 0.007) ps{sup -1} using the time-dependent angular analysis. Combining the angular analysis with flavor-tagging, we find that assuming the Standard Model predictions of {beta}{sub s} and {Delta}{Lambda}{sub s}, the probability of a deviation as large as the level of the observed data is 33%. We obtain a suite of associated results which are discussed in detail in this dissertation alongside the main results.

  5. Search for the rare decay Bs0→μ+μ-

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; et al

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of a search for the flavor changing neutral current decay B0susing 6.1 fb-1 of pp⁻ collisions at collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The observed number of B0scandidates is consistent with background expectations. The resulting upper limit on the branching fraction is B (B0s → μ⁺μ⁻) -8 at the 95% C.L. This limit is a factor of 2.4 better than that of the previous D0 analysis and the best limit to date.

  6. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, or United ...

  7. Characterizing toxic emissions from a coal-fired power plant demonstrating the AFGD ICCT Project and a plant utilizing a dry scrubber/baghouse system: Bailly Station Units 7 and 8 and AFGD ICCT Project. Final report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dismukes, E.B.

    1994-10-20

    This report describes results of assessment of the risk of emissions of hazardous air pollutants at one of the electric power stations, Bailly Station, which is also the site of a Clean Coal Technology project demonstrating the Pure Air Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization process (wet limestone). This station represents the configuration of no NO{sub x} reduction, particulate control with electrostatic precipitators, and SO{sub 2} control with a wet scrubber. The test was conducted September 3--6, 1993. Sixteen trace metals were determined along with 5 major metals. Other inorganic substances and organic compounds were also determined.

  8. Measurement of the Oscillation Frequency of B_s Mesons in the Hadronic Decay Mode B_s-> pi D_s(phi pi)X$ with the D0 Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Gernot August; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.

    2009-03-01

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics is a theory, describing three out of four fundamental forces. In this model the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix describes the transformation between the mass and weak eigenstates of quarks. The matrix properties can be visualized as triangles in the complex plane. A precise measurement of all triangle parameters can be used to verify the validity of the SM. The least precisely measured parameter of the triangle is related to the CKM element |V{sub td}|, accessible through the mixing frequency (oscillation) of neutral B mesons, where mixing is the transition of a neutral meson into its anti-particle and vice versa. It is possible to calculate the CKM element |V{sub td}| and a related element |V{sub ts}| by measuring the mass differences {Delta}m{sub d} ({Delta}m{sub s}) between neutral B{sub d} and {bar B}{sub d} (B{sub s} and {bar B}{sub s}) meson mass eigenstates. This measurement is accomplished by tagging the initial and final state of decaying B mesons and determining their lifetime. Currently the Fermilab Tevatron Collider (providing p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV) is the only place, where B{sub s} oscillations can be studied. The first selection of the 'golden', fully hadronic decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {pi}D{sub s}({phi}{pi})X at D0 is presented in this thesis. All data, taken between April 2002 and August 2007 with the D0 detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of {integral} Ldt = 2.8 fb{sup -1} is used. The oscillation frequency {Delta}m{sub s} and the ratio |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}| are determined as {Delta}m{sub s} = (16.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.5}(stat){sub -0.3}{sup +0.4}(sys)) ps{sup -1}, |V{sub td}|/|V{sub ts}| = 0.213{sub -0.003}{sup +0.004}(exp) {+-} 0.008(theor). These results are consistent with the standard model expectations and no evidence for new physics is observable.

  9. First observation of the Bs->K+K- decay mode, and measurement of the B0 and Bs mesons decay-rates into two-body charmless final states at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonelli, Diego; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore

    2006-11-01

    The authors searched for decays of the type B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} h{sup +}h{prime}{sup -} (where h, h{prime} = K or {pi}) in a sample corresponding to 180 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A total signal of approximately 900 events was reconstructed, and the relative branching fractions ({Beta}) of each decay mode were determined with a likelihood fit.

  10. II

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    describes the concen- 1) because control devices, such as baghouse filters and tration of hydrogen ions along a scale (from 0 to 14) that electrostatic precipitators, remove most...

  11. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Quantity and Net Summer Capacity of Operable Environmental Equipment, 2004 - 2014 Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems Electrostatic Precipitators Baghouses Select Catalytic and ...

  12. EIA-815

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    51","Part3C48" "BS111","Part3C46" "BS112","Part3C47" "BS117","Part3C43" "BS118","Part3C41" "BS125","Part3C34" "BS127","Part3C35" ...

  13. B physics: first evidence for b_s0 --> phi phi decay and measurements of branching ratio and a_cp for b+ --> phi k+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-05-31

    We present the first evidence of charmless decays of the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson, the decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}, and a measurement of the Branching Ratio BR(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {phi}{phi}) using 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. In addition, the BR and direct CP asymmetry for the B{sup +} {yields} {phi}K{sup +} decay are measured.

  14. Search for $B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B_d \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ Decays with CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-07-01

    A search has been performed for B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} decays using 7 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The observed number of B{sup 0} candidates is consistent with background-only expectations and yields an upper limit on the branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 6.0 x 10{sup -9} at 95% confidence level. We observe an excess of B{sub s}{sup 0} candidates. The probability that the background processes alone could produce such an excess or larger is 0.27%. The probability that the combination of background and the expected standard model rate of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} could produce such an excess or larger is 1.9%. These data are used to determine {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = (1.8{sub -0.9}{sup +1.1}) x 10{sup -8} and provide an upper limit of {Beta}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) < 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 95% confidence level.

  15. Measurement of the Ratio of Branching Fractions Br(Bs -> Ds- pi+)/Br(B -> D- pi+) at CDF-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furic, Ivan Kresimir; /MIT

    2004-03-01

    The measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing is one of the flagship analyses for the Run II B physics program. The sensitivity of the measurement to the frequency of B{sub s}{sup 0} oscillations strongly depends on the number of reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons. They present the measurement of the ratio of branching fractions Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}), which directly influences the number of B{sub s}{sup 0} events available for the measurement of B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing at CDF-II. They analyze 115 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF-II detector in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a novel displaced track trigger. They reconstruct 78 {+-} 11 B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays at 1153 {+-} 45 B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays with good signal to background ratio. This is the world's largest sample of fully reconstructed B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decays. They find the ratio of production fractions multiplied by the ratio of branching fractions to be: f{sub s}/f{sub d} {center_dot} Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.325 {+-} 0.046(stat) {+-} 0.034(syst) {+-} 0.084 (BR). Using the world average value of f{sub s}/f{sub d} = 0.26 {+-} 0.03, we infer that the ratio of branching fractions is: Br(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} D{sub s}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/Br(B{sup 0} {yields} D{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 1.25 {+-} 0.18(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst) {+-} 0.32(BR) {+-} 0.14(PR) where the last uncertainty is due to the uncertainty on the world average measurement of the ratio of B{sub s}{sup 0} to B{sup 0} production rates, f{sub s}/f{sub d}.

  16. Some aspects of hadron-hadron collisions in high energy interactions (Bs mixing oscillations in semileptonic decay at D0 experiment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naimuddin, Md.; /Delhi U.

    2006-09-01

    In this thesis, we report the study on one such particle called the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson made up of a bottom and a strange quark. B{sub s}{sup 0} mesons are currently produced in a great numbers only at the Tevatron and we report a study done to measure the mixing parameter {Delta}m{sub s} between the B{sub s}{sup 0} meson and its anti-particle {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0}. Mixing is the ability of a very few neutral mesons to change from their particle to their antiparticle and vice versa. Until recently there existed only a lower limit on this measurement, here we report an upper bound and a most probable value for the mixing parameter. In the following chapter, we discuss the theoretical motivation behind this study. The measurement technique and the different factors that effect the measurement are also given. In Chapter 3, we provide an overview of the experimental setup needed to perform the study. In Chapter 4, we present a new initial state flavor tagging algorithm using electrons and measurement of the B{sub d}{sup 0} mixing parameter {Delta}m{sub d} with the new technique. Details of the combined initial state tagging used in the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing study are also given. A detailed description of the B{sub s}{sup 0} mixing analysis and the results are covered in Chapter 5. And finally the results from all the three channels and a bound on the mixing parameter are presented in Chapter 6.

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating phase βsJ/ψΦ in Bs0→J/ψΦ decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-23

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter βsJ/ψΦ using approximately 6500 B0s→J/ψΦ decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb⁻¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range βsJ/ψΦϵ [0.02,0.52]∪[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wavemore » contribution to the B0s→J/ψK⁺K⁻ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/ψΦ, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ΔΓs=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps⁻¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime τ(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase δ⊥=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.« less

  18. SAND2002-0131

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The AustralianNew Zealand standard, ASNZS 4444 8, is a very close adaptation of BS 7799. We are familiar with BS 7799 but not with the others. However, our review of BS 7799 ...

  19. Efrem Braun | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email: efrem.braun at berkeley.edu Phone: 201-693-2155 BS in Chemical Engineering, University of Pennsylvania BS in Economics, University of Pennsylvania EFRC Research ...

  20. Joshua D. Howe | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fellow, Georgia Institute of Technology BS in Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University BS in Physics, Pennsylvania State University EFRC research: MOFs are a...

  1. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ΦsJ/ψΦ using the flavor-tagged decay Bs0→J/ ψΦ in 8 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ΦsJ/ψΦ, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ΔΓs, from the flavor-tagged decay B0s→J/ψΦ. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb⁻¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ΔΓs=0.163+0.065₋0.064 ps⁻¹ and ΦsJ/ψΦ=₋0.55+0.38₋0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  2. Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  3. Study of Charged Particle Species Produced in Association with B0, B-, and Bs Mesons in proton - anti-proton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usynin, Denys

    2005-12-01

    The authors study the yields of charged kaons, charged pions, and protons produced in association with B mesons produced in proton-antiproton collisions at center of mass energy 1960 GeV using 355 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This is the first reported measurements of these yields at a hadron collider. The B mesons are reconstructed using their semileptonic decays: B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D{sup -}X, D{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}D*{sup -}X, D*{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{bar D}{sup 0},{bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{bar D}{sup 0}X, {bar D}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}; B{sub s}{yields}{ell}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}X, D{sub s}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi},{phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The K, {pi}, and p are identified using the Time of Flight detector (TOF), the CDF spectrometer, and the specific ionization (dE/dx) measured in the central drift chamber (COT). The fraction of charged kaons produced in association with {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger than the fraction produced in association with the {bar B}{sup 0} and B{sup -} mesons, as expected from naive models of heavy quark hadronization to mesons. The particle species yields are found to be in qualitative agreement with simulation of B meson production in hadron collisions from the PYTHIA Monte Carlo, although the yield of kaons around {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons is found to be larger in the simulation when compared to the data. These studies are important for understanding methods of identifying the flavor of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mesons in measurement of {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} flavor oscillations and charge conjugation-parity (CP) violation in {bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} meson decays.

  4. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-14-050 University of Houston EC B3-6...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shake table. SECTION C. Environmental Aspects Potential Sources of Impact The action consists of constructing a model of an SMR and test the model on a shake table. The...

  5. Microsoft Word - Chapter 12 - 2-10-11

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 1976 B.S., Law Enforcement, Brigham Young University, 1970 Years of Experience: 30 Smith, Mark, Principal-In-Charge, Tetra Tech B.S., Civil Engineering, Carnegie Mellon ...

  6. Advanced Biofuels Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mr. Higgins has a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Notre Dame. Peter ... Zia has a BS in Chemical Engineering from Northwestern University and an MS in Chemical ...

  7. Joseph Zadrozny | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of California, Berkeley Presently: Postdoctoral Fellow, Northwestern University BS in Chemistry, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University EFRC research:...

  8. SOLVENT FOR EXTRACTING ACTINIDE SALTS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaplan, L.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A mixture of hexone and 2-hexylpyridine can be used for the selective extraction of actinide values.

  9. Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

    2008-02-01

    CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

  10. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.; Chang, R.

    1996-07-27

    The overall objective this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. During Phase 1, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed and will be integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will then be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase 11 effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology (technically and economically feasible) shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale. An extensive work plan has been developed for the project. Three sorbents will be selected for evaluation at the facility through investigation, presentation, and discussion among team members: PSCO, EPRI, ADA, and DOE. The selected sorbents will be tested in the five primary bench-scale configurations: pulse `et baghouse, TOXECON, reverse-gas baghouse, electrostatic precipitator, and an ESP or fabric filter `with no Comanche ash in the flue gas stream. In the EPRI TOXECON system, mercury sorbents will be injected downstream of a primary particulate control device, and collected in a pulse-jet baghouse operated at air-to-cloth ratios of 12 to 16 ft/min, thus separating the mercury and sorbent from the captured flyash. In the no-ash configuration, an external flyash sample will be injected into a clean gas stream to investigate possible variations in sorbent effectiveness in the presence of different ashes. The use of an existing test facility, a versatile design for the test fixture, and installation of a continuous mercury analyzer will allow for the completion of this ambitious test plan. The primary activity during the quarter was to complete fabrication and installation of the facility.

  11. Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Charles Lindsey; Paul Brignac

    2006-05-01

    This document provides a summary of the full-scale demonstration efforts involved in the project ''Field Test Program for Long-Term Operation of a COHPAC{reg_sign} System for Removing Mercury from Coal-Fired Flue Gas''. The project took place at Alabama Power's Plant Gaston Unit 3 and involved the injection of sorbent between an existing particulate collector (hot-side electrostatic precipitators) and a COHPAC{reg_sign} fabric filter (baghouse) downstream. Although the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse was designed originally for polishing the flue gas, when activated carbon injection was added, the test was actually evaluating the EPRI TOXECON{reg_sign} configuration. The results from the baseline tests with no carbon injection showed that the cleaning frequency in the COHPAC{reg_sign} unit was much higher than expected, and was above the target maximum cleaning frequency of 1.5 pulses/bag/hour (p/b/h), which was used during the Phase I test in 2001. There were times when the baghouse was cleaning continuously at 4.4 p/b/h. In the 2001 tests, there was virtually no mercury removal at baseline conditions. In this second round of tests, mercury removal varied between 0 and 90%, and was dependent on inlet mass loading. There was a much higher amount of ash exiting the electrostatic precipitators (ESP), creating an inlet loading greater than the design conditions for the COHPAC{reg_sign} baghouse. Tests were performed to try to determine the cause of the high ash loading. The LOI of the ash in the 2001 baseline tests was 11%, while the second baseline tests showed an LOI of 17.4%. The LOI is an indication of the carbon content in the ash, which can affect the native mercury uptake, and can also adversely affect the performance of ESPs, allowing more ash particles to escape the unit. To overcome this, an injection scheme was implemented that balanced the need to decrease carbon injection during times when inlet loading to the baghouse was high and increase carbon injection when inlet loading and mercury removal were low. The resulting mercury removal varied between 50 and 98%, with an overall average of 85.6%, showing that the process was successful at removing high percentages of vapor-phase mercury even with a widely varying mass loading. In an effort to improve baghouse performance, high-permeability bags were tested. The new bags made a significant difference in the cleaning frequency of the baghouse. Before changing the bags, the baghouse was often in a continuous clean of 4.4 p/b/h, but with the new bags the cleaning frequency was very low, at less than 1 p/b/h. Alternative sorbent tests were also performed using these high-permeability bags. The results of these tests showed that most standard, high-quality activated carbon performed similarly at this site; low-cost sorbent and ash-based sorbents were not very effective at removing mercury; and chemically enhanced sorbents did not appear to offer any benefits over standard activated carbons at this site.

  12. Investigation and demonstration of dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control. Quarterly technical report, July 1, 1996--September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Sjostrom, S.; Smith, J.

    1996-11-06

    The overall objective of this two phase program is to investigate the use of dry carbon-based sorbents for mercury control. This information is important to the utility industry in anticipation of pending regulations. During Phase I, a bench-scale field test device that can be configured as an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet baghouse, or a reverse-gas baghouse has been designed, built and integrated with an existing pilot-scale facility at PSCo`s Comanche Station. Up to three candidate sorbents will be injected into the flue gas stream upstream of the test device to and mercury concentration measurements will be made to determine the mercury removal efficiency for each sorbent. During the Phase II effort, component integration for the most promising dry sorbent technology shall be tested at the 5000 acfm pilot-scale.

  13. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structure whose behavior is fundamentally nonlinear. Thus, the students assigned to this project will develop control techniques that will allow an electrodynamic shake table to...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    event Annual Exercise an earth-shaking activity Sandia President and Laboratories Director Jill Hruby Partnerships, mission synergy key to Sandia's future Sandia California...

  15. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Composite-to-Steel Joint Integrity Monitoring and Assessment Compressive sensing ... Nonlinear Shake Table Control Passive Vibration Sensor Erik Moro UCSD Student Michael Todd ...

  16. Forensic Science Education Programs in the Midwest | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Programs in the Midwest Carroll University Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.), Chemistry Major with a Forensic Science emphasis Chemistry Program | Forensic Science emphasis Columbia College of Missouri Bachelor of Science (B.S.) Degree in Forensic Science Forensic Science Program Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Master of Science (M.S.) Degree in Forensic Science Forensic and Investigative Sciences Program Iowa State University

  17. Design and operating experience of the Holcomb Station dry scrubber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emerson, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    The Holcomb Station dry flue gas desulfurization system has been operational since May, 1983. The lime based system, consisting of three spray drying absorbers and two baghouses, has met all regulatory compliance requirements and contractual guarantee values. Some serious operational problems were encountered during the startup of this system. This paper discusses these problems and subsequent solutions along with testing experience to-date. The availability of this system for the first quarter of 1985 was 99.51 percent.

  18. Spray drying for high-sulfur coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhudy, R.

    1988-09-01

    Recent pilot plant tests indicate that spray drying, now used to control SO/sub 2/ emissions from low-sulfur coal, can also be effective for high-sulfur coal. Spray drying coupled with baghouse particulate removal is the most effective configuration tested to date, removing over 90% of SO/sub 2/ while easily meeting New Source Performance Standards for particulate emissions. 2 figures, 1 table.

  19. SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} flue gas clean-up demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    Babcock and Wilcox`s (B and W) SOx-NOx-Rox Box{trademark} process effectively removes SOx, NOx and particulate (Rox) from flue gas generated from coal-fired boilers in a single unit operation, a high temperature baghouse. The SNRB technology utilizes dry sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for removal of SOx and ammonia injection upstream of a zeolitic selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst incorporated in the baghouse to reduce NOx emissions. Because the SOx and NOx removal processes require operation at elevated gas temperatures (800--900 F) for high removal efficiency, high-temperature fabric filter bags are used in the baghouse. The SNRB technology evolved from the bench and laboratory pilot scale to be successfully demonstrated at the 5-MWe field scale. This report represents the completion of Milestone M14 as specified in the Work Plan. B and W tested the SNRB pollution control system at a 5-MWe demonstration facility at Ohio Edison`s R.E. Burger Plant located near Shadyside, Ohio. The design and operation were influenced by the results from laboratory pilot testing at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The intent was to demonstrate the commercial feasibility of the SNRB process. The SNRB facility treated a 30,000 ACFM flue gas slipstream from Boiler No. 8. Operation of the facility began in May 1992 and was completed in May 1993. About 2,300 hours of high-temperature operation were achieved. The main emissions control performance goals of: greater than 70% SO{sub 2} removal using a calcium-based sorbent; greater than 90% NOx removal with minimal ammonia slip; and particulate emissions in compliance with the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) of 0.03 lb/million Btu were exceeded simultaneously in the demonstration program when the facility was operated at optimal conditions. Testing also showed significant reductions in emissions of some hazardous air pollutants.

  20. Micronized coal-fired retrofit system for SO{sub x} reduction: Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Program. Technical progress report No. 1, [April--June 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Objective of the project is to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization System and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emissions, including SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616, which is based in the vicinity of the Krakow airport. Progress is described.

  1. Advanced dry scrubbing on Ohio coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrhein, G.T.; Kudlac, G.A.; Smith, P.V.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} emissions while burning high-sulfur Ohio coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. Dry scrubbing involves injecting an atomized mist of sorbent-containing slurry droplets into hot flue gas. The reaction products exit the scrubber as a dry powder that can be filtered from the gas and recycled or disposed. The project consists of testing an advanced dry scrubber system on two high sulfur Ohio coals. All testing will be conducted in the 5 MBtu pilot facility at B and W`s Alliance Research Center. The facility consists of a test furnace, a dry scrubber using a B and W DuraJet{trademark} two fluid atomizer, a pulse-jet baghouse, and an ash slaking system. Tests were conducted with and without recycling the solids collected from the baghouse. During recycle operation the solids were slurried with water and injected into the dry scrubber with the fresh lime slurry. Test results will be presented, including SO{sub 2} removal (70--99%), calcium to sulfur ratios (1.1--1.9), dry scrubber outlet temperatures (10--30 F), and system performance. An advanced feature of the project was the use of the B and W patented Droplet Impingement Device which removes large slurry droplets from the gas stream prior to the baghouse to prevent baghouse deposition. This allows operation at low approach temperatures.

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Elaine Hale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Austin, TX, 2004 B.S. in chemical engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 2000 Prior work experience PfeifferVIGRE Instructor, Dept. of Computational and ...

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Ilya Chernyakhovskiy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education and background training M.Sc. in Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, 2015 B.S. in Natural Resource Economics, University of Massachusetts ...

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jørn Aabakken

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scenarios Education and background training B.S. in economics, The Pennsylvania State University M.S. in mineral economics, The Pennsylvania State University Prior work ...

  5. NREL: Energy Analysis - Monisha Shah

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between energy, environment, and economics The impact of climate change and energy ... University of Iowa, 2000 B.S. in economics, University of Iowa, 2000 Prior work ...

  6. Robinson W. Flaig | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

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    of California, Berkeley Email: flaigr at berkeley.edu Phone: 608-778-4216 BS in Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Platteville EFRC Research Metal-organic frameworks...

  7. Ryan Egidi | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    These projects primarily involve advanced metering infrastructure, communication infrastructure, distribution automation, demand management and cybersecurity. Ryan has a B.S. in ...

  8. Dr Michael Pechan | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Executive Committee for the APS topical subgroup GMAG. Education: B.S., Physics and Mathematics, University of Wisconsin, Platteville Ph.D., Physics, Iowa State University Last ...

  9. Marine Current Turbines Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom Zip: BS34 8PD Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Product: Developer of tidal stream turbine technology for exploiting flowing water in general and tidal streams in...

  10. Profile for Nathan Andrew Moody

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    frequency science Remote sensing High Energy Density Plasmas and Fluids Advanced concepts in ... Low Work function Cesiated Electron Sources B.S., Electrical Engineering, The ...

  11. Gardner Energy Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gardner Energy Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gardner Energy Management Place: Bristol, United Kingdom Zip: BS1 2HS Product: UK-based steam trap manufacturer....

  12. Benjamin K. Keitz | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

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    Institute of Technology BS in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin EFRC research: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise for a variety of gas...

  13. Harin Ullal - Resume

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    Harin S. Ullal, Ph.D. National Center for Photovoltaics National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado USA Education: B.S.: Metallurgical Engineering University of Nagpur,...

  14. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database IEA RECaBS Interactive REcalculator IEA Technology Roadmaps IEA World Energy Outlook IEA-Risk Quantification and Risk Management in Renewable Energy Projects...

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    Ecolane Transport Conultancy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecolane Transport Conultancy Place: Bristol, United Kingdom Zip: BS3 4UB Product: UK-based sustainable transport...

  16. Ms Van T Nguyen | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    firm as a Chemical Engineer. Education: M.S., Environmental Science and Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1993 B.S., Chemical Engineering, ...

  17. January 2015 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Sohn has an extensive background in nuclear safety analysis and nuclear materials processing. Ms. Sohn obtained her BS in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University. She also ...

  18. Dr Robert J Stack | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Robert J Stack Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home ... Education: B.S., Chemical and Cell Biology, College of Agriculture and Environmental ...

  19. Carol Sohn named Deputy Manager at Nevada Field Office | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sohn has an extensive background in nuclear safety analysis and nuclear materials processing. Ms. Sohn obtained her BS in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University. She also ...

  20. Fermilab Today | University of Pittsburgh Profile

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    postdocs and four students. COLLABORATING AT FERMILAB SINCE: 1992 MAJOR CONTRIBUTIONS: CP violation in Bs->Jpsi phi RESEARCH FOCUS: B physics, neutrinos WHAT SETS PARTICLE...

  1. ENTECH European Nuclear Technologies Ltd | Open Energy Information

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    ENTECH European Nuclear Technologies Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: ENTECH (European Nuclear Technologies Ltd.) Place: Bristol, United Kingdom Zip: BS99 7JT Product: Entech...

  2. Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with ... between opening and closing lease inventories, and (2) basic sediment and water (BS&W). ...

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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Experience prior to Bettis includes: evaluation of land ... requirements of RCRA, CERCLA, Environmental Technical Assistant Education:. Pursuing BS in Natural Sciences ...

  4. Sustain Ltd | Open Energy Information

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    Kingdom Zip: BS40 5QA Sector: Services Product: Sustain provides consultancy and delivery services to help clients and partners in the public and private sectors bring...

  5. Auriga Energy | Open Energy Information

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    search Name: Auriga Energy Place: Bristol, United Kingdom Zip: BS1 5UB Sector: Solar, Vehicles Product: String representation "Auriga Energy i ... of the market." is too...

  6. NREL: Biomass Research - David A. Sievers, P.E.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo of David Sievers David Sievers is an engineer in the Bioprocess Integration R&D ... Education and Training Licensed Professional Engineer, Colorado B.S., Chemical ...

  7. DOE/Sandia Tribal Energy - Internship Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... entitled, "Tribal Renewable Energy Integration: An Analysis of Current Tribal ... Los Angeles; BS-Biology and minor in Mathematics, New Mexico State University Her thesis ...

  8. DOE/Sandia Tribal Energy Internship Program: Immersion of Future...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... entitled, "Tribal Renewable Energy Integration: An Analysis of Current Tribal ... Los Angeles; BS-Biology and minor in Mathematics, New Mexico State University Her paper ...

  9. 06-DataManagement-Gerhardt.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 5 G Bs a ggregate b andwidth * Access w ith HOME, * Other n ame globalhomesddpturner * Low---level name globalu1ddpturner globalu2ddpturner...

  10. Lisa Gerhardt! NERSC User Services Group! NUG Training!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 5 G Bs a ggregate b andwidth * Access w ith HOME, * Other n ame globalhomesllgerhard * Low---level name globalu1llgerhard globalu2llgerhard...

  11. Envar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Envar Place: United Kingdom Zip: PE28 3BS Product: UK-based waste management and recycling company specialising in organic waste and marketproduct...

  12. Compact Power Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Place: Bristol, England, United Kingdom Zip: BS11 9HZ Product: Builds gasification plants for municipal, industrial and clinical waste. References: Compact Power Ltd1 This...

  13. Liliana Stan | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M.S. Electrical Engineering, University of New Mexico. B.S. Physics, University of Bucharest, Romania Research interests Design and development of functional structures ...

  14. sadow | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3D Controlled Environment Education: Postdoctoral Associate, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH), 2003-2005 PhD., University of California, Berkeley, 2003 B.S., The...

  15. Maisah Khan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    She graduated summa cum laude from Arizona State University with a B.S. in Conservation Biology and Ecological Sustainability. Most Recent DOE Joins Pakistan's Energy Ministries to ...

  16. Microsoft Word - EDUconnectPolyNYU5-11 _2_

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more info Martin Lewis Perl 1995 Physics Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn: B.S. Chemical Engineering 1948; Polytechnic University: Honorary Dr.Sc. 1996 Professor, SLAC...

  17. Robert Hofstadter, Electron Scattering, the Structure of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Robert Hofstadter, Electron Scattering, the Structure of the Nucleons, and Scintillation ... After receiving a B.S. from The City College of New York in 1935, Robert Hofstadter ...

  18. 3emrsl I[. E. field?, Dlrwctor of

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    arvlws smy be required inc1ud.l cher@as lorosa &Y l stinvted at &OoaOOOO for fi?cal par U5 i;hlb no ast CM bs mde now, ft is estkntadthet emual costs for mr will bs...

  19. Richard Gerber! NERSC Senior Science Advisor! User Services Group...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bs 7.4 PB @ 1 80 G Bs Peak B isec6on B W ( TBs) 5.1 11.0 12.6 Power ( MW L inpack) 2.9 1.9 2.0 Allocation Year Rollover --- 7 --- David T urner HPC C onsultant NERSC U ser S ...

  20. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

  1. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arron Phillips Shakes Up Science at the Foundry Sometimes you need to shake up your perspective in order to do good science. So says Molecular Foundry intern Arron Phillips, who has captured some artistic views of her research on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Shown here is her color-altered photograph of MOF-199 samples, one of the best-known materials in that family of porous crystals. Visiting from the University of Florida, Phillips says she enjoys using photography as a way to shake up

  2. Kinetic studies of dry sorent for medium temperature applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keener, T.C.; Wang, Z.

    1996-07-12

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the fundamental nature of sorbent reactivity and reaction kinetics in the medium temperature range from 600{degrees}F (316{degrees}C) to 1200{degrees}F (649{degrees}C) available in the convective pass of a boiler upstream of the economizer, where dry sorbents are injected to remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas. Research focuses on the mechanisms of sorbent- flue gas interaction under economizer and hot baghouse conditions utilizing the experimental setup and the results of the first four years of research.

  3. Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Final report: Initial site investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-15

    Original objective of this project was to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization system and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emission, including SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616. In May 1995 the Polish Military announced it had decided to convert its boiler house to gas; thus cancelling the TCS Project. The balance of 1995 was spent considering alternative Project sites in Krakow for the application of the TCS coal Micronization technology.

  4. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Ruhl; Justin Smith; Sharon Sjostrom; Sheila Haythorthwaite; Terry Hunt

    1997-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCO) a cost sharing contract to evaluate carbon-based sorbents for mercury control on a 600 acfm laboratory-scale particulate control module (PCM). The PCM can be configured as simulate an electrostatic precipitator, a pulse-jet fabric filter, or a reverse-gas fabric filter and is installed on an operating coal-fired power plant. Three different dry carbon-based sorbents were tested this quarter to determine their mercury removal capability in the different configurations. The project is currently in the seventh quarter of an eight-quarter Phase I project. Testing in all configurations is nearly complete. Original plans included the use of an on-line mercury analyzer to collect test data. However, due to very low baseline mercury concentration, on-line measurement did not provide accurate data. The project used a modified MESA method grab sample technique to determine inlet and outlet mercury concentrations. A major concern during sorbent evaluations was the natural ability of the flyash at the test site to remove mercury. This often made determination of sorbent only mercury removal difficult. The PCM was configured as a reverse-gas baghouse and brought online with "clean" flue gas on March 10* at an A/C of 2.0 ft/min. The dustcake forms the filtering media in a reverse gas baghouse. In the absence of flyash, the bags were precoated with a commercially available alumina silicate material to form an inert dustcake. Some baseline tests were completed with clean gas for comparison to clean gas pulse jet tests. The PCM was reconfigured as a TOXECON unit in April 1997 with testing completed in May 1997. TOXECON, an EPIU patented technology, is a pulse-jet baghouse operating at a high A/C ratio downstream of a primary particulate colIector with sorbent injection upstream of the baghouse for air toxics removal. Mercury removals of O to 97o/0 were obtained depending on test conditions.

  5. J.K. Spruce power plant, Unit 1, San Antonio, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peltier, R.

    2008-10-15

    CPS Energy's J.K. Spruce power plant, Unit 1 was recently recognised by the EUCG Fossil Productivity Committee as the best performer in the large coal plant category over the 2002-2006 evaluation period. The competition was tough, with more than 80 plants in the running, but Unit 1 emerged as the clear winner by earning top points for high plant reliability and very low nonfuel O & M costs. It meets its environmental goals when burning PRB coal in its tangentially fired furnace with recently upgraded low NOx burners, overfire air and a new combustion control system. A baghouse and wet flue gas desulfurization system clean up combustion products. 3 photos.

  6. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System. Quarterly report, November 1, 1988--January 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-03-01

    Work continued on life-cycle testing, optimization, and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly as well as the auxiliary subsystems. Emphasis of combustor testing was to determine optimum size and location of air inlets in primary combustion chambers; it was found that using a single air inlet about 70 degrees upsteam from the agglomeration site produces a combustion efficiency of 99.0% while producing no agglomeration. The test of the fouling effect on heat exchanger performance showed a steady decrease in time of the overall heat transfer coefficient. Particle size distribution of fly ash in the baghouse showed 50% of the particles smaller than 11.2 microns.

  7. 'Tis the Season for Giving the Gift of Energy Savings | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    presents. The catchy advertising jingles are back, sale signs are in every window, and a man with a white beard, hearty laugh, and a stomach that shakes like a bowl full of jelly...

  8. Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Shake, Rattle, and Roll for National Security ...

  9. Edward Teller

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Edward Teller Still Shaking Up Science Today * For the Love of Science * Centennial Highlights Biographical Sketch * Resources with Additional Information Edward Teller, Director of LLNL 1958 - 1960 Edward Teller, 1958 Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Still Shaking Up Science Today 'There is little doubt that Edward Teller is one of the towering figures of 20th-century physics. ... Although his early training was in chemical physics and spectroscopy, Teller has made

  10. Edward Teller Medals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edward Teller Still Shaking Up Science Today * For the Love of Science * Centennial Highlights Biographical Sketch * Resources with Additional Information Edward Teller, Director of LLNL 1958 - 1960 Edward Teller, 1958 Courtesy of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Still Shaking Up Science Today 'There is little doubt that Edward Teller is one of the towering figures of 20th-century physics. ... Although his early training was in chemical physics and spectroscopy, Teller has made

  11. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond earthquake Topic Shake Rattle and Roll! The Science of Earthquakes by Kate Bannan 25 Aug, 2011 in Science Communications A rare, powerful 5.8-magnitude earthquake shook the East Coast United States on August 23. Damage was light, but millions of people were surprised and unnerved by the event. The earthquake occurred near Mineral, Virginia, about 100 miles southwest of Washington, DC. It was a shallow earthquake, and shaking was

  12. Jihye Park | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jihye Park Previous Next List ParkJ PhD Student Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Email: jihye.park at chem.tamu.edu Phone: 979-422-9821 BS in Chemistry, Dankook...

  13. Feng Xue | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Next List PhD Student Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science University of Minnesota Email: xuexx215 at umn.edu Phone: 612-806-5055 BS in Materials ...

  14. News Item

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    After receiving his B.S. from the University of Minnesota and Ph.D. from Cornell University, Neaton spent three years in the Rutgers Physics Department, where he was a postdoctoral ...

  15. Marcia A. Wood | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marcia A. Wood Group Leader, Information Solutions and Technology Assurance B.S. Computer Science, University of St. Francis Telephone 630.252.4656 Fax 630.252.6866 E-mail...

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - Dave Bielen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Education and background training Ph.D. in economics, Duke University, 2015 M.A. in economics, Duke University, 2011 B.S. in economics, Pennsylvania State University, 2009 Prior ...

  17. Energy Exchange Plenary Speakers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Rhode Island native, he earned his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of California, Davis, ...

  18. The prospects for magnetohydrodynamic stability in advanced tokamak regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manickam, J.; Chance, M.S.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Monticello, D.; Pomphrey, N.; Reiman, A.; Wang, C.; Zakharov, L.E. )

    1994-05-01

    Stability analysis of advanced regime tokamaks is presented. Here advanced regimes are defined to include configurations where the ratio of the bootstrap current, [ital I][sub BS], to the total plasma current, [ital I][sub [ital p

  19. Alejandro M. Fracaroli | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phone: 510-642-6331 PhD in Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina BS in Organic Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina EFRC Research Metal-organic...

  20. Bo Zhen | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio: Bo Zhen received a B.S. in 2008 from Tsinghua University (Academic talent program, Mathematics & Physics), and a PhD in 2014 from MIT Physics. Since then, he has been working ...

  1. Joshua Borycz | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities Email: boryc019 at umn.edu Phone: 309-749-5099 BS in Chemistry and Mathematics, Hope College, Michigan EFRC Research I study CO2 adsorption ...

  2. Director Biography | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... Dr. Kountouris holds a BS in Mathematics, an MS in Computer Science, and a Ph.D. in Information Technology. He is fluent in Greek. He is a certified Project Management Professional ...

  3. Jessica Burton > Graduate Student - Schlom Group > Researchers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I received my B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering in 2012. Following graduate school I hope to become a professor. In my free time I like to cook, read, and run marathons...

  4. Introduction Alcator C-Mod

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Physics High Performance Self-heating Reactor Scale Physics Support for reduced cost ignition expts. Lower Hybrid CD 70% BS, n Quasi-Steady AT Compact Hi-Field 3 ,I1MA...

  5. Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Japan); B.S. Mun (Hanyang University, Korea, and ALS); M. Rossi, and Z. Hussain (ALS); P.N. Ross Jr. (Berkeley Lab); C.S. Fadley (University of California at...

  6. EC Power UK Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UK Ltd Place: Bristol, England, United Kingdom Zip: BS37 6JL Product: Micro combined heat and power plant manufacturer (<18kWe). Coordinates: 42.55678, -88.050449 Show Map...

  7. DOE-HDBK-1140-2001, Human Factors/Ergonomics Handbook for the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Air Force Base, Ohio, ASD Technical Report 61-381(NTIS AD- 269332), 1961. 2. Blanchard, B.S., & Lowery, E.E., Maintainability: Principles and practices, McGraw-Hill, New ...

  8. Richard Lazarus Named as Executive Director of National Commission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Solicitor General. He also serves as Faculty Director of the Supreme Court Institute. He is a graduate of Harvard Law School and earned a B.S. in chemistry and a B.A. in ...

  9. Hugh Chen | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Physics and Chemistry in 2003. His work focused on estimating the sources and sinks of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. He has a B.S. in Chemistry from ...

  10. Anna Brockway | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Anna joined the SunShot program in January 2013 and holds a B.S. in chemistry from Haverford College. At Haverford, her research focused on computational physical chemistry modeling ...

  11. Meet CMI Researcher Karl Gschneidner | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center from 1966 to 1996. Gschneidner received a B.S. degree from the University of Detroit in 1952 and his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1957. He was at the Los Alamos...

  12. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    layer and a basement layer of less than 100 ohm.m (Kauahikaua and Mattice, 1981). The depth of penetration of these soundings was estimated to be about 800 m to 900 m b.s.1....

  13. Anne Marti | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email: anne.marti at contr.netl.doe.gov Phone: 412-386-4773 PhD in Chemistry, University of Texas at Dallas BS in Chemistry, University of West Florida EFRC Research Metal ...

  14. Laura Garchar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Laura Garchar is a Science and Technology Policy Fellow through DOE's Institute for Science and Education at Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORISE). She has a B.S. in Geological Engineering from the...

  15. Zhi-Yuan Gu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formerly: Post-doctoral Research Associate, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University PhD in Chemistry, Nankai University, China BS in Chemistry, Nankai University, China EFRC ...

  16. Building America Webinar: Who's Successfully Doing Deep Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comps. MEL's Ventilat'nIAQ Ventilat'nIAQ Water Man. Water ... her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from The Johns Hopkins ... projects including deep retrofits, zero-net energy ...

  17. John Marohn > ProfessorChemistry and Chemical Biology > Faculty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Marohn Professor Chemistry and Chemical Biology Research Group Webpage jam99@cornell.edu John Marohn earned a B.S. in Chemistry and a B.A. in Physics from the University of...

  18. Michael Urashka

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controls Engineer. He has B.S. degrees from University of Massachusetts - Amherst (Microbiology and in Cellular & Molecular Biology) and an M.S. in Systems Management from Golden...

  19. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes within the clouds when aircraft above the NSA site VISIBILITY PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION PR PR PR PR PR *ICE FOG (IF) *BLOWING SNOW(BS) *DIAMOND DUST(DD)...

  20. Dear Family and friends,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and environmental engineering. He holds a B.S. in geology from Muenster University in Germany and an M.S. in geology from the Technical University of Berlin, Germany. He edited...

  1. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Majka, A. Makeev, B. McBreen, M. Mikelsen, M. Murray, J.B. Natowitz, B.S. Nielsen, J. Norris, K. Olchanski, J. Olness, D. Ouerdane, R. Planeta, F. Rami, D. Rohrich, B.H. Samset, ...

  2. ABSTRACTS OF PAPERS PUBLISHED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Murray, J. Natowitz, B.S. Nielsen, J. Norris, K. Olchanski, D. Ouerdane, R. Paneta, ... M. Murray, J. Natowitz, B. S. Nielsen, J. Norris, K. Olchanski, D. Ouerdane, R. Paneta, ...

  3. Energy Exchange 2015 Plenary Speakers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... He earned a B.S. degree in Naval Engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy; attended the ... volunteers who collected clothes, food and diapers for members of their community. ...

  4. International Natural Gas Workshop U.S. Energy Information Administrat...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... He has a BS in chemical engineering from M. I. T. and an MBA from Harvard Business School. ... Howard Rogers retired from BP in 2008 after a career of 29 years. Originally a Chemical ...

  5. EIA-813, Monthly Crude Oil Report Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    transporting Alaskan crude oil by water in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. ... month, corrected to 60 degrees Fahrenheit (F) less basic sediment and water (BS&W). ...

  6. EIA-803, Weekly Crude Oil Stocks Report Page 1 U. S. DEPARTMENT...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    transporting Alaskan crude oil by water in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. ... reported corrected to 60 degrees Fahrenheit ( 0 F) less basic sediment and water (BS&W). ...

  7. Women @ Energy: Mary "Molly" Finster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    arrived at Argonne in 2005 as a post-doc, but is now full time staff. With degrees in Chemical Engineering (B.S. and M.S.) and Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.), her...

  8. Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Godfrey, A.T., B.S. Collins, K.S. Kim, R. Lee, J. Powers, R. Salko, S.G. Stimpson, W.A. ... Allison, L., R.C. Smith and B. Williams, An Information Theoretic Approach to Use ...

  9. Bahamas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name The Bahamas Population 254,685 GDP 8,043,000,000 Energy Consumption Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code BS 3-letter ISO code BHS Numeric ISO code...

  10. Microsoft Word - Lili Ji-PHD dissertation title page.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications by Lili Ji B.S. (Peking University, P.R. China) 2002 A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the ...

  11. CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    &rKey2b8c3800c9c1c824 Presentation Speaker Biography Craig S. Turchi-Senior Engineer II Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University B.S. Chemical Engineering,...

  12. Stephen F. Dwyer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Steve Dwyer has a BS, MS and PHD in Civil Engineering as well as an MBA.  Steve is a professional engineer in multiple states and has 31 years of engineering experience including 25 years as a...

  13. Dr. Steven Ashby | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... He also was elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences in 2013. He holds a B.S. in MathematicsComputer Science from the University of Santa Clara. He earned his M.S. and ...

  14. Director | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Steve has a B.S. in Mining Engineering, and an M.S. in Organizational Learning. He is a Registered Professional Engineer, and a Project Management Professional. Last modified: 35...

  15. Fay Martin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fay retired in 1996 from ORNL, where she worked as an environmental toxicologist. She received her B.S. in chemistry/botany/zoology from the University College of the West Indies, an M.S. in...

  16. NREL: Energy Sciences - Kirstin M. Alberi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2003 and a PhD in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of...

  17. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geographic documentaries. Patrick Brewick Patrick Brewick earned his B.S. in Civil Engineering from the University of Notre Dame in 2009 and his Ph.D. from the Department of...

  18. R H Bott Son | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    H Bott Son Jump to: navigation, search Name: R H Bott & Son Place: Hertfordshire, United Kingdom Zip: SG2 7BS Sector: Wind energy Product: UK-based private developer, Andrew Bott,...

  19. Biomass Surface Characterization Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Energy Fuels (23); pp. 3810-3817. Donohoe, B.S., et al. (2009). "Detecting Cellulase Penetration into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy." Biotechnol. Bioeng. ...

  20. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1 CHAPTER 10 LIST OF PREPARERS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Burandt, Mary Beth EIS Responsibilities: Document Manager Education: M.S., Engineering Management, Catholic University of America B.S., Biomedical Engineering, Marquette University Experience: 27 years Chapin, Doug EIS Responsibilities: Fast Flux Test Facility Lead Education: B.S., Biology, Whitworth College Experience: 34 years Daniels, Jeff EIS Responsibilities: Cost, Schedule, and Baseline and Performance Lead Education: B.A., Finance,

  1. OP-JAMI160029 1..7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RECEIVED 2 December 2015 REVISED 17 January 2016 ACCEPTED 11 February 2016 The Medical Science DMZ Sean Peisert, PhD 1,2,3 , William Barnett, PhD 4 , Eli Dart, BS 5 , James Cuff, D.Phil 6 , Robert L Grossman, PhD 7 , Edward Balas, BS 8 , Ari Berman, PhD 9 , Anurag Shankar, PhD 10 , Brian Tierney, MS 5 ABSTRACT .................................................................................................................................................... Objective We describe use cases and an

  2. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory Timothy Germann german Contact Information Los Alamos National Laboratory Theoretical Division Physics and Chemistry of Materials Group Phone: (505) 665-9772 tcg@lanl.gov Bio Education Ph.D., Chemical Physics, Harvard University, 1995 B.S., Computer Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1991 B.S., Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, 1991 Research and Professional Experience Technical Staff Member, Los Alamos National Laboratory, April

  3. Mercury control challenge for industrial boiler MACT affected facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-09-15

    An industrial coal-fired boiler facility conducted a test program to evaluate the effectiveness of sorbent injection on mercury removal ahead of a fabric filter with an inlet flue gas temperature of 375{sup o}F. The results of the sorbent injection testing are essentially inconclusive relative to providing the facility with enough data upon which to base the design and implementation of permanent sorbent injection system(s). The mercury removal performance of the sorbents was significantly less than expected. The data suggests that 50 percent mercury removal across a baghouse with flue gas temperatures at or above 375{sup o}F and containing moderate levels of SO{sub 3} may be very difficult to achieve with activated carbon sorbent injection alone. The challenge many coal-fired industrial facilities may face is the implementation of additional measures beyond sorbent injection to achieve high levels of mercury removal that will likely be required by the upcoming new Industrial Boiler MACT rule. To counter the negative effects of high flue gas temperature on mercury removal with sorbents, it may be necessary to retrofit additional boiler heat transfer surface or spray cooling of the flue gas upstream of the baghouse. Furthermore, to counter the negative effect of moderate or high SO{sub 3} levels in the flue gas on mercury removal, it may be necessary to also inject sorbents, such as trona or hydrated lime, to reduce the SO{sub 3} concentrations in the flue gas. 2 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Continuous Emissions Monitoring System Monitoring Plan for the Y-12 Steam Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-28

    The Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12), managed by BWXT, is submitting this Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) Monitoring Plan in conformance with the requirements of Title 40 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 75. The state of Tennessee identified the Y-12 Steam Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, as a non-electrical generation unit (EGU) nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) budget source as a result of the NO{sub x} State Implementation Plan (SIP) under the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) Rule 1200-3-27. Following this introduction, the monitoring plan contains the following sections: CEMS details, NO{sub x} emissions, and quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC). The following information is included in the attachments: fuel and flue gas diagram, system layout, data flow diagrams, Electronic Monitoring Plan printouts, vendor information on coal and natural gas feed systems, and the Certification Test Protocol. The Y-12 Steam Plant consists of four Wickes boilers. Each is rated at a maximum heat input capacity of 296.8 MMBtu/hour or 250,000 lb/hour of 250-psig steam. Although pulverized coal is the principal fuel, each of the units can fire natural gas or a combination of coal and gas. Each unit is equipped with a Joy Manufacturing Company reverse air baghouse to control particulate emissions. Flue gases travel out of the baghouse, through an induced draft fan, then to one of two stacks. Boilers 1 and 2 exhaust through Stack 1. Boilers 3 and 4 exhaust through Stack 2. A dedicated CEMS will be installed in the ductwork of each boiler, downstream of the baghouse. The CEMS will be designed, built, installed, and started up by URS Group, Inc. (URS). Data acquisition and handling will be accomplished using a data acquisition and handling system (DAHS) designed, built, and programmed by Environmental Systems Corporation (ESC). The installed CEMS will continuously monitor NO{sub x}, flue gas flowrate, and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The CEMS will be utilized to report emissions from each unit for each ozone season starting May 1, 2003. Each boiler has independent coal and natural gas metering systems. Coal is fed to each boiler by belt-type coal feeders. Each boiler has two dedicated coal feeders. Natural gas may be burned along with coal for flame stability. The boilers may also be fired on natural gas alone. Orifice meters measure the natural gas flow to each boiler.

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of L-lactate dehydrogenase and its H171C mutant from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Gao, Xiaoli

    2012-08-31

    L-Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an important enzyme involved in the last step of glycolysis that catalyzes the reversible conversion of pyruvate to L-lactate with the simultaneous oxidation of NADH to NAD{sup +}. In this study, wild-type LDH from Bacillus subtilis (BsLDH-WT) and the H171C mutant (BsLDH-H171C) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to near-homogeneity. BsLDH-WT was crystallized in the presence of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and NAD{sup +} and the crystal diffracted to 2.38 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 171.04, c = 96.27 {angstrom}. BsLDH-H171C was also crystallized as the apoenzyme and in complex with NAD{sup +}, and data sets were collected to 2.20 and 2.49 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Both BsLDH-H171C crystals belonged to space group P3, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 133.41, c = 99.34 {angstrom} and a = b = 133.43, c = 99.09 {angstrom}, respectively. Tetramers were observed in the asymmetric units of all three crystals.

  6. Bispecific Antibody Pretargeting for Improving Cancer Imaging and Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Robert M.

    2005-02-04

    The main objective of this project was to evaluate pretargeting systems that use a bispecific antibody (bsMAb) to improve the detection and treatment of cancer. A bsMAb has specificity to a tumor antigen, which is used to bind the tumor, while the other specificity is to a peptide that can be radiolabeled. Pretargeting is the process by which the unlabeled bsMAb is given first, and after a sufficient time (1-2 days) is given for it to localize in the tumor and clear from the blood, a small molecular weight radiolabeled peptide is given. According to a dynamic imaging study using a 99mTc-labeled peptide, the radiolabeled peptide localizes in the tumor in less than 1 hour, with > 80% of it clearing from the blood and body within this same time. Tumor/nontumor targeting ratios that are nearly 50 times better than that with a directly radiolabeled Fab fragment have been observed (Sharkey et al., ''Signal amplification in molecular imaging by a multivalent bispecific nanobody'' submitted). The bsMAbs used in this project have been composed of 3 antibodies that will target antigens found in colorectal and pancreatic cancers (CEA, CSAp, and MUC1). For the ''peptide binding moiety'' of the bsMAb, we initially examined an antibody directed to DOTA, but subsequently focused on another antibody directed against a novel compound, HSG (histamine-succinyl-glycine).

  7. Iron Phosphate Glasses: An Alternative for Vitrifying Certain Nuclear Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delbert E. Day; Chandra S. Ray; Cheol-Woon Kim

    2004-12-28

    Vitrification of nuclear waste in a glass is currently the preferred process for waste disposal. DOE currently approves only borosilicate (BS) type glasses for such purposes. However, many nuclear wastes, presently awaiting disposal, have complex and diverse chemical compositions, and often contain components that are poorly soluble or chemically incompatible in BS glasses. Such problematic wastes can be pre-processed and/or diluted to compensate for their incompatibility with a BS glass matrix, but both of these solutions increases the wasteform volume and the overall cost for vitrification. Direct vitrification using alternative glasses that utilize the major components already present in the waste is preferable, since it avoids pre-treating or diluting the waste, and, thus, minimizes the wasteform volume and overall cost.

  8. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  9. Follow that mercury!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linero, A.A.

    2008-07-01

    The article discusses one technology option for avoiding release of mercury captured by power plant pollution control equipment in order to render it usable in concrete. This is the use of selective catalytic reduction for NOx control and lime spray dryer absorbers (SDA) for SO{sub 2} control prior to particulate collection by fabric filters. In this scenario all mercury removed is trapped in the fabric filter baghouse. The US EPA did not establish mercury emission limits for existing cement plants in the latest regulation 40 CFR 63, Subpart LLL (December 2006) and was sued by the Portland Cement Association because of the Hg limits established for new kilns and by several states and environmental groups for the lack of limits on existing ones. A full version of this article is available on www.acaa-usa.org/AshatWork.htm. 2 figs.

  10. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  11. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, D.A.; Farthing, G.A.

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse. 5 figs.

  12. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, OH)

    1998-09-29

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  13. Flue gas desulfurization method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Canfield, OH); Farthing, George A. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    1998-08-18

    A combined furnace limestone injection and dry scrubber flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system collects solids from the flue gas stream in first particulate collection device located downstream of an outlet of a convection pass of the furnace and upstream of the dry scrubber. The collected solids are diverted to the dry scrubber feed slurry preparation system to increase sulfur oxide species removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The level of lime in the feed slurry provided to the dry scrubber is thus increased, which enhances removal of sulfur oxide species in the dry scrubber. The decreased particulate loading to the dry scrubber helps maintain a desired degree of free moisture in the flue gas stream entering the dry scrubber, which enhances sulfur oxide species removal both in the dry scrubber and downstream particulate collector, normally a baghouse.

  14. Cotton gin trash incinerator-air heat project. Consultant report (final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The California Energy Commission has funded the final phase of a four year project resulting in development of a successful system for burning cotton gin trash as a fuel providing the heat for ginning. The incinerator - air heater system installed in Corcoran, California operates continuously throughout the ginning season. Trash feeding and burning rate is automatically controlled from the combustion temperature, hot air temperature is controlled by the drying needs, and ashes are automatically removed from the system and pneumatically conveyed to the disposal site. The system complies with state and county air pollution codes by means of baghouse collectors. Savings in fossil fuel and trash disposal costs have demonstrated the equipment system is feasible for a four year payback at large, well utilized gins.

  15. LANL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shake, Rattle, and Roll Los Alamos scientists analyze North Korea's recent "hydrogen bomb" test to determine the details-location, yield, and type-of the explosion. Around 10 a.m. Pyongyang Time on Wednesday, January 6, 2016, seismic analysts around the world picked up something unusual-a 5.1-magnitude seismic event in the northeast corner of North Korea. Earthquakes of this size aren't common on the Korean Peninsula, which likely meant the violent shaking was caused by something else:

  16. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. I. Theoretical model applied to the interpretation of experimental results on H{sub 2}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carniato, S. Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; itnik, M.; Bu?ar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-07

    We present in detail a theoretical model that provides absolute cross sections for simultaneous core-ionization core-excitation (K{sup ?2}V ) and compare its predictions with experimental results obtained on the water molecule after photoionization by synchrotron radiation. Two resonances of different symmetries are assigned in the main K{sup ?2}V peak and comparable contributions from monopolar (direct shake-up) and dipolar (conjugate shake-up) core-valence excitations are identified. The main peak is observed with a much greater width than the total experimental resolution. This broadening is the signature of nuclear dynamics.

  17. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Shake Rattle and Roll! The Science of Earthquakes by Kate Bannan on Thu, Aug 25, 2011 A rare, powerful 5.8-magnitude earthquake shook the East Coast United States on August 23. Damage was light, but millions of people were surprised and unnerved by the event. The earthquake occurred near Mineral, Virginia, about 100 miles southwest of Washington, DC. It was a shallow earthquake, and shaking was recorded all along the Appalachians,

  18. Fun with Big Sky Learning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big Sky Learning WHEN: Mar 21, 2015 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, New Mexico, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Big Sky Learning Event Description Bring your kids and teens to the museum for an afternoon of "maker-space" activities with Big Sky Learning. Participants will be able to: Build their own Shake Bot-a small simple robot that shakes-and take

  19. Ferroelectric, piezoelectric, and dielectric properties of BiScO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3}-Pb(Cd{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} ternary high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Tianlong; Chen Jianguo; Dong Shuxiang; Wang Chunming; Yu Yang

    2013-07-14

    (0.95-x)BiScO{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3}-0.05Pb(Cd{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} (BS-xPT-PCN) high temperature piezoelectric ceramics near the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) have been synthesized by traditional solid-state reaction methods. The microstructural morphology, phase structure, and electrical properties of BS-xPT-PCN ceramics were investigated in detail. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated BS-xPT-PCN ceramics have a pure perovskite structure. The coexistence of rhombohedral and tetragonal phases at MPB composition enhanced the polarizability by the coupling between two dynamically equivalent energy states, resulting in the improved piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties at MPB vicinity. The BS-xPT-PCN (x = 0.60) ceramics possess the optimal piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties with d{sub 33} = 505pC/N, k{sub p} = 55.9%, k{sub t} = 36.5%, strain = 0.23% (under the electric field 37.5 kV/cm), and P{sub r} = 39.7 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}. High temperature dielectric behaviors showed diffuse phase transition in BS-xPT-PCN ceramics. The Curie temperature T{sub c} was found to increase from 371 Degree-Sign C to 414 Degree-Sign C with x increasing from 0.58 to 0.62. All these results together with the good thermal stabilities make the BS-xPT-PCN ceramics promising candidates for high temperature piezoelectric applications.

  20. untitled

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ac cc co om mp plliis sh hm me en nt ts s A Ac cc co om mp plliis sh hm me en nt ts s 2 20 00 06 6 2 20 00 06 6 F Fe eb br ru ua ar ry y * * 2 20 00 06 6 THE LITTLE ROBOT THAT COULD . . . Meet the Sandia robot that helped secure a radiation source at White Sands Missile Range. Details on page 5. L La ab bs s L La ab bs s Sandia National Laboratories W elcome to this year's edition of the annual Lab News Labs Accomplishments. Throughout this 16-page document, you'll find a resounding affirmation

  1. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; et al

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tiermore » 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.« less

  2. Nicholas J. Grundl | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nicholas J. Grundl Process Engineer Nicholas.Grundl@nrel.gov | 303-275-3228 Research Interests Application of numerical methods to process problems Fuel and chemical production from biomass feedstocks Biochemical conversion of feedstocks Affiliated Research Programs Algal biofuels techno-economic analysis (contributor) Biochemical platform analysis (contributor) Thermochemical platform analysis (contributor) Education B.S., Chemical and Biological Engineering (special emphasis on biochemistry

  3. SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 8019 -Greven 8019 -Greven 8019 -Greven 2679 -Que 2679 -Que 8831E-Latimer *1E59 -Shafer *1E59 -Shafer *1E59 -Shafer *1E59 -Shafer 7-3 Wig-Side 2679 -Que Change>8831E B-S24>S21 ...

  4. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-20

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  5. Strain-Specific V3 and CD4 Binding Site Autologous HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies Select Neutralization-Resistant Viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moody, M.  Anthony; Gao, Feng; Gurley, Thaddeus  C.; Amos, Joshua  D.; Kumar, Amit; Hora, Bhavna; Marshall, Dawn  J.; Whitesides, John  F.; Xia, Shi-Mao; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey  E.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Lu, Xiaozhi; Bonsignori, Mattia; Finzi, Andrés; Vandergrift, Nathan  A.; Alam, S.  Munir; Ferrari, Guido; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia  D.; Kamanga, Gift; Cohen, Myron  S.; Sam, Noel  E.; Kapiga, Saidi; Gray, Elin S.; Tumba, Nancy  L.; Morris, Lynn; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Gorny, Miroslaw  K.; Mascola, John  R.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George  M.; Sodroski, Joseph  G.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Montefiori, David C.; Hraber, Peter T.; Korber, Bette T.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-09-09

    The third variable (V3) loop and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of the viral envelope are frequently targeted by neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. In chronic infection, virus escape mutants repopulate the plasma and V3 and CD4bs nAbs emerge that can neutralize heterologous tier 1 easy-to-neutralize, but not tier 2 difficult-to-neutralize HIV-1 isolates. However, neutralization sensitivity of autologous plasma viruses to this type of nAb response has not been studied. We describe the development and evolution in vivo of antibodies distinguished by their target specificity for V3and CD4bs epitopes on autologous tier 2 viruses but not on heterologous tier 2 viruses. A surprisingly high fraction of autologous circulating viruses was sensitive to these antibodies. These findings demonstrate a role for V3 and CD4bs antibodies in constraining the native envelope trimer in vivo to a neutralization-resistant phenotype, explaining why HIV-1 transmission generally occurs by tier 2 neutralization-resistant viruses.

  6. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creutz, E.C.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Weinberg, A.M.; Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1959-10-27

    BS>A reactor cooled by water, biphenyl, helium, or other fluid with provision made for replacing the fuel rods with the highest plutonium and fission product content without disassembling the entire core and for promptly cooling the rods after their replacement in order to prevent build-up of heat from fission product activity is described.

  7. FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, J.S.

    1959-12-01

    BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

  8. Catherine DeBlase > Graduate Student - Dichtel Group > Researchers,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Postdocs & Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Catherine DeBlase Graduate Student - Dichtel Group crd93@cornell.edu Cathy joined Cornell in 2011 after receiving her BS in Chemistry from Marist College. Her current research focus is rational design and synthesis of structurally precise polymeric materials for energy storage devices.

  9. Measurement of branching ratio and B0s lifetime in the decay B0s → J/ψ f0(980) at CDF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-09-30

    We present a study of Bs0 decays to the CP-odd final state J/ψ f0(980) with J/ψ → µ+µ- and f0(980) → π+π-. Using pp̄ collision data with an integrated luminosity of 3.8 fb-1 collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron we measure a Bs0 lifetime of τ(B0s → J/ψ f0(980)) = 1.70-0.11+0.12(stat) ± 0.03(syst) ps. This is the first measurement of the Bs0} lifetime in a decay to a CP eigenstate and corresponds in the standard model to the lifetime of the heavy Bs0 eigenstate. We also measure the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψ f0(980)more » and f0(980) → π+π- relative to the product of branching fractions of B0s → J/ψφ and φ→K+K- to be Rf0/ψ = 0.257 ± 0.020(stat) ± 0.014(syst), which is the most precise determination of this quantity to date.« less

  10. NEW METHOD OF GRAPHITE PREPARATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, S.D.; Harper, W.T.

    1961-08-29

    BS>A method is described for producing graphite objects comprising mixing coal tar pitch, carbon black, and a material selected from the class comprising raw coke, calcined coke, and graphite flour. The mixture is placed in a graphite mold, pressurized to at least 1200 psi, and baked and graphitized by heating to about 2500 deg C while maintaining such pressure. (AEC)

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - rf_5year_review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N 3, I non 100%, I BS 70%, H 89 2.5, for t pulse > t LR . BPX: demonstrate the viability of high performance plasmas, B T 8T, I p 2 MA, P 6 MW, H 89 2, Z eff <...

  12. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  13. Combined processing of coal and heavy resids. Final report, July 1982-January 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, C.W.; Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    The results from this report are summarized on Tables 47, 48 and 49. These results are presented in terms of the average values obtained from the experiments performed and present a good overview of the results obtained. The addition of catalyst in the residuum upgrading reactions increased the amount of PS (pentane-solubles) production achieved and, in the case of NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, substantially increased the IOM formed. The presence of TET (tetralin) had varying effect; but only in the reaction with NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ did TET improve the PS production. In all upgrading reactions, the BS fraction was reduced during the reaction forming both lighter and heavier products. The catalytic reactions with NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and Mo naphthenate at 425/sup 0/C reduced the BS (benzene-soluble) fraction the most. The combination of TET plus NiMo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ resulted in the greatest reduction of the BS fraction and subsequent increase in the PS fraction. In the coprocessing experiments, both the addition of catalyst and the addition of TET promoted coal conversion. Coal conversion in coprocessing appears to be dependent upon both catalyst and hydrogen donation except in the case of a highly active catalyst where catalytic activity predominates. TET did not promote the production of PS materials in either the thermal or catalytic reactions. The effect of TET and catalytic treatment on BS production is also instructive in examining the roles and relative importance of these two factors in coprocessing. Since all of these reactions showed positive oil production, the increases observed in the BS production were directly related to the upgrading of liquefied coal to BS products. Thus, the presence of TET assisted in the production of BS but not in the production of PS. The presence of a hydrotreating catalyst was required for PS production in the copressing reactions. Appendices A, B and C have been entered separately into EDB and ERA.

  14. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Mike J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang; Jill M. Zola

    2004-02-01

    North Dakota lignite-fired power plants have shown a limited ability to control mercury emissions in currently installed electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), dry scrubbers, and wet scrubbers (1). This low level of control can be attributed to the high proportions of Hg{sup 0} present in the flue gas. Speciation of Hg in flue gases analyzed as part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) information collection request (ICR) for Hg data showed that Hg{sup 0} ranged from 56% to 96% and oxidized mercury ranged from 4% to 44%. The Hg emitted from power plants firing North Dakota lignites ranged from 45% to 91% of the total Hg, with the emitted Hg being greater than 85% elemental. The higher levels of oxidized mercury were only found in a fluidized-bed combustion system. Typically, the form of Hg in the pulverized and cyclone-fired units was dominated by Hg{sup 0} at greater than 85%, and the average amount of Hg{sup 0} emitted from North Dakota power plants was 6.7 lb/TBtu (1, 2). The overall objective of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project is to develop and evaluate advanced and innovative concepts for controlling Hg emissions from North Dakota lignite-fired power plants by 50%-90% at costs of one-half to three-fourths of current estimated costs. The specific objectives are focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in wet and dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in ESPs and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The scientific approach to solving the problems associated with controlling Hg emissions from lignite-fired power plants involves conducting testing of the following processes and technologies that have shown promise on a bench, pilot, or field scale: (1) activated carbon injection (ACI) upstream of an ESP combined with sorbent enhancement, (2) Hg oxidation and control using wet and dry scrubbers, (3) enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel (TDF) and oxidizing catalysts, and (4) testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter insert.

  15. WERF MACT Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Bonnema; D. Moser; J. Riedesel; K. Kooda; K. Liekhus; K. Rebish; S. Poling

    1998-11-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the technical feasibility of upgrading the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory to meet the offgas emission limits proposed in the Maximum Achievable Control Technologies (MACT)rule. Four practicable offgas treatment processes were identified, which, if installed, would enable the WERF to meet the anticipated MACT emission limits for dioxins and furans (D/F), hydrochloric acid (HCI), and mercury (Hg). Due to the three-year time restraint for MACT compliance, any technology chosen for the upgrade must be performed within the general plant project funding limit of $5 M. The option selected consists of a partial-quench evaporative cooler with dry sorbent injection for HCI removal followed by a sulfur-impregnated activated carbon bed for Hg control. The planning cost estimate for implementing the option is $4.17 M (with 24% contingency). The total estimated cost includes capital costs, design and construction costs, and project management costs. Capital costs include the purchase of a new offgas evaporative cooler, a dry sorbent injection system with reagent storage, a new fabric filter baghouse, a fixed carbon bed absorber, and two offgas induced draft exhaust fans. It is estimated that 21 months will be required to complete the recommended modification to the WERF. The partial-quench cooler is designed to rapidly cool the offgas exiting the secondary combustion chamber to minimize D/F formation. Dry sorbent injection of an alkali reagent into the offgas is recommended. The alkali reacts with the HCI to form a salt, which is captured with the fly ash in the baghouse. A design HCI removal efficiency of 97.2% allows for the feeding 20 lbs/hr of chlorine to the WERF incinerator. The sorbent feed rate can be adjusted to achieve the desired HCI removal efficiency. A fixed bed of sulfur-impregnated carbon was conservatively sized for a total Hg removal capacity when feeding 10 g/hr Hg to the WERF incinerator. An added benefit for using carbon adsorption is that the activated carbon will also capture a large fraction of any residual D/F present in the offgas.

  16. Toxecon Retrofit for Mercury and Mulit-Pollutant Control on Three 90-MW Coal-Fired Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Derenne; Robin Stewart

    2009-09-30

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) project was based on a cooperative agreement between We Energies and the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to design, install, evaluate, and demonstrate the EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} air pollution control process. Project partners included Cummins & Barnard, ADA-ES, and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The primary goal of this project was to reduce mercury emissions from three 90-MW units that burn Powder River Basin coal at the We Energies Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Michigan. Additional goals were to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and particulate matter emissions; allow reuse and sale of fly ash; advance commercialization of the technology; demonstrate a reliable mercury continuous emission monitor (CEM) suitable for use at power plants; and demonstrate recovery of mercury from the sorbent. Mercury was controlled by injection of activated carbon upstream of the TOXECON{trademark} baghouse, which achieved more than 90% removal on average over a 44-month period. During a two-week test involving trona injection, SO{sub 2} emissions were reduced by 70%, although no coincident removal of NOx was achieved. The TOXECON{trademark} baghouse also provided enhanced particulate control, particularly during startup of the boilers. On this project, mercury CEMs were developed and tested in collaboration with Thermo Fisher Scientific, resulting in a reliable CEM that could be used in the power plant environment and that could measure mercury as low as 0.1 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Sorbents were injected downstream of the primary particulate collection device, allowing for continued sale and beneficial use of captured fly ash. Two methods for recovering mercury using thermal desorption on the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture were successfully tested during this program. Two methods for using the TOXECON{trademark} PAC/ash mixture in structural concrete were also successfully developed and tested. This project demonstrated a significant reduction in the rate of emissions from Presque Isle Units 7, 8, and 9, and substantial progress toward establishing the design criteria for one of the most promising mercury control retrofit technologies currently available. The Levelized Cost for 90% mercury removal at this site was calculated at $77,031 per pound of mercury removed with a capital cost of $63,189 per pound of mercury removed. Mercury removal at the Presque Isle Power Plant averages approximately 97 pounds per year.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site seismic safety program: summary of findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheimer, J.F.

    1985-07-01

    This report summarizes the final assessments of geologic hazards at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Detailed discussions of investigations are documented in a series of reports produced by LLNL's Site Seismic Safety Program and their consultants. The Program conducted a probabilistic assessment of hazards at the site as a result of liquefaction, landslide, and strong ground shaking, using existing models to explicitly treat uncertainties. The results indicate that the Greenville and Las Positas-Verona Fault systems present the greatest hazard to the LLNL site as a result of ground shaking, with a lesser contribution from the Calaveras Fault. Other, more distant fault systems do not materially contribute to the hazard. No evidence has been found that the LLNL site will undergo soil failures such as landslides or liquefaction. In addition, because of the locations and ages of the faults in the LLNL area, surface ground rupture during an earthquake is extremely unlikely.

  18. NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesJune2011.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 NERSC Science Highlights NERSC Scientific Accomplishments, Q2CY2011 2 Energy Resources NERSC users have explained the cause of LED droop; this may lead to less-expensive higher efficiency LED lighting. (Kioupakis / Van de Walle, UC SB) Fusion Energy Magnetic reconnection simulations done at NERSC along with NASA Voyager probe data help shake up prevailing views of the solar system's outer reaches. (J. Drake, U. Maryland) Nuclear Theory Computations done primarily at NERSC suggest the possible

  19. National Security Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science National Security Science Latest Issue:April 2016 past issues All Issues » submit National Security Science Showcasing Los Alamos National Laboratory's work on nuclear weapons and in science for national and global security April 2016 july 2015 The Hurt-Locker School Explosive Results Questing for the Holy Grail of High Explosives Learning from (Near) Disaster A Safer Liftoff Shake, Rattle, and Roll Manhattan Project National Historical Park Strategic Deterrent Forces Charting a

  20. Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg Publications Los Alamos publications demonstrate the Lab's enduring commitment to researching and applying the best science, engineering and technology in order to meet the challenges facing our country and society in the 21st century. NSS april 2016 1663 NEW ISSUE Nss: April 2016 Welcome to this issue The Hurt-Locker School Explosive Results Questing for the Holy Grail of High Explosives Learning from (Near) Disaster A Safer Liftoff Shake,

  1. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nonlinear Shake Table Control Collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff Assistant Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505) 665-8899 Email UCSD Faculty and Graduate Students Professor Miroslav Krstic , Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

  2. Xenon monitoring and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, Theodore W.

    2014-05-09

    How do you monitor (verify) a CTBT? It is a difficult challenge to monitor the entire world for nuclear tests, regardless of size. Nuclear tests 'normally' occur underground, above ground or underwater. Setting aside very small tests (let's limit our thinking to 1 kiloton or more), nuclear tests shake the ground, emit large amounts of radioactivity, and make loud noises if in the atmosphere (or hydroacoustic waves if underwater)

  3. A comparative theoretical study on core-hole excitation spectra of azafullerene and its derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Yunfeng; Department of Physics, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 ; Gao, Bin; Centre for Theoretical and Computational Chemistry , Department of Chemistry, University of Tromsø—The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037 Tromsø ; Deng, Mingsen; Luo, Yi; Department of Theoretical Chemistry, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm

    2014-03-28

    The core-hole excitation spectra—near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shake-up satellites have been simulated at the level of density functional theory for the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its derivatives (C{sub 59}N){sup +}, C{sub 59}HN, (C{sub 59}N){sub 2}, and C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60}, in which the XPS shake-up satellites were simulated using our developed equivalent core hole Kohn-Sham (ECH-KS) density functional theory approach [B. Gao, Z. Wu, and Y. Luo, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 234704 (2008)] which aims for the study of XPS shake-up satellites of large-scale molecules. Our calculated spectra are generally in good agreement with available experimental results that validates the use of the ECH-KS method in the present work. The nitrogen K-edge NEXAFS, XES, and XPS shake-up satellites spectra in general can be used as fingerprints to distinguish the azafullerene C{sub 59}N and its different derivatives. Meanwhile, different carbon K-edge spectra could also provide detailed information of (local) electronic structures of different molecules. In particular, a peak (at around 284.5 eV) in the carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectrum of the heterodimer C{sub 59}N–C{sub 60} is confirmed to be related to the electron transfer from the C{sub 59}N part to the C{sub 60} part in this charge-transfer complex.

  4. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shaking Things Up-What Triggers Atmospheric Convection in the West African Sahel? Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Couvreux F, C Rio, F Guichard, M Lothon, G Canut, D Bouniol, and A Gounou. 2012. "Initiation of daytime local convection in a semi-arid region analysed with high-resolution simulations and AMMA observations." Quarterly

  5. Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay of Materials Synthesis and Integrated Devices (MPA-11) received the honorary title of Professor in Chemistry from Poland's President Bronisław Komorowski during a June 23 ceremony at the Presidential Palace in Warsaw. October 8, 2015 Zelenay receives professorship in chemistry from president of Poland Piotr Zelenay, right, shakes hands with

  6. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    22nd Session Presentations | Department of Energy Session Presentations October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting - Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations Presentations from the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting - Wednesday, October 22nd Session Presentations Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at

  7. Precarious Rock Methodology for Seismic Hazard: Physical Testing, Numerical Modeling and Coherence Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anooshehpoor, Rasool; Purvance, Matthew D.; Brune, James N.; Preston, Leiph A.; Anderson, John G.; Smith, Kenneth D.

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the following projects: Shake table tests of precarious rock methodology, field tests of precarious rocks at Yucca Mountain and comparison of the results with PSHA predictions, study of the coherence of the wave field in the ESF, and a limited survey of precarious rocks south of the proposed repository footprint. A series of shake table experiments have been carried out at the University of Nevada, Reno Large Scale Structures Laboratory. The bulk of the experiments involved scaling acceleration time histories (uniaxial forcing) from 0.1g to the point where the objects on the shake table overturned a specified number of times. The results of these experiments have been compared with numerical overturning predictions. Numerical predictions for toppling of large objects with simple contact conditions (e.g., I-beams with sharp basal edges) agree well with shake-table results. The numerical model slightly underpredicts the overturning of small rectangular blocks. It overpredicts the overturning PGA for asymmetric granite boulders with complex basal contact conditions. In general the results confirm the approximate predictions of previous studies. Field testing of several rocks at Yucca Mountain has approximately confirmed the preliminary results from previous studies, suggesting that he PSHA predictions are too high, possibly because the uncertainty in the mean of the attenuation relations. Study of the coherence of wavefields in the ESF has provided results which will be very important in design of the canisters distribution, in particular a preliminary estimate of the wavelengths at which the wavefields become incoherent. No evidence was found for extreme focusing by lens-like inhomogeneities. A limited survey for precarious rocks confirmed that they extend south of the repository, and one of these has been field tested.

  8. Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the behavior and failure mode of common joints under extreme lateral loads * Static and shake table tests conducted of pressurized - Threaded, - Brazed, - Mechanical joints Static Testing o Pressurized spool to 150 psi o Steady downward force applied while recording deflections o Grooved clamped mech. joints * 16 tests

  9. Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Algal Biofuels Research Laboratory Enabling fundamental understanding of algal biology and composition of algal biomass to help develop superior bioenergy strains NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL's algal biofuels research capabilities include: * Growth platforms from 0.2 mL to 270 L scale in multi- well plates, shake flasks, photobioreactors, and open ponds

  10. Comparative study of Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) transportation alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    WIPP transportation studies in the Final Supplement Environmental Impact Statement for WIPP are the baseline for this report. In an attempt to present the most current analysis, this study incorporates the most relevant data available. The following three transportation options are evaluated for the Disposal Phase, which is assumed to be 20 years: Truck shipments, consisting of a tractor and trailer, with three TRUPACT-IIs or one RH-72B; Regular commercial train shipments consisting of up to three railcars carrying up to 18 TRUPACT-IIs or up to six RH-72Bs; Dedicated train shipments consisting of a locomotive, an idle car, railcars carrying 18 TRUPACT-IIs or six RH-72Bs, another idle car, and a caboose or passenger car with an emergency response specialist. No other cargo is carried. This report includes: A consideration of occupational and public risks and exposures, and other environmental impacts; A consideration of emergency response capabilities; and An extimation of comparative costs.

  11. Growth of tapered silica nanowires with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber: Growth mechanism and structural and optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Danqing; Zhang, Xi Wei, Jianglin; Gu, Gangxu; Xiang, Gang

    2015-04-28

    Traditional chemical vapor deposition method modified with a shallow U-shaped vapor chamber has been used to synthesize tapered bamboo shoot-like (BS-like) amorphous SiO{sub 2} nanowires (NWs) on Si (100) substrates without catalyst. The key innovation of this approach lies in a creation of swirling flow of the reactant vapors during the growth, which leads to a harvest of tapered silica NWs with lengths up to several microns. The unique structures and corresponding luminescence properties of the BS-like NWs were studied and their relationship with the evaporated active reactants was explored. A thermodynamic model that considers the critical role of the vapor flow during the growth is proposed to understand the structural and optical features. The shallow U-shaped vapor chamber-aided approach may provide a viable way to tailor novel structure of NWs for potential applications in nano-devices.

  12. An efficient process for recovery of fine coal from tailings of coal washing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicek, T.; Cocen, I.; Engin, V.T.; Cengizler, H.

    2008-07-01

    Gravity concentration of hard lignites using conventional jigs and heavy media separation equipment is prone to produce coal-rich fine tailings. This study aims to establish a fine coal recovery process of very high efficiency at reasonable capital investment and operational costs. The technical feasibility to upgrade the properties of the predeslimed fine refuse of a lignite washing plant with 35.9% ash content was investigated by employing gravity separation methods. The laboratory tests carried out with the combination of shaking table and Mozley multi-gravity separator (MGS) revealed that the clean coal with 18% ash content on dry basis could be obtained with 58.9% clean coal recovery by the shaking table stage and 4.1% clean coal recovery by MGS stage, totaling to the sum of 63.0% clean coal recovery from a predeslimed feed. The combustible recovery and the organic efficiency of the shaking table + MGS combination were 79.5% and 95.5%, respectively. Based on the results of the study, a flow sheet of a high-efficiency fine coal recovery process was proposed, which is also applicable to the coal refuse pond slurry of a lignite washing plant.

  13. Earthquake design criteria for small hydro projects in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, P.P.; McCandless, D.H.; Asce, M.

    1995-12-31

    The definition of the seismic environment and seismic design criteria of more than twenty small hydro projects in the northern part of the island of Luzon in the Philippines took a special urgency on the wake of the Magnitude 7.7 earthquake that shook the island on July 17, 1990. The paper describes the approach followed to determine design shaking level criteria at each hydro site consistent with the seismic environment estimated at that same site. The approach consisted of three steps: (1) Seismicity: understanding the mechanisms and tectonic features susceptible to generate seismicity and estimating the associated seismicity levels, (2) Seismic Hazard: in the absence of an accurate historical record, using statistics to determine the expected level of ground shaking at a site during the operational 100-year design life of each Project, and (3) Criteria Selection: finally and most importantly, exercising judgment in estimating the final proposed level of shaking at each site. The resulting characteristics of estimated seismicity and seismic hazard and the proposed final earthquake design criteria are provided.

  14. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alex Weber-Bargioni Weber-Bargioni Staff Scientist, Imaging and Manipulation of Nanostructures afweber-bargioni@lbl.gov 510.486.4026 personal website Biography Education University of Konstanz, Germany Physics B.S., 2001 Portland State University Physics M.S., 2003 University of British Columbia Physics Ph.D., 2007 Lawrence Berkeley Nat. Lab Material Science PostDoc 2008-2010 Research Interests Dr. Weber-Bargioni's research revolves around understanding fundamental opto electronic processes at

  15. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chengyu Song Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, NCEM csong@lbl.gov 510.486.6751 Biography Education B.S. in Materials Science, Zhejiang University, China M.S. in high Tc superconductor structure and property, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Expertise Technical support for TEAM microscopes, Tecnai, CM300, and CM200. Secondary support for Titan-X, 3010, FIB, and specimen preparation. High resolution TEM and STEM, mono-chromated EELS, image and probe aberration

  16. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peter Ercius Staff Scientist, NCEM percius@lbl.gov 510.486.4634 Biography Peter Ercius graduated from Cornell University with a B.S. in applied and engineering physics in 2003. He remained at Cornell and completed a Ph.D. in applied and engineering physics with Professor David Muller in 2009. His dissertation project involved three-dimensional imaging of semiconductor devices using STEM. He then joined NCEM as a collaborative postdoctoral researcher for 2 years to implement electron tomography

  17. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ron Zuckermann Ron Zuckermann Facility Director, Biological Nanostructures User Program Senior Advisor rnzuckermann@lbl.gov 510.486.7091 personal website Biography Education Ph.D. Chemistry, UC Berkeley, 1989. Advisor: Prof. Peter Schultz B.S. Chemistry, Harvey Mudd College, 1984 Past professional positions 2003 - 2005 Research Fellow, Chiron Corp. 1996 - 2003 Director of Bioorganic Chemistry, Chiron Corp. 1993 - 1996 Associate Director, Bioorganic Chemistry, Chiron Corp. 1991 - 1993 Sr.

  18. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teresa Williams Williams Principal Scientific Engineering Associate, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis TEWilliams@lbl.gov 510.486.6671 Biography Teresa Williams received a BS in Chemistry from UC Davis in 2001 and earned an MS in Applied Science and Technology from UC Berkeley in 2014 while she continues to work towards her PhD. Teresa joined the Organic Facility at the Foundry in 2007 after spending six years as a medicinal chemist working on oncology targets at Chiron/Novartis in

  19. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tevye Kuykendall Klivansky Principal Scientific Engineering Associate, Organic and Macromolecular Synthesis TRKuykendall@lbl.gov 510.495.2649 Biography Education Postdoctoral Fellow, University of California, Berkeley, 2008 Ph.D. in Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, 2007 B.S. in Chemistry, University of California, Santa Cruz, 2000 Expertise Tevye Kuykendall is an expert in the field of III-V nanowire growth and characterization. His work concentrates on the synthesis and

  20. Molecular Foundry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracy Mattox TMMattox Senior Scientific Engineering Associate, Inorganic Nanostructures TMMattox@lbl.gov 510.495.2649 Biography Education M.S. in Chemistry, Miami University, 2006 B.S. in Chemistry, University of Portland, 2003 Tracy Mattox has been a member of the Inorganic Facility at the Molecular Foundry as a Scientific Engineering Associate since 2007. Expertise Tracy's main focus is assisting users with their research projects (helping design reactions and analyze results). She is well

  1. Vitali Morozov | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vitali Morozov Principal Application Performance Engineer Vitali Morozov Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 1127 Argonne, IL 60439 630 252-7068 morozov@anl.gov Vitali Morozov is a Principal Application Performance Engineer at the ALCF. He received his B.S. in Mathematics from Novosibirsk State University, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Ershov's Institute for Informatics Systems, Novosibirsk, Russia. At Argonne since 2001, he has been working on computer

  2. Burton Richter, Storage Rings, and the J/psi Particle

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Burton Richter, Storage Rings, and the J/psi Particle Resources with Additional Information * Honors * Interviews Burton Richter Credit: P.A. Moore, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory "After receiving his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology [MIT] in 1952 and 1956, respectively, [Burton Richter] accepted a post-doctoral position at Stanford University's High Energy Physics Laboratory. There he was seized with the idea to test the accepted theory of Quantum

  3. James Cronin, CP Violation, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    James Cronin, CP Violation and the Pierre Auger Observatory Resources with Additional Information James Cronin Courtesy Brookhaven National Laboratory James Watson Cronin "received his B.S. degree from Southern Methodist University in 1951. He then attended the University of Chicago for graduate school, earning his M.S. in 1953 and his Ph.D. in 1955. He began his scientific career at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he served as an assistant physicist from 1955 to 1958. Cronin joined

  4. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Bio-Oil Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 David Dayton, Ph.D. RTI International Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Dr. David C. Dayton Director, Chemistry and Biofuels Center for Energy Technology RTI International 2007 - present RTI International 1993 - 2007 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1991-1993 U.S. Army Research Laboratory * Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2000 * B.S., Biochemistry, cum laude, Washington

  5. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Bio-Oil Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 Doug C. Elliott PNNL Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Douglas C. Elliott Laboratory Fellow Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1974 - present PNNL B.S. in Chemistry from Montana State University M.B.A. in Operations and Systems Analysis from the University of Washington  Over 37 years of project management and research experience in biomass thermochemical conversion R&D involving biomass liquefaction and bio-oil

  6. Conversion Technologies for Advanced Biofuels … Carbohydrates Upgrading

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading Report-Out Webinar February 9, 2012 Ellen Panisko, Ph.D. PNNL Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov 2 Dr. Ellen Panisko Senior Research Scientist Chemical and Biological Process Development Group Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2002 - present Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2001 - 2002 Phytagenics Ph.D., Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 2000 B.S., Biochemistry, Washington State University, 1995  Current work

  7. Women @ Energy: Rachel Segalman | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rachel Segalman Women @ Energy: Rachel Segalman March 13, 2013 - 5:38pm Addthis Women @ Energy: Rachel Segalman Dr. Rachel Segalman is currently an associate professor of Chemical Engineering at UC Berkeley and a faculty scientist in the Materials Science Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She received her BS in Chemical Engineering with highest honors from the University of Texas at Austin. She then performed her doctoral work in Chemical Engineering (polymer physics) at the

  8. J.-H. Kim and P. W. Terry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information J. Robert Schrieffer Courtesy of NHMFL Robert Schrieffer received his BS from M.I.T. in 1953 and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1957. Upon entering the University of Illinois, "he immediately began research with Professor John Bardeen. After working out a problem dealing with electrical conduction on semiconductor surfaces, Schrieffer spent a year in the laboratory, applying the

  9. JAMES J. SPIVEY J.M. Shivers Professor Department of Chemical Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JAMES J. SPIVEY J.M. Shivers Professor Department of Chemical Engineering Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA 70803 USA email: jjspivey@lsu.edu voice: 225-578-1426 fax: 225-578-1476 EDUCATION B.S., Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, 1972 M.S., Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University, 1974 Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, 1980 (Minor - Management) EXPERIENCE Jan 2003-present. Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA. J.M. Shivers

  10. Rami Hourani | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rami Hourani Previous Next List Hourani Rami Hourani Formerly: Postdoctoral Fellow, Materials Science & Engineering Department University of California, Berkeley Presently: Staff scientist, Intel PhD in Chemistry, McGill University BS (Honors) in Chemistry, McGill University EFRC research: Thin films containing sub-nanometer channels aligned normal to the surface constitute promising materials for selective separation and transport to meet growing demands

  11. Rebecca Siegelman | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rebecca Siegelman Previous Next List PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: rsiegelman [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3832 BS in Chemical Engineering, Columbia University EFRC Research The capture of carbon dioxide from point sources such as coal-fired power plants represents a promising approach to curb anthropogenic emissions. Currently, aqueous amine absorbers are used for this purpose, but their high regeneration

  12. Roberta Poloni | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Roberta Poloni Previous Next List Poloni Roberta Poloni Formerly: Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering University of California, Berkeley Presently: Postoctoral Researcher, Laboratoire de Science et Ingéniérie des Matériaux et Procédés, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, France Ph.D. in Physics, University of Lyon-1, France BS in Physics, Camerino, Italy EFRC research: Detailed studies on the CO2 locations in

  13. Seungkyu Lee | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Seungkyu Lee Previous Next List LeeS PhD student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: sk-lee [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-646-5440 MS in Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science & Technology BS in Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University EFRC Research Diverse functionalities can be introduced to metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Precise control of the functionalities in numbers and positions in the frameworks has potentials for a

  14. Shawn Darnall | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Shawn Darnall Previous Next List PhD Student Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Berkeley Email: smd74 [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-6804 BS in Materials Science & Engineering, Cornell University EFRC Research The main bottleneck of current polymeric membranes is simultaneously optimizing flux and selectivity for molecular separations. In the first phase of the CGS EFRC, research focused on creating a thin membrane

  15. Stephen Meckler | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Stephen Meckler Previous Next List Meckler PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: smmeckler@berkeley.edu Phone: 215-595-3952 BS in Chemistry, The Pennsylvania State University EFRC Research My research is aimed at understanding and controlling gas transport across hybrid polymer-porous crystal membranes in order to design more energy efficient gas separation devices. My goal is to synthesize ultrathin (sub-micron) films of

  16. Sudi Jawahery | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Sudi Jawahery Previous Next List Jawahery PhD Student Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering University of California, Berkeley Email: sjawahery@berkeley.edu Phone: 301-602-1644 BS in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park EFRC Research Information about the structural properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) is necessary in order to better understand their stability, flexibility and surface properties. In

  17. Tao Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blandine Jerome Tao Li Previous Next List Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Berkeley Email: taoli [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-6804 PhD in Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh BS in Chemistry, Fudan University EFRC research: By embedding inorganic particles in polymer matrices, the resulting mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) can potentially combine the benefits of both materials to simultaneously achieve high selectivity, high

  18. Thomas M. Osborn Popp | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Thomas M. Osborn Popp Previous Next List Popp.photo PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: tosbornp [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3073 BS in Chemistry, Arizona State University EFRC research: My research concerns the dynamics and behavior of adsorbates within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Specifically, I am interested in using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to probe the dynamics of molecules via relaxation

  19. Tomče Runčevski | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Tomče Runčevski Previous Next List Runchevski Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: runcevski@berkeley.edu Phone: 510-708-2455 PhD in Materials Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research and Stuttgart University, Germany BS and MS in Applied Chemistry, Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Macedonia EFRC Research Structural characterization of materials is the key step in understanding their

  20. The Savannah River Site is owned by the U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Steven Tibrea Savannah River National Laboratory The Ohio State University B.S. Electrical Engineering Mr. Tibrea is the Program Lead for developing industrial partner relationships and commercial programs with in the Advanced Manufacturing Collaborative. Steve has more than 33 years of technical and management experience in research, development, and engineering programs at the Savannah River Site. He most recently lead SRNL's Research and Development Engineering organization, which provided

  1. The U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program Publications and Presentations Resulting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program Publications and Presentations Resulting from DOE-Supported Methane Hydrate R&D 1999-2016 Including a Listing of DOE-Sponsored Student Researchers March 2016 U.S. DOE Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography Page 2 Table of Contents Section I: Documentation of Support for Education .................................................................................... 6 Undergraduate (B.S. and B.E.), Master of Science (M.S.), Doctoral (Ph.D.), and

  2. Peter St. John | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    St. John Peter St. John Postdoctoral Researcher, Systems Biology and Metabolic Engineering Peter.StJohn@nrel.gov | 303-275-4399 Education Peter St. John received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts University in 2010, followed by his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California at Santa Barbara in 2015. During his Ph.D., St. John applied techniques from systems biology and dynamic systems to understand the gene regulatory networks underlying mammalian circadian

  3. Xing Chen | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Xing Chen Principal Investigator and Group Leader - Nanostructured Materials Group Dr. Xing Chen is an Applications Scientist and group leader of the Nanostructured Materials Group in the Energy Systems Division at Argonne National Laboratory. Dr. Chen received his B.S. in Applied Physics from University of Science and Technology of China and Ph.D. in Physics from University of Delaware, and worked as a postdoctoral appointee at Argonne before promoted as a staff scientist. Dr. Chen has

  4. ______________________________________________________________________________

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E. Rhodes, Jr. - 1 CURRICULUM VITAE OLIN EUGENE RHODES, JR. Savannah River Ecology Lab Phone: (803) 725-8191 PO Drawer E Fax: (803) 725-3309 Aiken, South Carolina Email: rhodes@srel.uga.edu INTERESTS Wildlife Ecology; Human-Wildlife Conflicts; Applied Wildlife Genetics EDUCATION Ph.D. Wildlife Science 1991 Texas Tech University M.S. Wildlife Biology 1986 Clemson University B.S. Biology 1983 Furman University HONORS Fellow - The Wildlife Society (2015) North Central Section of TWS Professional

  5. Women @ Energy: Kristine Monteith | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kristine Monteith Women @ Energy: Kristine Monteith March 4, 2014 - 2:44pm Addthis Kristine Montheith is a computer scientist at Laurence Livermore National Laboratory. Photo from BYU News. Kristine Montheith is a computer scientist at Laurence Livermore National Laboratory. Photo from BYU News. Kristine Monteith completed a BS in Music Therapy at Utah State University and an MS and PhD in Computer Science at Brigham Young University. Her dissertation was titled "Automatic Generation of

  6. jonesll | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jonesll Ames Laboratory Profile Lawrence Jones Assoc Scientist Division of Materials Science & Engineering Facilities Services 121 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-5236 Email Address: jonesll@ameslab.gov Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Novel Materials Preparation & Processing Methodologies Education: M.S. Metallurgical Engineering, Iowa State University, 1985 B.S. Metallurgical Engineering, Iowa State University, 1983 Professional Appointments: Iowa State University; Ames

  7. jwang | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jwang Ames Laboratory Profile Jigang Wang Associate Division of Materials Science & Engineering B15 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-2964 Email Address: jgwang@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Metamaterials Education: Ph.D. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2005 M.S. Electrical Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, 2002 B.S. Physics, Jilin University, Changchun, P. R. China, 2000 Professional Appointments: Associate Scientist, Ames Laboratory, Iowa State

  8. PREPARATION OF ACTINIDE-ALUMINUM ALLOYS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, R.H.

    1962-09-01

    BS>A process is given for preparing alloys of aluminum with plutonium, uranium, and/or thorium by chlorinating actinide oxide dissolved in molten alkali metal chloride with hydrochloric acid, chlorine, and/or phosgene, adding aluminum metal, and passing air and/or water vapor through the mass. Actinide metal is formed and alloyed with the aluminum. After cooling to solidification, the alloy is separated from the salt. (AEC)

  9. Benjamin Richards > Member - Hanrath Group > Researchers, Postdocs &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Benjamin Richards Member - Hanrath Group btr22@cornell.edu Ben received his B.S. from Cornell University in 2011 and is now a nanoscience practitioner. After graduating from Cornell University, Ben received the unique opportunity to continue his undergraduate research-developing high-throughput Ge/Si nanowire synthesis processes. Originally, his research was solely intended to be implemented in battery applications; recently, he has

  10. Biography Francis D. Hansen (Frank)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Francis D. Hansen (Frank) Dr. Hansen holds a B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering and a Ph.D. in Geology/Tectonophysics. He has nearly 40 years of experience in repository sciences and has contributed significant original research in rock mechanics to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, helping reduce uncertainty in performance assessment with practical engineering and providing the bridge from science to compliance. His team developed the shaft seal system design and analysis. He provided leadership

  11. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows number of health physics degrees increased for graduates, decreased for undergraduates in 2010 Decreased number of B.S. degrees remains higher than levels in the early 2000 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 20, 2011 FY12-09 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of health physics graduate degrees increased for both master's and doctoral candidates in 2010, but decreased for bachelor's degrees, says a report released this year by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The ORISE report,

  12. Hydriding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  13. Joshua A Breslau | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joshua A Breslau Research Physicist, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Dr. Breslau is a research physicist in the Theory department at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). He received a B.S. in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.I.T.) in 1995 and a Ph.D. in plasma physics from Princeton in 2001. His doctoral research, with Dr. Stephen Jardin, involved a numerical study of fast collisionless magnetic reconnection in merging spheromaks and flux tubes with an original

  14. LA-UR-

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approved (or public release; distribution is unlimited. ~Alamos NATIONAL LABORATORY - - - - EST . 194J - - - Title: Calibrating the ChemCam LlBS for Carbonate Minerals on Mars Author(s): Nina Lanza Samuel M. Clegg Ann M. Ollila James E. Barefield Horton E. Newsom Roger C. Wiens and the ChemCam team Intended for: Applied Optics Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the National Nuclear Security

  15. Sherrell R. Greene | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sherrell R. Greene About Us Sherrell R. Greene - EMAB Board Member Sherrell Greene is the Founder and President of Advanced Technology Insights, LLC, (ATI) - a professional skills development, management and technical consulting firm. ATI provides technology assessment, systems analysis, personal coaching, and organizational training to individuals and organizations in the energy and environmental technology arenas. Mr. Greene received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Nuclear Engineering from the

  16. Doug Larson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doug Larson Doug Larson NIF Facility Manager and Chief Engineer, NIF & Photon Science NIF Facility Manager Doug Larson has nearly 30 years of experience in LLNL's fusion programs, including NIF technology development, Beamlet, Nova, and TMX. He received his B.S. degree from the University of New Mexico in electrical engineering in 1983. Previous positions have included project engineer for Beamlet, pulsed power engineer for Nova, Beamlet,and NIF, leadership of NIF line-replaceable unit

  17. METHOD OF SEPARATING PLUTONIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heal, H.G.

    1960-02-16

    BS>A method of separating plutonium from aqueous nitrate solutions of plutonium, uranium. and high beta activity fission products is given. The pH of the aqueous solution is adjusted between 3.0 to 6.0 with ammonium acetate, ferric nitrate is added, and the solution is heated to 80 to 100 deg C to selectively form a basic ferric plutonium-carrying precipitate.

  18. Dr. David Wilson | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Wilson About Us Dr. David Wilson - President, Morgan State University Dr. David Wilson Dr. David Wilson, the 10th inaugurated president of Morgan State University, has a long record of accomplishments and more than 30 years of experience in higher education administration. He holds four academic degrees: a B.S. in political science and an M.S. in education from Tuskegee University; a master's in educational planning and administration from Harvard University; and a doctorate in

  19. COAXIAL TUBE COUPLING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemoth, H.R.

    1963-02-26

    BS>This patent shows a device for quickly coupling coaxial tubes in metal-to-metal fashion, so as to be suitable for use in a nuclear reactor. A threaded coliar urges a tapered metal extension on the outer coaxial tube into a tapered seat in the device and simultaneously exerts pressure through a coaxial helical spring so that a similar extension on the inner tube seats in a similar seat near the other end. (AEC)

  20. Richard J. French, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard J. French Richard J. French, Ph.D. Senior Scientist Richard.French@nrel.gov | 303-384-6135 Research Interests Biomass thermal processing Hydrotreating Catalytic pyrolysis Steam reforming to hydrogen Gasification Bench-scale reactors Process monitoring Molecular beam mass spectrometry Molecular structure Instrumentation and controls Laboratory equipment design and construction Computer-aided design (CAD) Education Ph.D., Chemistry, Oregon State University B.S., Chemistry, Wheaton College

  1. Robert Howard Grubbs - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scintillation Counters Robert Hofstadter, Electron Scattering, the Structure of the Nucleons, and Scintillation Counters Resources with Additional Information * Patents After receiving a B.S. from The City College of New York in 1935, Robert Hofstadter completed his Ph.D. at Princeton University in 1938. He worked at the National Bureau of Standards during World War II and afterwards returned to Princeton, where, during the late 1940s, "he began serious studies of nuclear processes and

  2. Robert M. Baldwin | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    M. Baldwin Robert M. Baldwin Principal Scientist Robert.Baldwin@nrel.gov | 303-384-6858 Areas of Expertise Baldwin has extensive experience in catalysis, reaction engineering, biomass gasification, biomass liquefaction, upgrading of bio-oil, and advanced biofuels. Education Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Colorado School of Mines B.S., M.S., Chemical Engineering, Iowa State University Professional Experience Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Process R&D and Biorefinery Analysis, National

  3. Robert S. Nelson | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Nelson Robert S. Nelson Scientist II Robert.Nelson@nrel.gov | 303-275-3112 Areas of Expertise Robert S. Nelson has extensive experience working in academic and biopharmaceutical laboratories, developing analytical methods and processes for the production of recombinant proteins. His current work is focused on the biological conversion of lignocellulose to advanced biofuels and other bioproducts. He enjoys finding novel applications of biotechnology to solve problems. Education B.S.,

  4. NREL: Resource Assessment and Forecasting - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff NREL's resource assessment and forecasting research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo not available Linda Crow - Administrative Associate B.S. Environmental Studies, The Evergreen State College Linda currently works for the Resource Assessment and Forecasting group as their administrative support. She has worked with scientists at the Office of Science at the Air Force Academy and at

  5. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff NREL's transmission and grid integration research staff work to incorporate renewable energy into the transmission system primarily through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of Barbara O'Neill Barbara O'Neill, Transmission and Grid Integration Group Manager M.S., Energy Management and Policy, University of Pennsylvania Engineering Diploma, Petroleum Economics and Management, French Institute of Petroleum B.S., Electrical Engineering, Pratt Institute Barbara has a

  6. NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff Biographies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff Biographies Read more about the wind and water power research staff at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL. Sheri Anstedt Communications Specialist B.S. in English with a Professional Writing Emphasis, Carroll University 303-275-3255 (Mon/Fri: RSF); 303-384-7092 (Tues/Thurs: NWTC) sheri.anstedt@nrel.gov Sheri uses her extensive experience in communications to help facilitate NWTC publications through the NREL publishing process. Specifically, she is an editor,

  7. NREL: Distributed Grid Integration - Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Staff NREL's distributed grid integration research staff work to strengthen and diversify the electric power system through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of James Cale James Cale, Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group Manager Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Purdue University M.S., Electrical Engineering, Purdue University B.S., Electrical Engineering, MS&T Dr. James Cale is an expert in the field of power electronics and electrical machine modeling and

  8. A Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production by Robert H. Nelson B.S., University of California, Santa Barbara, 2003 A thesis submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School of the University of Colorado in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Physics 2010 This thesis entitled: A Measurement of Neutrino-Induced Charged-Current Neutral Pion Production written by Robert H. Nelson has been approved for the Department of Physics

  9. Microsoft Word - Scott-CV2013Sept.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2013 David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, S.C. 29802 Phone: 803-725-5747 E-mail: scott@srel.edu Fax: 803-725-3309 Education: 1979-1983 MS (Environmental Sciences) University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. 1973-1977 BS (Biology), Phi Beta Kappa, Magna cum laude Wofford College, Spartanburg, South Carolina. Employment: * 1984-present Research assistant in the herpetology program at SREL. Research responsibilities include the design and

  10. Microsoft Word - greeneCV.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CURRICULUM VITAE Judith L. Greene ADDRESS: Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P. O. Drawer E Aiken, SC 29802 Office Phone: (803) 725-5988 Email: jgreene@srel.edu PERSONAL: Born October 20, 1953, Augusta, GA Married, 1 child EDUCATION: B.S. in Biology, Furman University, 1975 EMPLOYMENT HISTORY: 1992-Present Research Coordinator, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 1976-1992 Research Technician, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC 1975-1976 Research Technician, Medical College of

  11. rshouk | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rshouk Ames Laboratory Profile Robert Houk Prof Chemical & Biological Sciences B27 Spedding Phone Number: 515-294-9462 Email Address: rshouk@iastate.edu Ames Laboratory Associate and Professor, Iowa State University Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Chemical Analysis of Nanodomains Education: Postdoctoral Associate, Iowa State University, 1981 Ph.D. Iowa State University, 1980 B.S. Slippery Rock State College, 1974 Professional Appointments: Senior Chemist and Professor of Chemistry, Iowa

  12. shem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shem D Unger Savannah River Ecology Lab Phone: cell (765) 414-5435 P.O. Drawer E Phone: office (803)725-5324 Aiken, South Carolina 29802 email: unger@srel.edu EDUCATION Ph.D. Purdue University Wildlife Genetics 2012 M.S. Missouri State University Biology 2003 B.S. Texas A & M University Wildlife & Fisheries Sciences 1999 RESEARCH INTERESTS Conservation Genetics, Wildlife Biology, Amphibian & Reptile Ecology, Proteomics, Stream Ecology PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE Postdoctoral Researcher

  13. CURRICULUM VITAE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ralph T. Muehleisen Ph.D, P.E., LEED AP BD+C, INCE Board Certified Principal Building Scientist, Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Ave., Bldg. 202, Lemont IL 60439 Email: rmuehleisen@anl.gov, (630) 252-2547 Education Ph. D. in Acoustics, Department of Aerospace Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 1996 B.S., Majors in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1989 Work Experience 2011-Present: Principal Building Scientist, Argonne National

  14. Chris Golubieski | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chris Golubieski Research Technician Christopher.Golubieski@nrel.gov | 303-384-6341 Areas of Expertise Instrumentation Soldering Electrical (AC and DC) Rigging and Fall Protection Education B.A., Geology, Miami University, 1997 B.S., Areonautics/Meterology, Miami University, 1997 Professional Experience Research Technician, Thermochemical Process Development Unit, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2014-present Research Technician, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 2004--2014 Research

  15. Peter Beaucage > Graduate Student - Wiesner Group > Researchers, Postdocs &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Beaucage Graduate Student - Wiesner Group pab275@cornell.edu Peter Beaucage is from Cincinnati, Ohio and received his BS in Chemical Engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He joined the Wiesner group in 2013 and is currently working with the EMC2 center on using copolymers to create mesoporous metal oxides, nitrides, and other inorganic materials for energy applications. He is a joint student with the Gruner group in Physics,

  16. REAC/TS Management of Radiation Accidents 2015-16 Course Brochure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adayabalam S. Balajee, PhD Technical Director, REAC/TS Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory (CBL) Maria Escalona, BS MS Lead Biologist / Cytogenetics-Biodosimetry Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory (CBL) Becky Murdock, AS REAC/TS Education Coordinator Glenda Gross REAC/TS Administrative Assistant Amanda Hughes REAC/TS Travel / Property Coordinator Gail Mack-Bramlette REAC/TS Course Registrar Name: Last First Middle Initial Degree/Certification Home Address City State Zip Code Country Home Area

  17. Biographical sketch - Ana Moore | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production Ana Moore Professional Preparation University of La Plata, Argentina Pharmacy B.S., 1964 Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Chemistry M.S., 1966 Texas Tech University Chemistry Ph.D., 1972 University of Washington, Postdoctoral studies Chemistry 1973-1976 Area of Specialization: organic chemistry; solar energy conversion; artificial photosynthesis. Appointments Professor, Arizona State University, 1996-present; Assistant Chair for Graduate Studies, Department of

  18. Biographical sketch - Dong-Kyun Seo | Center for Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Production Dong-Kyun Seo BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH a. Professional Preparation Seoul National University Chemistry B.S. 1990 Seoul National University Chemistry M.S. 1992 North Carolina State University Chemistry Ph. D. 1997 b. Area of Specialization: Inorganic Chemistry, Materials Science c. Appointments 12/11 - Founder and CTO, Matteren Corporation, Arizona 8/07- Associate Professor, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 8/01-8/07 Assistant Professor, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona

  19. Buses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Burton Richter, Storage Rings, and the J/psi Particle Resources with Additional Information * Honors * Interviews Burton Richter Credit: P.A. Moore, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory "After receiving his B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology [MIT] in 1952 and 1956, respectively, [Burton Richter] accepted a post-doctoral position at Stanford University's High Energy Physics Laboratory. There he was seized with the idea to test the accepted theory of Quantum

  20. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory - Ellen Cerreta Image of Ellen Contact Information Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science and Technology Division MST-8, Structure/Property Relations Group Phone: (505) 665-2576 ecerreta@lanl.gov Bio Education Ph.D. (2001), Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania M.S. (1997), Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania B.S. (1996), Aerospace Engineering, University of

  1. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory Kenneth J. McClellan Contact Information Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science & Technology Division Structure/Property Relations, MS G755 Phone: (505) 667-5452 kmcclellan@lanl.gov Bio Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 1994 M.S., Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, 1991 B.S., Metallurgy and Materials Science, Case Western Reserve University, 1988 Research and Professional

  2. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alamos Laboratory Nathan Mara IMage of Nathan Mar Contact Information Staff Scientist Los Alamos National Laboratory Metallurgy, MS G770 Phone: (505) 667-8665 Fax: (505) 667-5268 namara@lanl.gov Bio Education Ph.D., Materials Science and Eng., University of California-Davis, 2005 B.S., Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California-Davis, 2000 Research and Professional Experience Technical staff member, Los Alamos National Lab, March 2008 - present Director's

  3. Xueqian (Sean) Kong | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Xueqian (Sean) Kong Previous Next List Kong Xueqian (Sean) Kong Formerly: Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley PhD Iowa State University MA Clark University BS University of Science and Technology of China EFRC research: My current research is focused on characterizing the structure of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with methodologies based on nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Magnetic resonance is a

  4. Yangyang Liu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Yangyang Liu Previous Next List Yangyang Liu Formerly: PhD Student, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Presently: Postdoctoral Fellow, Northwestern University BS in Chemistry, Nankai University EFRC research: My research focuses on the design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks and metal-organic polyhedra for gas storage and gas separation. Ligands with different geometry and functional groups may lead to different properties of the

  5. Yeh-Yung Lin | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Yeh-Yung Lin Previous Next List LinYY Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: yylin[at]berkeley.edu Phone: 510-944-8071 PhD in Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan BS in Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan EFRC Research Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise for applications in catalysis, gas separation and gas storage. My

  6. Zachary Smith | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Smith Previous Next List Smith Postdoctoral Scholar Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: zpsmith [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3832 PhD in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin BS in Chemical Engineering, Penn State University EFRC research: Membranes offer a more efficient and cleaner alternative to traditional separation techniques that are commonly found in industry such as distillation and absorption. However,

  7. Zhangwen Wei | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Zhangwen Wei Previous Next List Wei Zhangwen Wei Formerly: PhD Student, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University BS in Chemistry, Nankai University EFRC research: Metal-Organic Frameworks(MOFs), also known as coordination polymers, are crystalline frameworks consisting of metal ions (or clusters) and organic ligands. In some cases, pores inside an open MOF are stable after removal of guest molecules (often solvents) and the MOF can be used for storage

  8. Zhiyong Wang | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Zhiyong Wang Previous Next List Wang Zhiyong Wang Formerly: Postdoctoral Associate, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Presently: Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry, Troy University Email: wangz [at] troy.edu BS, Department of Chemistry, Beijing University, China PhD, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University EFRC research: I am working on the synthesis of novel MOF structures using nitrogen-donor ligands. Due to the increased

  9. Michael Ratzloff | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Ratzloff Scientist II Mike.Ratzloff@nrel.gov | 303-384-7861 Research Interests Michael Ratzloff received his B.S. in Chemistry from the Colorado School of Mines in 2008, where his senior research focused on chemical education. In 2011, he received his M.S. in Materials Science, also from the Colorado School of Mines. His Master's thesis involved developing multiple infrared (IR) spectroscopic techniques to allow the study of structure/function relationships of the active site, or

  10. Michelle L. Reed | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michelle L. Reed Michelle L. Reed Biomass Research Technician Michelle.Reed@nrel.gov | 303-384-7887 Areas of Expertise National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Laboratory Analytical Procedures Bench-scale wet chemistry Instrumental analysis including maintenance and troubleshooting Fraction insoluble solids High-throughput procedures In-house and external client training Method development High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis Bench-scale methods Education B.S., Chemistry (Mathematics

  11. James L. Folk, Jr. is the Deputy Assistant Manager for Waste Deposition (AMWD) a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    James Cronin, CP Violation and the Pierre Auger Observatory Resources with Additional Information James Cronin Courtesy Brookhaven National Laboratory James Watson Cronin "received his B.S. degree from Southern Methodist University in 1951. He then attended the University of Chicago for graduate school, earning his M.S. in 1953 and his Ph.D. in 1955. He began his scientific career at Brookhaven National Laboratory, where he served as an assistant physicist from 1955 to 1958. Cronin joined

  12. Jeff Atherton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atherton Jeff Atherton Principal Deputy Principal Associate Director NIF & Photon Science Dr. L. Jeffrey (Jeff) Atherton is the principal deputy principal associate director for the NIF & Photon Science Directorate, with management and oversight responsibility for broad aspects of the directorate. He also serves as co-manager for target fabrication. Dr. Atherton received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Caltech and his Ph.D. degree in chemical engineering from the

  13. Juchen Guo > Asst. Professor - UC Riverside > Center Alumni > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell Juchen Guo Asst. Professor - UC Riverside juchen.guo@ucr.edu Juchen received his B.S. degree in 1999 from Zhejiang University, and his Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering in 2007 from the University of Maryland. Before joining Prof. Archer's group in Nov. 2011, he worked as an Assistant Research Scientist at the University of Maryland. He is now an assistant professor at UC Riverside in the department of Chemical & Environmental Engineering

  14. Alejandro M. Fracaroli | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Alejandro M. Fracaroli Previous Next List Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: fracaroli [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-642-6331 PhD in Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina BS in Organic Chemistry, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Argentina EFRC Research Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) show special promise in selective and efficient carbon dioxide capture because of their adjustable chemical

  15. Ali K. Sekizkardes | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Ali K. Sekizkardes Previous Next List Sekizkardes Postdoctoral Researcher National Energy and Technology Laboratory (NETL) Email: ali.sekizkardes[at]netl.doe.gov Phone: 412-386-7255 PhD in Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University BS in Chemical Engineering, Gazi University EFRC Research Porous organic polymers (POPs) have received great attention in recent years because of their novel properties such as permanent porosity, adjustable chemical nature, and

  16. Benjamin K. Keitz | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Benjamin K. Keitz Previous Next List Keitz Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: keitz [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 512-970-7955 PhD in Chemistry, California Institute of Technology BS in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin EFRC research: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise for a variety of gas separation and catalytic application. We are exploring the use of nickel-based

  17. Dana Levine | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Dana Levine Previous Next List Levine PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: dlevine [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3832 BS in Chemistry, California Institute of Technology EFRC research: My research involves the design and synthesis of metal-organic frameworks with expanded pores to enhance gas storage and separation properties. By tuning the composition and geometry of these materials, we hope to modulate the

  18. Microsoft Word - Los Alamos National Laboratory ships remote-handled transuranic waste to WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion sources and ion beam technology in microfabrications by Lili Ji B.S. (Peking University, P.R. China) 2002 A dissertation submitted in partial satisfaction of the Requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering-Nuclear Engineering in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY Committee in charge: Professor Ka-Ngo Leung, Chair Professor Jasmina L. Vujic Professor Vivek Subramanian Doctor Qing Ji Fall 2007 The dissertation of Lili Ji is approved: Chair

  19. Women @ Energy: Wei Xu | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wei Xu joined Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) in 2013 and is currently an Advanced Applications Engineer in the Computational Science Center. Wei Xu joined Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) in 2013 and is currently an Advanced Applications Engineer in the Computational Science Center. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Wei Xu received the BS and MS degree in Computer Science from Zhejiang University, China in 2004 and the Ph.D. degree in

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR WITH ACCESSIBLE THIMBLE AND EMERGENCY COOLING FEATURES

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCorkle, W.H.

    1960-02-23

    BS>A safety system for a water-moderated reactor is described. The invention comprises a reservoir system for spraying the fuel elements within a fuel assembly with coolant and keeping them in a continuous bath even if the coolant moderator is lost from the reactor vessel. A reservoir gravity feeds one or more nozzels positioned within each fuel assembly which continually forces water past the fuel elements.

  1. Sharon Smolinski | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sharon Smolinski Sharon Smolinski Scientist II Sharon.Smolinski@nrel.gov | 303-384-6275 Education Ph.D. Candidate, Public Affairs, University of Colorado at Denver, 2012-present M.S., Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado at Denver, 2007-2011 Graduate Certificate in Geospatial Analysis, University of Colorado at Denver, 2011 B.S., Biology, University of Colorado at Denver, 1993-1998 Professional Experience Scientist II, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 2010-present Scientist

  2. Eric Scott | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Scott Previous Next List Eric Scott PhD Student, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Email: es1055 [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-2503 B.S. Colorado State University EFRC research: Non-resonant inductively detected NMR experiments at cryogenic temperatures. EFRC publications: Lin, Li-Chiang; Kim, Jihan; Kong, Xueqian; Scott, Eric; McDonald, Thomas M; Long, Jeffrey R; Reimer, Jeffrey A.; and Smit, Berend

  3. Forrest Abouelnasr | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Forrest Abouelnasr Previous Next List Abouelnasr Mahmoud Forrest Abouelnasr Formerly: PhD Student, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Presently: Software Engineer, Anthem BS in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology EFRC research: My research focuses on the diffusion of chemical species that are adsorbed inside solid frameworks such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks.

  4. Joseph Chen | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Chen Previous Next List Joseph J. Chen Ph.D Student, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Email: joseph.chen [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-3073 BS in Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin EFRC research: Metal-organic frameworks (MOF) demonstrate an exceptional level of structural and functional control, portending a revolution in the use of porous materials. This revolution awaits, however, a

  5. Deborah A. Hyman | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deborah A. Hyman Deborah A. Hyman Senior Analytical Chemical Technician-Analytical Group Biomass Analysis deborah.hyman@nrel.gov | 303-384-7717 Research Interests Deborah Hyman's research interests include analytical method development. She believes that in a rapidly changing environment, analysis needs to adapt to the current and future needs of the researchers and methods need to be faster and more efficient. Education M.S., Biochemistry, Montana State University B.S., Chemistry and Biology,

  6. J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    J. Robert Schrieffer and the BCS Theory of Superconductivity Resources with Additional Information J. Robert Schrieffer Courtesy of NHMFL Robert Schrieffer received his BS from M.I.T. in 1953 and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1957. Upon entering the University of Illinois, "he immediately began research with Professor John Bardeen. After working out a problem dealing with electrical conduction on semiconductor surfaces, Schrieffer spent a year in the laboratory, applying the

  7. L3:THM.P9.08

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Development of a General Purpose Subgrid Wall Boiling Model from Improved Physical Understanding for Use in Computational Fluid Dynamics Emilio Baglietto Massachusetts Institute of Technology September 30, 2014 CASL-8-2014-0205-000 CASL-U-2014-0205-000 Development of a General Purpose Subgrid Wall Boiling Model from Improved Physical Understanding for Use in Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lindsey Anne Gilman B.S. Chemistry, Valparaiso University, 2010 S.M. Nuclear Science and Engineering,

  8. LIMIT ON THE MUON NEUTRINO MAGNETIC MOMENT AND A MEASUREMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LIMIT ON THE MUON NEUTRINO MAGNETIC MOMENT AND A MEASUREMENT OF THE CCPIP TO CCQE CROSS SECTION RATIO A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in The Department of Physics And Astronomy by Serge Ouedraogo B.S. in Physics, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2001 M.S., Louisiana State University, 2004 December 2008 In loving memory

  9. Guo-Yong Fu | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico production volumes are presented as a separate data series beginning in 2001. Production data for the Gulf of Mexico for years prior to 2001 are presented as part of the production volumes for the States of Alabama, Louisiana

    Includes Federal Offshore Alabama, Louisiana,

    Guo-Yong Fu Principal Research Physicist, Plasma Physics Laboratory. Dr. Guoyong Fu is a Principal Research Physicist in the Theory Department. He received B.S. in physics from

  10. US ITER | Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kelli Kizer Subcontract Administrator Tell us about your background Kelli Kizer Kelli Kizer I was born in Knoxville, Tennessee, attended Lenoir City High School, then studied and graduated from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) with a BS in Business Administration. What were you doing before you came to US ITER? When I was a sophomore at UTK, I began to intern during summers at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Upon graduating, I began working in the Environmental Restoration

  11. Scott Parker | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scott Parker Principal Application Performance Engineer Scott Parker Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Building 240 - Rm. 1129 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-3446 sparker@anl.gov Scott Parker is an Application Performance Engineer at the ALCF. He received his B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Prior to joining Argonne, he worked at the National Center for Supercomputing

  12. Chris Barty

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chris Barty Chris Barty Chief Technology Officer NIF & Photon Science Dr. C.P.J. (Chris) Barty is the chief technology officer for the National Ignition Facility and Photon Science Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His academic background includes Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in applied physics from Stanford University and B.S. degrees, each with honors, in chemistry, physics, and chemical engineering from North Carolina State University. He was elected a Fellow of the Optical

  13. Ames Lab Interns Make Their Research Mark in Industry, Academia and at DOE National Labs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inquiry Issue 2 | 2013 Inquiry Issue 2 | 2013 19 Ames Lab Interns Make Their Research Mark in Industry, Academia and at DOE National Labs Kevin Yang, Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship - 2008 B.S., Electrical and Computer Engineering, Cornell University - 2011 Amazon.com, software development engineer "From my experience at Ames Laboratory, I learned many invaluable skills that have helped me a great deal with my research and academic endeavors. I feel no hesitation in asserting

  14. BEK CV 12 31 11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Curriculum Vitae Bruce E. Koel Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering Princeton University A311 Engineering Quadrangle Princeton, NJ 08544-5263 Phone: 609-258-4524 bkoel@princeton.edu http://www.princeton.edu/cbe/people/faculty/koel/ Birthdate: June 30, 1955 Birthplace: Norton, Kansas Education: Ph.D., Chemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, 1981 M.S., Chemistry, Emporia State University, 1978 B.S., Highest Honors, Chemistry, Emporia State University, 1976 Research Activities:

  15. Structures of Arg- and Gln-type bacterial cysteine dioxygenase homologs: Arg- and Gln-type Bacterial CDO Homologs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Driggers, Camden M.; Hartman, Steven J.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    In some bacteria, cysteine is converted to cysteine sulfinic acid by cysteine dioxygenases (CDO) that are only ~15–30% identical in sequence to mammalian CDOs. Among bacterial proteins having this range of sequence similarity to mammalian CDO are some that conserve an active site Arg residue (“Arg-type” enzymes) and some having a Gln substituted for this Arg (“Gln-type” enzymes). Here, we describe a structure from each of these enzyme types by analyzing structures originally solved by structural genomics groups but not published: a Bacillus subtilis “Arg-type” enzyme that has cysteine dioxygenase activity (BsCDO), and a Ralstonia eutropha “Gln-type” CDO homolog ofmore » uncharacterized activity (ReCDOhom). The BsCDO active site is well conserved with mammalian CDO, and a cysteine complex captured in the active site confirms that the cysteine binding mode is also similar. The ReCDOhom structure reveals a new active site Arg residue that is hydrogen bonding to an iron-bound diatomic molecule we have interpreted as dioxygen. Notably, the Arg position is not compatible with the mode of Cys binding seen in both rat CDO and BsCDO. As sequence alignments show that this newly discovered active site Arg is well conserved among “Gln-type” CDO enzymes, we conclude that the “Gln-type” CDO homologs are not authentic CDOs but will have substrate specificity more similar to 3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenases.« less

  16. Environmental standards provide competitive advantage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chynoweth, E.; Kirshner, E.

    1993-04-28

    Quality organizations are breaking new ground with the development of international standards for environmental management. These promise to provide the platform for chemical companies wanting to establish their environmental credibility with a global audience. [open quotes]It will be similar to auditing our customers to ISO 9000[close quote], says the environmental manager for a European chemical firm. [open quote]We will only want to deal with people who have got their environmental act together. And we'll be in a better competitive positions[close quote]. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO;Geneva) has set up a taskforce to develop an environmental management standard, which is expected to be completed by the mid-1990s. Observers think the ISO standard will draw heavily on the British Standard Institute's (BSI;London) environmental management standard, BS7750, which will likely be the first system adopted in the world. Published last year, BS7750 has been extensively piloted in the UK (CW, Sept. 30, 1992, p. 62) and is now set to be revised before being offically adopted by BSI. The UK's Chemical Industries Association (CIA;London) is anxious to prevent a proliferation of standards, and its report on BS7750 pilot projects calls for an approach integrating quality, environment, and health and safety. But standard setters, including ISO, appear to be moving in the opposite direction. In the US, the American national Standards Institute (ANSI;Washington) has started work on an environmental management standard.

  17. A Successful Synthesis of the CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} Single-Crystal, High-Entropy Alloy by Bridgman Solidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, S. G.; Zhang, S. F.; Gao, M. C.; Liaw, P. K.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, a face-centered-cubic, single-crystal CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} (designated as Al0.3), high-entropy alloy (HEA) was successfully synthesized by the Bridgman solidification (BS) method, at an extremely low withdrawal velocity through a constant temperature gradient, for which it underwent two BS steps. Specially, at the first BS step, the alloy sample underwent several morphological transitions accompanying the crystal growth from the melt. This microstructure evolves from as-cast dendrites, to equiaxed grains, and then to columnar crystals, and last to the single crystal. In particular, at the equiaxed-grain region, some visible annealing twins were observed, which indicates a low stacking fault energy of the Al0.3 alloy. Although a body-centered- cubic CoCrFeNiAl (Al1) HEA was also prepared under the same conditions, only a single columnar-crystal structure with instinctively preferential crystallographic orientations was obtained by the same procedure. A similar morphological transition from dendrites to equiaxed grains occurred at the equiaxed-grain region in Al1 alloy, but the annealing twins were not observed probably because a higher Al addition leads to a higher stacking fault energy for this alloy.

  18. Characterization of emissions from a fluidized-bed wood chip home heating furnace. Final report Apr 82-May 83

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truesdale, R.S.

    1984-03-01

    The report gives results of measurements of emissions from a residential wood-chip combustor, operated in both a fluidized-bed and cyclone-fired mode, and their comparison with those from a conventional woodstove and industrial wood-fired boilers. In general, the combustion efficiency of the fluidized-bed and cyclone-fired wood-chip burner is higher than that of conventional woodstoves. Concomitant with this increase in efficiency is a decrease in most emissions. For the fluidized-bed tests, significant reductions of total hydrocarbons and CO were observed, compared to woodstove emissions. The cyclone test showed PAH levels far below those of conventional woodstoves, approaching levels measured in industrial wood-fired boilers. A baghouse, installed during two fluidized-bed tests, was extremely effective in reducing both particulate and PAH emissions. Method 5 samples from above the fluid bed suggest that appreciable PAH is formed in the upper region of the furnace or in the watertube heat exchangers. In general, the cyclone-fired mode was more effective in reducing emissions from residential wood combustion than the fluidized-bed mode.

  19. A review of the global emissions, transport and effects of heavy metals in the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.R.; Ashton, W.B.; Rapoport, R.D.

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the current state of knowledge regarding the sources and quantities of heavy metal emissions, their transport and fate, their potential health and environmental effects, and strategies to control them. The approach is to review the literature on this topic and to consult with experts in the field. Ongoing research activities and research needs are discussed. Estimates of global anthropogenic and natural emissions indicate that anthropogenic emissions are responsible for most of the heavy metals released into the atmosphere and that industrial activities have had a significant impact on the global cycling of trace metals. The largest anthropogenic sources of trace metals are coal combustion and the nonferrous metal industry. Atmospheric deposition is an important pathway by which trace metals enter the environment. Atmospheric deposition varies according to the solubility of the element and the length of time it resides in the atmosphere. Evidence suggests that deposition is influenced by other chemicals in the atmosphere, such as ozone and sulfur dioxide. Trace metals also enter the environment through leaching. Existing emissions-control technologies such as electrostatic precipitators, baghouses, and scrubbers are designed to remove other particulates from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants and are only partially effective at removing heavy metals. Emerging technologies such as flue gas desulfurization, lignite coke, and fluidized bed combustion could further reduce emissions. 108 refs.

  20. Advances in controlling particulate emissions from fossil-fired power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, R.

    1995-12-31

    Present and possible future Federal, state, and local air pollutant emission regulations coupled with an increasingly competitive business environment and the aging of existing particulate control equipment are motivating utilities to improve particulate control system effectiveness and reduce control cost. To these ends, several cost-effective means of improving particulate control are being developed and tested. Three fossil plant retrofit technologies of note include two flue gas conditioning systems--one ``agentless`` arrangement that uses the SO{sub 2} in the flue gas as the raw material for an SO{sub 3} conditioning system, and a promising new additive that has performed well in laboratory and pilot-scale tests. A second retrofit technology supplements all or most of the existing electrostatic precipitator with a pulse-jet baghouse. A third approach described in this paper is one example of a new class of advanced filtration systems, some of which can remove NO{sub x} and particulate in the same vessel. Technologies like these will enable utilities to boost particulate removal effectiveness after switching to lower-sulfur coal for Clean Air Act compliance, minimize compliance costs, and optimally position themselves for possible further emission regulations.

  1. Investigation of Fly Ash and Activated Carbon Obtained from Pulverized Coal Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely; Zheng Yao

    2006-08-31

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addressed the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addressed the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project has determined the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed have also been determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control have been analyzed in an effort to determine the effects of SCR on the ash.

  2. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2004-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash. These analyses will also determine the properties of ash which are important for Hg capture.

  3. INVESTIGATION OF FLY ASH AND ACTIVATED CARBON OBTAINED FROM PULVERIZED COAL BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Christopher Kiely

    2005-11-01

    One of the techniques for Hg capture in coal-fired boilers involves injection of activated carbon (AC) into the boiler downstream of the air preheater. Hg is adsorbed onto the AC particles and fly ash, which are then both removed in an electrostatic precipitator or baghouse. This project addresses the issues of Hg on activated carbon and on fly ash from a materials re-use point of view. It also addresses the possible connection between SCR reactors, fly ash properties and Hg capture. The project is determining the feasibility of separating AC from fly ash in a fluidized bed and of regenerating the separated AC by heating the AC to elevated temperatures in a fluidized bed. The temperatures needed to drive off the Hg from the ash in a fluidized bed are also being determined. Finally, samples of fly ash from power plants with SCR reactors for NO{sub x} control, are being analyzed to determine the effect of SCR on the ash.

  4. MERCURY AND LEAD SAMPLING AT MINNESOTA POWER'S BOSWELL ENERGY CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis L. Laudal

    2000-08-01

    At the request of the Minnesota Power, Inc., the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) sampled for lead at the stack (or duct directly leading to the stack) for three units at the Boswell Energy Center. All sampling was done in triplicate using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 12, with sampling procedures following EPA Methods 1 through 4. During the test program, lead sampling was done using EPA Method 12 in the duct at the outlet of the baghouse serving Unit 2 and the duct at the outlet of the wet particulate scrubber serving Unit 3. For Unit 4, lead sampling was done at the stack. The specific objective for the project was to determine the concentration of lead in the flue gas being emitted into the atmosphere from the Boswell Energy Center. The test program was performed during the period of May 8 through 11, 2000. This report presents the test data, sample calculations, and results, and a discussion of the lead sampling performed at the Boswell Energy Center. The detailed test data and test results, raw test data, process data, laboratory reports, and equipment calibration records are provided in Appendices A, B, and C.

  5. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

  6. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  7. Projects of the year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, T.

    2007-01-15

    The Peabody Hotel, Orlando, Florida was the site of Power Engineering magazine's 2006 Projects of the Year Awards Banquet, which kicked-off the Power-Gen International conference and exhibition. The Best Coal-fired Project was awarded to Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association Inc., owner of Springenville Unit 3. This is a 400 MW pulverized coal plant in Springeville, AZ, sited with two existing coal-fired units. Designed to fire Powder River Basin coal, it has low NOx burners and selective catalytic reduction for NOx control, dry flue gas desulfurization for SO{sub 2} control and a pulse jet baghouse for particulate control. It has a seven-stage feedwater heater and condensers to ensure maximum performance. Progress Energy-Carolinas' Asheville Power Station FGD and SCR Project was awarded the 2006 coal-fired Project Honorable Mention. This plant in Skyland, NC was required to significantly reduce NOx emissions. When completed, the improvements will reduce NOx by 93% compared to 1996 levels and SO{sub 2} by 93% compared to 2001 levels. Awards for best gas-fired, nuclear, and renewable/sustainable energy projects are recorded. The Sasyadko Coal-Mine Methane Cogeneration Plant near Donezk, Ukraine, was given the 2006 Honorable Mention for Best Renewable/Sustainable Energy Project. In November 2004, Ukraine was among 14 nations to launch the Methane to Markets partnership. The award-winning plant is fuelled by methane released during coal extraction. It generates 42 MW of power. 4 photos.

  8. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System. Quarterly report, February 1, 1989--April 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    During the report period, work continued on the life-cycle testing, optimization and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly, which comprises all the major furnace components: The combustor, heat exchanger, and baghouse, as well as the auxiliary subsystems. The furnace has operated for about 90 hours, and has burned 1,000 pounds of CWS. During testing, the only maintenance that was performed on the system was to clean the bag filters to obtain ash samples for analysts. Concurrent with testing the second-generation furnace, fabrication and assembly of the third-generation furnace was completed, and a life-cycle testing and optimization process for this furnace has started. In contrast to the second-generation furnace, which was designed more as an experimental unit, the third-generation furnace is a stand-alone heating unit Incorporating the standard air handling system, blower, pump, and control box as part of the furnace. During the report period, the third-generation furnace operated for a total of 35 hours, and burned more than 300 pounds of CWS, with average tests lasting 6 hours. During the next quarter, life-cycle testing of the third-generation furnace will continue to identify areas needing further development.

  9. CWS-Fired Residential Warm-Air Heating System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balsavich, J.; Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1989-07-01

    During the report period, work continued on the life-cycle testing, optimization and refining of the second-generation furnace assembly, which comprises all the major furnace components: The combustor, heat exchanger, and baghouse, as well as the auxiliary subsystems. The furnace has operated for about 90 hours, and has burned 1,000 pounds of CWS. During testing, the only maintenance that was performed on the system was to clean the bag filters to obtain ash samples for analysts. Concurrent with testing the second-generation furnace, fabrication and assembly of the third-generation furnace was completed, and a life-cycle testing and optimization process for this furnace has started. In contrast to the second-generation furnace, which was designed more as an experimental unit, the third-generation furnace is a stand-alone heating unit Incorporating the standard air handling system, blower, pump, and control box as part of the furnace. During the report period, the third-generation furnace operated for a total of 35 hours, and burned more than 300 pounds of CWS, with average tests lasting 6 hours. During the next quarter, life-cycle testing of the third-generation furnace will continue to identify areas needing further development.

  10. $$B \\to \\pi \\ell \

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-04-14

    We calculate the form factors for B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decay in dynamical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use the (2+1)-flavor gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations with the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with a relativistic heavy-quark interpretation. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV. We simultaneously extrapolate our numerical results to the physical light-quark masses and tomore » the continuum and interpolate in the pion/kaon energy using SU(2) “hard-pion” chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light meson form factors. We provide complete systematic error budgets for the vector and scalar form factors f + (q2) and f0(q2) for both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν at three momenta that span the q2 range accessible in our numerical simulations. Next we extrapolate these results to q2 = 0 using a model-independent z-parametrization based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2)as the coefficients of the series in z and the matrix of correlations between them; this provides a parametrization of the form factors valid over the entire allowed kinematic range. Our results agree with other three-flavor lattice-QCD determinations using staggered light quarks, and have comparable precision, thereby providing important independent cross-checks. Both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decays enable determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub|. Furthermore, we perform a combined z-fit of our numerical B → πℓν form-factor data with the experimental measurements of the branching fraction from BABAR and Belle leaving the relative normalization as a free parameter; we obtain |Vub| = 3.61(32)×10-3, where the error includes statistical and all systematic uncertainties. The same approach can be applied to the decay Bs → Kℓν to provide an alternative determination of |Vub| once the process has been measured experimentally. In anticipation of future experimental measurements, we make predictions for B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν differential branching fractions and forward-backward asymmetries in the Standard Model.« less

  11. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  12. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT B COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-01-19

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Therefore, the objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit B glass and perform additional testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and for additional performance testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The glass was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. The leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. The leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to identify the formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. Characterization of the glass prior to testing revealed that some undissolved plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The undissolved particles had a disk-like morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar disk-like PuO{sub 2} phases were observed in previous LaBS glass testing at PNNL. In that work, researchers concluded that plutonium formed with this morphology as a result of the leaching process. It was more likely that the presence of the plutonium oxide crystals in the PNNL testing was a result of glass fabrication. A series of PCTs were conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water. The PCT-Method A (PCT-A) was conducted to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT-A test has a strict protocol and is designed to specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of a nuclear waste glass have been consistently controlled during production and, thus, meet the repository acceptance requirements. The PCT-A results on the Pu containing LaBS Frit B glass showed that the glass was very durable with a normalized elemental release value for boron of approximately 0.02 g/L. This boron release value was better than two orders of magnitude better from a boron release standpoint than the current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The boron release value for EA glass is 16.7 g/L.

  13. High-Solids Enzymatic Saccharification Screening Method for Lignocellulosic Biomass (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, C. M.; Stickel, J. J.

    2009-05-01

    The ability to screen new biomass pretreatments and advanced enzyme systems at process-relevant conditions is key to developing economically viable lignocellulosic ethanol. While much research is being invested in developing pretreatment technologies and enzyme systems that will more efficiently convert cellulosic biomass to sugars, the current standard reactor vessel, a shake flask, that is used for screening enzymatic saccharification of cellulosic biomass is inadequate at high-solids conditions. Shake flasks do not provide adequate mixing at high solids conditions. In this work, a roller bottle reactor was identified as a small-scale high-solids saccharification reaction vessel, and a method was developed for use in screening both pretreated biomass and enzyme systems at process-relevant conditions. This new method addresses mixing issues observed in high-solids saccharifications. In addition, yield calculations from sugar concentrations on a mass basis were used to account for the two-phase nature of the saccharification slurry, which eliminates discontinuities in comparing high-solids to low-solids saccharifications that occur when using concentrations on a volume basis. The roller bottle reactors out-performed the shake flasks by 5% for an initial insoluble solids loading of 15% and 140% for an initial soluble solids loading of 30%. The reactor system and method was compared at bench and floor scales and determined to be scalable for initial insoluble solids loading in the range of 15% to 30%. Pretreatment and enzyme screening results indicate that mid severity pretreated biomass is more digestible than the low and high severity biomass and GC220 is a superior enzyme to Spezyme CP.

  14. Development and Testing of Industrial Scale Coal Fired Combustion System, Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-09-30

    Coal Tech Corp's mission is to develop, license & sell innovative, lowest cost, solid fuel fired power systems & total emission control processes using proprietary and patented technology for domestic and international markets. The present project 'DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF INDUSTRIAL SCALE, COAL FIRED COMBUSTION SYSTEM, PHASE 3' on DOE Contract DE-AC22-91PC91162 was a key element in achieving this objective. The project consisted of five tasks that were divided into three phases. The first phase, 'Optimization of First Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor', consisted of three tasks, which are detailed in Appendix 'A' of this report. They were implemented in 1992 and 1993 at the first generation, 20 MMBtu/hour, combustor-boiler test site in Williamsport, PA. It consisted of substantial combustor modifications and coal-fired tests designed to improve the combustor's wall cooling, slag and ash management, automating of its operation, and correcting severe deficiencies in the coal feeding to the combustor. The need for these changes was indicated during the prior 900-hour test effort on this combustor that was conducted as part of the DOE Clean Coal Program. A combination of combustor changes, auxiliary equipment changes, sophisticated multi-dimensional combustion analysis, computer controlled automation, and series of single and double day shift tests totaling about 300 hours, either resolved these operational issues or indicated that further corrective changes were needed in the combustor design. The key result from both analyses and tests was that the combustor must be substantially lengthened to maximize combustion efficiency and sharply increase slag retention in the combustor. A measure of the success of these modifications was realized in the third phase of this project, consisting of task 5 entitled: 'Site Demonstration with the Second Generation 20 MMBtu/hr Air-Cooled Slagging Coal Tech Combustor'. The details of the task 5 effort are contained in Appendix 'C'. It was implemented between 1994 and 1998 after the entire 20 MMBtu/hr combustor-boiler facility was relocated to Philadelphia, PA in 1994. A new test facility was designed and installed. A substantially longer combustor was fabricated. Although not in the project plan or cost plan, an entire steam turbine-electric power generating plant was designed and the appropriate new and used equipment for continuous operation was specified. Insufficient funds and the lack of a customer for any electric power that the test facility could have generated prevented the installation of the power generating equipment needed for continuous operation. All other task 5 project measures were met and exceeded. 107 days of testing in task 5, which exceeded the 63 days (about 500 hours) in the test plan, were implemented. Compared to the first generation 20 MMBtu/hr combustor in Williamsport, the 2nd generation combustor has a much higher combustion efficiency, the retention of slag inside the combustor doubled to about 75% of the coal ash, and the ash carryover into the boiler, a major problem in the Williamsport combustor was essentially eliminated. In addition, the project goals for coal-fired emissions were exceeded in task 5. SO{sub 2} was reduced by 80% to 0.2 lb/MMBtu in a combination of reagent injection in the combustion and post-combustion zones. NO{sub x} was reduced by 93% to 0.07 lb/MMBtu in a combination of staged combustion in the combustor and post-combustion reagent injection. A baghouse was installed that was rated to 0.03 lb/MMBtu stack particle emissions. The initial particle emission test by EPA Method 5 indicated substantially higher emissions far beyond that indicated by the clear emission plume. These emissions were attributed to steel particles released by wall corrosion in the baghouse, correction of which had no effect of emissions.

  15. Addendum to Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project: Additiona NH3, NOx, and CO Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

    2008-03-01

    On March 28-30 and May 1-4, 2007, CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-MW Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The testing in March and May demonstrated that the multi-pollutant control system attained its performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions, SO{sub 2} removal efficiency, acid gas (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF) removal efficiency, and mercury removal efficiency. However, the ammonia slip measured between the SCR outlet and air heater inlet was consistently greater than the guarantee of 2 ppmvd {at} 3% O{sub 2}. As a result, additional testing was performed on May 30-June 1 and on June 20-21, 2007, in conjunction with tuning of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system by BPEI, in an effort to achieve the performance target for ammonia slip. This additional testing occurred after the installation of a large particle ash (LPA) screen and removal system just above the SCR reactor and a fresh SCR catalyst layer in mid-May. This report describes the results of the additional tests. During the May 30-June 1 sampling period, CONSOL R&D and Clean Air Engineering (CAE) each measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet, downstream of the in-duct SCR reactor. In addition, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the economizer outlet, upstream of the SCR reactor, and CAE measured flue gas NO{sub x} and CO concentrations at the sampling grids located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor. During the June 20-21 sampling period, CONSOL R&D measured flue gas ammonia concentrations at the air heater inlet. All ammonia measurements were performed using a modified version of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Conditional Test Method (CTM) 027. The NO{sub x} and CO measurements were performed using U.S. EPA Methods 7E and 10, respectively.

  16. ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller; Michelle R. Olderbak; Rich Gebert

    2001-12-01

    A new concept in particulate control, called an advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC), is being developed under funding from the U.S. Department of Energy. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in an entirely novel manner. The AHPC concept combines fabric filtration and electrostatic precipitation in the same housing, providing major synergism between the two methods, both in the particulate collection step and in transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. Phase I of the development effort consisted of design, construction, and testing of a 5.7-m{sup 3}/min (200-acfm) working AHPC model. Results from both 8-hr parametric tests and 100-hr proof-of-concept tests with two different coals demonstrated excellent operability and greater than 99.99% fine-particle collection efficiency. Since all of the developmental goals of Phase I were met, the approach was scaled up in Phase II to a size of 255 m{sup 3}/min (9000 acfm) (equivalent in size to 2.5 MW) and was installed on a slipstream at the Big Stone Power Plant. For Phase II, the AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant was operated continuously from late July 1999 until mid-December 1999. The Phase II results were highly successful in that ultrahigh particle collection efficiency was achieved, pressure drop was well controlled, and system operability was excellent. For Phase III, the AHPC was modified into a more compact configuration, and components were installed that were closer to what would be used in a full-scale commercial design. The modified AHPC was operated from April to July 2000. While operational results were acceptable during this time, inspection of bags in the summer of 2000 revealed some membrane damage to the fabric that appeared to be caused by electrical effects. Subsequently, extensive theoretical, bench-scale, and pilot-scale investigations were completed to find an approach to prevent bag damage without compromising AHPC performance. Results showed that the best bag protection and AHPC performance were achieved by using a perforated plate installed between the discharge electrodes and bags. This perforated-plate design was then installed in the 2.5-MW AHPC at Big Stone Power Plant in Big Stone City, South Dakota, and the AHPC was operated from March to June 2001. Results showed that the perforated-plate design solved the bag damage problem and offered even better AHPC performance than the previous design. All of the AHPC performance goals were met, including ultrahigh collection efficiency, high air-to-cloth ratio, reasonable pressure drop, and long bag-cleaning interval.

  17. file://\\troi2\wwwroot\TeamWorks\index.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2012 WIPP Quick Facts (As of 2-27-12) 10,308 Shipments received since opening (9,772 CH and 536 RH) 80,199 Cubic meters of waste disposed (79,919 CH and 280 RH) 157,123 Containers disposed in the underground (156,587 CH and 536 RH) During Week One, CBFO Manager Joe Franco held WIPP All Hands Meetings. Franco shaking hands with Mark Long, Jr. following an all hands meeting with employees. CBFO Manager Joe Franco hits the ground running If you want to catch up with Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO)

  18. News | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL, Princeton University physicists join German Chancellor Angela Merkel at Wendelstein 7-X celebration Click on an image below to view the high resolution image. Then right click on the image and select "Save Image" or "Save Image As..." An image of the hydrogen plasma inside the Wendelstein 7-X. A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton University vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel shake hands in the Wendelstein 7-X control

  19. ASSESSMENT OF THE STATE OF PRECIPITATION IN ALUMINUM CASTING A356.2 ALLOY USING NONDESTRUCTIVE MICROSTRUCTURE ELECTRONIC PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiattisaksri, P.; Gibbs, P. J.; Koenig, K.; Pfeif, E. A.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D. L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado (United States); Lasseigne, A. N. [Generation 2 Materials Technology LLC, Firestone, Colorado (United States); Mendez, P. F. [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2010-02-22

    Application of nondestructive electronic property measurements to assess the strengthening of Mg{sub 2}Si precipitates in aluminum A356.2 casting has been demonstrated. The results indicated the evolution of precipitation phase through over aging with increased cooling time or thickness of the cast part. The classical optimum precipitation behavior has been characterized and verified with thermal analysis, thermoelectric power, low frequency impedance, and micro hardness measurements. A proposed practice to use nondestructive electronic property measurement tools to assess aluminum casting for acceptable mechanical properties after mold shake out is presented.

  20. Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

    2008-10-17

    Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

  1. Pocket radiation dosimeter--dosimeter charger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, Frank W.

    1984-01-01

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  2. Pocket radiation dosimeter: dosimeter charger assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, F.W.

    1982-03-17

    This invention is a novel pocket-type radiation dosimeter comprising an electrometric radiation dosimeter and a charging circuit therefor. The instrument is especially designed to be amenable to mass production, to have a long shelf life, and to be compact, lightweight, and usable by the layman. The dosimeter proper may be of conventional design. The charging circuit includes a shake-type electrostatic generator, a voltage doubler for integrating generator output voltages of one polarity, and a switch operated by an external permanent magnet.

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Around 10 a.m. Pyongyang Time on Wednesday, January 6, 2016, seismic analysts around the world picked up something unusual-a 5.1-magnitude seismic event in the northeast corner of North Korea. Earthquakes of this size aren't common on the Korean Peninsula, which likely meant the violent shaking was caused by something else: an explosion. Enter Los Alamos National Laboratory. Los Alamos isn't just in the business of developing, testing, and maintaining explosives. A

  4. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayberry, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

  5. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2013 [Facility News] Work Cut Out for ARM Science Board Bookmark and Share With a new fixed site on the horizon in the Azores, a third ARM Mobile Facility gearing up for action in the Arctic, and more aircraft probes and sensors than scientists can shake a stick at, the ARM Facility continues to expand its considerable suite of assets for conducting climate research. Along with this impressive inventory comes the responsibility to ensure the Facility is supporting the highest-value science

  6. Centrifuge modeling of radioactive waste migration through backfill in a near surface disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurumoorthy, C.; Kusakabe, O.

    2007-07-01

    Investigations on the performance of backfill barrier in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF) for radioactive wastes are important to ensure the long term safety of such disposal option. Favorable condition to delay migration of radionuclides from disposed waste to far fields is diffusion process. However, advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism plays an important role due to changes in backfill over a period of time. In order to understand these mechanisms, detailed laboratory experiments are usually conducted for developing mathematical models to assess the behaviour of backfill. However, these experiments are time consuming and suffer with the limitations due to material complexity. Also, there are constraints associated with validation of theoretical predictions due to intricacy of boundary conditions as well as the time scale is quite different as compared to the time required for completion of the processes in the field. Keeping in view these aspects, centrifuge modeling technique has been adopted by various researchers to model and understand various geo-environment problems in order to provide a link between the real life situation termed as the 'Prototype' and its model, which is exposed to a higher gravitational field. An attempt has been made in this paper to investigate the feasibility of this technique to model advective dispersion/diffusion mechanism of radionuclides through saturated Bentonite-Sand (B:S) backfill. Various stages of centrifuge modeling are highlighted. Column tests were conducted in the centrifuge to evaluate the hydraulic conductivity of B:S mixture under prototype NSDF stress conditions. Results showed that steady state hydraulic conductivity under saturated conditions was 2.86 10{sup -11} m/sec. Studies indicate the feasibility of centrifuge modeling technique and usefulness to model advective diffusion of radionuclides through B:S backfill. (authors)

  7. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  8. Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S.J.

    1995-11-01

    As the consumption of energy increases, its impact on ambient air quality has become a significant concern. Recent studies indicate that fine particles from coal combustion cause health problems as well as atmospheric visibility impairment. These problems are further compounded by the concentration of hazardous trace elements such as mercury, cadmium, selenium, and arsenic in fine particles. Therefore, a current need exists to develop superior, but economical, methods to control emissions of fine particles. Since most of the toxic metals present in coal will be in particulate form, a high level of fine- particle collection appears to be the best method of overall air toxics control. However, over 50% of mercury and a portion of selenium emissions are in vapor form and cannot be collected in particulate control devices. Therefore, this project will focus on developing technology not only to provide ultrahigh collection efficiency of particulate air toxic emissions, but also to capture vapor- phase trace metals such as mercury and selenium. Currently, the primary state-of-the-art technologies for particulate control are fabric filters (baghouses) and electrostatic precipitators (ESPs). However, they both have limitations that prevent them from achieving ultrahigh collection of fine particulate matter and vapor-phase trace metals. The objective of this project is to develop a highly reliable advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC) that can provide > 99.99 % particulate collection efficiency for all particle sizes between 0.01 and 50 14m, is applicable for use with all U.S. coals, and is cost-0443competitive with existing technologies. Phase I of the project is organized into three tasks: Task I - Project Management, Reporting, and Subcontract Consulting Task 2 - Modeling, Design, and Construction of 200-acfm AHPC Model Task 3 - Experimental Testing and Subcontract Consulting

  9. Advanced emissions control development program. Quarterly technical progress report {number_sign}4, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the US Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B and W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  10. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}5 for the period October 1 to December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five year project aimed at the development of practical, cost- effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self-consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  11. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program. Quarterly Technical Progress Report {number_sign}6 for the period: January 1 to March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farthing, George A.

    1996-12-31

    Babcock {ampersand} Wilcox (B{ampersand}W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls will likely arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B{ampersand}W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF will provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. The specific objectives of the project are to: (1) measure and understand the production and partitioning of air toxics species for a variety of steam coals, (2) optimize the air toxics removal performance of conventional flue gas cleanup systems (ESPs, baghouses, scrubbers), (3) develop advanced air toxics emissions control concepts, (4) develop and validate air toxics emissions measurement and monitoring techniques, and (5) establish a comprehensive, self- consistent air toxics data library. Development work is currently concentrated on the capture of mercury, fine particulate, and a variety of inorganic species such as the acid gases (hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, etc.).

  12. York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

  13. Petropower energia project under way in Chile promises refiner better economics at lower cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    Construction of the Republic of Chile`s first public/private industrial partnership project is well under way. Ground was broken for the $232-million Petropower Energia Limitada project early this year, shortly after the final contract between the parties - Foster Wheeler Power Systems, Inc. (FWPS); Petrox S.A. Refineria de Petroleo and Empresa Nacional del Petroleo (ENAP) - was signed. The Petropower project, located adjacent to Petrox`s 84,000-b/d refinery in Talcahuano, represents the first project ever to combine petroleum coking technology with cogeneration technology in a single project financing. Petropower is 85% owned by FWPS, 7.5% by ENAP, the Chilean national oil company and parent of Petrox S.A. When completed in mid-1998, the Petropower project will enable Petrox to refine heavier crudes and enhance the refinery`s flexibility and economics. The project will consist of a delayed coking facility (a 12,000-b/d delayed coking unit and a 7,000-b/d hydrotreating plant) and a 67-MW (59 MW net) cogeneration plant. The coke produced will fuel a Foster Wheeler proprietary-design circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boiler which will generate all the high-pressure steam and electric power needs of the Petrox refinery. This unit will be the first circulating fluidized-bed boiler to be built in Latin America. The cogeneration facility, using limestone as a reagent and equipped with a baghouse, will control SO{sub x} emissions from combustion of the green coke fuel and easily meet all Chilean environmental standards. Moreover, by constructing the cogeneration facility, Petrox will not have to proceed with capital improvements to existing facilities to ensure a reliable source of steam and electricity, resulting in substantial savings for Petrox. The cogeneration plant provides a permanent {open_quotes}disposal{close_quotes} for all coke produced by the delayed coker, thereby solving any future problems of unwanted or excess coke.

  14. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Progress continued at MHD coal-fired flow facility. UTSI reports on progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming portion of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. No Proof-of-Concept (POC) testing was conducted during the quarter but data analyses are reported from the test conducted during the prior quarter. Major results include corrosion data from the first 500 hours of testing on candidate tube materials in the superheater test module (SHTM). Solids mass balance data, electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and baghouse (BH) performance data, diagnostic systems and environmental data results from previous POC tests are included. The major activities this quarter were in facility modifications required to complete the scheduled POC test program. Activities reported include the installation of an automatic ash/seed removal system on the SHTM, the BH, and ESP hoppers. Also, a higher pressure compressor (350 psi) is being installed to provide additional blowing pressure to remove solids deposits on the convective heat transfer tubes in the high temperature zone where the deposits are molten. These activities are scheduled to be completed and ready for the next test, which is scheduled for late May 1990. Also, experiments on drying western coal are reported. The recommended system for modifying the CFFF coal system to permit processing of western coal is described. Finally, a new effort to test portions of the TRW combustor during tests in the CFFF is described. The status of system analyses being conducted under subcontract by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation is also described. 2 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Geological reasons for rapid water encroachment in wells at Sutorma oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkhipov, S.V.; Dvorak, S.V.; Sonich, V.P.; Nikolayeva, Ye.V.

    1987-12-01

    The Sutorma oil field on the northern Surgut dome is one of the new fields in West Siberia. It came into production in 1982, but already by 1983 it was found that the water contents in the fluids produced were much greater than the design values. The adverse effects are particularly pronounced for the main reservoir at the deposit, the BS/sub 10//sup 2/ stratum. Later, similar problems occurred at other fields in the Noyarbr and Purpey regions. It is therefore particularly important to elucidate the geological reasons for water encroachment.

  16. Charles Townes, the Maser, and the Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charles Townes - the Maser and the Laser Resources with Additional Information * Awards and Honors Charles Townes Photo Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Charles Hard Townes was educated at Furman University (B.A. in Modern Languages and B.S. in Physics in 1935), at Duke University (M.A. in Physics in 1937), and at the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D. in Physics in 1939). ' Townes was a member of the technical staff of the Bell Telephone Laboratories from 1939 to 1947.

  17. Women @ Energy: Jana Thayer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Jana Thayer Women @ Energy: Jana Thayer March 13, 2013 - 8:59am Addthis Dr. Jana Thayer works on the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. Dr. Jana Thayer works on the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. Check out other profiles in the Women @ Energy series and share your favorites on Pinterest. Dr. Jana Thayer earned her B.S. in Engineering Physics and a Ph.D. in Particle Physics from the University of Illinois and the Ohio State University, respectively. She then served as a postdoctoral scientist at

  18. Lightest Higgs boson production at photon colliders in the two Higgs doublet model type III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, R.; Rodriguez, J.-Alexis; Milanes, D.A.

    2005-08-01

    The branching ratios of the lightest CP-even Higgs boson h{sup 0} are calculated in the framework of the general two higgs doublet model. Different scenarios are presented taking into account constraints on the flavor changing neutral currents factors obtained in previous works. Plausible scenarios where appear flavor changing processes at tree level like bs and tc are analyzed for relevant parameters. The loop-induced Higgs couplings to photon pairs can be tested with a photon collider. The number of events of h{sup 0} as a resonance in photon colliders are calculated taking into account its corresponding background signal at TESLA, CLIC, and NLC.

  19. Rocío Mercado | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rocío Mercado Previous Next List PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California, Berkeley Email: rocio [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 310-259-5178 BS in Chemistry, California Institute of Technology EFRC Research To be better able to understand gas adsorptions and separations in MOFs, my EFRC research has focused on developing a force field from periodic density functional theory calculations for M-MOF-74 (M = Mg, Mn, Ni, Fe, Co, Zn) and water, carbon

  20. Sarah Hesse > Graduate Student - Wiesner Group > Researchers, Postdocs &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduates > The Energy Materials Center at Cornell Sarah Hesse Graduate Student - Wiesner Group sah354@cornell.edu Sarah Hesse is originally from near Cologne, Germany, but grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. She received her B.S. in Chemistry and B.A. in German from the University of California, Berkeley. Sarah joined the Wiesner group in Fall 2013 as a graduate student in Chemistry and is currently working on mesoporous carbons from block terpolymer self-assembly as

  1. PINCHED PLASMA REACTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, J.A.; Suydam, R.; Tuck, J.L.

    1961-07-01

    BS>A plasma confining and heating reactor is described which has the form of a torus with a B/sub 2/ producing winding on the outside of the torus and a helical winding of insulated overlapping tunns on the inside of the torus. The inner helical winding performs the double function of shielding the plasma from the vitreous container and generating a second B/sub z/ field in the opposite direction to the first B/sub z/ field after the pinch is established.

  2. Todd Shollenberger | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Todd Park About Us Todd Park - U.S. Chief Technology Officer and Assistant to the President Most Recent Energy Datapalooza: Unleashing the Power of Open Data to Advance our Energy Future October 22 Open Data for a Clean, Secure Energy Future July 12 Unlocking the Power of Energy Data May 2

    Shollenberger Research Technician Todd.Shollenberger@nrel.gov | 303-384-7943 Research Interests Todd Shollenberger graduated in 2009 with a B.S. in Biology. His background is in microbiology, quality

  3. Bob Hatcher | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bob Hatcher About Us Bob Hatcher - Member Bob is primarily a research scientist in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and holds the position of Distinguished Scientist and Professor. He worked 14 years under a joint appointment between UT and Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the UT/ORNL Distinguished Scientist Program. He received his B.S. in geology and chemistry and his M.S. is geology at Vanderbilt University. He earned his

  4. Greg Skupien | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Greg Skupien SREL Graduate Program Odum School of Ecology Greg Skupien Masters Student Odum School of Ecology, UGA Greg Skupien is currently pursuing a Master’s in Conservation Ecology and Sustainable Development in the Odum School of Ecology at the University of Georgia under the advisement of Dr. Kimberly Andrews. Greg graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2008 where he received his B.S. in Zoology and a certificate in Environmental Studies. In 2011, Greg began work in the

  5. Pat Phelan | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pat Phelan About Us Pat Phelan - Emerging Technologies Program Manager Pat Phelan Patrick (Pat) Phelan received his BS degree from Tulane University in New Orleans, his MS degree from MIT, and his PhD from UC Berkeley, all in mechanical engineering. Following a two-year post-doctoral fellowship at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, he started his academic career as an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawaii in 1992. In 1996 he moved to Arizona State University (ASU), where he is a

  6. CCEI WEBINAR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wednesday, October 13, 2015 11:30 a.m. (EDT) - 322 ISE Lab www.efrc.udel.edu The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation is an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Professor John Kitchin Department of Chemical Engineering Carnegie Mellon University http://kitchingroup.cheme.cmu.edu John Kitchin completed his B.S. in Chemistry at North Carolina State University. He completed a M.S. in Materials Science and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at

  7. A Tribute to Professor Cornelius Bennhold | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Tribute to Professor Cornelius Bennhold A Tribute to Professor Cornelius Bennhold Cornelius Bennhold, Professor of Physics and recent Chair of the Department of Physics at The George Washington University, passed on from this world on April 22, 2009, at the age of 48, after a long and courageous struggle against cancer. Cornelius earned his B.S. degree from the University of Mainz in Germany in 1981, and his Ph.D. from Ohio University in 1987. He held postdoctoral fellowships at Mainz and then

  8. A. Lawrence Bryan, Jr.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Lawrence (Larry) Bryan, Jr. Research Professional III Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P.O. Drawer E Aiken, SC 29802 803-725-2907 (Voice) -3309 (Fax) 803-646-3616 (cell) lbryan@srel.uga.edu (e-mail) Education: B.S., Wildlife Biology/North Carolina State University. May, 1979 M.S., Wildlife Biology/Clemson University. December, 1981 Experience summary From 1984 through the present, I have been involved in research pertaining to the ecology, behavior and conservation of Wood Storks, including

  9. Paul Wegner

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul Wegner Paul Wegner Program Director, Laser S&T and Systems Engineering NIF & Photon Science Dr. Paul Wegner, program director for Laser Science & Technology and Systems Engineering, has more than 30 years of experience developing solid-state inertial confinement fusion laser systems beginning with the Nova laser at LLNL in 1984. Dr. Wegner received his B.S. in physics and mathematics from Portland State University in 1984 and his Ph.D. in applied science from the University of

  10. Brent Draney

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brent Draney Brent Draney bdraney.jpg Brent R. Draney Group Lead Networking, Servers and Security Group BRDraney@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-5791 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943R0256 Berkeley, CA 94720 US Biographical Sketch Before joining NERSC, Brent analyzed census data as an information specialist in Berkeley Lab's Work Force Diversity Office. Before coming to the Lab, he worked as a statistician at the National Council on Crime and Delinquency. He has completed a B.S. at the

  11. Center for Materials at Irradiation and Mechanical Extremes: Los Alamos Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William D. Nix Professor Nix obtained his B.S. degree in Metallurgical Engineering from San Jose State College, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, respectively, from Stanford University. He joined the faculty at Stanford in 1963 and was appointed Professor in 1972. He was named the Lee Otterson Professor of Engineering at Stanford University in 1989 and served as Chairman of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering from 1991 to 1996. He

  12. Charles Wilson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Charles Townes - the Maser and the Laser Resources with Additional Information * Awards and Honors Charles Townes Photo Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Charles Hard Townes was educated at Furman University (B.A. in Modern Languages and B.S. in Physics in 1935), at Duke University (M.A. in Physics in 1937), and at the California Institute of Technology (Ph.D. in Physics in 1939). ' Townes was a member of the technical staff of the Bell Telephone Laboratories from 1939 to 1947.

  13. l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -_ ._ i,;PA.il--l-( ---.~ .-.---.-- .-.-_ L.. ,' 3:. /,y. ; .' ( * ' . bABDFUWW.64 iii4 ! .' - , _ ., - \ *Q@e Menwmzdzkm /-5*-i .-, ? r' / .j CJ ' 7, l UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT TO : FROM : SUBJECT: Reautor Materiala Brash, Bew York DATE : Au-t 2 % 1950 B.S. Pearson, Chief, Admbidratios Serviwr/ w ' Branch, Pittsburgh W fJ3lUAL~FBR~lFICATES MATDl!ALS,-3 @ * l . - -- E&red ia Copy lo. laf &8tewial Tramfor Cerfiiioatu Nor, 303-Z 353-2, 71bds 958-2 and %pZ eoverhg 6hipnsnt6 of sirc~ni\rp~

  14. Xizhen Lian | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Xizhen Lian Previous Next List Lian PhD Student Department of Chemistry Texas A&M University Email: xizhen.lian [at] mail.chem.tamu.edu Phone: 979-587-4228 BS in Chemistry, Nankai University, China EFRC Research Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been extensively studied over the past two decades due to their promising applications in storage, separation and conversion. Mesoporous MOF (mesoMOF) is an interesting type of MOF material with very large

  15. Zachary Perry | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Perry Previous Next List Perry PhD Student Department of Chemistry Texas A&M University Email: Zachary.Perry [at] mail.chem.tamu.edu Phone: 979-845-3216 BS in Chemistry, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga EFRC Research Metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) are discrete cages that can be thought of as engineered pores. New systems are being designed through the expansion of the list of transition metals used and the application of the knowledge gained from the

  16. Isaac Ovadia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isaac Ovadia Isaac Ovadia Isaac-Ovadia.jpg Isaac Ovadia HPC Technician Operations Technology Group IOvadia@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-6821 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 Biographical Sketch Isaac Ovadia joined LBNL in 2007 to provide Computer Operations and Network support to NERSC and ESNET. Isaac has a BS degree in Informations Systems Management from the University of San Francisco. In addition, he has a certification in Unix Systems Administration and

  17. Yu Lok Lam

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yu Lok Lam Yu Lok Lam ylam.jpg Yu Lok Lam Team Lead, CSE Operations Technology Group YLLam@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 486-6821 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 Biographical Sketch Yu Lok Lam is the Team Lead and provides operations and network support to NERSC and ESnet control room staff. He earned a B.S. degree in Computer Information Systems at San Francisco State University and an M.S. degree in Information Technology from Golden Gate University. Last

  18. Microsoft Word - EDUconnectUofFlorida3-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EDU c c c o o o n n n n n n e e e c c c t t t i i i o o o n n n s s s Nobel Laureate Associated with University of Florida and DOE 1 Nobel Laureate Name Date/Award In Association with U. of Florida Association with DOE 1 Robert H. Grubbs 2005 Chemistry B.S. Chemistry 1963; M.S. Chemistry 1965 Initial research in homogeneous catalysis was supported from 1979 through 1988 by DOE 1 Office of Science; more info 1 DOE - U.S. Department of Energy

  19. Liyun Zhang | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liyun Zhang SREL Graduate Program UGA Crop & Soil Liyun Zhang Ph.D. Student Seaman Lab Liyun Zhang is a graduate student in Crop and Soil Sciences at the University of Georgia (UGA). After she received her BS in Resources and Environmental Sciences from China Agricultural University, she went to Louisiana State University (LSU) for her MS under Dr. H.M. Selim. She worked on Ag sorption and transport in different soils in the presence of Zn during the two years. She also worked on the

  20. Geometric and Electronic Structures of the Ni(I) and Methyl-Ni(III)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermediates of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase 9 Geometric and Electronic Structures of the Ni(I) and Methyl-Ni(III) Intermediates of Methyl-Coenzyme M Reductase Methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) from methanogenic archaea catalyzes the terminal step in biological methane synthesis. Using coenzyme B (CoBSH) as the two-electron donor, MCR reduces methyl-coenzyme M (methyl-SCoM) to form methane and the heterodisulfide product, CoBS-SCoM. MCR contains an essential redox active nickel tetrapyrrolic

  1. UNCLASSIFIED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , i m - 5 - ' ., Physics - General ? c t 1 EFFECT O F TF3SOR BANGE I N 1 NUCLEBR TWO BODY PFtOBLEBBS * , ' 1 I bs Herman Feshbach, Massachusetts I I n s t i t u t e o f Technology I Julian Schwinger, Harvard. Unfversity John A. B~PP, Harvard University Computation Laboratory of HwvaP61 University Cambrfdge, Massaehuse tts Contract No, ~~(30-l),-497 Issued: Decernb~, 1949 I UNCLASSIFIEB j ! I* ' -. ...; I ; L 2 : , \' p ;? 2 i -1- UNCLASSIFIEB DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of

  2. US ITER | Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Suzanne Herron US ITER Deputy Project Manager Tell us about your background Suzanne Herron Suzanne Herron I have a BS in mathematics, a master's degree in Industrial and Systems Engineering and am a certified project manager. I was born in Ohio. However, I have lived and worked in Tennessee for the past 25 years. What were you doing before you came to US ITER? I have had a variety of experiences in my career. I started out in Ohio, working on the Gaseous Diffusion Program for the enrichment of

  3. Clayton Bagwell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clayton Bagwell Clayton Bagwell Clayton-Bagwell.jpg Clayton L. Bagwell Jr. Account & Allocation Support, NIM Development Team Member CLBagwell@lbl.gov Phone: (510) 495-2264 Fax: (510) 486-4316 1 Cyclotron Road Mail Stop 943-256 Berkeley, CA 94720 US Biographical Sketch Clayton Bagwell provides Account & Allocation Support and is a primary member of the NIM (NERSC Information Management) system development team. He has a B.S. degree in Information Systems Management from the University of

  4. HIGH TEMPERATURE SYSTEMS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomson, G.P.; Blackman, M.

    1961-07-25

    BS>A device is descrined for producing nuclear fusion reactions by additional acceleration of a hydrogen isotope plasma formed and initially accelerated by a collapsing magnetic field. The plasma is enclosed in a toroidal cavity within a vessel composed of a plurality of insulated coaxial segments. The added acceleration is caused by providing progressing potentials to the insulated segments acting as electrodes by means of a segmented delay transmission line coupled to the electrode segments and excited by a two phase alternating current supply.

  5. CONTROL SYSTEM FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crever, F.E.

    1962-05-01

    BS>A slow-acting shim rod for control of major variations in reactor neutron flux and a fast-acting control rod to correct minor flux variations are employed to provide a sensitive, accurate control system. The fast-acting rod is responsive to an error signal which is produced by changes in the neutron flux from a predetermined optimum level. When the fast rod is thus actuated in a given direction, means is provided to actuate the slow-moving rod in that direction to return the fast rod to a position near the midpoint of its control range. (AEC)

  6. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Seismic Safety Program: Summary of findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheimer, J.F.; Burkhard, N.R.; Emerson, D.O.

    1991-05-01

    This report summarizes the final assessments of geologic hazards at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and includes a revision of the peak acceleration hazard curve. Detailed discussions of investigations are documented in a series of reports produced by LLNL's Site Seismic Safety Program and their consultants. The Program conducted a probabilistic assessment of hazards at the site as a result of liquefaction, landslide, and strong ground shaking, using existing models to explicitly treat uncertainties. The results indicate the Greenville and Las Positas-Verona Fault systems present the greatest hazard to the LLNL site as a result of ground shaking, with a lesser contribution from the Calaveras Fault. Other, more distant fault systems do not materially contribute to the hazard. No evidence has been found that the LLNL site will undergo soil failures such as landslides or liquefaction. In addition, because of the locations and ages of the faults in the LLNL area, surface ground rupture during an earthquake is extremely unlikely. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Role and development of soil parameters for seismic responses of buried lifelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Buried lifelines, e.g. oil, gas, water and sewer pipelines have been damaged heavily in recent earthquakes such as 1971 San Fernando Earthquake, in U.S.A., 1976 Tangshan Earthquake, in China, and 1978 MiyagiKen-Oki Earthquake, in Japan, among others. Researchers on the seismic performance of these buried lifelines have been initiated in the United States and many other countries. Various analytical models have been proposed. However, only limited experimental investigations are available. The sources of earthquake damage to buried lifelines include landslide, tectonic uplift-subsidence, soil liquefaction, fault displacement and ground shaking (effects of wave propagation). This paper is concerned with the behavior of buried lifeline systems subjected to surface faulting and ground shaking. The role and development of soil parameters that significantly influence the seismic responses are discussed. The scope of this paper is to examine analytically the influence of various soil and soilstructure interaction parameters to the seismic responses of buried pipelines, to report the currently available physical data of these and related parameters for immediate applications, and to describe the experiments to obtain additional information on soil resistant characteristics to longitudinal pipe motions.

  8. Seismic Loading for FAST: May 2011 - August 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asareh, M. A.; Prowell, I.

    2012-08-01

    As more wind farms are constructed in seismically active regions, earthquake loading increases in prominence for design and analysis of wind turbines. Early investigation of seismic load tended to simplify the rotor and nacelle as a lumped mass on top of the turbine tower. This simplification allowed the use of techniques developed for conventional civil structures, such as buildings, to be easily applied to wind turbines. However, interest is shifting to more detailed models that consider loads for turbine components other than the tower. These improved models offer three key capabilities in consideration of base shaking for turbines: 1) The inclusion of aerodynamics and turbine control; 2) The ability to consider component loads other than just tower loads; and 3) An improved representation of turbine response in higher modes by reducing modeling simplifications. Both experimental and numerical investigations have shown that, especially for large modern turbines, it is important to consider interaction between earthquake input, aerodynamics, and operational loads. These investigations further show that consideration of higher mode activity may be necessary in the analysis of the seismic response of turbines. Since the FAST code is already capable of considering these factors, modifications were developed that allow simulation of base shaking. This approach allows consideration of this additional load source within a framework, the FAST code that is already familiar to many researchers and practitioners.

  9. Self-cleaning inlet screen to an ocean riser pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmore, S.B.; Person, A.

    1980-06-17

    A long, vertically disposed ocean water upwelling pipe, such as a cold water riser in an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, is fitted at its lower inlet end with a self-cleaning inlet screen. The screen includes a right conical frustum of loose metal netting connected at its larger upper end to the lower end of the pipe. A heavy, negatively buoyant closure is connected across the lower end of the frustum. A weight is suspended below the closure on a line which passes loosely through the closure into the interior of the screen. The line tends to stay stationary as the lower end of the pipe moves, as in response to ocean current vortex shedding and other causes, thus causing the closure to rattle on the line and to shake the netting. The included half-angle of the frustum is approximately 20 so that, on shaking of the netting, marine life accumulated on the netting becomes loose and falls free of the netting. 6 claims.

  10. Quantitative extraction and concentration of synthetic water-soluble acid dyes from aqueous media using a quinine-chloroform solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, F.; Ozawa, N.; Hanai, J.; Isobe, M.; Watabe, T.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty-one water-soluble acid dyes, including eleven azo, five triphenylmethane four xanthene, one naphthol derivatives, used at practical concentrations for food coloration, were quantitatively extracted from water and various carbonated beverages into a 0.1 M quinine-chloroform solution in the presence of 0.5 M boric acid by brief shaking. Quantitative extraction of these dyes was also accomplished by the 0.1 M quinine-chloroform solution made conveniently from chloroform, quinine hydrochloride, and sodium hydroxide added successively to water or beverages containing boric acid. Quinine acted as a countercation on the dyes having sulfonic and/or carboxylic acid group(s) to form chloroform-soluble ion-pair complexes. The diacidic base alkaloid interacted with each acid group of mono-, di-, tri-, and tetrasulfonic acid dyes approximately in the ratio 0.8-0.9 to 1. The dyes in the chloroform solution were quantitatively concentrated into a small volume of sodium hydroxide solution also by brief shaking. The convenient quinine-chloroform method was applicable to the quantitative extraction of a mixture of 12 dyes from carbonated beverages, which are all currently used for food coloration. A high-pressure liquid chromatographic method is also presented for the systematic separation and determination of these 12 dyes following their concentration into the aqueous alkaline solution. The chromatogram was monitored by double-wavelength absorptiometry in the visible and ultraviolet ray regions.

  11. Experimental Validation of LLNL Finite Element Codes for Nonlinear Seismic Simulations (Progress, Year 1 of 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alves, S W; Noble, C R

    2006-12-06

    Shake table tests were performed on a full-scale 7-story slice of a reinforced concrete building at UC San Diego between October 2005 and January 2006. The tests were performed on the NEES Large High-Performance Outdoor Shake Table (LHPOST) at the Engelkirk Structural Engineering Center of UCSD. The structure was subjected to four uniaxial earthquake ground motions of increasing amplitude. The accelerations measured at the base of the structure and the measured roof displacements have been provided by UCSD. Details of the building construction have also been provided by UCSD. The measured response of this structure was used to assess the capability of the homogenized rebar model in DYNA3D/ParaDyn [1,2] to simulate the seismic response of reinforced concrete structures. The homogenized rebar model is a composite version of the Karagozian & Case concrete model [3]. Work has been done to validate this material model for use in blast simulations, but seismic simulations require longer durations. The UCSD experiment provides full-scale data that can be used to validate seismic modeling capabilities.

  12. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  13. Determination of inorganic and organic priority pollutants in biosolids from meat processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sena, Rennio F. de Tambosi, Jose L.; Floriani, Silvia L.; Virmond, Elaine; Schroeder, Horst Fr.; Moreira, Regina F.P.M.; Jose, Humberto J.

    2009-09-15

    The biosolids (BS) generated in the wastewater treatment process of a meat processing plant were monitored and the priority pollutant content was characterized. The trace metal and organic pollutant content - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) - were determined quantitatively and compared to guideline limits established by the US EPA and EU. PCBs were not detected in the solid samples, while trace metals, PAHs and PCDD/PCDF were detected in concentrations below the limits established by international standards. Toxic equivalent factors were evaluated for the biosolids, and the results proved that these wastes can be safely deposited on land or used in combustion/incineration plants. Since no previous data were found for meat processing waste, comparisons were made using municipal sewage sludge data reported in the literature. Since, this report monitored part of the priority pollutants established by the US EPA for meat and poultry processing wastewater and sludge, the results verified that low pollution loads are generated by the meat processing plant located in the southern part of Brazil. However, the BS generated in the treatment processes are in accordance with the limits established for waste disposal and even for soil fertilizer.

  14. Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Sperling, E.J.; Shen, G.; Yin, H.; Rana, M.D.

    1996-12-01

    An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach; The welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

  15. Prediction of failure behavior of a welded pressure vessel containing flaws during a hydrogen-charged burst test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhuyan, G.S.; Sperling, E.J.; Shen, G.; Yin, H.; Rana, M.D.

    1999-08-01

    An industry-government collaborative program was carried out with an aim to promoting the acceptance of fracture mechanics-based fitness-for-service assessment methodology for a service-damaged pressure vessel. A collaborative round robin exercise was carried out to predict the fracture behavior of a vessel containing hydrogen damage, fabrication-related lack-of-fusion defects, an artificially induced fatigue crack, and a localized thinned area. The fracture assessment procedures used include the US ASME Material Property Council`s PREFIS Program based on the British Standard (BS) Published Document (PD) 6493, ASME Section XI and The Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB) R6 approach, The Welding Institute (TWI) CRACKWISE program (based on BS PD6493 Level 2 approach), a variant of the R6 approach, J-tearing instability approaches, various J-estimation schemes, LEFM approach, and simplified stress analysis. Assessments were compared with the results obtained from a hydrogen-charged burst test of the vessel. Predictions, based on the J-tearing approach, compared well with the actual burst test results. Actual burst pressure was about five times the operating pressure.

  16. Effect of mechanical strain on electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Sandeep Kumar, Jagdish Sastri, O. S. K. S.

    2015-05-15

    Ab-initio density functional theory based calculations of electronic properties of bulk and monolayer Molybdenum di-Sulfide (MoS{sub 2}) have been performed using all electron Full Potential Linearised Augmentad Plane Wave (FPLAPW) method using Elk code. We have used Generalised Gradient Approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation functionals and performed calculaitons of Lattice parameters, Density Of States (DOS) and Band Structure (BS). Band structure calculations revealed that bulk MoS{sub 2} has indirect band gap of 0.97 eV and mono-layer MoS{sub 2} has direct band gap which has increased to 1.71 eV. These are in better agreement with experimental values as compared with the other calculations using pseudo-potential code. The effect of mechanical strain on the electronic properties of bulk MoS{sub 2} has also been studied. For the different values of compressive strain (varying from 2% to 8% in steps of 2%) along the c-axis, the corresponding DOS and BS are obtained. We observed that the band gap decreases by about 15% for every 2% increase in strain along the c-axis.

  17. Hexagonal-structured epsilon-NbN. Ultra-incompressibility, high shear rigidity, and a possible hard superconducting material

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zou, Y.; Wang, X.; Chen, T.; Li, X.; Qi, X; Welch, D.; Zhu, P.; Liu, B.; Cui, T.; Li, B.

    2015-06-01

    Exploring the structural stability and elasticity of hexagonal ε-NbN helps discover correlations among its physical properties for scientific and technological applications. Here, for the first time, we measured the ultra-incompressibility and high shear rigidity of polycrystalline hexagonal ε-NbN using ultrasonic interferometry and in situ X-ray diffraction, complemented with first-principles density-functional theory calculations up to 30 GPa in pressure. Using a finite strain equation of state approach, the elastic bulk and shear moduli, as well as their pressure dependences are derived from the measured velocities and densities, yielding BS0 = 373.3(15) GPa, G0 = 200.5(8) GPa, ∂BS/∂P = 3.81(3) and ∂G/∂Pmore » = 1.67(1). The hexagonal ε-NbN possesses a very high bulk modulus, rivaling that of superhard material cBN (B0 = 381.1 GPa). The high shear rigidity is comparable to that for superhard γ-B (G0 = 227.2 GPa). We found that the crystal structure of transition-metal nitrides and the outmost electrons of the corresponding metals may dominate their pressure dependences in bulk and shear moduli. In addition, the elastic moduli, Vickers hardness, Debye temperature, melting temperature and a possible superconductivity of hexagonal ε-NbN all increase with pressures, suggesting its exceptional suitability for applications under extreme conditions.« less

  18. The I=2 ππ S-wave Scattering Phase Shift from Lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beane, S. R.; Chang, E.; Detmold, W.; Lin, H. W.; Luu, T. C.; Orginos, K.; Parreno, A.; Savage, M. J.; Torok, A.; Walker-Loud, A.

    2012-02-16

    The π+π+ s-wave scattering phase-shift is determined below the inelastic threshold using Lattice QCD. Calculations were performed at a pion mass of mπ ≈ 390 MeV with an anisotropic nf = 2+1 clover fermion discretization in four lattice volumes, with spatial extent L ≈ 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 and 3.9 fm, and with a lattice spacing of bs ≈ 0.123 fm in the spatial direction and bt bs/3.5 in the time direction. The phase-shift is determined from the energy-eigenvalues of π+π+ systems with both zero and non-zero total momentum in the lattice volume using Luscher's method. Our calculations are precise enoughmore » to allow for a determination of the threshold scattering parameters, the scattering length a, the effective range r, and the shape-parameter P, in this channel and to examine the prediction of two-flavor chiral perturbation theory: mπ2 a r = 3+O(mπ2/Λχ2). Chiral perturbation theory is used, with the Lattice QCD results as input, to predict the scattering phase-shift (and threshold parameters) at the physical pion mass. Our results are consistent with determinations from the Roy equations and with the existing experimental phase shift data.« less

  19. Low Velocity Sphere Impact of a Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrissey, Timothy G; Ferber, Mattison K; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Fox, Ethan E

    2012-05-01

    This report summarizes US Army TARDEC sponsored work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) involving low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) ball impact testing of Borofloat borosilicate glass, and is a follow-up to a similar study completed by the authors on Starphire soda-lime silicate glass last year. The response of the borosilicate glass to impact testing at different angles was also studied. The Borofloat glass was supplied by the US Army Research Laboratory and its tin-side was impacted or indented. The intent was to better understand low velocity impact response in the Borofloat. Seven sphere materials were used whose densities bracket that of rock: borosilicate glass, soda-lime silicate glass, silicon nitride, aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide, carbon steel, and a chrome steel. A gas gun or a ball-drop test setup was used to produce controlled velocity delivery of the spheres against the glass tile targets. Minimum impact velocities to initiate fracture in the Borofloat were measured and interpreted in context to the kinetic energy of impact and the elastic property mismatch between the seven sphere-Borofloat-target combinations. The primary observations from this low velocity (< 30 m/s or < 65 mph) testing were: (1) BS glass responded similarly to soda-lime silicate glass when spherically indented but quite differently under sphere impact conditions; (2) Frictional effects contributed to fracture initiation in BS glass when it spherically indented. This effect was also observed with soda-lime silicate glass; (3) The force necessary to initiate fracture in BS glass under spherical impact decreases with increasing elastic modulus of the sphere material. This trend is opposite to what was observed with soda-lime silicate glass. Friction cannot explain this trend and the authors do not have a legitimate explanation for it yet; (4) The force necessary to initiate contact-induced fracture is higher under dynamic conditions than under quasi-static conditions. That difference decreases with increasing elastic modulus mismatch between the sphere material and borosilicate This trend was opposite in soda-lime silicate glass; (5) Fracture in borosilicate glass occurs at lower velocities (i.e., easier) at 24{sup o} than at 0{sup o} (orthogonal) and 46{sup o} of impact for the same probability of failure. Though not analyzed yet, this suggests that a convolution of kinetic energy and friction is contributing to that trend; (6) There is a subtle indication there was intra-tile differences in spherical indentation RCIF. This likely is not a material property nor exclusive to borosilicate glass, rather, it is a statistical response of a combination of local, surface-located flaw and imposed tensile stress. Understanding of the surface flaw population and flaw positioning can likely enable prediction of spherical indentation RCIF; and (7) Contact-induced fracture did not initiate in the Borofloat BS for impact kinetic energies up to {approx} 20 mJ. For kinetic energies between {approx} 20-150 mJ, fracture sometimes initiated. Contact-induced fracture would always occur for impact energies > 150 mJ. The energy values, and their boundaries, were much lower for BS glass than they were for soda-lime silicate glass.

  20. Smart Screening System (S3) In Taconite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryoush Allaei

    2006-09-08

    The conventional screening machines used in processing plants have had undesirable high noise and vibration levels. They also have had unsatisfactorily low screening efficiency, high energy consumption, high maintenance cost, low productivity, and poor worker safety. These conventional vibrating machines have been used in almost every processing plant. Most of the current material separation technology uses heavy and inefficient electric motors with an unbalanced rotating mass to generate the shaking. In addition to being excessively noisy, inefficient, and high-maintenance, these vibrating machines are often the bottleneck in the entire process. Furthermore, these motors, along with the vibrating machines and supporting structure, shake other machines and structures in the vicinity. The latter increases maintenance costs while reducing worker health and safety. The conventional vibrating fine screens at taconite processing plants have had the same problems as those listed above. This has resulted in lower screening efficiency, higher energy and maintenance cost, and lower productivity and workers safety concerns. The focus of this work is on the design of a high performance screening machine suitable for taconite processing plants. SmartScreens{trademark} technology uses miniaturized motors, based on smart materials, to generate the shaking. The underlying technologies are Energy Flow Control{trademark} and Vibration Control by Confinement{trademark}. These concepts are used to direct energy flow and confine energy efficiently and effectively to the screen function. The SmartScreens{trademark} technology addresses problems related to noise and vibration, screening efficiency, productivity, and maintenance cost and worker safety. Successful development of SmartScreens{trademark} technology will bring drastic changes to the screening and physical separation industry. The final designs for key components of the SmartScreens{trademark} have been developed. The key components include smart motor and associated electronics, resonators, and supporting structural elements. It is shown that the smart motors have an acceptable life and performance. Resonator (or motion amplifier) designs are selected based on the final system requirement and vibration characteristics. All the components for a fully functional prototype are fabricated and have been tested.

  1. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  2. CFD Modeling for Mercury Control Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, J.I.

    2006-12-01

    Compliance with the Clean Air Mercury Rule will require implementation of dedicated mercury control solutions at a significant portion of the U.S. coal-fired utility fleet. Activated Carbon Injection (ACI) upstream of a particulate control device (ESP or baghouse) remains one of the most promising near-term mercury control technologies. The DOE/NETL field testing program has advanced the understanding of mercury control by ACI, but a persistent need remains to develop predictive models that may improve the understanding and practical implementation of this technology. This presentation describes the development of an advanced model of in-flight mercury capture based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The model makes detailed predictions of the induct spatial distribution and residence time of sorbent, as well as predictions of mercury capture efficiency for particular sorbent flow rates and injection grid configurations. Hence, CFD enables cost efficient optimization of sorbent injection systems for mercury control to a degree that would otherwise be impractical both for new and existing plants. In this way, modeling tools may directly address the main cost component of operating an ACI system the sorbent expense. A typical 300 MW system is expected to require between $1 and $2 million of sorbent per year, and so even modest reductions (say 10-20%) in necessary sorbent feed injection rates will quickly make any optimization effort very worthwhile. There are few existing models of mercury capture, and these typically make gross assumptions of plug gas flow, zero velocity slip between particle and gas phase, and uniform sorbent dispersion. All of these assumptions are overcome with the current model, which is based on first principles and includes mass transfer processes occurring at multiple scales, ranging from the large-scale transport in the duct to transport within the porous structure of a sorbent particle. In principle any single one of these processes could limit the overall capture of mercury. For example, capture may be severely limited in situations where the dispersion of sorbent is poor, or where adsorption rates are low because of relatively high temperatures. Application examples taken from the DOE/NETL field test program were considered. The sites considered include Brayton Point, Meramec, Monroe, and Yates. Some general lessons learned concerning the impact of turbulence and flow stratification on dispersion and capture will be presented.

  3. Spectroscopic evidence for Ag(III) in highly oxidized silver films by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Chambers, Scott A.; Bagus, Paul S.

    2010-12-16

    In situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized to identify the chemical state of silver in a range of silver oxide thin films obtained by co-deposition of silver and atomic oxygen. A highly oxidized silver species was observed at an unexpectedly low Ag 3d5/2 binding energy (BE) of 366.8 eV with an associated broad satellite at 368.2 eV; this species was assigned as Ag(III). It was found to be highly unstable in vacuum, but could be regenerated by further exposure to atomic oxygen. Both BE shifts and intensity changes of the O 1s peak were found to correlate with changes in the silver oxidation state. Theoretical calculations of the expected XPS of high spin Ag(III) provide insight into the significance of satellite structure and shake features in the Ag 3d spectra.

  4. Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

    2014-03-25

    An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

  5. Seismic ruggedness of aged electrical components: Final report (Phase 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    Seismic tests on new and aged components have shown that, for many types of commonly used nuclear plant electrical components, deterioration due to aging does not significantly affect the ability of the components to function during and after a seismic event. This was demonstrated for capacitors, circuit breakers, contactors (motor starters), control station assemblies, electronic alarms, electronics, fuses, fuse blocks, inductors, meters, motors, pressure transmitters, power supplies, relays, RTDs, solenoid valves, terminal blocks, time delay relays, transformers and switches. A few switch types (limit, pressure and rotary) were observed to be more prone to contact chatter in an aged condition than in an unaged condition. However, the ability of these devices to switch during and after shaking was not affected by aging. These results can be referenced to eliminate the cost of aging prior to seismic qualification testing for many types of electrical components.

  6. Studies on the stripping of cerium from the loaded tbp-kerosene solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizk, S.E.; Abdel Rahman, N.; Daoud, J.A.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-07-01

    The reductive stripping of Ce(IV) from the loaded organic phase (30% TBP in kerosene) was investigated, using two stripping agents, EDTA and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, in nitric acid. The results are compared to determine the optimum conditions for the reduction of Ce(IV) in the organic phase to Ce(III) in the aqueous phase. For each of the two stripping agents, the effect of different parameters affecting the reduction process was investigated: stripping-agent concentration, nitric acid concentration, phase ratio, shaking time, and temperature. The results are compared and discussed in terms of the conditions required for maximum reductive stripping of Ce(IV). (authors)

  7. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

  8. Test series 1: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Gould NCX-2250 battery cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J. S.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D A; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1984-09-01

    The seismic-fragility response of naturally-aged, nuclear station, safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and thresholds; and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the end-of-life of a battery, given a seismic event. This report covers the first test series of an extensive program using 12-year old, lead-calcium, Gould NCX-2250 cells, from the James A. Fitzpatrick Nuclear Power Station operated by the New York Power Authority. Seismic tests with three cell configurations were performed using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, rigidly mounted; multi-cell (three) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack; and single-cell tests specifically aimed towards examining propagation of pre-existing case cracks. In general the test philosophy was to monitor the electrical properties including discharge capacity of cells through a graduated series of g-level step increases until either the shake-table limits were reached or until electrical failure of the cells occurred. Of nine electrically active cells, six failed during seismic testing over a range of imposed g-level loads in excess of a 1-g ZPA. Post-test examination revealed a common failure mode, the cracking at the abnormally brittle, positive lead bus-bar/post interface; further examination showed that the failure zone was extremely coarse grained and extensively corroded. Presently accepted accelerated-aging methods for qualifying batteries, per IEEE Std. 535-1979, are based on plate growth, but these naturally-aged 12-year old cells showed no significant plate growth.

  9. NON-DESTRUCTIVE METHOD AND MEANS FOR FLAW DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hochschild, R.

    1959-03-10

    BS>An improved method is presented for the nondestructive detection of flaws in olectrictilly conductivc articles using magnetic field. According to thc method a homogoneous mignetic field is established in the test article;it right angle" to the artyicle. A probe is aligned with its axis transverse to the translates so hat th4 probe scans the surface of the test article while the axis of the robe is transverse to the direction of translation of the article. In this manner any output current obtained in thc probe is an indication of the size and location of a flaw in the article under test, with a miiiimum of signal pick- up in the probe from the established magnetic field.

  10. Influence of Bridgman solidification on microstructures and magnetic behaviors of a non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi high-entropy alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Tingting; Yang, Xiao; Liaw, Peter K.; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-07

    The non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi alloy is prepared by the Bridgman solidification (BS) technique at different withdrawal velocities (V = 30, 100, and 200 μm/s). Various characterization techniques have been used to study the microstructure and crystal orientation. The morphological evolutions accompanying the crystal growth of the alloy prepared at different withdrawal velocities are nearly the same, from equiaxed grains to columnar crystals. The transition of coercivity is closely related to the local microstructure, while the saturation magnetization changes little at different sites. The coercivity can be significantly reduced from the equiaxed grain area to the columnar crystal area when the applied magnetic field direction is parallel to the crystal growth direction, no matter what is the withdrawal velocity. As a result, the alloy possesses magnetic anisotropy when the applied magnetic field is in different directions.

  11. Synthesis of acylphosphonites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prishchenko, A.A.; Livantsov, M.V.; Lutsenko I.F.

    1987-12-10

    The authors showed earlier that (alkoxycarbonyl)phosphonites are obtained in high yields by the reactions of (dialkoxymethyl)phosphonites with alkyl chloroformates. In the present work the analogous reactions of the phosphonites with acyl chlorides were applied in the synthesis of the previously difficultly accessible acylphosphonites. The phosphonites are formed rapidly when mixtures of the reactants are boiled in ether. The IR spectra were determined on a IKS-22 spectrometer, the PMR spectra of a Tesla BS-467 spectrometer, and /sup 13/C and /sup 31/P NMR spectra on Varian FT-80A and Jeol FX-100 spectrometers; standards: TMS (/sup 1/H, /sup 13/C) and an 85% solution of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in D/sub 2/O.

  12. Synthesis of new pyrazole and isoxazole derivatives based on products of condensation of. beta. -dicarbonyl compounds with 1,2,3-trihalopropanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhmedov, Sh.T.; Sadykhov, N.S.; Ismailov, V.M.; Akhundova, M.A.; Mamedov, M.M.; Kozhushkov, S.I.; Zefirov, N.S.

    1987-12-01

    The reaction of 2-(2-halo-3-propenyl)-1,3-dicarbonyl compounds, which are formed in the alkylation of ..beta..-dicarbonyl compounds with 1,2,3-trihalopropanes in the presence of potassium carbonate in DMSO, with hydrazine and hydroxylamine derivatives was studied. The synthesis of new pyrazole and isoxazole derivatives on the basis of this reaction is described. Some chemical transformations of the 1,2-azoles obtained were investigated. The IR spectra of suspensions of the compounds in mineral oil were recorded with a UR-20 spectrometer. The /sup 1/H NMR spectra were recorded with a Tesla BS-487 spectrometer (80 MHz), and the /sup 13/C NMR spectra were recorded with a Varian FT-80A spectrometer (20 MHz) with complete decoupling of the protons and tetramethylsilane (TMS) as the standard.

  13. Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    difference ΔΓs using the Bs0→J/ψϕ(1020) decay channel in pp collisions at s=8 TeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width difference ΔΓs using the B s 0 → J / ψ ϕ ( 1020 ) decay channel in pp collisions at s = 8 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the CP-violating weak phase ϕs and the decay width difference ΔΓs using the B s 0 → J / ψ ϕ ( 1020 ) decay channel in pp collisions at s = 8

  14. Portable computer to reduce gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopic ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Camp, D.C.

    1981-05-15

    In response to Task A.63 of the International Safeguards Project Office (ISPO), to upgrade measurement technology used by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), a portable data-reduction microprocessor was designed and programmed which allows in-field reduction of gamma-ray spectra and interfaces with the IAEA's multichannel analyzers - the 1000 or 2000-channel memory Silena BS27/N. This report describes the components used in assembling the microprocessor unit: hardware, software used to control the unit, and the mathematical formulation used to obtain isotopic ratios from the gamma-ray data. A simple overview is presented of the unit's operation and the results of tests on gamma-ray spectra that sought to verify the unit's operating characteristics and to determine the precision and effectiveness of the software developed for data reduction.

  15. Technical Information to Support Double Shell Tank (DST) Emergency Annulus Pumping [SEC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REBERGER, D.W.

    2000-09-14

    This document provides the design calculations for the DST Annulus Emergency Pumping Project. This document also contains essential information relative to DST annulus emergency pumping that may not be found in other documents. This information consists of the following: Index drawing for annulus pumping; References to the Acceptance Test Report, DST Emergency Pumping Guide, Time Deployment study, etc.; Statements of work; and Reference CEIS and RMIS numbers. A Vendor Information document, VI-50121, is not included in this document, but a copy can be obtained by contacting Document Control Services. This document contains various information regarding the Hydrostar pumps, such as the air motor, cylinder size, pump installation and operation manual. It also contains information regarding the Flygt BS2060 submersible pump, such as parts list, pump handling, preventative maintenance, overhaul and repair. In addition, this document also has information on 3-way PM ball valves, electrical skid components and the alternate Gurman-Rupp stainless steel submersible pump.

  16. Mapping site-specific endonuclease binding to DNA by direct imaging with AFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, D.P.; Thundat, T.; Doktycz, M.J.; Kerper, P.S.; Warmack, R.J.; Modrich, P.; Isfort, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    Physical mapping of DNA can be accomplished by direct AFM imaging of site specific proteins bound to DNA molecules. Using Gln-111, a mutant of EcoRI endonuclease with a specific affinity for EcoRI sites 1,000 times greater than wild type enzyme but with cleavage rate constants reduced by a factor of 10{sup 4}, the authors demonstrate site-specific mapping by direct AFM imaging. Images are presented showing specific-site binding of Gln-111 to plasmids having either one (pBS{sup +}) or two (pMP{sup 32}) EcoRI sites. Identification of the Gln-111/DNA complex is greatly enhanced by biotinylation of the complex followed by reaction with streptavidin gold prior to imaging. Image enhancement coupled with improvements in the preparation techniques for imaging large DNA molecules, such as lambda DNA (47 kb), has the potential to contribute to direct AFM restriction mapping of cosmid-sized genomic DNAs.

  17. A new hydrocarbon empirical potential in angle bending calculation for the molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping, Tan Ai; Hoe, Yeak Su

    2014-07-10

    Typically, short range potential only depends on neighbouring atoms and its parameters function can be categorized into bond stretching, angle bending and bond rotation potential. In this paper, we present our work called Angle Bending (AB) potential, whereas AB potential is the extension of our previous work namely Bond Stretching (BS) potential. Basically, potential will tend to zero after truncated region, potential in specific region can be represented by different piecewise polynomial. We proposed the AB piecewise potential which is possible to solve a system involving three atoms. AB potential able to handle the potential of covalent bonds for three atoms as well as two atoms cases due to its degeneracy properties. Continuity for the piecewise polynomial has been enforced by coupling with penalty methods. There are still plenty of improvement spaces for this AB potential. The improvement for three atoms AB potential will be studied and further modified into torsional potential which are the ongoing current research.

  18. 2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tyler; Shirk, Matthew; Wishart, Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (CAU No. 443)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    N V- - 48 3- R E V 1 U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on D i v i s i on N ev ada E nv i r onm ent al R es t or at i on Pr oj ect Cor r ect i v e Act i on Inv es t i gat i on Pl an f or t he Cent r al N ev ada Tes t Ar ea S u bs u r f ace S i t es ( Cor r ect i v e Act i on U ni t N o. 443) Cont r ol l ed Copy N o. : R ev i s i on N o. : 1 Febr u ar y 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public

  20. Historical Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rulison Nocturnal Drainage Study, August 1970 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. O F F ~ ~-~ ~- U. S. PEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE SERVICES AOM~NISTRATION llosi3 R E S E A R C H L A B O R A T O R I E S A I R R E S O U R C E S L A B O R A T O R Y - L A S V E G A S P. 0. 8 0 X I49BS L A S V E G A S . N E V A D A (19114 . ~ IN REPLY R E F E R T O : STUDY U. S. DEPARTMENT O

  1. Influence of Bridgman solidification on microstructures and magnetic behaviors of a non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi high-entropy alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zuo, Tingting; Yang, Xiao; Liaw, Peter K.; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-07

    The non-equiatomic FeCoNiAlSi alloy is prepared by the Bridgman solidification (BS) technique at different withdrawal velocities (V = 30, 100, and 200 μm/s). Various characterization techniques have been used to study the microstructure and crystal orientation. The morphological evolutions accompanying the crystal growth of the alloy prepared at different withdrawal velocities are nearly the same, from equiaxed grains to columnar crystals. The transition of coercivity is closely related to the local microstructure, while the saturation magnetization changes little at different sites. The coercivity can be significantly reduced from the equiaxed grain area to the columnar crystal area when the appliedmore » magnetic field direction is parallel to the crystal growth direction, no matter what is the withdrawal velocity. As a result, the alloy possesses magnetic anisotropy when the applied magnetic field is in different directions.« less

  2. PLASMA ENERGIZATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, H.P.; Chambers, E.S.

    1962-03-01

    BS>A method is given for ion cyclotron resonance heatthg of a magnetically confined plasma by an applied radio-frequency field. In accordance with the invention, the radiofrequency energy is transferred to the plasma without the usual attendent self-shielding effect of plasma polarlzatlon, whereby the energy transfer is accomplished with superior efficiency. More explicitly, the invention includes means for applying a radio-frequency electric field radially to an end of a plasma column confined in a magnetic mirror field configuration. The radio-frequency field propagates hydromagnetic waves axially through the column with the waves diminishing in an intermediate region of the column at ion cyclotron resonance with the fleld frequency. In such region the wave energy is converted by viscous damping to rotational energy of the plasma ions. (AEC)

  3. 2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Evaluation of Impurity Extremes in a Plutonium-loaded Borosilicate Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.M.; Crawford, C.L.; Marra, J.C.; Bibler, N.E.; Hoffman, E.N.; Edwards, T.B. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2008-07-01

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for the disposition of excess weapons-usable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990's. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt % Pu and to be tolerant of a range of impurities. To confirm the results of previous testing with surrogate Pu feeds containing impurities, four glass compositions were selected for fabrication with actual plutonium oxide and impurities. The four compositions represented extremes in impurity type and concentration. The homogeneity and durability of these four compositions were measured. The homogeneity of the glasses was evaluated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The XRD results indicated that the glasses were amorphous with no evidence of crystalline species in the glass. The SEM/EDS analyses did show the presence of some undissolved PuO{sub 2} material. The EDS spectra indicated that some of the PuO{sub 2} crystals also contained hafnium oxide. The SEM/EDS analyses showed that there were no heterogeneities in the glass due to the feed impurities. The durability of the glasses was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT results indicated that the durability of Pu impurity glasses was comparable with Pu glasses without impurities and significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used as the benchmark for repository disposition of high-level waste (HLW) glasses. (authors)

  5. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  6. Enhanced piezoelectric performance of (0.98-x)Bi(Sc{sub 3/4}In{sub 1/4})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3}-0.02Pb(Zn{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} ternary high temperature piezoelectric ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Jianguo; Zhao Tianlong; Cheng Jinrong; Dong Shuxiang

    2013-04-14

    (0.98-x)Bi(Sc{sub 3/4}In{sub 1/4})O{sub 3}-xPbTiO{sub 3}-0.02Pb(Zn{sub 1/3}Nb{sub 2/3})O{sub 3} (BSI-PT-PZN) high temperature piezoelectric ceramics were prepared by traditional solid-state reaction method. Combining X-ray diffraction results with piezoelectric data, it was found that the morphotropic phase boundary (MPB) occurred at x = 0.575. The piezoelectric constant d{sub 33}, curie temperature T{sub c}, and electromechanical coupling factor k{sub p} of BIS-PT-PZN ceramics with MPB composition were 427 pC/N, 412 Degree-Sign C, and 0.51, respectively. Furthermore, the strain of BIS-PT-PZN ceramics reached up to 0.25% under the electric field of 40 kV/cm. Temperature-dependent electromechanical coupling coefficient for MPB composition was stable from room temperature up to 350 Degree-Sign C. The piezoelectric properties of BIS-PT-PZN ceramics were comparable to that of 0.36BiScO{sub 3}-0.64PbTiO{sub 3} (BS-PT) ceramics, and the piezoelectric constant d{sub 33} of BIS-PT-PZN ceramics was about twice that of our previous reported 0.4Bi(Sc{sub 3/4}In{sub 1/4})O{sub 3}-0.6PbTiO{sub 3} (BSI-PT) ceramics. The reduction in the expensive Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} content and comparable piezoelectric properties with BS-PT ceramics indicated that BIS-PT-PZN ceramics were promising for commercial applications as high temperature actuators and sensors.

  7. DOE Chair of Excellence in Environmental Disciplines-Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurunganty, Sastry; Loran, Roberto; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Hijazi, Yazan; Nieto, Santander; Gomez, Will A.; Duconge, Jose; Cotto, María del C.; Muniz, Carlos; Diaz, Francisco J.; Neira, Carlos F.; Marquez, Francisco; Del Valle, W.; Thommes, M.

    2014-02-19

    The report Massie Chair of Excellence Program at Universidad del Turabo, contract DE-FG02-95EW12610, during the period of 9/29/1995 to 9/29/2011. The initial program aims included development of academic programs in the Environmental Sciences and Engineering, and Research and Development focused initially on environmentally friendly processes and later revised also include: renewable energy and international cooperation. From 1995 -2005, the Program at UT lead the establishment of the new undergraduate program in electrical engineering at the School of Engineering (SoE), worked on requirements to achieve ABET accreditation of the SoE B.S. Mechanical Engineering and B.S. Electrical Engineering programs, mentored junior faculty, taught undergraduate courses in electrical engineering, and revised the electrical engineering curriculum. Engineering undergraduate laboratories were designed and developed. The following research sub-project was developed: Research and development of new perovskite-alumina hydrogen permeable asymmetrical nanostructured membranes for hydrogen purification, and extremely high specific surface area silica materials for hydrogen storage in the form of ammonia, Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Subproject PI, Dr. Santander Nieto and Mr. Will Gómez Research Assistants. In 2006, the Massie Chair of Excellence Program was transferred to the National Nuclear Security Agency, NNSA and DNN. DoE required a revised proposal aligned with the priorities of the Administration. The revised approved program aims included: (1) Research (2) Student Development: promote the development of minority undergraduate and graduate students through research teams, internships, conferences, new courses; and, (3) Support: (a) Research administration and (b) Dissemination through international conferences, the UT Distinguished Lecturer Series in STEM fields and at the annual Universidad del Turabo (UT) Researchers Conference. Research included: Sub-Project 1: Synthesis and Characterization of low Refractive Index Aerogel Silica for Cherenkov Counters- Dr. Rolando Roque-Malherbe Sub-project PI, Dr. Jose Duconge Sub-project Co-PI, Dr. Santander Nieto Assistant Researcher, Francisco Diaz and Carlos Neira Associate Researchers. The initial aim of this sub-project was changed to the synthesis and characterization of extremely high specific surface area aerogel silica for gas storage. A high specific surface area silica gel that has applications in gas drying, cleaning operation useful in nuclear industry in process was developed. Sub-Project 2: Investigation Study of Magnetic and Electronic Transport Properties at Material Interfaces in Magnetic Multilayer Heterostructure using Gd. – Dr. Yazan Hijazi, Sub-project Co-PI. UT developed the capability and infrastructure to produce high quality thin-film magnetic films and magnetic multilayer structures with fine control over film quality and thickness using sputter deposition capability to perform in-house electric and magnetic characterization of these films. The research experimentally quantified the effect of Gd incorporation within the magnetic multilayer structure and produce magnetic media with exchanged decoupled multilevel magnetic anisotropy. From September 2006 to September 2011 the Massie Chair produced nineteen (19) publications, (including 3 books), five (5) presentations and three (3) international conferences abstracts. A total of fourteen (14) undergraduates and (6) graduate students acquired research experience. Two Ph.D. students presented their dissertations on topics related to nuclear energy and graduated as follows: María Cotto (May 2009) and Eric Calderón (May 2011). Five of the participating undergraduate students graduated: Ramon Polanco (BSME, May 2009), Jason Pérez (BSEE, May 2008), Rafael Colón (BSME, May 2008), Jessenia Marfisi (BS Chemistry, May 2008). Eleven (11) students were sent to National Laboratories (LANL, SNL and LLNL), NNSA and DoE facilities for summer internships. Twenty eight (28) undergraduate students participated in Summer Internships (2010, 2011) at the Puerto Rico Energy Center (PREC). Four international energy symposiums were held aligned with the DoE and the NNSA missions and dissemination of Massie Chair research activities (660 attendees). Academic programs developed or revised under advice of the Massie Chair: Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences (revised); MSc in Environmental Sciences (revised); MSc in Mechanical Engineering with concentration in Alternative Energy (new); BS in Industrial Management & Engineering (revised to fulfill the ABET requirements); BS in Civil Engineering including an environmental option (new); BS in Electrical Engineering (revised); and, Associate in Renewable Energy (new). The Puerto Rico Energy Center (PREC) was designed and developed under the Massie Chair initiative. Thirty-three (33) proposals were developed and submitted during the period of which 12 were approved in the amount of $ $1,931,306.

  8. Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Connell

    2008-10-18

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electric generating units (EGUs). There are about 400 units in the United States with capacities of 50-300 MW that currently are not equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR), flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. Many of these units, which collectively represent more than 55 GW of installed capacity, are difficult to retrofit for deep emission reductions because of space constraints and unfavorable economies of scale, making them increasingly vulnerable to retirement or fuel switching in the face of progressively more stringent environmental regulations. The Greenidge Project sought to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs by offering a combination of deep emission reductions, low capital costs, small space requirements, applicability to high-sulfur coals, mechanical simplicity, and operational flexibility. The multi-pollutant control system includes a NO{sub x}OUT CASCADE{reg_sign} hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct SCR system for NO{sub x} control and a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubbing system (with a new baghouse) for SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter control. Mercury removal is provided as a co-benefit of the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse, and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, if required. The multi-pollutant control system was installed and tested on the 107-MW{sub e}, 1953-vintage AES Greenidge Unit 4 by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. About 44% of the funding for the project was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and the remaining 56% was provided by AES Greenidge. Project goals included reducing high-load NO{sub x} emissions to {le} 0.10 lb/mmBtu; reducing SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF emissions by at least 95%; and reducing Hg emissions by at least 90% while the unit fired 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fired up to 10% biomass. This report details the final results from the project. The multi-pollutant control system was constructed in 2006, with a total plant cost of $349/kW and a footprint of 0.4 acre - both substantially less than would have been required to retrofit AES Greenidge Unit 4 with a conventional SCR and wet scrubber. Start-up of the multi-pollutant control system was completed in March 2007, and the performance of the system was then evaluated over an approximately 18-month period of commercial operation. Guarantee tests conducted in March-June 2007 demonstrated attainment of all of the emission reduction goals listed above. Additional tests completed throughout the performance evaluation period showed 96% SO{sub 2} removal, 98% mercury removal (with no activated carbon injection), 95% SO{sub 3} removal, and 97% HCl removal during longer-term operation. Greater than 95% SO{sub 2} removal efficiency was observed even when the unit fired high-sulfur coals containing up to 4.8 lb SO{sub 2}/mmBtu. Particulate matter emissions were reduced by more than 98% relative to the emission rate observed prior to installation of the technology. The performance of the hybrid SNCR/SCR system was affected by problems with large particle ash, ammonia slip, and nonideal combustion characteristics, and high-load NO{sub x} emissions averaged 0.14 lb/mmBtu during long-term operation. Nevertheless, the system has reduced the unit's overall NO{sub x} emissions by 52% on a lb/mmBtu basis. The commercial viability of the multi-pollutant control system was demonstrated at AES Greenidge Unit 4. The system, which remains in service after the conclusion of the project, has enabled the unit to satisfy its permit requirements while continuing to operate profitably. As a result of the success at AES Greenidge Unit 4, three additional deployments of the Turbosorp{reg_sign} technology had been announced by the end of the project.

  9. Smart Screening System (S3) In Taconite Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daryoush Allaei; Asim Syed Mohammed; David Tarnowski

    2004-09-01

    The conventional vibrating machines used in processing plants have had undesirable high noise and vibration levels. They also have had unsatisfactorily low screening efficiency, high energy consumption, high maintenance cost, low productivity, and poor worker safety. These conventional vibrating machines have been used in most every processing plant. Most of the current material separation technology uses heavy and inefficient electric motors with an unbalance rotating mass to generate the shaking. In addition to being excessively noisy, inefficient, and high-maintenance, these vibrating machines are often the bottleneck in the entire process. Furthermore, these motors, along with the vibrating machines and supporting structure, shake other machines and structures in the vicinity. The latter increases maintenance costs while reducing worker health and safety. The conventional vibrating fine screens at taconite processing plants have had the same problems as those listed above. This has resulted in lower screening efficiency, higher energy and maintenance cost, and lower productivity and workers safety concerns. The focus of this work is on the design of a high performance screening machine suitable for taconite processing plants. SmartScreens{trademark} technology uses miniaturized motors, based on smart materials, to generate the shaking. The underlying technologies are Energy Flow Control{trademark} and Vibration Control by Confinement{trademark}. These concepts are used to direct energy flow and confine energy efficiently and effectively to the screen function. The SmartScreens{trademark} technology addresses problems related to noise and vibration, screening efficiency, productivity, and maintenance cost and worker safety. Successful development of SmartScreens{trademark} technology will bring drastic changes to the screening and physical separation industry. The final designs for key components of the SmartScreens{trademark} have been developed. The key components include smart motor and associated electronics, resonators, and supporting structural elements. It is shown that the smart motors have an acceptable life and performance. Resonator (or motion amplifier) designs are selected based on the final system requirement and vibration characteristics. All the components for a fully functional prototype are fabricated. The system is assembled and tested under laboratory and field conditions. The lab results are promising and the field test resulted in system performance drop due to plant structure not able to provide the required stiffness. The PZT-based Smart Motors performed better than expected. None of the Smart Motors failed during testing and the results were very encouraging. The development program is on schedule. Supporting structure was modified to improve system rigidity and integrity to help improve overall system performance. The improved supporting structure was fabricated and tested in the lab and in field. Results showed a significant improvement in reducing undesirable supporting structure vibration, better system performance and ease of installation. We plan to work on system installation sensitivity to relax plant structure foundation requirement. This would be necessary for the PZT-based system to perform better and not loose energy into the plant structure.

  10. Evaluation of MerCAP for Power Plant Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Richardson

    2008-09-30

    This report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41993, 'Evaluation of EPRI's MerCAP{trademark} Technology for Power Plant Mercury Control'. This project has investigated the mercury removal performance of EPRI's Mercury Capture by Amalgamation Process (MerCAP{trademark}) technology. Test programs were conducted to evaluate gold-based MerCAP{trademark} at Great River Energy's Stanton Station Unit 10 (Site 1), which fired both North Dakota lignite (NDL) and Power River Basin (PRB) coal during the testing period, and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 (Site 2) [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company] which fires a low sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. Additional tests were carried out at Alabama Power's Plant Miller, which fires Powder River Basin Coal, to evaluate a carbon-based MerCAP{trademark} process for removing mercury from flue gas downstream of an electrostatic precipitator [Alabama Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company]. A full-scale gold-based sorbent array was installed in the clean-air plenum of a single baghouse compartment at GRE's Stanton Station Unit 10, thereby treating 1/10th of the unit's exhaust gas flow. The substrates that were installed were electroplated gold screens oriented parallel to the flue gas flow. The sorbent array was initially installed in late August of 2004, operating continuously until its removal in July 2006, after nearly 23 months. The initial 4 months of operation were conducted while the host unit was burning North Dakota lignite (NDL). In November 2004, the host unit switched fuel to burn Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and continued to burn the PRB fuel for the final 19 months of this program. Tests were conducted at Site 1 to evaluate the impacts of flue gas flow rate, sorbent plate spacing, sorbent pre-cleaning and regeneration, and spray dryer operation on MerCAP{trademark} performance. At Site 2, a pilot-scale array was installed in a horizontal reactor chamber designed to treat approximately 2800 acfm of flue gas obtained from downstream of the plant's flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. The initial MerCAP{trademark} array was installed at Plant Yates in January 2004, operating continuously for several weeks before a catastrophic system failure resulting from a failed flue gas fan. A second MerCAP{trademark} array was installed in July 2006 and operated for one month before being shut down for a reasons pertaining to system performance and host site scheduling. A longer-term continuous-operation test was then conducted during the summer and fall of 2007. Tests were conducted to evaluate the impacts of flue gas flow rate, sorbent space velocity, and sorbent rinsing frequency on mercury removal performance. Detailed characterization of treated sorbent plates was carried out in an attempt to understand the nature of reactions leading to excessive corrosion of the substrate surfaces.

  11. Oxidation of Mercury in Products of Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Walsh; Giang Tong; Neeles Bhopatkar; Thomas Gale; George Blankenship; Conrad Ingram; Selasi Blavo Tesfamariam Mehreteab; Victor Banjoko; Yohannes Ghirmazion; Heng Ban; April Sibley

    2009-09-14

    Laboratory measurements of mercury oxidation during selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide, simulation of pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash, and synthesis of new materials for simultaneous oxidation and adsorption of mercury, were performed in support of the development of technology for control of mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers and furnaces. Conversion of gas-phase mercury from the elemental state to water-soluble oxidized form (HgCl{sub 2}) enables removal of mercury during wet flue gas desulfurization. The increase in mercury oxidation in a monolithic V{sub 2}O{sub 5}-WO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} SCR catalyst with increasing HCl at low levels of HCl (< 10 ppmv) and decrease in mercury oxidation with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio during SCR were consistent with results of previous work by others. The most significant finding of the present work was the inhibition of mercury oxidation in the presence of CO during SCR of NO at low levels of HCl. In the presence of 2 ppmv HCl, expected in combustion products from some Powder River Basin coals, an increase in CO from 0 to 50 ppmv reduced the extent of mercury oxidation from 24 {+-} 3 to 1 {+-} 4%. Further increase in CO to 100 ppmv completely suppressed mercury oxidation. In the presence of 11-12 ppmv HCl, increasing CO from 0 to {approx}120 ppmv reduced mercury oxidation from {approx}70% to 50%. Conversion of SO{sub 2} to sulfate also decreased with increasing NH{sub 3}/NO ratio, but the effects of HCl and CO in flue gas on SO{sub 2} oxidation were unclear. Oxidation and adsorption of mercury by unburned carbon and fly ash enables mercury removal in a particulate control device. A chemical kinetic mechanism consisting of nine homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions for mercury oxidation and removal was developed to interpret pilot-scale measurements of mercury oxidation and adsorption by unburned carbon and fly ash in experiments at pilot scale, burning bituminous coals (Gale, 2006) and blends of bituminous coals with Powder River Basin coal (Gale, 2005). The removal of mercury by fly ash and unburned carbon in the flue gas from combustion of the bituminous coals and blends was reproduced with satisfactory accuracy by the model. The enhancement of mercury capture in the presence of calcium (Gale, 2005) explained a synergistic effect of blending on mercury removal across the baghouse. The extent of mercury oxidation, on the other hand, was not so well described by the simulation, because of oversensitivity of the oxidation process in the model to the concentration of unburned carbon. Combined catalysts and sorbents for oxidation and removal of mercury from flue gas at low temperature were based on surfactant-templated silicas containing a transition metal and an organic functional group. The presence of both metal ions and organic groups within the pore structure of the materials is expected to impart to them the ability to simultaneously oxidize elemental mercury and adsorb the resulting oxidized mercury. Twelve mesoporous organosilicate catalysts/sorbents were synthesized, with and without metals (manganese, titanium, vanadium) and organic functional groups (aminopropyl, chloropropyl, mercaptopropyl). Measurement of mercury oxidation and adsorption by the candidate materials remains for future work.

  12. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest iodine number was superior to commercial DARCO FGD for mercury capture. The results of the activated carbon market assessment indicate an existing market for water treatment and an emerging application for mercury control. That market will involve both existing and new coal-fired plants. It is expected that 20% of the existing coal-fired plants will implement activated carbon injection by 2015, representing about 200,000 tons of annual demand. The potential annual demand by new plants is even greater. In the mercury control market, two characteristics are going to dominate the customer's buying habit-performance and price. As continued demonstration testing of activated carbon injection at the various coal-fired power plants progresses, the importance of fuel type and plant configuration on the type of activated carbon best suited is being identified.

  13. Greenridge Multi-Pollutant Control Project Preliminary Public Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell

    2009-01-12

    The Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project is being conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Power Plant Improvement Initiative to demonstrate an innovative combination of air pollution control technologies that can cost-effectively reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Hg, acid gases (SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF), and particulate matter from smaller coal-fired electrical generating units (EGUs). The multi-pollutant control system includes a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/in-duct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NOx emissions by {ge}60%, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, and HF by {ge}95%. Mercury removal of {ge}90% is also targeted via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. The technology is particularly well suited, because of its relatively low capital and maintenance costs and small space requirements, to meet the needs of coal-fired units with capacities of 50-300 MWe. There are about 440 such units in the United States that currently are not equipped with SCR, flue gas desulfurization (FGD), or mercury control systems. These smaller units are a valuable part of the nation's energy infrastructure, constituting about 60 GW of installed capacity. However, with the onset of the Clean Air Interstate Rule, Clean Air Mercury Rule, and various state environmental actions requiring deep reductions in emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and mercury, the continued operation of these units increasingly depends upon the ability to identify viable air pollution control retrofit options for them. The large capital costs and sizable space requirements associated with conventional technologies such as SCR and wet FGD make these technologies unattractive for many smaller units. The Greenidge Project aims to confirm the commercial readiness of an emissions control system that is specifically designed to meet the environmental compliance requirements of these smaller coal-fired EGUs. The multi-pollutant control system is being installed and tested on the AES Greenidge Unit 4 (Boiler 6) by a team including CONSOL Energy Inc. as prime contractor, AES Greenidge LLC as host site owner, and Babcock Power Environmental Inc. as engineering, procurement, and construction contractor. All funding for the project is being provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, through its National Energy Technology Laboratory, and by AES Greenidge. AES Greenidge Unit 4 is a 107 MW{sub e} (net), 1950s vintage, tangentially-fired, reheat unit that is representative of many of the 440 smaller coal-fired units identified above. Following design and construction, the multi-pollutant control system will be demonstrated over an approximately 20-month period while the unit fires 2-4% sulfur eastern U.S. bituminous coal and co-fires up to 10% biomass. This Preliminary Public Design Report is the first in a series of two reports describing the design of the multi-pollutant control facility that is being demonstrated at AES Greenidge. Its purpose is to consolidate for public use all available nonproprietary design information on the Greenidge Multi-Pollutant Control Project. As such, the report includes a discussion of the process concept, design objectives, design considerations, and uncertainties associated with the multi-pollutant control system and also summarizes the design of major process components and balance of plant considerations for the AES Greenidge Unit 4 installation. The Final Public Design Report, the second report in the series, will update this Preliminary Public Design Report to reflect the final, as-built design of the facility and to incorporate data on capital costs and projected operating costs.

  14. MEASURING TRANSIT SIGNAL RECOVERY IN THE KEPLER PIPELINE. I. INDIVIDUAL EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christiansen, Jessie L.; Clarke, Bruce D.; Burke, Christopher J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Haas, Michael R.; Seader, Shawn; Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Tenenbaum, Peter; Twicken, Joseph D.; Thompson, Susan E.; Sabale, Anima; Uddin, Akm Kamal

    2013-08-15

    The Kepler mission was designed to measure the frequency of Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of Sun-like stars. A crucial component for recovering the underlying planet population from a sample of detected planets is understanding the completeness of that sample-the fraction of the planets that could have been discovered in a given data set that actually were detected. Here, we outline the information required to determine the sample completeness, and describe an experiment to address a specific aspect of that question, i.e., the issue of transit signal recovery. We investigate the extent to which the Kepler pipeline preserves individual transit signals by injecting simulated transits into the pixel-level data, processing the modified pixels through the pipeline, and comparing the measured transit signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) to that expected without perturbation by the pipeline. We inject simulated transit signals across the full focal plane for a set of observations for a duration of 89 days. On average, we find that the S/N of the injected signal is recovered at MS = 0.9973({+-} 0.0012) Multiplication-Sign BS - 0.0151({+-} 0.0049), where MS is the measured S/N and BS is the baseline, or expected, S/N. The 1{sigma} width of the distribution around this correlation is {+-}2.64%. This indicates an extremely high fidelity in reproducing the expected detection statistics for single transit events, and provides teams performing their own periodic transit searches the confidence that there is no systematic reduction in transit signal strength introduced by the pipeline. We discuss the pipeline processes that cause the measured S/N to deviate significantly from the baseline S/N for a small fraction of targets; these are primarily the handling of data adjacent to spacecraft re-pointings and the removal of harmonics prior to the measurement of the S/N. Finally, we outline the further work required to characterize the completeness of the Kepler pipeline.

  15. CCSD(T) calculations of stabilities and properties of confined systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holka, F.; Urban, M.; Melicherčík, M.; Neogrády, P.; Paldus, J.

    2015-01-22

    We analyze energies, electron affinities and polarizabilities of small anions exposed to an external confinement. The second electron in free O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions is unbound. We investigate the stabilizing effect of the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω. on these anions employing the Hartree-Fock stability analysis as introduced by Čížek and Paldus. With increasing strength of the external harmonic-oscillator confinement potential ω the broken symmetry (BS) solutions are systematically eliminated. For ω larger than 0.1 all BS solutions for O{sup 2−} disappear. For ω larger than 0.13 the CCSD(T) energy of O{sup 2−} becomes more negative than the energy of the singly charged O{sup −} anion. We relate the harmonic-oscillator confining potential to a crystalline environment in which the O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions are stable. We also present a model allowing calculations of the in-crystal polarizabilities of anions. The model is based on CCSD(T) calculations of static polarizabilities of selected anions exposed to the spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω This artificial confinement potential ω is then related to the ionic radii of the cation in representative crystal lattices. We investigate the polarizability of O{sup 2−} and S{sup 2−} anions in MgO, MgS, CaO, CaS, SrO, SrS, BaO and BaS crystals. We compare our results with alternative models for in-crystal polarizabilities. External confinement also stabilizes the uracil anion U{sup −}, as is shown by calculations with a stepwise micro-hydration of U{sup −}. Upon hydration is the CCSD(T) adiabatic electron affinity (AEA) of uracil enhanced by about 250 up to 570 meV in comparison with AEA of the isolated molecule, depending on the geometry of the hydrated uracil anion complex. We tried to find an analogy of the stabilization effect of the external confinement on the otherwise unstable anions. In uracil and its anion is the external confinement represented by the polarized continuum solvation model with dielectric constant as a variational parameter. The physical behavior of ions exposed to an artificial external, spherical harmonic-oscillator confining potential ω, the environment represented by a crystal structure and the confinement represented by the solvent, all have considerable stabilizing effect on the otherwise unstable free anion.

  16. Model Evaluation Report for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruskauff, Greg; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-09-01

    Model evaluation focused solely on the PIN STRIPE and MILK SHAKE underground nuclear tests contaminant boundaries (CBs) because they had the largest extent, uncertainty, and potential consequences. The CAMBRIC radionuclide migration experiment also had a relatively large CB, but because it was constrained by transport data (notably Well UE-5n), there was little uncertainty, and radioactive decay reduced concentrations before much migration could occur. Each evaluation target and the associated data-collection activity were assessed in turn to determine whether the new data support, or demonstrate conservatism of, the CB forecasts. The modeling teamin this case, the same team that developed the Frenchman Flat geologic, source term, and groundwater flow and transport modelsanalyzed the new data and presented the results to a PER committee. Existing site understanding and its representation in numerical groundwater flow and transport models was evaluated in light of the new data and the ability to proceed to the CR stage of long-term monitoring and institutional control.

  17. Computation and control with neural nets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corneliusen, A.; Terdal, P.; Knight, T.; Spencer, J.

    1989-10-04

    As energies have increased exponentially with time so have the size and complexity of accelerators and control systems. NN may offer the kinds of improvements in computation and control that are needed to maintain acceptable functionality. For control their associative characteristics could provide signal conversion or data translation. Because they can do any computation such as least squares, they can close feedback loops autonomously to provide intelligent control at the point of action rather than at a central location that requires transfers, conversions, hand-shaking and other costly repetitions like input protection. Both computation and control can be integrated on a single chip, printed circuit or an optical equivalent that is also inherently faster through full parallel operation. For such reasons one expects lower costs and better results. Such systems could be optimized by integrating sensor and signal processing functions. Distributed nets of such hardware could communicate and provide global monitoring and multiprocessing in various ways e.g. via token, slotted or parallel rings (or Steiner trees) for compatibility with existing systems. Problems and advantages of this approach such as an optimal, real-time Turing machine are discussed. Simple examples are simulated and hardware implemented using discrete elements that demonstrate some basic characteristics of learning and parallelism. Future microprocessors' are predicted and requested on this basis. 19 refs., 18 figs.

  18. Preclosure seismic design methodology for a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain. Topical report YMP/TR-003-NP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This topical report describes the methodology and criteria that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to use for preclosure seismic design of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of the proposed geologic repository operations area that are important to safety. Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 60 (10 CFR 60), Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in Geologic Repositories, states that for a license to be issued for operation of a high-level waste repository, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must find that the facility will not constitute an unreasonable risk to the health and safety of the public. Section 60.131 (b)(1) requires that SSCs important to safety be designed so that natural phenomena and environmental conditions anticipated at the geologic repository operations area will not interfere with necessary safety functions. Among the natural phenomena specifically identified in the regulation as requiring safety consideration are the hazards of ground shaking and fault displacement due to earthquakes.

  19. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  20. Bioelectrochemical Immunoassay of Polychlorinated Biphenyl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Liu, Guodong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-04-01

    A simple, rapid, and highly sensitive bioelectrochemical immunoassay method based on magnetic beads (MBs) and disposable screen-printed electrodes (SPE) has been developed to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The principle of this bioassay is based on a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using PCB-antibody-coated MBs and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled PCB (HRP-PCB). A magnetic process platform was used to mix and shake the samples during the immunoreactions and to separate free and unbound reagents after the liquid-phase competitive immunoreactions among PCB-antibody-coated MBs, PCB analyte, and HRP-PCB. After a complete immunoassay, the HRP tracers attached to MBs were transferred to a substrate solution containing o-aminophenol and hydrogen peroxide for electrochemical detection. The different parameters, including the amount of HRP-PCB conjugates, immunoreaction time, and the concentration of substrate that governs the analytical performance of the immunoassay have been studied in detail and optimized. The detection limit of 5 pg mL-1 was obtained under optimum experimental conditions. The performance of this bioelectrochemical immunoassay was successfully evaluated with untreated river water spiked with PCBs, and the results were validated by commercial PCB enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit, indicating that this convenient and sensitive technique offers great promise for decentralized environmental application and trace PCBs monitoring.

  1. Dynamics of solid-containing tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.; Bandyopadhyay, K.

    1997-01-01

    Making use of a relatively simple, approximate but reliable method of analysis, a study is made of the responses to horizontal base shaking of vertical, circular cylindrical tanks that are filled with a uniform viscoelastic material. The method of analysis is described, and comprehensive numerical data are presented that elucidate the underlying response mechanisms and the effects and relative importance of the various parameters involved. In addition to the characteristics of the ground motion and a dimensionless measure of the tank wall flexibility relative to the contained medium, the parameters examined include the ratio of tank-height to tank-radius and the physical properties of the contained material. Both harmonic and earthquake-induced ground motions are considered. The response quantities investigated are the dynamic wall pressures, the critical forces in the tank wall, and the forces exerted on the foundation. Part A of the report deals with rigid tanks while the effects of tank wall flexibility are examined in Part B. A brief account is also given in the latter part of the interrelationship of the critical responses of solid-containing tanks and those induced in tanks storing a liquid of the same mass density.

  2. Quantum and Thermodynamic Properties of Spontaneous and Low-Energy Induced Fission of Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadmensky, S.G. [Voronezh State University, Universitetskaya pl. 1, Voronezh, 394693 (Russian Federation)

    2005-12-01

    It is shown that A. Bohr's concept of transition fission states can be matched with the properties of Coriolis interaction if an axisymmetric fissile nucleus near the scission point remains cold despite a nonadiabatic character of nuclear collective deformation motion. The quantum and thermodynamic properties of various stages of binary and ternary fission after the descent of a fissile nucleus from the outer saddle point are studied within quantum-mechanical fission theory. It is shown that two-particle nucleon-nucleon correlations--in particular, superfluid correlations--play an important role in the formation of fission products and in the classification of fission transitions. The distributions of thermalized primary fission fragments with respect to spins and their projections onto the symmetry axis of the fissile nucleus and fission fragments are constructed, these distributions determining the properties of prompt neutrons and gamma rays emitted by these fragments. A new nonevaporation mechanism of third-particle production in ternary fission is proposed. This mechanism involves transitions of third particles from the cluster states of the fissile-nucleus neck to high-energy states under effects of the shake-off type that are due to the nonadiabatic character of nuclear collective deformation motion.

  3. Surface coating for prevention of metallic seed migration in tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunseok; Park, Jong In; Lee, Won Seok; Park, Min; Son, Kwang-Jae; Bang, Young-bong; Choy, Young Bin E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr; Ye, Sung-Joon E-mail: sye@snu.ac.kr

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, metallic implants often detach from their deposited sites and migrate to other locations. This undesirable migration could cause inadequate dose coverage for permanent brachytherapy and difficulties in image-guided radiation delivery for patients. To prevent migration of implanted seeds, the authors propose a potential strategy to use a biocompatible and tissue-adhesive material called polydopamine. Methods: In this study, nonradioactive dummy seeds that have the same geometry and composition as commercial I-125 seeds were coated in polydopamine. Using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the surface of the polydopamine-coated and noncoated seeds was characterized. The detachment stress between the two types of seeds and the tissue was measured. The efficacy of polydopamine-coated seed was investigated through in vitro migration tests by tracing the seed location after tissue implantation and shaking for given times. The cytotoxicity of the polydopamine coating was also evaluated. Results: The results of the coating characterization have shown that polydopamine was successfully coated on the surface of the seeds. In the adhesion test, the polydopamine-coated seeds had 2.1-fold greater detachment stress than noncoated seeds. From the in vitro test, it was determined that the polydopamine-coated seed migrated shorter distances than the noncoated seed. This difference was increased with a greater length of time after implantation. Conclusions: The authors suggest that polydopamine coating is an effective technique to prevent migration of implanted seeds, especially for permanent prostate brachytherapy.

  4. Case report: Profound neurobehavioral deficits in an oil field worker overcome by hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilburn, K.H. )

    1993-11-01

    A 24-year-old oil well tester was rendered semiconscious by hydrogen sulfide (H2S). He received oxygen and was hospitalized but released in 30 minutes. The next day, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and incontinence of urine and stool led to rehospitalization. These problems and leg shaking, dizziness, sweating, trouble sleeping, and nightmares prevented his return to work. A physical examination, chest x-ray, and pulmonary function tests were normal 39 months after the episode but vibration sense was diminished. Two choice visual reaction times were delayed. Balance was highly abnormal (5 to 6 cm/sec) with eyes closed. Blink reflex latency was slow (R-1 17.5 msec versus normal 14.3 msec). Numbers written on finger tips were not recognized. Verbal and visual recall were impaired but overlearned memory was intact. Cognitive functions measured by Culture Fair, block design, and digit symbol were impaired. Perceptual motor was slow. Scores for confusion, tension-anxiety, depression, and fatigue were elevated and vigor was reduced. Forty-nine months after exposure his reaction time, sway speed, and color vision had not improved. His recall and his cognitive, constructional, and psychomotor speeds had improved but remained abnormal. These deficits are most likely due to H2S. Similar testing of other survivors is recommended.

  5. Major results of geophysical investigations at Yucca Mountain and vicinity, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, H.W.; Ponce, D.A.; Hunter, W.C.

    1995-12-31

    In the consideration of Yucca Mountain as a possible site for storing high level nuclear waste, a number of geologic concerns have been suggested for study by the National Academy of Sciences which include: (1) natural geologic and geochemical barriers, (2) possible future fluctuations in the water table that might flood a mined underground repository, (3) tectonic stability, and (4) considerations of shaking such as might be caused by nearby earthquakes or possible volcanic eruptions. This volume represents the third part of an overall plan of geophysical investigation of Yucca Mountain, preceded by the Site Characterization Plan (SCP; dated 1988) and the report referred to as the Geophysical White Paper, Phase 1, entitled Status of Data, Major Results, and Plans for Geophysical Activities, Yucca Mountain Project (Oliver and others, 1990). The SCP necessarily contained uncertainty about applicability and accuracy of methods then untried in the Yucca Mountain volcano-tectonic setting, and the White Paper, Phase 1, focused on summarization of survey coverage, data quality, and applicability of results. For the most part, it did not present data or interpretation. The important distinction of the current volume lies in presentation of data, results, and interpretations of selected geophysical methods used in characterization activities at Yucca Mountain. Chapters are included on the following: gravity investigations; magnetic investigations; regional magnetotelluric investigations; seismic refraction investigations; seismic reflection investigations; teleseismic investigations; regional thermal setting; stress measurements; and integration of methods and conclusions. 8 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Landslides in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jibson, R.W.; Keefer, D.K.

    1985-01-01

    During the New Madrid earthquakes of 1811-12, bluffs bordering the Mississippi alluvial plain in the epicentral region underwent large-scale landsliding. Between Cairo, Illinois and Memphis, Tennessee, the authors mapped 221 large landslides of three types: (1) old, eroded, coherent block slides and slumps; (2) old earth flows; and (3) young, fresh slumps that occur only along near-river bluffs and are the only landslides present along such bluffs. Historical accounts and field evidence indicate that most or all old coherent slides and earth flows date to the 1811-12 earthquakes and that the only currently active, large-scale landsliding in the area occurs along bluffs bordering the river. Analysis of old coherent slides and earth flows indicates that landslide distribution is most strongly affected by slope height, but that proximity to the hypocenters of the 1811-12 earthquakes also has a significant effect. Slope-stability analyses of an old coherent slide and an earth flow selected as representative of the principal kinds of landslides present indicate that both were stable in aseismic conditions even when water tables were at highest possible levels. However, a dynamic Newmark displacement analysis shows that ground shaking such as that in 1811-12 would cause large displacements leading to catastrophic failure in both slides. These results indicate that in large earthquakes landsliding in much of the study are is likely. Moderate earthquakes may also trigger landslides at some locations.

  7. Gap solitons in rocking optical lattices and waveguides with undulating gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayteevarunyoo, Thawatchai; Malomed, Boris A.

    2009-07-15

    We report results of a systematic analysis of the stability of one-dimensional solitons in a model including the self-repulsive or attractive cubic nonlinearity and a linear potential represented by a periodically shaking lattice, which was recently implemented in experiments with Bose-Einstein condensates. In optics, the same model applies to undulated waveguiding arrays, which are also available to the experiment. In the case of the repulsive nonlinearity, stability regions are presented, in relevant parameter planes, for fundamental gap solitons and their two-peak and three-peak bound complexes, in the first and second finite band gaps. In the model with the attractive nonlinearity, stability regions are produced for fundamental solitons and their bound states populating the semi-infinite gap. In the first finite and semi-infinite gaps, unstable solitons gradually decay into radiation, while, in the second finite band gap, they are transformed into more complex states, which may represent new species of solitons. For a large amplitude of the rocking-lattice drive, the model is tantamount to that with a 'flashing' lattice potential, which is controlled by periodic sequences of instantaneous kicks. Using this correspondence, we explain generic features of the stability diagrams for the solitons. We also derive a limit case of the latter system, in the form of coupled-mode equations with a 'flashing' linear coupling.

  8. Exceptional Ground Accelerations and Velocities Caused by Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, John

    2008-01-17

    This project aims to understand the characteristics of the free-field strong-motion records that have yielded the 100 largest peak accelerations and the 100 largest peak velocities recorded to date. The peak is defined as the maximum magnitude of the acceleration or velocity vector during the strong shaking. This compilation includes 35 records with peak acceleration greater than gravity, and 41 records with peak velocities greater than 100 cm/s. The results represent an estimated 150,000 instrument-years of strong-motion recordings. The mean horizontal acceleration or velocity, as used for the NGA ground motion models, is typically 0.76 times the magnitude of this vector peak. Accelerations in the top 100 come from earthquakes as small as magnitude 5, while velocities in the top 100 all come from earthquakes with magnitude 6 or larger. Records are dominated by crustal earthquakes with thrust, oblique-thrust, or strike-slip mechanisms. Normal faulting mechanisms in crustal earthquakes constitute under 5% of the records in the databases searched, and an even smaller percentage of the exceptional records. All NEHRP site categories have contributed exceptional records, in proportions similar to the extent that they are represented in the larger database.

  9. Interfacial mode coupling as the origin of the enhancement of Tc in FeSe films on SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. J.; Schmitt, F. T.; Moore, R. G.; Johnston, S.; Cui, Y. -T.; Li, W.; Yi, M.; Liu, Z. K.; Hashimoto, M.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, D. H.; Devereaux, T. P.; Lee, D. -H.; Shen, Z. -X.; /SIMES, Stanford /SLAC /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2014-11-12

    Films of iron selenide (FeSe) one unit cell thick grown on strontium titanate (SrTiO3 or STO) substrates have recently shown superconducting energy gaps opening at temperatures close to the boiling point of liquid nitrogen (77 K), which is a record for the iron-based superconductors. The gap opening temperature usually sets the superconducting transition temperature Tc, as the gap signals the formation of Cooper pairs, the bound electron states responsible for superconductivity. To understand why Cooper pairs form at such high temperatures, we examine the role of the SrTiO3 substrate. Here we report high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy results that reveal an unexpected characteristic of the single-unit-cell FeSe/SrTiO3 system: shake-off bands suggesting the presence of bosonic modes, most probably oxygen optical phonons in SrTiO3, which couple to the FeSe electrons with only a small momentum transfer. Such interfacial coupling assists superconductivity in most channels, including those mediated by spin fluctuations. Our calculations suggest that this coupling is responsible for raising the superconducting gap opening temperature in single-unit-cell FeSe/SrTiO3.

  10. Basin amplification of seismic waves in the city of Pahrump, Nevada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Robert E.

    2005-07-01

    Sedimentary basins can increase the magnitude and extend the duration of seismic shaking. This potential for seismic amplification is investigated for Pahrump Valley, Nevada-California. The Pahrump Valley is located approximately 50 km northwest of Las Vegas and 75 km south of the Nevada Test Site. Gravity data suggest that the city of Pahrump sits atop a narrow, approximately 5 km deep sub-basin within the valley. The seismic amplification, or ''site effect'', was investigated using a combination of in situ velocity modeling and comparison of the waveforms and spectra of weak ground motion recorded in the city of Pahrump, Nevada, and those recorded in the nearby mountains. Resulting spectral ratios indicate seismic amplification factors of 3-6 over the deepest portion of Pahrump Valley. This amplification predominantly occurs at 2-2.5 Hz. Amplification over the deep sub-basin is lower than amplification at the sub-basin edge, location of the John Blume and Associates PAHA seismic station, which recorded many underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. A comprehensive analysis of basin amplification for the city of Pahrump should include 3-D basin modeling, due to the extreme basement topography of the Pahrump Valley.

  11. Process for removing thorium and recovering vanadium from titanium chlorinator waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsen, Richard S.; Banks, John T.

    1996-01-01

    A process for removal of thorium from titanium chlorinator waste comprising: (a) leaching an anhydrous titanium chlorinator waste in water or dilute hydrochloric acid solution and filtering to separate insoluble minerals and coke fractions from soluble metal chlorides; (b) beneficiating the insoluble fractions from step (a) on shaking tables to recover recyclable or otherwise useful TiO.sub.2 minerals and coke; and (c) treating filtrate from step (a) with reagents to precipitate and remove thorium by filtration along with acid metals of Ti, Zr, Nb, and Ta by the addition of the filtrate (a), a base and a precipitant to a boiling slurry of reaction products (d); treating filtrate from step (c) with reagents to precipitate and recover an iron vanadate product by the addition of the filtrate (c), a base and an oxidizing agent to a boiling slurry of reaction products; and (e) treating filtrate from step (d) to remove any remaining cations except Na by addition of Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3 and boiling.

  12. Nonlinear Seismic Correlation Analysis of the JNES/NUPEC Large-Scale Piping System Tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie,J.; DeGrassi, G.; Hofmayer, C.; Ali, S.

    2008-06-01

    The Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization/Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (JNES/NUPEC) large-scale piping test program has provided valuable new test data on high level seismic elasto-plastic behavior and failure modes for typical nuclear power plant piping systems. The component and piping system tests demonstrated the strain ratcheting behavior that is expected to occur when a pressurized pipe is subjected to cyclic seismic loading. Under a collaboration agreement between the US and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed a correlation analysis of the large-scale piping system tests using derailed state-of-the-art nonlinear finite element models. Techniques are introduced to develop material models that can closely match the test data. The shaking table motions are examined. The analytical results are assessed in terms of the overall system responses and the strain ratcheting behavior at an elbow. The paper concludes with the insights about the accuracy of the analytical methods for use in performance assessments of highly nonlinear piping systems under large seismic motions.

  13. Biological Production of a Hydrocarbon Fuel Intermediate Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from a Process Relevant Lignocellulosic Derived Sugar (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.; Mittal, A.; Mohagheghi, A.; Johnson, D. K.

    2014-04-01

    PHAs are synthesized by many microorganisms to serve as intracellular carbon storage molecules. In some bacterial strains, PHB can account for up to 80% of cell mass. In addition to its application in the packaging sector, PHB also has great potential as an intermediate in the production of hydrocarbon fuels. PHB can be thermally depolymerized and decarboxylated to propene which can be upgraded to hydrocarbon fuels via commercial oligomerization technologies. Cupriavidus necator is the microorganism that has been most extensively studied and used for PHB production on an industrial scale; However the substrates used for producing PHB are mainly fructose, glucose, sucrose, fatty acids, glycerol, etc., which are expensive. In this study, we demonstrate production of PHB from a process relevant lignocellulosic derived sugar stream, i.e., saccharified slurry from pretreated corn stover. The strain was first investigated in shake flasks for its ability to utilize glucose, xylose and acetate. In addition, the strain was also grown on pretreated lignocellulose hydrolyzate slurry and evaluated in terms of cell growth, sugar utilization, PHB accumulation, etc. The mechanism of inhibition in the toxic hydrolysate generated by the pretreatment and saccharification process of biomass, was also studied.

  14. Recommissioning the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynn, C.C. ); Brewer, D.W. )

    1991-10-01

    The Center of Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE) was established under the technical direction of Dr. James E. Beavers with a mandate to assess, by analyses and testing, the seismic capacity of building structures that house sensitive processes at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. This mandate resulted in a need to recommission the K-1600 Seismic Test Facility (STF) at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, which had been shutdown for 6 years. This paper documents the history of the facility and fives some salient construction, operation, and performance details of its 8-ton, 20-foot center of gravity payload bi-axial seismic simulator. A log of activities involved in the restart of this valuable resource is included as Table 1. Some of problems and solutions associated with recommissioning the facility under a relatively limited budget are included. The unique attributes of the shake table are discussed. The original mission and performance requirements are compared to current expanded mission and performance capabilities. Potential upgrades to further improve the capabilities of the test facility as an adjunct to the CNPE are considered. Additional uses for the facility are proposed, including seismic qualification testing of devices unique to enrichment technologies and associated hazardous waste treatment and disposal processes. In summary, the STF restart in conjunction with CNPE has added a vital, and unique facility to the list of current national resources utilized for earthquake engineering research and development. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Pressure and concentration dependences of the autoignition temperature for normal butane + air mixtures in a closed vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandraratna, M.R.; Griffiths, J.F. . School of Chemistry)

    1994-12-01

    The condition at which autoignition occurs in lean premixed n-butane + air mixtures over the composition range 0.2%--2.5% n-butane by volume (0.06 < [phi] < 0.66) were investigated experimentally. Total reactant pressure from 0.1 to 0.6 MPa (1--6 atm) were studied in a spherical, stainless-steel, closed vessel (0.5 dm[sup 3]). There is a critical transition from nonignition to ignition, at pressures above 0.1 MPa, as the mixture is enriched in the vicinity of 1% fuel vapor by volume. There is also a region of multiplicity, which exhibits three critical temperatures at a given composition. Chemical analyses show that partially oxygenated components,including many o-heterocyclic compounds, are important products of the lean combustion of butane at temperatures up to 800 K. The critical conditions for autoignition are discussed with regard to industrial ignition hazards, especially in the context of the autoignition temperature of alkanes given by ASTM or BS tests. The differences between the behavior of n-butane and the higher n-alkanes are explained. The experimental results are also used as a basis for testing a reduced kinetic model to represent the oxidation and autoignition of n-butane or other alkanes.

  16. Effective Yukawa couplings and flavor-changing Higgs boson decays at linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabrielli, E.; Mele, B.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the advantages of a linear-collider program for testing a recent theoretical proposal where the Higgs boson Yukawa couplings are radiatively generated, keeping unchanged the standard-model mechanism for electroweak-gauge-symmetry breaking. Fermion masses arise at a large energy scale through an unknown mechanism, and the standard model at the electroweak scale is regarded as an effective field theory. In this scenario, Higgs boson decays into photons and electroweak gauge-boson pairs are considerably enhanced for a light Higgs boson, which makes a signal observation at the LHC straightforward. On the other hand, the clean environment of a linear collider is required to directly probe the radiative fermionic sector of the Higgs boson couplings. Also, we show that the flavor-changing Higgs boson decays are dramatically enhanced with respect to the standard model. In particular, we find a measurable branching ratio in the range (10{sup -4}-10{sup -3}) for the decay H{yields}bs for a Higgs boson lighter than 140 GeV, depending on the high-energy scale where Yukawa couplings vanish. We present a detailed analysis of the Higgs boson production cross sections at linear colliders for interesting decay signatures, as well as branching-ratio correlations for different flavor-conserving/nonconserving fermionic decays.

  17. Arbuzov rearrangement in alkoxy derivatives and chloro derivatives of methyl phosphonites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livantsov, M.V.; Prishchenko, A.A.; Lutsenko, I.F.

    1987-10-20

    In a series of alkoxy- and chloro-substituted methyl phosphonites, the Arbuzov reaction is a preparative method for the synthesis of new types of functionally substituted methyl phosphinates. The Arbuzov reaction takes a new pathway in the case of dialkoxymethyl phosphonites, in which the phosphorus-carbon bond is ruptured at the stage where a quasiphosphonium compound forms, producing alkoxycarbonyl phosphonites that have not been available before. The IR spectra were obtained on UR-20 and IKS-22 instruments in a thin layer (NaCL). The PMR spectra were taken on a Tesla BS-497 spectrometer (100 MHz) in C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ and CDCl/sub 3/ solutions (20 to 30% concn.), with TMS as standard. The /sup 13/C NMR spectrum of phosphonite (XI) was obtained on a Varian FT-80A spectrometer (20 MHz) in an 80% solution in C/sub 6/D/sub 6/ and with TMS as standard. The /sup 31/P NMR spectra were obtained on JEOL 6-50OHL (24.3 MHz), Varian FT-80A (32.2 MHz), and JOEL FX-100 (42 MHz) spectrometers with an 85% solution of H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ in D/sub 2/O as standard.

  18. The NUHM? after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flcher, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; Malik, S.; Marrouche, J.; et al

    2014-12-17

    We make a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the NUHM2, in which the soft supersymmetry (SUSY)-breaking contributions to the masses of the two Higgs multiplets, m2Hu,d, vary independently from the universal soft SUSY-breaking contributions m20 to the masses of squarks and sleptons. Our analysis uses the MultiNest sampling algorithm with over 4 10? points to sample the NUHM2 parameter space. It includes the ATLAS and CMS Higgs mass measurements as well as the ATLAS search for supersymmetric jets + /ET signals using the full LHC Run 1 data, the measurements of BR(Bs?????) by LHCb and CMS togethermorewith other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark-matter scattering. We find that the preferred regions of the NUHM2 parameter space have negative SUSY-breaking scalar masses squared at the GUT scale for squarks and sleptons, m20 2Hu 2Hd 2 = 32.5 with 21 degrees of freedom (dof) in the NUHM2, to be compared with ?2/dof = 35.0/23 in the CMSSM, and ?2/dof = 32.7/22 in the NUHM1. We find that the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses and other observables are similar to those found previously in the CMSSM and NUHM1.less

  19. Geology reinterpretation of an inactive old field-Mata 3, Venezuelan East Basin-using computer methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, O.; Rivero, C.; Abud, J.

    1996-08-01

    Nowadays to find a new oil field is a very dificult task that the petroleum people know very well; therefore the reactivation of an old oil field that had important production is the best way to increase the economic benefits for the Corporation and for the country in general. In this paper, the most important point was the Geology Study regarding the reopening of the Mata-3 oil field, which ceased to be active 15 years ago, after producing 30 mmbls of light oil. There are 30 prospective sands but only 3 of them have produced 70% of the primary production. Thus, the principal objectives were the S2, S3, 4 sands of Oficina Formation (Venezuelan East Basin) in 476 wells located in this area. The following computer systems that were available to us: GIPSIE System, Vax (Intergraph Co.); PMSE System, Vax (Intergraph Co.); CPS-3 System, Unix (Radian Co.); and SIGEMAP System PC (Corpoven, S.A.). All of them assist in the different tasks that must be done by the geologists working in the interpretation area. In the end, we recommended 40 wells to workover (2 wells/year for 20 years) and thereby to increase the POI (petroleum in situ) and increase the reserves by 13.4 mmbls of fight oil, important commercial production. The estimate of the total investment is about $2 million (340 mmBs.).

  20. CDF trigger final balance: Offline resolution at low level selections to fight against Tevatron increasing luminosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua

    2010-01-01

    The CDF detector at Tevatron collider is at present the most long-lasting high energy physics experiment. Since its first data taking in 1992 it has produced many results of primary importance, such as the discovery of top quark and, more recently, the observations of Bs oscillations and single-top production. None of them would have been possible without a fast and efficient trigger system. Based on a three level architecture, the CDF trigger takes decisions on simple calorimetric and tracking objects and assures both high efficiency on signal events and low dead time. It reduces the data flow rate from 2.53 MHz, the collision rate, to 150 Hz, the current limit on tape writing and is flexible enough to be easily adapted to the continuously growing instantaneous luminosity. In the last years the Tevatron instantaneous luminosity has rapidly increased and is now reaching 4 x 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The CDF trigger system has been widely upgraded to cope with increasing trigger rates. The upgrade result is online reconstruction of missing transverse energy, jets and tracks with a quality comparable to the offline one. Jet energy and direction can be precisely determined and tracks can be subjected to 3-D reconstruction with good resolution. These upgrades reduce high trigger rates to acceptable levels and have provided invaluable tools to increase the purity of the collected samples. They also represent a helpful experience for LHC experiments where background rates will be much more demanding.