National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bs baghouse fabric

  1. Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, G.; Keener, T.C.

    1995-12-31

    In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

  2. Baghouse Slipstream Testing at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jason Laumb; Robert Jensen; Jeffery Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Brandon Pavlish; Stanley Miller; Lucinda Hamre

    2007-04-30

    Performing sorbent testing for mercury control at a large scale is a very expensive endeavor and requires months of planning and careful execution. Even with good planning, there are plant limitations on what operating/design parameters can be varied/tested and when. For parameters that cannot be feasibly tested at the full scale (lower/higher gas flow, different bag material, cleaning methods, sorbents, etc.), an alternative approach is used to perform tests on a slipstream unit using flue gas from the plant. The advantage that a slipstream unit provides is the flexibility to test multiple operating and design parameters and other possible technology options without risking major disruption to the operation of the power plant. Additionally, the results generated are expected to simulate full-scale conditions closely, since the flue gas used during the tests comes directly from the plant in question. The Energy & Environmental Research Center developed and constructed a mobile baghouse that allows for cost-effective testing of impacts related to variation in operating and design parameters, as well as other possible mercury control options. Multiple sorbents, air-to-cloth ratios, bag materials, and cleaning frequencies were evaluated while flue gas was extracted from Big Brown when it fired a 70% Texas lignite-30% Powder River Basin (PRB) blend and a 100% PRB coal.

  3. Biochemistry BS DEGREE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    207 Biochemistry BS DEGREE PROGRAM The biochemistry program is the result of a joint effort in the interdiscipli- nary science of biochemistry. The program, strengthened by mathematics and physics, attempts. Administration of the program is by the biochemistry committee, composed of members of the departments

  4. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.; Lawson, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    A process for recovering zinc-rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered by distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10 C, separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream. 1 figure.

  5. Hydrometallurgical process for recovering iron sulfate and zinc sulfate from baghouse dust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (95706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521); Lawson, Daniel B. (925 Putnam Dr., Lockport, IL 60441)

    1994-01-01

    A process for recovering zinc/rich and iron-rich fractions from the baghouse dust that is generated in various metallurgical operations, especially in steel-making and other iron-making plants, comprises the steps of leaching the dust by hot concentrated sulfuric acid so as to generate dissolved zinc sulfate and a precipitate of iron sulfate, separating the precipitate from the acid by filtration and washing with a volatile liquid, such as methanol or acetone, and collecting the filtered acid and the washings into a filtrate fraction. The volatile liquid may be recovered distillation, and the zinc may be removed from the filtrate by alternative methods, one of which involves addition of a sufficient amount of water to precipitate hydrated zinc sulfate at 10.degree. C., separation of the precipitate from sulfuric acid by filtration, and evaporation of water to regenerate concentrated sulfuric acid. The recovery of iron may also be effected in alternative ways, one of which involves roasting the ferric sulfate to yield ferric oxide and sulfur trioxide, which can be reconverted to concentrated sulfuric acid by hydration. The overall process should not generate any significant waste stream.

  6. CP Violation in Other Bs Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhang; for the LHCb Collaboration

    2012-08-24

    The recent experimental results of CP violation in Bs decays other than in the J/psi phi final state are discussed. Included are the resonant components and $\\phi_s$ determination in Bs -> J/psi pi+ pi-, CP asymmetries in Bs -> h+ h'- decays, and the Bs effective lifetimes in the CP-even state K+ K- and the CP-odd state J/psi f0(980).

  7. B.A / B.S in Chemistry and B.S. in Biochemistry Learning Outcomes Program B.A. / B.S. Chemistry and B.S. Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    B.A / B.S in Chemistry and B.S. in Biochemistry Learning Outcomes Program B.A. / B.S. Chemistry and B.S. Biochemistry Department(s) Chemistry College Sciences 1. Student Learning Outcomes for the development of the professional skills needed to be an effective chemist. The B.S. program in Biochemistry

  8. Probing New Physics Through Bs Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricia Ball

    2007-03-20

    I discuss the interpretation of the recent experimental data on $B_s$ mixing in terms of model-independent new-physics parameters.

  9. Degrees At-A-Glance Biochemistry/Biotechnology....................................................................................................... BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degrees At-A-Glance Biochemistry/Biotechnology....................................................................................................... BS Biochemistry & Molecular Biology............................................................................................. BS MS, PhD Biochemistry & Molecular Biology - Environmental Toxicology

  10. CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY (CHEM) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements: ____ 32 CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (66 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  11. PHYSICS, B.S. BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    PHYSICS, B.S. BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements ______ 3 PHYS 37000 Biomedical Physics Seminar ______ 3 PHYS 41800 Thermal Physics ______ 3 PHYS 44200): ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ #12;PHYSICS, B.S. PLAN--BIOMEDICAL PHYSICS (BIMD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) Term: Year: 2015 Term: Year

  12. Industrial Engineering-BS ,PhD option in Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barge, Marcy

    I Industrial Engineering- BS ,PhD option in Engineering Industrial & Management Engineering - BS MS Applied Mathematics - BS optionin Mathematics Applied Mechanics PhD option in Engineering Applied; teaching "minor, Art History minor Art.History - BA option in Art; minor B Bio-resources`Engineering - BS

  13. Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS Kirsten Shea, MBA #12;NO CONFLICTS of budget reductions · Pharmacy services · Aging population · Legal obligations · Logistics specific to Correctional Institutions / Building InfrastructureInfrastructure · Space and accompanying environment

  14. B.S. in Biochemistry Requirements for the B.S. in Biochemistry degree program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    1045 & 1045L; 1046 and 1046L or CHM 1050 & 1050L; 1051 & 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHM 3120 & 3120B.S. in Biochemistry Requirements for the B.S. in Biochemistry degree program General Chemistry CHM; 4130 & 4130L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211L Biochemistry BCH 4053; 4054 Physical Chemistry CHM

  15. Mercury oxidation in flue gas using gold and palladium catalysts on fabric filters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason A. Hrdlicka; Wayne S. Seames; Michael D. Mann; Darrin S. Muggli; Carol A. Horabik [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-09-01

    The feasibility of oxidizing elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas using catalytic material impregnated onto fabric filters was explored. TiO{sub 2}, Au/TiO{sub 2}, and Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were studied based on promising results in previous research. Several fabric coating methods were investigated to determine the best way to load a filter. A spray coat method was found to have the highest initial loading and had the lowest losses after simulated pulse-jet cleaning. The oxidation performance of the catalyst-coated filters was tested using a simulated flue gas in a bench-scale reactor under conditions similar to those found in a baghouse. Au/TiO{sub 2} and Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were effective, yielding mercury oxidation ranges of 40-60% and 50-80%, respectively. A 19 kW research combustor equipped with a baghouse was used to fire a range of coals and further test the performance of Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Results obtained warrant further development of this technique as a means of mercury pollution control. 19 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Decoherence free Bd and Bs meson systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashutosh Kumar Alok; Subhashish Banerjee

    2013-04-15

    We study the impact of decoherence on B meson systems with specific emphasis on Bs. For consistency we also study the Bd mesons based on the most recent data. We find that the Bd mesons are 34 sigma away from total decoherence, while the Bs mesons are seen to be upto 31sigma away from total decoherence. Thus, our results prove, with experimental verity, that neutral meson systems are free from decoherence effects. Therefore, this provides a very useful laboratory for testing the foundations of quantum mechanics.

  17. Jon Petersen1, Shea Dillon2 1B.S., Mechanical & Materials Engineering,2 B.S., Mechanical & Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Jon Petersen1, Shea Dillon2 1B.S., Mechanical & Materials Engineering,2 B.S., Mechanical & Materials Engineering PROBLEM/OPPORTUNITY Figure 2: Live, unfiltered accelerometer/gyroscope data from

  18. BS Program in Physics Effective Fall 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Michael W.

    BS Program in Physics Effective Fall 2013 9/17/2013 CHMG- 141 or BIOL-101 General & Analytical-xxx General Physics Elective (c) 3 PHYS-451 Capstone Project 3 Open elective 3 PHYS-xxx Physics Elective (b) 3 Chemistry I or General Biology I 3 CHMG- 142 or BIOL-102 General & Analytical Chemistry II or General

  19. Clemson University Construction Science and Management BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Clemson University Construction Science and Management BS 2011 ­ 2012 Outcome Assessment Plan Mission / Purpose - The mission of the Department of Construction Science and Management undergraduate of improving the quality of the construction industry and thus the built environment. Goals G 1: Accreditation

  20. BS in Environmental Engineering ABET Accreditation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    BS in Environmental Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Environmental, and profession. III. are prepared for engineering practice and advanced studies in civil/environmental necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental

  1. WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum (structural)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    WSU B.S. Geology Curriculum Geology GEL 3300 (structural) GEL 3400 (sed/strat) Geology Elective 1 Geology Elective 2 Yr 1 Yr 2 Yr 3 Yr 4 PHY 2130/31 MAT 2010 PHY 2140/41 CHEM 1220/30 MAT 1800 Cognates GEL 5593 (writing intensive) GEL 3160 (petrology) GEL 3650 (field camp) Geology Elective 3 GEL 2130

  2. FVE BS sro | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpA JumpGmbH EFCFBA FrancoFRED Home >SIFUMPAFVE BS

  3. Roadmap: Technology Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-TECH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Technology ­ Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-TECH] College of Applied Engineering, Sustainability and Technology Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 1-June-12/JS This roadmap-division hours #12;Roadmap: Technology ­ Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-TECH] College of Applied Engineering

  4. Roadmap: Mathematics -Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-MATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Mathematics - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-MATH] College of Arts and Science Department of Mathematical Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 11-May-2012/LNHD This roadmap #12;Roadmap: Mathematics - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-MATH] College of Arts and Science Department

  5. UB DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BS in Biomedical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BS in Biomedical Engineering Facts About BME@UB · Full Sciences and School of Engineering · Small class size and Applied Sciences · Average starting salary for · Degrees offered: BS, MS, PhD Biomedical Engineers: $56,158 Curriculum Overview Freshman

  6. Physics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Physics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Physics BS Credits Completed In Progress Future ENGL 101 Foundations 3 UF 200 Civic and Ethical Foundations 3 DLM MATH 170 Calculus I 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab 5 DLN PHYS 212, 212L Physics II with Calculus & Lab 5 DLV Visual and Performing Arts 3 DLL

  7. BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    BIOLOGY, B.S. WITH TEACHER CERTIFICATE Biology (BIOT) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency/Gen Ed Biology BS Core/Supporting Courses (64 credits) *Note: 3.0 GPA required in Biology Core 21800 Genetics & Molecular Biology ______ 4 BIOL 21900 Principles of Functional Biology ______ 3 BIOL

  8. CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY PRE-DENTAL (CHPD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    CHEMISTRY, B.S. CHEMISTRY PRE-DENTAL (CHPD) (Fall 2015-Summer 2016) IPFW Residency Requirements in Gen Ed CHEMISTRY BS COURSES & SUPPORTING COURSES (81 credits) *Note: 2.0 CHM GPA required/2.0 CHM GPA in 300+ courses *The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry program is appropriate for premedical

  9. AUTOMATION OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING Sanzad Siddique, B.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    AUTOMATION OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING by Sanzad Siddique, B.S. A Thesis submitted to the Faculty OF ENERGY DEMAND FORECASTING Sanzad Siddique, B.S. Marquette University, 2013 Automation of energy demand of the energy demand forecasting are achieved by integrating nonlinear transformations within the models

  10. Page 1 | B.S. in Physics | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Physics | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Physics Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Physics and Optical Science physics declare a Physics major in their freshman or sophomore year. · Advising (For the Major): o Dr. Pedram

  11. Approved Module Information for BS3347, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Economics of Entrepreneurship Module Code: BS3347

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for BS3347, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Economics of Entrepreneurship Module Code: BS3347 School: Aston Business School Module Type: Standard Module New Module? No Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name Anna Rebmann Email Address rebmanna

  12. Approved Module Information for BS1163, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Introduction to Microeconomics Module Code: BS1163

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for BS1163, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Introduction to Microeconomics Module Code: BS1163 School: Aston Business School Module Type: Standard Module New Module? No Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name David Morris Email Address morrisd5@aston

  13. Approved Module Information for BS3325, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Competition Policy -Theory Module Code: BS3325

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for BS3325, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Competition Policy - Theory Module Code: BS3325 School: Aston Business School Module Type: Standard Module New Module? Yes Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name Matt Olczak Email Address olczakm

  14. Page 1 | B.S. in Psychology | Academic Plan of Study Updated June 2015 B.S. in Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Psychology | Academic Plan of Study Updated June 2015 B.S. in Psychology Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Psychology psych.uncc.edu PROGRAM) and a General Education science course with a lab outside Psychology), a 2.00 GPA for all Psychology coursework

  15. Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.S. in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Chemistry | Academic Plan of Study Updated May 2015 B.S. in Chemistry Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Chemistry chemistry.uncc.edu PROGRAM to declare the major. · Advising (For the Major): completed by your chemistry faculty advisor (please refer

  16. 1 BA/BS with a Major in Chemistry, Concentration in Forensic Chemistry BA/BS WITH A MAJOR IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Laboratory CHEM 3165 Biochemistry I CHEM 4122 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry CHEM 4134 Descriptive Instrumental Analytical Chemistry CHEM 4123 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry Laboratory CHEM 4134 (if1 BA/BS with a Major in Chemistry, Concentration in Forensic Chemistry BA/BS WITH A MAJOR

  17. B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Environmental Chemistry Requirements for the Environmental Chemistry B.S. degree program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    and 1051 & 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHM 3120 & 3120L; 4130 & 4130L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Environmental Chemistry Requirements for the Environmental Chemistry B.S. degree program General Chemistry CHM 1045 & CHM 1045L; 1046 and 1046L or CHM 1050 & 1050L

  18. Page 1 | B.S. in Geography | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Geography | Academic Plan of Study Updated April 2014 B.S. in Geography Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Geography & Earth Sciences geoearth & Economic Geography; Geographic Information Science & Technology (GISc&T) · Declaring the Major: Minimum GPA

  19. DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL, STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING BS in Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL, STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING BS in Civil Engineering Facts About,000 · Over 3,500 alumni around the world ENGINEERING.BUFFALO.EDU/csee Degrees offered: · BS in Civil Engineering · BS in Environmental Engineering · A 5-year combined BS Civil Eng./MBA · MS and PhD in Civil

  20. College Degree MAJOR Major Description Concentration Concentration Description A BS AGED Agricultural Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    Sciences A BS SUAS Sustainable Agronomic Systems ABMK Agronomic Bus & Marketing A BS SUAS Sustainable Agronomic Systems AMGT Agronomic Management A BS SUAS Sustainable Agronomic Systems IAGR International Fisheries & Aquatic Sciences A BS WLDL Wildlife A BSLA LARC Landscape Architecture A CERT DSPG Deans Scholar

  1. DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL, STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING BS in Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL, STRUCTURAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING BS in Environmental Engineering Facts,000 ENGINEERING.BUFFALO.EDU/csee CSEE degrees offered: · BS in Environmental Engineering · BS in Civil Engineering · A 5-year combined BS Civil Eng./MBA · MS and PhD in Civil Engineering Environmental Engineers Shape

  2. Synthesis and crystal structure of the isotypic rare earth thioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}], and Nd[BS{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunger, Jens; Borna, Marija [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kniep, Ruediger, E-mail: kniep@cpfs.mpg.d [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, D-01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    The orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared from mixtures of the rare earth (RE) metals together with amorphous boron and sulfur summing up to the compositions CeB{sub 3}S{sub 6}, PrB{sub 5}S{sub 9} and NdB{sub 3}S{sub 6}. The following preparation routes were used: solid state reactions with maximum temperatures of 1323 K and high-pressure high-temperature syntheses at 1173 K and 3 GPa. Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were also obtained from rare earth chlorides RECl{sub 3} and sodium thioborate Na{sub 2}B{sub 2}S{sub 5} by metathesis type reactions at maximum temperatures of 1073 K. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The thioborates are isotypic and crystallize in the orthorhombic spacegroup Pna2{sub 1} (No. 33; Z=4; Ce: a=7.60738(6)A, b=6.01720(4)A, c=8.93016(6)A; Pr: a=7.56223(4)A, b=6.00876(2)A, c=8.89747(4)A; Nd: a=7.49180(3)A, b=6.00823(2)A, c=8.86197(3)A) . The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of undulated kagome nets, which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species. - Abstract: Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure The isotypic orthothioborates Ce[BS{sub 3}], Pr[BS{sub 3}] and Nd[BS{sub 3}] were prepared using different preparation routes. The crystal structure of the title compounds was determined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The crystal structures contain isolated [BS{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups with boron in trigonal-planar coordination. The sulfur atoms form the vertices of corrugated kagome nets (sketched with blue dotted lines), which are stacked along [100] according to the sequence ABAB. Within these nets every second triangle is occupied by boron and the large hexagons are centered by rare earth ions, which are surrounded by overall nine sulfur species.

  3. College of Arts & Sciences Psychology, B.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    05/01/2009 College of Arts & Sciences Psychology, B.S. Broad Learning Outcomes A. Students and critically evaluate psychological research methods. C2. Students will be able to acquire and analyze

  4. Search for the rare decays Bs -->mumu and Bd -->mumu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Amoraal; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; L. Arrabito; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; E. Bos; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; X. Cid Vidal; P. J. Clark; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; W. Da Silva; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; M. Dima; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estève; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; P. F. Harrison; J. He; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; F. Kapusta; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; A. Konoplyannikov; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; Y. Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; B. M'charek; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; A. Maier; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; V. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; M. Merkin; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; J. V. Morris; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; F. Murtas; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; A. Ostankov; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson; G. N. Patrick; C. Patrignani; C. Pavel -Nicorescu; A. Pazos Alvarez; A. Pellegrino; G. Penso; M. Pepe Altarelli; S. Perazzini; D. L. Perego; E. Perez Trigo; A. Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo; P. Perret; A. Petrella

    2012-07-23

    A search for the decays Bs-->mumu and Bd-->mumu is performed with about 37 pb^{-1} of pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. The observed numbers of events are consistent with the background expectations. The resulting upper limits on the branching ratios are BR(Bs-->mumu) mumu) <1.5 x 10^{-8} at 95% confidence level.

  5. Search for the decay Bs0 ? ?? and a measurement of the branching fraction for Bs0 ? ??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Deepanwita; Bhuyan, Bipul; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, David M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Aziz, T.; Bahinipati, S.; Bakich, A. M.; Bansal, Vikas; Bhardwaj, V.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, Giovanni; Bracko, Marko; Browder, Thomas E.; Cervenkov, D.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, David A.; Dalseno, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Drasal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, James E.; Frost, O.; Gaur, Vipin; Ganguly, Sudeshna; Garmash, Alexey; Getzkow, D.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Hou, W. S.; Iijima, T.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, Igal; Joffe, D.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, Kay; Ko, Byeong Rok; Kodys, P.; Korpar, S.; Krizan, P.; Krokovny, Pavel; Kuhr, Thomas; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, I. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, Dmitri; Matvienko, D.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mori, T.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nayak, Minakshi; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, Galina; Pedlar, Todd K.; Pestotnik, Rok; Petric, Marko; Piilonen, Leo E.; Ribezl, Eva; Ritter, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, Saurabh; Santelj, Luka; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, Vladimir; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Semmler, D.; Shebalin, V.; Shibata, T. A.; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Sohn, Y. S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Staric, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Unno, Yuji; Uno, S.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vossen, Anslem G.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, Y.; Wehle, S.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamaoka, J.; Yashchenko, S.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2015-01-01

    We search for the decay B0s??? and measure the branching fraction for B0s??? using 121.4~fb-1 of data collected at the ?(5S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The B0s??? branching fraction is measured to be (3.6±0.5(stat.)±0.3(syst.)±0.6(fs))×10-5, where fs is the fraction of Bs(*)B¯s(*) in bb¯ events. Our result is in good agreement with the theoretical predictions as well as with a recent measurement from LHCb. We observe no statistically significant signal for the decay B0s??? and set a 90% confidence-level upper limit on its branching fraction at 3.1×10-6. This constitutes a significant improvement over the previous result.

  6. UB DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (MAE) BS in Mechanical Engineering (ME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING (MAE) BS in Mechanical Engineering (ME) Facts,500. The mean annual wage for ME's is $85,930 · Degrees offered: BS, MS, and PhD · A five-year BS Mechanical Engineering + MBA program is available What do Mechanical Engineers Do? Mechanical engineers use principles

  7. UB DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING BS in Industrial Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING BS in Industrial Engineering Facts About IE: $61,400 (BS) · A five-year BS IE + MBA degree Industrial Engineers Keep Thriving in the Changing · enhance productivity and quality in company operations For over 100 years, industrial engineers have been

  8. UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING BS in Chemical and Biological EngineeringD (all in Chemical Engineering) · Average ChE starting salary: $66,000 (BS) · A five-year BS in Chemical by teaching assistants: 0 What Do Chemical and Biological Engineers Do? CBE graduates apply chemistry to make

  9. Polymorphous computing fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolinski, Christophe Czeslaw (Los Alamos, NM); Gokhale, Maya B. (Los Alamos, NM); McCabe, Kevin Peter (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-01-18

    Fabric-based computing systems and methods are disclosed. A fabric-based computing system can include a polymorphous computing fabric that can be customized on a per application basis and a host processor in communication with said polymorphous computing fabric. The polymorphous computing fabric includes a cellular architecture that can be highly parameterized to enable a customized synthesis of fabric instances for a variety of enhanced application performances thereof. A global memory concept can also be included that provides the host processor random access to all variables and instructions associated with the polymorphous computing fabric.

  10. Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In Progress and Foundational Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical Sciences 3 MATH 305 Intro to Abstract Algebra & Number Theory 3 MATH 314 Foundations of Analysis 3

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Mathematics College of Sciences math.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience, mathematical: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Mathematics Degree Mathematics is a powerful tool

  12. Applied Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Applied Mathematics BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical To Computational Mathematics 3 FF MATH 401 Senior Thesis in the Mathematical Sciences 1 MATH 465 Numerical Analysis

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Sport Administration - Bachelor of Science [EH-BS-SPAD] College of Education, Health of Business Administration Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 2 | Last Updated: 15-May-12/JS This roadmap and Recreation 3 General Elective (lower or upper division) 3 #12;Roadmap: Sport Administration - Bachelor

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Zoology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-ZOOL] College of Arts and Science Department of Biological Sciences Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 14-May-2012/LNHD This roadmap hours and minimum 42 upper- division credit hours #12;Roadmap: Zoology ­ Bachelor of Science [AS

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Photo Illustration - Bachelor of Science [CI-BS-PHOI] College of Communication/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses if not satisfied earlier. See note 3 on page 2. #12;Roadmap: Photo Illustration - Bachelor of Science [CI

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Physics BS, Astrophysics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab 5 DLN PHYS 212, 212L Physics II with Calculus Electronics 4 PHYS 309, 309L Introductory Quantum Physics & Lab 4 PHYS 311 Modern Physics 3 PHYS 325

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    I & Lab · PHYS 196 (or 186) Physics w Calc II LSP coursework Fall--Fourth Year · CHEM 445 Senior Chemistry II & Lab · Elective(s) and/or LSP coursework Spring--Fourth Year · CHEM 310 Modern MethodsChemistry B.S. Fall--First Year · CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* · CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    : The Speech Mechanism · CMDS 472: Audiology · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year Program (LSP) coursework Spring--Fourth Year · CMDS 480: Clinical Practice (if not taken fall--fourth yearCommunication Disorders: BA/BS Fall--First Year · CMDS 200: Intro to Comm. Disorders · CMDS 101

  19. Agricultural Science BS (Science Track) Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year · AGSC 415: Ethical Issues in Sustainable · AGSC 490 · Ag.Sci. Learning Plan Elective(s) · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Spring--Fourth Year Elective(s) · B.S. Requirement Course · Liberal Studies Program (LSP) coursework Fall--Fourth Year · AGSC

  20. Civil Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Civil Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In course in a second field* 3 CE 210, 211 Engineering Surveying and Lab 3 CE 280 Civil Engineering Case Studies 2 CE 282 Engineering Practice 3 CE 284 Computational Methods 2 CE 320 Principles of Environmental

  1. A wee bit of Deciphering physics from Bs J/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Physics Motivation A wee bit of Theory Extracting Physics MV Studies Summary Deciphering physics from Bs J/ events at LHCb Colin Mclean School of Physics & Astronomy, University of Edinburgh. Heidelberg 19th June 2008 THE U N I V E R S ITY OF E D I N B U R G H 1 / 56 #12;Physics Motivation A wee bit

  2. Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS Code-ESSE 128+ Credits "C-"or better) EAPS 10900^ Dynamic Earth (fall) ( also satisfies Science Selective for core) (3) EAPS 11800^ Introduction to Earth Science (spring) (1) EAPS 13700^ First Year Seminar in EAPS (spring) (4) EAPS 24300

  3. Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS Code-ESSE 126+ Credits "C-"or better) EAPS 10900^ Dynamic Earth (fall) ( also satisfies Science Selective for core) (3) EAPS 11800^ Introduction to Earth Science (spring) (1) EAPS 13700^ First Year Seminar in EAPS (spring) (4) EAPS 24300

  4. Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Earth Space Science Education College of Science code-BS Code-ESSE 123+ Credits "C-"or better) EAPS 10900^ Dynamic Earth (fall) ( also satisfies Science Selective for core) (3) EAPS 11800^ Introduction to Earth Science (spring) (1) EAPS 13700^ First Year Seminar in EAPS (spring) (4) EAPS 24300

  5. Mechanical Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Mechanical Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed Mechanical Engineering Graphics 3 ME 271 Introduction to Computation for Engineers 3 ME 302 or ENGR 320 or ENGR 330, 331 Fluid Mechanics and Lab 4 ME 350 or CE 350 or ENGR 350 Engineering Mechanics of Materials

  6. Academic Planning Worksheet (BS in Computer Science) General Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    Academic Planning Worksheet (BS in Computer Science) General Requirements 122: Total credit hours: Use the following guidelines in preparing your plan: · Use the courses or the course instructor. · Plan an average of four to five courses each semester (14-17 credits). Summer may

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed InProgress Future General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual and Performing Arts 3 DLL in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323 Ecology 4 BIOL 343

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Microbiology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  9. Biology BS, Ecology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Ecology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Biology BS, Botany Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Biology BS, Zoology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual and Performing Arts 3 DLL in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323 Ecology 4 BIOL 343

  12. UNLV B.S. Biochemistry 2008-2010 Catalog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    UNLV B.S. Biochemistry 2008-2010 Catalog Log-in to your student account at UNLV to access your Chemistry I 3 CHEM472 Biochemistry Laboratory 2 Course CHEM347 Laboratory Techniques of Organic Chemistry I 1 CHEM474 Biochemistry I 3 Requirements CHEM242 Organic Chemistry II 3 CHEM475 Biochemistry II 3

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    B.S. in Biochemistry Typical Program of Study: First Semester Second Semester 1st Year CHEM 1211K Biochemistry I Organic Chemistry Lab CHEM 4512 (3) CHEM 4581 (3) Biology Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Core Elective (3) Biochemistry II Biochemistry Lab I 4th Year CHEM 4582 (3) CHEM 4521 (3) Biology Elective (3

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Geology College of Sciences geoscience.unlv.edu/ Mission of the College: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising About the Geology Career Geoscientists are stewards understanding of Earth processes and history. Value of the Geology Degree Opportunities for interesting

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2015 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science/Engineering Elective (2xxxx or above) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics http

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Geology and Geophysics College of Science code-BS Code-GEOP 120 Credits "C-"or better required Professional Elective (3xxxx and above) (6) EAPS 49000 Geology Field Experience (summer) (3) Science ******************************************************************************************************************************** (effective Fall 2013) #12;Geology and Geophysics Fall 2014 Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    UNLV B.S. Geology 2008-2010 Catalog Log-in to your student account at UNLV to access your: required ONLY to reach 124 total credits (these can be ANY 100-400 level courses offered at UNLV) Geology Major Requirements: Minimum grade C or better Geology Core Course Requirements GEOL 101/101D Intro

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Psychology BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed InProgress Future Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 228 Human Anatomy and Physiology 4 PSYC 101 General Psychology 3 PSYC 120 Introduction to the Psychology Major 2 PSYC 295 Statistical Methods 3 CID PSYC 321 Research

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    UB DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING BS in Electrical Engineering Facts About EE@UB · Full-time faculty: 28 · Average starting salary: $61,420 Electrical Engineering: Lead to a Better Future The field of Electrical Engineering is built on the shoulders of giants - Tesla, Edison, Marconi, Bell - to meet

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Electrical Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In, 121L Computer Science I and lab 4 CS 221 Computer Science II 3 ECE 210 Introduction to Electric ECE 380, 380L Electrical Engineering Practice and Lab 3 ECE 480 Senior Design Project I 3 FF ECE 482

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Kinesiology BS, Biomechanics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits, 331 Exercise Physiology and Lab 4 KINES 363 Exercise Psychology 3 KINES 370, 371 Biomechanics and Lab Biomechanics 3 #12;PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus and Lab 5 PHYS 212, 212L Physics II with Calculus

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Social Science BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed In, & Applied Sciences course with lab 4 DLN Natural, Physical, and Applied Sciences course 3-4 DLV Visual and Performing Arts 3 DLL Literature and Humanities 3-4 DLS Social Sciences course in a first field 3 DLS Social

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Chemistry BS, Forensics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Completed 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab and Justice 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 CHEM 112, 112L General Chemistry II & Lab 4 CHEM

  6. MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    MAJOR TO CAREER GUIDE B.S. Chemistry College of Sciences www.unlv.edu/chemistry Mission of the College of Sciences The College of Sciences offers programs in life sciences, chemistry, geoscience: 702-895-2077 Campus Location: MPE-A 130 www.unlv.edu/sciences/advising Chemistry Career Options

  7. Chemistry BS, Biochemistry Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Chemistry BS, Biochemistry Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 CHEM 112, 112L General Chemistry II & Lab 4

  8. Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Chemistry B.S. Fall--First Year CHEM 130 Chemical Principles I* CHEM 145 Freshman Seminar MATH Intro to Quant Analysis CHEM 245 Sophomore Seminar CHEM 329 Organic Chemistry I MATH 264 Calculus III LSP coursework Fall--Third Year CHEM 345 Junior Seminar CHEM 323/324 Physical Chemistry I & Lab

  9. Study of Bs->mu+mu- in CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urs Langenegger

    2006-10-24

    We present a Monte Carlo simulation study of measuring the rare leptonic decay Bs->mu+mu- with the CMS experiment at the LHC. The study is based on a full detector simulation for signal and background events. We discuss the high-level trigger algorithm and the offline event selection.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2013-2014 CATALOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    June 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2013-2014 CATALOG There are three tracks in Interdisciplinary Studies (IS). This handout is for the Environmental Studies track. Office Classroom I ­ Suite 302 for students seeking a combination of studies. The Environmental Studies track is designed for students who

  11. Core Mathematics Honors College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Core Mathematics Honors College of Science MATH-BS Code-MAHO Departmental/Program Major Courses (76 Of Analysis or MA 44000 Real Analysis Honors (3) MA 35300 Linear Algebra II With Applications (3) Math ******************************************************************************************************************************** #12;Revised 2/2013 (effective Fall 2013) Core Mathematics Honors http://www.math

  12. Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-APMA Departmental/Program Major Courses (79 II With Applications (3) Math Selective I: MA 36200 Topics In Vector Calculus/MA 44200 - Multivariate Systems For Engineering And The Sciences (3) Math Selective II: MA 42500 - Elements Of Complex Analysis

  13. Operations Research Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Operations Research Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-MAOR Departmental/Program Major To Time Series (3) MA 35300 Linear Algebra II With Applications (3) Math Selective I: MA 36200 Topics 51700 - Statistical Inference (3) Math Selective II: MA 37500 - Introduction To Discrete Mathematics /MA

  14. Statistics Math Emphasis College of Science STAT-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Statistics ­ Math Emphasis College of Science STAT-BS Code-STMA Departmental/Program Major Courses And Applications (3) Math Selective I: MA 36200 Topics In Vector Calculus/MA 44200 - Multivariate Analysis I Honors ******************************************************************************************************************************** #12;Revised 2/2013 (effective Fall 2013) Statistics-Math Emphasis http://www.math

  15. Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-APMA Departmental/Program Major Courses (70 Of Nonlinear Systems For Engineering And The Sciences (3) Applied Math Selective: MA 42500 - Elements To Complex Analysis (3) Math/Statistics Selective: MA/STAT 41600 Probability or STAT 51600 - Basic

  16. Core Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Core Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-MATH Departmental/Program Major Courses (77 II With Applications (3) Math Selective I: MA 36200 Topics In Vector Calculus/MA 44200 - Multivariate ******************************************************************************************************************************** #12;Revised 2/2013 (effective Fall 2013) Core Mathematics http://www.math

  17. Mathematics/Statistics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Mathematics/Statistics College of Science MATH-BS Code-MASI Departmental/Program Major Courses (75 Honors (3) MA or STAT 41600 ­ Probability or STAT 51600 - Basic Probability And Applications (3) Math ******************************************************************************************************************************** #12;Revised 2/2013 (effective Fall 2013) Mathematics/Statistics http://www.math

  18. Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Applied Mathematics College of Science MATH-BS Code-APMA Departmental/Program Major Courses (79 Of Nonlinear Systems For Engineering And The Sciences (3) Applied Math Selective: MA 42500 - Elements To Complex Analysis (3) Math/Statistics Selective: MA/STAT 41600 Probability or STAT 51600 - Basic

  19. BS in ACTUARIAL SCIENCE (695224) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Statistical Results Stat 330 Introduction to Regression Stat 340 Inference Program Requirements: Complete 496R Academic Internship: Statistics Stat 497R Introduction to Statistical Research RecommendedBS in ACTUARIAL SCIENCE (695224) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics For students entering

  20. BS in ACTUARIAL SCIENCE (695224) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    of Statistical Results Stat 330 Introduction to Regression Stat 340 Inference Program Requirements: Complete & Forecasting Stat 496R Academic Internship: Statistics Stat 497R Introduction to Statistical Research Stat 545BS in ACTUARIAL SCIENCE (695224) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics For students entering

  1. Chemistry Education College of Science CHEM-BS-Teaching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    26605 Organic Chemistry (1)CHM26600 or 26400 Organic Chemistry Lab (4)CHM32100 Analytical Chemistry I (4Chemistry Education College of Science CHEM-BS-Teaching CHED 120 Credits 2.5 GPA in content courses credits) (5)CHM12500 Introduction to Chemistry I(satisfies Science Selective for core) (5)CHM12600

  2. B.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Chemistry Requirements for the Chemistry B.S. degree program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    General Chemistry CHM 1045 & 1045L; 1046 & 1046L or CHM 1050, 1050L; 1051, 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHMB.S. and ACS Approved Degrees in Chemistry Requirements for the Chemistry B.S. degree program 3120 & 3120L; 4130 & 4130L Inorganic Chemistry CHM 4610, 4610L Organic Chemistry CHM 2210; 2211, 2211L

  3. Page 1 | B.S. in Mechanical Engineering & Physics (dual degree) | Academic Plan of Study Updated June 2015 B.S. in Mechanical Engineering & Physics (dual degree)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Mechanical Engineering & Physics (dual degree) | Academic Plan of Study Updated June 2015 B.S. in Mechanical Engineering & Physics (dual degree) Academic Plan of Study William States and Engineering Science + Dept. of Physics & Optical Science mees.uncc.edu & physics.uncc.edu PROGRAM SUMMARY

  4. Approved Module Information for BS2209, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: International Business Environment 2 Module Code: BS2209

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    Approved Module Information for BS2209, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: International Business Environment 2 Module Code: BS2209 School: Aston Business School Module Type: Standard Module New Module? No Module Credits: 10 Module Management Information Module Leader Name Yama Temouri Email Address temoury1

  5. Page 1 | B.S. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Earth Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yongge

    Page 1 | B.S. in Earth Sciences | Academic Plan of Study Updated March 2014 B.S. in Earth Sciences Academic Plan of Study College of Liberal Arts & Sciences Department of Geography & Earth Sciences geoearth. · Minimum Grades/GPA: minimum GPA is 2.0 · Teacher Licensure: No. Only in B.A. in Earth Sciences. Students

  6. DESIGN [fabrication] BUILD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rader, Nicolas Glen

    2006-01-01

    DESIGN [fabrication] BUILD proposes a new relationship among the architect, homeowner, and fabricator/assembler through the use of parametric software in order to create a truly customizable prefabricated home. This ...

  7. Fabrics with tunable oleophobicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Gareth H.

    A simple “dip-coating” process that imbues oleophobicity to various surfaces that inherently possess re-entrant texture, such as commercially available fabrics, is reported. These dip-coated fabric surfaces exhibit reversible, ...

  8. Photochemical cutting of fabrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piltch, Martin S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for the cutting of garment patterns from one or more layers of fabric. A laser capable of producing laser light at an ultraviolet wavelength is utilized to shine light through a pattern, such as a holographic phase filter, and through a lens onto the one or more layers of fabric. The ultraviolet laser light causes rapid photochemical decomposition of the one or more layers of fabric, but only along the pattern. The balance of the fabric of the one or more layers of fabric is undamaged.

  9. BS-Seeker2: a versatile aligning pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    15] and RMAP [16]. Various types of libraries are supported,reads from various types of library. We improved BS-Seeker2

  10. Observation of B-s production at the Upsilon(5S) resonance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke

    2006-01-01

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have observed the B-s meson in e(+)e(-) annihilation at the Upsilon(5S) resonance. We find 14 candidates consistent with B-s decays into final states with a J/psi or a D...

  11. Roadmap: Visual Journalism Photojournalism -Bachelor of Science [CI-BS-VJNL-PHOJ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Visual Journalism ­ Photojournalism - Bachelor of Science [CI-BS-VJNL-PHOJ] College | Last Updated: 8-Oct-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study;Roadmap: Visual Journalism ­ Photojournalism - Bachelor of Science [CI-BS-VJNL-PHOJ] College

  12. Roadmap: Aeronautics-Air Traffic Control -Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-ATC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Aeronautics- Air Traffic Control - Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-ATC] College of Applied This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses #12;Roadmap: Aeronautics- Air Traffic Control - Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-ATC] College

  13. Initial Placement of BS Chemical Engineers, `00-01 Industry 55.9%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    Initial Placement of BS Chemical Engineers, `00-01 Industry 55.9% Other 1.8% Graduate.8% Initial placement of Chemical Engineering Graduates, Academic Year `00-'01, AIChE Career Services Department #12;Breakdown of Industrial Employment for BS Chemical Engineers Chemical 23.3% Fuels 15

  14. A range of soil amendments including diammonium phosphate fertilizer (DAP), municipal biosolids (BS), biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    biosolids (BS), biosolids compost, and Al- and Fe-based water treatment residuals were tested on Pb-, Zn ranging from 35% (BS+Al, DAP 0.5%, DAP+Compost+Al) to 57% (Compost+Al). Plant Zn (Cynadon dactylon L for the first season, with the highest growth in the treatments that included compost and biosolids

  15. Observation of B?s - B??s oscillations and the development and application of same-side-kaon flavor tagging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Alberto, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01

    The search for flavor oscillations in the neutral Bs - B meson system constitutes a flagship analysis of the Tevatron proton-anti-proton collider physics program and an important probe for effects due to new physics beyond ...

  16. Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lab ­ Building Kit S 20 2Summer 2012 Integrated Systems ­ Programming Surfaces a) Exterior -Water production with integrated digital fabrication." Automation in Construction, Vol. 16, No. 3, 298­310, 2007Digitally Fabricated Building Delivery through Kitsthrough Kits Lawrence Sass Associate Professor

  17. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT X COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-15

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is the preferred option for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium in the late 1990's. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Recent FY05 studies have further investigated the LaBS Frit B formulation as well as development of a newer LaBS formulation denoted as LaBS Frit X. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit X glass and perform corrosion testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit X composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL using quenched Pu Frit X glass with varying exposed surface areas. Effects of isothermal and can-in-canister heat treatments on the Pu Frit X glass were also investigated. Another series of PCTs were performed on these different heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses. Leachates from all these PCTs were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation.

  18. NC State Chemical Engineering Degrees -B and BS Graduation Name NicknamDgr Maj Grad Date H Hometown StateInitial Employer Employer City StateJob Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Asst. Chemist William Crawford Piver BS IC 5/30/1906 Wilson NC New York NY Analytical Chemi Peter Hometown StateInitial Employer Employer City StateJob Title Charles Lester Creech BS IC 5 BS IC 5/30/1906 Rowland NC Tennessee Coal, Iron Ensley AL Asst. Chemist Arthur Wynns Gregory BS IC 5

  19. Biologically inspired digital fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Sarah (Sarah J.)

    2013-01-01

    Objects and systems in nature are models for the practice of sustainable design and fabrication. From trees to bones, natural systems are characterized by the constant interplay of creation, environmental response, and ...

  20. Fabricated torque shaft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Anderson, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A fabricated torque shaft is provided that features a bolt-together design to allow vane schedule revisions with minimal hardware cost. The bolt-together design further facilitates on-site vane schedule revisions with parts that are comparatively small. The fabricated torque shaft also accommodates stage schedules that are different one from another in non-linear inter-relationships as well as non-linear schedules for a particular stage of vanes.

  1. Nuclear Fabrication Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levesque, Stephen

    2013-04-05

    This report summarizes the activities undertaken by EWI while under contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) � Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for the management and operation of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium (NFC). The NFC was established by EWI to independently develop, evaluate, and deploy fabrication approaches and data that support the re-establishment of the U.S. nuclear industry: ensuring that the supply chain will be competitive on a global stage, enabling more cost-effective and reliable nuclear power in a carbon constrained environment. The NFC provided a forum for member original equipment manufactures (OEM), fabricators, manufacturers, and materials suppliers to effectively engage with each other and rebuild the capacity of this supply chain by : � Identifying and removing impediments to the implementation of new construction and fabrication techniques and approaches for nuclear equipment, including system components and nuclear plants. � Providing and facilitating detailed scientific-based studies on new approaches and technologies that will have positive impacts on the cost of building of nuclear plants. � Analyzing and disseminating information about future nuclear fabrication technologies and how they could impact the North American and the International Nuclear Marketplace. � Facilitating dialog and initiate alignment among fabricators, owners, trade associations, and government agencies. � Supporting industry in helping to create a larger qualified nuclear supplier network. � Acting as an unbiased technology resource to evaluate, develop, and demonstrate new manufacturing technologies. � Creating welder and inspector training programs to help enable the necessary workforce for the upcoming construction work. � Serving as a focal point for technology, policy, and politically interested parties to share ideas and concepts associated with fabrication across the nuclear industry. The report the objectives and summaries of the Nuclear Fabrication Consortium projects. Full technical reports for each of the projects have been submitted as well.

  2. IDIQ BS Exhibit A General Conditions (Rev. 3.3, 9-27-13)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on claims shall be paid at the rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States pursuant to Public Law 92-41 (85 Stat. 97). IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.3, 92713)...

  3. IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.1, 4/9/13) Exhibit A General Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on claims shall be paid at the rate established by the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States pursuant to Public Law 92-41 (85 Stat. 97). IDIQ BS Ex A (Rev. 3.1, 4913)...

  4. Aerospace Engineering Aircraft and Spacecraft Design BS, MS Space Transportation and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Aviation Aviation Management BS Maintenance Management Operations Professional Flight Biomedical, CA 95192-0080 408-924-3800 PROGRAMS Aerospace Engineering 408-924-3965 www.ae.sjsu.edu Aviation 408

  5. First observation of Bs -> J/psi f0(980) decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Amoraal; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; L. Arrabito; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; E. Bos; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; L. Camilleri; P. Campana; G. Capon; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; X. Cid Vidal; P. J. Clark; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; W. Da Silva; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; M. Dima; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; L. Eklund; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estève; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. L. Fungueirino Pazos; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; P. F. Harrison; J. He; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; V. Iakovenko; C. Iglesias Escudero; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; F. Kapusta; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; A. Konoplyannikov; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefran\\ccois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; Y. Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; B. M'charek; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; A. Maier; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martin Sanchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; V. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; M. Merkin; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; J. V. Morris; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; F. Murtas; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; A. Ostankov; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson; G. N. Patrick; C. Patrignani; C. Pavel -Nicorescu; A. Pazos Alvarez; A. Pellegrino; G. Penso; M. Pepe Altarelli; S. Perazzini; D. L. Perego; E. Perez Trigo

    2011-03-02

    Using data collected with the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the hadronic decay Bs -> J/psi f0(980) is observed. This CP eigenstate mode could be used to measure mixing-induced CP violation in the B_s system. Using a fit to the pi+ pi- mass spectrum with interfering resonances gives R_{f0/phi} = [Gamma(Bs -> J/psi f0, f0 -> pi+ pi-)]/[Gamma(Bs -> J/psi phi, phi -> K+K-)] = 0.252^{+0.046+0.027}_{-0.032-0.033}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  6. Renee Gunderson, M.S. Program Director, B.S. Information and Communication Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    Renee Gunderson, M.S. Program Director, B.S. Information and Communication Technologies University of Wisconsin-Stout Apparel and Communications Technology Department Information Technology Management 206 centers, and virtualized environment security and auditing. Information technology government and industry

  7. CP-Violation in K, B and B_{s} decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayyazuddin

    2009-09-28

    In this review we give an overview of CP-violation for K, B and B_s systems. Direct CP-violation and mixing induced CP-violation are discussed.

  8. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE, BS IPC: 09/11/12 NATURAL RESOURCES CONCENTRATION EFFECTIVE: Winter 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SCIENCE, BS IPC: 09/11/12 NATURAL RESOURCES CONCENTRATION EFFECTIVE: Winter _______________ 3 SOCIAL SCIENCES:** CONC ELEC _______________ 3 (Anthropology, economics, geography, CONC ELEC Resources Concentration Electives chosen by student in consultation with advisor from the following courses

  9. Search for the rare decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; P. Dornan; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estéve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Nomerotski; A. Novoselov; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea

    2012-01-15

    A search for the decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu- is performed with 0.37 fb^-1 of pp collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV collected by the LHCb experiment in 2011. The upper limits on the branching fractions are BR (Bs -> mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) < 3.2 x 10^-9 at 95% confidence level.

  10. Covering Walls With Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01

    , grasscloth and many other textures and weaves are available in this type of wall covering. When selecting fabrics to apply to interior walls, consider pattern, color, amount of shrink age and weight. Check to see if the design is printed with the grain... several times over a 12-inch length until fabric is cut through and can be pulled away easily (see Figure 5) . Figure 5 To cover raw edges at top or bottom when . there is no molding, attach an attractive gimp, flat braid or decorative molding...

  11. MOX Fabrication Isolation Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric L. Shaber; Bradley J Schrader

    2005-08-01

    This document provides a technical position on the preferred level of isolation to fabricate demonstration quantities of mixed oxide transmutation fuels. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative should design and construct automated glovebox fabrication lines for this purpose. This level of isolation adequately protects the health and safety of workers and the general public for all mixed oxide (and other transmutation fuel) manufacturing efforts while retaining flexibility, allowing parallel development and setup, and minimizing capital expense. The basis regulations, issues, and advantages/disadvantages of five potential forms of isolation are summarized here as justification for selection of the preferred technical position.

  12. Lithographic fabrication of nanoapertures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A new class of silicon-based lithographically defined nanoapertures and processes for their fabrication using conventional silicon microprocessing technology have been invented. The new ability to create and control such structures should significantly extend our ability to design and implement chemically selective devices and processes.

  13. Measurement of the Bs0 Lifetime in Fully and Partially Reconstructed Bs0 -> Ds- (phi pi-)X Decays in pp? Collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Gonzalez, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; et al

    2011-12-29

    The authors present a measurement of the Bs0 lifetime in fully and partially reconstructed Bs0 = Ds0(??-)X decays in 1.3 fb-1 collected in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 Tev by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. They measure ?(Bs0) = 1.518 ± 0.041 (stat.) ± 0.027 (syst.) ps. The ratio of this result and the world average B0 lifetime yields ?(Bs0)/?(B0) = 0.99 ± 0.03, which is in agreement with recent theoretical predictions.

  14. $B_{s}^{0} \\to D_{s}^{- }a_{1}^{+} (D_{s}^{-} \\to \\phi \\pi^{-}, D_{s}^{-} \\to K^{*0}K^{-})$ decay channel in the ATLAS $B_{s}^{0}$-mixing studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bannikov, AV; Silagadze, Z K

    1997-01-01

    It is shown, using a track-level simulation, that the use of the $D_s^- \\to K^{*0}K^-$ decay channel for $D_s^-$ reconstruction, in additioon with the previously studied $D_s^- \\to \\phi \\pi^-$ mode, enables two fold gain in the ATLAS $B_s^0$-mixing signal statistics through $B_s^0 \\to D_s^-a_1$ $B_s^0$-decay channel. A new modification of the amplitude fit method is suggested for the $x_s$ determination. Some general aspects of the $B_s^0$-mixing phenomenon is illustrated by pictures of Casimir Malevich, Maurits Cornelis Escher and Salvador Dali.

  15. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Fabricated Metals Sector (NAICS 332) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS...

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Francis Randall

    2011-10-21

    into polymeric nano bers as a means to incorporate nanowires within other nanostructures. The knowledge obtained through the analysis of the AAO template fabrication guides the fabrication of SMA nanowires of various diameters. The fabrication of SMA... in learning how to perform molecular dynamic simulations. Further thanks are given to Dr. Jun Kameoka and Miao Wang for their help in fabricating the electrospun polymeric nano bers. Furthermore, I would like to thank the National Science Foundation...

  17. Directed light fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.K.; Nemec, R.; Milewski, J.; Thoma, D.J.; Cremers, D.; Barbe, M.

    1994-09-01

    Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a rapid prototyping process being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to fabricate metal components. This is done by fusing gas delivered metal powder particles in the focal zone of a laser beam that is, programmed to move along or across the part cross section. Fully dense metal is built up a layer at a time to form the desired part represented by a 3 dimensional solid model from CAD software. Machine ``tool paths`` are created from the solid model that command the movement and processing parameters specific to the DLF process so that the part can be built one layer at a time. The result is a fully dense, near net shape metal part that solidifies under rapid solidification conditions.

  18. B.S. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY At least 45 credits in chemistry are required for the B.S. degree. Each student's course of study should include the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Robert

    ) CHE 347: Physical ­ Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (2) CHE 356: Physical Chemistry Lecture II (3B.S. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR CHEMISTRY At least 45 credits in chemistry are required for the B.S. degree. Each student's course of study should include the following: 1.) Required Chemistry Core Courses

  19. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE FRIT B COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-01-19

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Therefore, the objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit B glass and perform additional testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and for additional performance testing at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The glass was characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. The leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. The leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to identify the formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. Characterization of the glass prior to testing revealed that some undissolved plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The undissolved particles had a disk-like morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar disk-like PuO{sub 2} phases were observed in previous LaBS glass testing at PNNL. In that work, researchers concluded that plutonium formed with this morphology as a result of the leaching process. It was more likely that the presence of the plutonium oxide crystals in the PNNL testing was a result of glass fabrication. A series of PCTs were conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water. The PCT-Method A (PCT-A) was conducted to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT-A test has a strict protocol and is designed to specifically be used to evaluate whether the chemical durability and elemental release characteristics of a nuclear waste glass have been consistently controlled during production and, thus, meet the repository acceptance requirements. The PCT-A results on the Pu containing LaBS Frit B glass showed that the glass was very durable with a normalized elemental release value for boron of approximately 0.02 g/L. This boron release value was better than two orders of magnitude better from a boron release standpoint than the current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The boron release value for EA glass is 16.7 g/L.

  20. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs0??? Decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; et al

    2011-12-22

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs0 decay into two light vector mesons, Bs0???, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.348±0.041(stat)±0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs0???)=[2.32±0.18(stat)±0.82(syst)]×10??. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.007±0.064(stat)±0.018(syst) and Av=-0.120±0.064(stat)±0.016(syst).

  1. UNT Core: English Composition & Rhetoric This requirement will be met by fulfilling the B.S. Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    .S. Biochemistry English Composition & Rhetoric requirement (see next page). UNT Core: U.S. History UNT Core the B.S. Biochemistry major mathematics requirement (see page two). UNT Core: Natural Science This requirement will be met by fulfilling the B.S. Biochemistry major requirements (see page two). Courses

  2. UNT Core: English Composition & Rhetoric This requirement will be met by fulfilling the B.S. Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    .S. Biochemistry English Composition & Rhetoric requirement (see next column). UNT Core: U.S. History UNT Core the B.S. Biochemistry major mathematics requirement (see page two). UNT Core: Natural Science This requirement will be met by fulfilling the B.S. Biochemistry major requirements (see page two). Courses

  3. Electrochemical fabrication of capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mansour, Azzam N. (Fairfax Sta., VA); Melendres, Carlos A. (Lemont, IL)

    1999-01-01

    A film of nickel oxide is anodically deposited on a graphite sheet held in osition on an electrochemical cell during application of a positive electrode voltage to the graphite sheet while exposed to an electrolytic nickel oxide solution within a volumetrically variable chamber of the cell. An angularly orientated x-ray beam is admitted into the cell for transmission through the deposited nickel oxide film in order to obtain structural information while the film is subject to electrochemical and in-situ x-ray spectroscopy from which optimum film thickness, may be determined by comparative analysis for capacitor fabrication purposes.

  4. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salazar, Mike A. (Albuquerque, NM); Foreman, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made rom clear Teflon.TM., Mylar.TM., or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube.

  5. Intraocular lens fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salazar, M.A.; Foreman, L.R.

    1997-07-08

    This invention describes a method for fabricating an intraocular lens made from clear Teflon{trademark}, Mylar{trademark}, or other thermoplastic material having a thickness of about 0.025 millimeters. These plastic materials are thermoformable and biocompatable with the human eye. The two shaped lenses are bonded together with a variety of procedures which may include thermosetting and solvent based adhesives, laser and impulse welding, and ultrasonic bonding. The fill tube, which is used to inject a refractive filling material is formed with the lens so as not to damage the lens shape. A hypodermic tube may be included inside the fill tube. 13 figs.

  6. U-spin Implication for B_s Physics and New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makiko Nagashima

    2008-06-30

    With U-spin symmetry, b->s and b->d penguin decays could be a subtle probe of CP violating new physics contributions. We show that, for B->PP (P stands for a pseudoscalar meson), the U-spin relation is expected to be violated for only one decay pair by assuming that new physics affects only b->s transition processes. We also very shortly discuss the polarizations of two types of U-spin pairs for B->VV (V stands for a vector meson).

  7. Strong constraints on the rare decays Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; A. Adametz; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; S. Ali; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; J. Beddow; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; M. Chrzaszcz; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; E. Cogneras; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; K. De Bruyn; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; P. Dornan; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; A. Dzyuba; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; A. Falabella; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; O. Grünberg; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; I. Komarov; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; V. Kudryavtsev; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. von Loeben; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; M. Martinelli; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; A. D. Nguyen; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; T. Nikodem; A. Nomerotski

    2012-04-26

    A search for Bs -> mu+ mu- and B0 -> mu+ mu- decays is performed using 1.0 fb^-1 of pp collision data collected at \\sqrt{s}=7 TeV with the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. For both decays the number of observed events is consistent with expectation from background and Standard Model signal predictions. Upper limits on the branching fractions are determined to be BR(Bs -> mu+ mu-) mu+ mu-) < 1.0 (0.81) x 10^-9 at 95% (90%) confidence level.

  8. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.? S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J.? P.; Alexeev, G.? D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2015-02-09

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ±more »0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).« less

  9. Measurement of the B?s lifetime in the flavor-specific decay channel B?s ? D?s ???X

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.? M. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Moscow (Russia); Abbott, B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Acharya, B.? S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Adams, M. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States); Adams, T. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Agnew, J.? P. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Alexeev, G.? D. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research (JINR), Dubna (Russian Federation); Alkhazov, G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., St. Petersburg (Russia); Alton, A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Askew, A. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Atkins, S. [Louisiana Tech Univ., Ruston, LA (United States); Augsten, K. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic); Avila, C. [Univ. de los Andes, Bogota (Columbia); Badaud, F. [Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont (France); Bagby, L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Baldin, B. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Bandurin, D.? V. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Banerjee, S. [Tata Inst. of Fundamental Research, Mumbai (India); Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J.? F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S.? B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P.? C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E.? E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X.? B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C.? P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B.? C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K.? M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S.? W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W.? E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S.? J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S.? P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H.? T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P.? F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L.? V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V.? D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V.? N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H.? E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P.? H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J.? A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C.? E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P.? D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M.? W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J.? M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A.? P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M.? D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J.? D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J.? L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A.? S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M.? S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A.? W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y.? N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J.? M.; Kozelov, A.? V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V.? A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H.? S.; Lee, S.? W.; Lee, W.? M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q.? Z.; Lim, J.? K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V.? V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A.? L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V.? L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C.? L.; Meijer, M.? M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P.? G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N.? K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H.? A.; Negret, J.? P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H.? T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S.? K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.

    2015-02-01

    We present an updated measurement of the B?s lifetime using the semileptonic decays B?s ? D?s ???X, with D?s ? ??? and ? ? K?K? (and the charge conjugate process). This measurement uses the full Tevatron Run II sample of proton-antiproton collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV, comprising an integrated luminosity of 10.4 fb?1. We find a flavor-specifc lifetime Tfs(B?s) = 1.479 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. This technique is also used to determine the B? lifetime using the analogous B? ? D????X decay with D? ? ??? and ? ? K?K? , yielding T(B?) = 1.534 ± 0.019 (stat) ± 0.021 (syst) ps. Both measurements are consistent with the current world averages, and the B?s lifetime measurement is one of the most precise to date. Taking advantage of the cancellation of systematic uncertainties, we determine the lifetime ratio Tfs(B?s)/T(B?) = 0.964 ± 0.013 (stat) ± 0.007 (syst).

  10. AFIP-6 Fabrication Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Moore; M. Craig Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The AFIP-6 (ATR Full-size plate In center flux trap Position) experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. Two qualified fueled plates were fabricated for the AFIP-6 experiment; to be irradiated in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This report provides details of the fuel fabrication efforts, including material selection, fabrication processes, and fuel plate qualification.

  11. Choices...S H R P School of Health Related Professions BS in Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    it's all about Choices...S H R P School of Health Related Professions BS in Health Sciences_tech_support.htm Students who choose UMDNJ's School of Health Related Professions want a University. Frequently Asked Questions What is the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)? UMDNJ

  12. Materials Science and Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Materials Science and Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits or ECE 210 3 ENGR 245, 245L Intro to Materials Science & Engineering & Lab 4 MATH 175 Calculus II 4 MATH Engineering Statistics 3 CID MSE 215 Materials Processing 3 MSE 305 Structure of Materials 3 MSE 308

  13. Materials Science and Engineering BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Materials Science and Engineering BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course 130 3-4 ENGR 210 Engineering Statics 3 ENGR 240 or ECE 210 3 ENGR 245, 245L Intro to Materials Science Equations with Matrix Theory 4 MATH 360 Engineering Statistics 3 CID MSE 215 Materials Processing 3 MSE 305

  14. Electrical Engineering BS, IDoTeach Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

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    Barrash, Warren

    Electrical Engineering BS, IDoTeach Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course, 211L-212, 212L Physics I & II with Calculus & Labs 10 Electrical Engineering electives* 12 IDo Apprentice Teaching 6 Total 140 *Electrical engineering and technical electives must be approved

  15. Suggested Course Sequence for Biochemistry (BS) and Biomedical Engineering (MS) Fast Track Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Suggested Course Sequence for Biochemistry (BS) and Biomedical Engineering (MS) Fast Track Program BE 1225 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering 2 CHEM 1442 General Chemistry II 4 CHEM 1441 General MAE 2314 Fluid Mechanics I 3 CHEM 3315 Introduction to Biophysical Chemistry 3 CHEM 4312 Biochemistry

  16. Computer Science B.S. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Computer Science B.S. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014 http://ua.soe.ucsc.edu · advising three options to fulfill the Computer Science exit requirement: 1. Pass a Capstone Course (which can on the GRE Computer Science Subject Test 3. Submit a Senior Thesis *CMPE 12/L Computer Systems & Assembly

  17. Computer Science B.S. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    Computer Science B.S. Degree Curriculum Chart: 2013-2014 http://ua.soe.ucsc.edu · advising the Computer Science exit requirement: 1. Pass a Capstone Course (which can also fulfill an elective requirement, see on back for courses) 2. Receive a score of 600 or above on the GRE Computer Science Subject

  18. Computer Science B.S. Degree 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    Computer Science B.S. Degree 2014-2015 Curriculum Chart CMPS 12B/M Data Structures *CMPS 13H Electives: Four upper-division computer science or computer engineering courses with course number 190 ____________________ Comprehensive Requirement - Students have two options to fulfill the Computer Science exit requirement: 1. Pass

  19. NAME__________________________________ REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    NAME__________________________________ REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (effective entering class Fall 2013) 1) REQUIRED COMPUTER SCIENCE COURSES (Total of 50 CS credit hours) * COS.00 or greater as must the overall GPA. February 18, 2013 #12;Computer Science Summary Total Total CS Hrs Hrs Q

  20. From Genes to Pathways and Back Again: A Visual Analytical Approach Bryant Dang BS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhavnani, Suresh K.

    From Genes to Pathways and Back Again: A Visual Analytical Approach Bryant Dang BS1 , Justin A basic features such as Boolean searching that do not fully support the comprehension and exploration and pathways, current online databases provide very basic search and exploration capabilities to support

  1. BS in Software Engineering (BSSE), 2015-2016 catalog 3 hours of Math electives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    4321 Software Testing *CSE 4322 Software Project Management CSE 3311 Object-Oriented SoftwareBS in Software Engineering (BSSE), 2015-2016 catalog Electives · 3 hours of Math electives · 4 Design II CSE 3302 Programming Languages CSE 3315 Theoretical CS *CSE 4361 Software Design Patterns *SE

  2. Mathematics BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Mathematics BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title.) 4-5 MATH 175 Calculus II 4 MATH 187 Discrete and Foundational Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical Sciences 3 MATH 305 Intro to Abstract

  3. Applied Mathematics BS, Statistics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Applied Mathematics BS, Statistics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Mathematics I 3 MATH 275 Multivariable and Vector Calculus 4 CID MATH 287 Communication in the Mathematical To Computational Mathematics 3 FF MATH 401 Senior Thesis in the Mathematical Sciences 1 MATH 465 Numerical Analysis

  4. Roadmap: Aeronautics -Aviation Management -Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-AVMN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Aeronautics - Aviation Management - Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-AVMN] College of 3 | Last Updated: 6-Dec-12/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study on page 2 TECH 36620 Project Management in Engineering and Technology 3 #12;Roadmap: Aeronautics

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Digital Sciences ­ Digital Systems Analysis ­ Bachelor of Science [DS-BS-DS-DSA] School of Digital Sciences Catalog Year: 2012-2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 16-Apr-12/LNHD This roadmap (lower or upper division) 6 #12;Roadmap: Digital Sciences ­ Digital Systems Analysis ­ Bachelor

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

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    Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-GEOL-EGEO] College of Arts This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses on page 2 General Elective 8 #12;Roadmap: Geology ­ Environmental Geology - Bachelor of Science [AS

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    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Aeronautics - Aviation Management - Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-AVMN] College of 2 | Last Updated: 4-June-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study (upper division) 3 #12;Roadmap: Aeronautics - Aviation Management - Bachelor of Science [AT

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    Roadmap: Aeronautics-Flight Technology-Bachelor of Science [AT-BS-AERN-FLGT] College of Applied This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However, courses Resource Management 2 Offered in fall only AERN 45721 Crew Resource Management Laboratory 1 #12;Roadmap

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    Roadmap: Mathematics ­ Actuarial Mathematics - Bachelor of Science [AS-BS-MATH-AMAT] College Updated: 11-May-12/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major requirement General Electives (lower or upper division) 5 #12;Roadmap: Mathematics ­ Actuarial Mathematics

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    Physics BS, Applied Physics Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab 5 DLN PHYS 212, 212L Physics II with Calculus Electronics 4 PHYS 309, 309L Introductory Quantum Physics & Lab 4 PHYS 311 Modern Physics 3 PHYS 325

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Gering, Jon C.

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  17. Civil Engineering BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Civil Engineering BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Engineering Surveying and Lab 3 CE 280 Civil Engineering Case Studies 2 CE 282 Engineering Practice 3 CE 284 Computational Methods 2 CE 320 Principles of Environmental Engineering 3 CID CE 321 Principles of Environmental

  18. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Biological Engineering Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Biological CHE 5811 - Research Preparation I 1 CHE 3820 ­ Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 CHE 4200 ­ Product and Process Design 3 CHE 4600 ­ Process Dynamics and Simulation 2 CHE 4860 ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar II 1

  19. BS in STATISTICS: Applied Statistics and Analytics Emphasis (695234) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    BS in STATISTICS: Applied Statistics and Analytics Emphasis (695234) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics For students entering the degree program during the 2014­2015 curricular year. UNIVERSITY CORE* Calculus 1 Math 113 Calculus 2 Complete one course from the following: Stat 121 Principles of Statistics

  20. Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Environmental Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  1. BS Plant Biology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 5 PPLLAANNTT BBIIOOLLOOGGYY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BS Plant Biology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 5 PPLLAANNTT BBIIOOLLOOGGYY BBAACCHHEELLOORR OOFF SSCCIIEENNCCEE IINN BBIIOOLLOOGGYY The Plant Biology option provides students with strong and broad training in plant biology, ranging from the cellular, physiological and systematic levels to an ecological

  2. Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Molecular Cell Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 160 or MATH 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell

  3. BS Biology, Physiology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 6 PPHHYYSSIIOOLLOOGGYY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    BS Biology, Physiology 4/2/2015 Page 1 of 6 PPHHYYSSIIOOLLOOGGYY BBAACCHHEELLOORR OOFF such as English Composition, Writing, Foreign Language, QSR, VLPA, and I&S. Biology Department Competitive in careful planning and preparation for success in the Biology Major. A completed electronic application

  4. Biology BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  5. Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Biology BS, Human Biology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 170 4 DLN BIOL 191 General Biology I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLV Visual Sciences course in a second field 3 BIOL 192 General Biology II 4 BIOL 301 Cell Biology 3 CID BIOL 323

  6. BS in BIOCHEMISTRY (692826) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    BS in BIOCHEMISTRY (692826) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students courses. The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours of required chemistry. Writing Using Chemical Literature Chem 468 Biophysical Chemistry Chem 481M* Biochemistry - Majors Chem 482

  7. BS in BIOCHEMISTRY (692826) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    BS in BIOCHEMISTRY (692826) MAP Sheet Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry For students is allowed in major courses. The Chemistry and Biochemistry Department requires the final 10 hours* Biochemistry - Majors Chem 482 Mechanisms of Molecular Biology Chem 489 Structural Biochemistry Chem 495 Senior

  8. Atomistic and Mesoscale Modeling of Dislocation B.S., Huazhong University of Science and Technology (1995)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    1995-01-01

    Atomistic and Mesoscale Modeling of Dislocation Mobility by Wei Cai B.S., Huazhong University by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sow-Hsin Chen Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students #12;2 #12;Atomistic and Mesoscale theories and simulations of dislocations in Si and BCC transition metals, with emphasis on the atomistic-mesoscale

  9. Approved September 12, 2003 Associate in Arts to BA/BS in Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Approved September 12, 2003 Associate in Arts to BA/BS in Psychology Students will complete Sciences--6 credits PSYC 140 General Psychology Complete one additional 3-credit course: #12;Approved Lifespan Development ­ 4 credits OR PSYC 250 Social Psychology ­ 3 credits No more than one

  10. Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Skin Cancer: A Young Person's Disease By Lauren Duffy (B.S. Communication, Journalism '14 is that this behavior is extremely unhealthy and risky for their bodies, specifically their skin. Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer found in young adults and second most common cancer found in adolescents

  11. CP Violation in Bs J/ decays at LHCb and Sensitivity to the Weak Mixing Phase s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    both a quantitative and qualitative improvement in the precision with which s is obtained to the Weak Mixing Phase s Author: Colin David MCLEAN THESIS SUBMITTED IN FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENTS of the Bs J/ decay channel at LHCb. I hereby declare that the writing of this thesis is my own work

  12. Abbott, Albert G., Professor, Genetics and Biochemistry. BS, University of Connecticut, 1976; PhD, Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    of Connecticut, 1976; PhD, Brown University, 1980 Abbott, Sherrie Wilder, Lecturer, School of Nursing. BSN, Emory Abramovitch, Rudolph A., Professor, Chemistry. BS, Alexandria University (Egypt), 1950; PhD, 1953, DSc, 1964 (England), 1962; MS, Clemson University, 1963; PhD, Nottingham Trent University (England), 1967 Adams

  13. MEMS Design Synthesis Based on Hybrid Evolutionary Computation B.S. (Tongji University, Shanghai) 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    MEMS Design Synthesis Based on Hybrid Evolutionary Computation by Ying Zhang B.S. (Tongji is approved: Chair Date Date Date Date University of California, Berkeley Fall 2006 #12;MEMS Design Synthesis Based on Hybrid Evolutionary Computation © 2006 by Ying Zhang #12;1 Abstract MEMS Design Synthesis Based

  14. Radiologic Sciences BS, Computed Tomography Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Radiologic Sciences BS, Computed Tomography Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number with Computers 3 DLS PSYC 101 or SOC 101 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 MATH 143 or MATH 170 Imaging 3 RADSCI 431 CT Radiation Dose and Risk Analysis 1 RADSCI 450 Principles of Computed Tomography 3

  15. Chemistry BS, ACS Certified Professional Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Chemistry BS, ACS Certified Professional Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 170 Calculus I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 CHEM 112, 112L General Chemistry

  16. Chemistry BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Chemistry BS, Secondary Education Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I with Calculus & Lab of Education 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 CHEM 112, 112L General Chemistry II & Lab 4 CHEM

  17. Approved April 27, 2004 Associate in Arts to BS in Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Approved April 27, 2004 Associate in Arts to BS in Chemistry Indian Hills Community CollegeT Calculus-Analytic Geometry I MM 252T Calculus-Analytic Geometry II SC 204T Chemistry I OR SC 201T College Chemistry I Social Sciences ­ 9 semester credits required Complete one History and one Social

  18. Chemistry BS, ACS Certified Biochemistry Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Chemistry BS, ACS Certified Biochemistry Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title 170 Calculus I 4 DLN CHEM 111, 111L General Chemistry I with Lab 4 DLN PHYS 211, 211L Physics I course in a first field 3 DLS Social Sciences course in a second field 3 CHEM 112, 112L General Chemistry

  19. B.S. in Biomedical Engineering Sample Curriculum*1 Fall Semester Spring Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    B.S. in Biomedical Engineering ­ Sample Curriculum*1 2015-16 First Year Fall Semester Spring Semester Couse Title Number Units Course Title Number Units Introduction to Biomedical Engr E62-BME 140 3 Title Number Units Course Title Number Units Biomedical Engineering Design E62-BME 401 3 Ethics

  20. Environmental and Occupational Health BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Environmental and Occupational Health BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 or BIOL 228 Biology 4 BIOL 205 or BIOL Environmental Health Management 3 ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health 3 ENVHLTH 416 Noise and Other

  1. CP Violation with Bs -> J/Psi phi at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad Abbott

    2011-07-01

    Recent results using B_s -> J/Psi phi decays for measuring the CP violating phase, phi_s, and the decay width difference for the two mass eigenstates, Delta Gamma_s, are presented from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider.

  2. BS in STATISTICS: Statistical Science Emphasis (695220) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    : Statistics Stat 497R Introduction to Statistical Research Stat 538 Survival Analysis Note: Students may countBS in STATISTICS: Statistical Science Emphasis (695220) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics & Oral Communication Quantitative Reasoning Languages of Learning (Math or Language) Arts, Letters

  3. BS in STATISTICS: Statistical Science Emphasis (695220) MAP Sheet Department of Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    the statistics list: C S 142 Introduction to Computer Programming Math 334 Ordinary Differential Equations Math Academic Internship: Statistics Stat 497R Introduction to Statistical Research Stat 535 Applied Linear are strongly recommended to choose electives to prepare for the BYU BS/MS statistics integrated program

  4. Program B.S. in Geology Assessment Coordinator for the program Dave Kreamer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    1 Program B.S. in Geology Assessment Coordinator for the program Dave Kreamer Department. Student Learning Outcomes for the program. By the end of the Geology program students will be able, and the environments in which they lived. 4. Recognize, in the field, various types of geologic structures, and be able

  5. B.S. in Marine Science page 1 09/25/08

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    B.S. in Marine Science page 1 09/25/08 · To earn a Bachelor of Science degree in Marine Science students must complete 1) the CORE requirements for the major, 2) at least 15 credits of approved Marine Science Electives at 300+ level, 3) UM General required for the major in Marine Science, i.e., in CORE

  6. B.S. Health Care Administration Curriculum College of Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    B.S. Health Care Administration Curriculum College of Health Sciences 128 credits minimum PRIOR: Language of Medicine (F, S) 3 HS (HCA) 101: Intro to Health and Disease (F, S, SU) 2 HS (HCA) 224: Microcomputers for HC Professionals (F, S) 3 HS (HCA) 105: Survey of the Health Professions (F) 3 COM 103: Public

  7. Health Science Studies BS, Gerontology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Health Science Studies BS, Gerontology Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Terminology 3 HLTHST 202 Health Delivery Systems 3 HLTHST 215 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology 4 HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics 3 CID HLTHST 382 Research Methods in Health 3 FF HLTHST 400

  8. Health Science Studies BS, Health Policy and Leadership Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Health Science Studies BS, Health Policy and Leadership Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course 101 Medical Terminology 3 HLTHST 202 Health Delivery Systems 3 HLTHST 215 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology 4 HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics 3 CID HLTHST 382 Research Methods

  9. Health Science Studies BS, Public Health Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Health Science Studies BS, Public Health Emphasis, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Terminology 3 HLTHST 202 Health Delivery Systems 3 HLTHST 215 Introduction to Health Informatics 3 HLTHST 300 Pathophysiology 4 HLTHST 314 Health Law and Ethics 3 CID HLTHST 382 Research Methods in Health 3 FF HLTHST 400

  10. Process for fabrication of cermets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Landingham, Richard L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-02-01

    Cermet comprising ceramic and metal components and a molten metal infiltration method and process for fabrication thereof. The light weight cermets having improved porosity, strength, durability, toughness, elasticity fabricated from presintered ceramic powder infiltrated with a molten metal or metal alloy. Alumina titanium cermets biocompatible with the human body suitable for bone and joint replacements.

  11. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C; James Marra, J; Ned Bibler, N

    2007-02-12

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is a leading candidate for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B glass and perform testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the proposed Federal Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit B composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support glass durability testing via the ASTM Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. This characterization revealed some crystalline PuO{sub 2} inclusions with disk-like morphology present in the as fabricated, quench-cooled glass. A series of PCTs was conducted at SRNL with varying exposed surface area and test durations. Filtered leachates from these tests were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. The leachate solutions were also ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. Leached solids from select PCTs were examined in an attempt to evaluate the Pu and neutron absorber release behavior from the glass and to investigate formation of alteration phases on the glass surface. A series of PCTs was conducted at 90 C in ASTM Type 1 water to compare the Pu LaBS Frit B glass durability to current requirements for High Level Waste (HLW) glass in a geologic repository. The PCT (7-day static test with powdered glass) results on the Pu-containing LaBS Frit B glass at SA/V of {approx} 2000 m{sup -1} showed that the glass was very durable with an average normalized elemental release value for boron of 0.013 g/m{sup 2}. This boron release value is {approx} 640X lower than normalized boron release from current Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used for repository acceptance. The PCT-B (7, 14, 28 and 56-day, static test with powdered glass) normalized elemental releases were similar to the normalized elemental release values from PCT-A testing, indicating that the LaBS Frit B glass is very durable as measured by the PCT. Normalized plutonium releases were essentially the same within the analytical uncertainty of the ICP-MS methods used to quantify plutonium in the 0.45 {micro}m-filtered leachates and ultra-filtered leachates, indicating that colloidal plutonium species do not form under the PCT conditions used in this study.

  12. GLASS FABRICATION AND PRODUCT CONSISTENCY TESTING OF LANTHANIDE BOROSHILICATE FRIT X COMPOSITION FOR PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-21

    The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) plans to conduct the Plutonium Disposition Project at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to disposition excess weapons-usable plutonium. A plutonium glass waste form is the preferred option for immobilization of the plutonium for subsequent disposition in a geologic repository. A reference glass composition (Lanthanide Borosilicate (LaBS) Frit B) was developed during the Plutonium Immobilization Program (PIP) to immobilize plutonium in the late 1990's. A limited amount of performance testing was performed on this baseline composition before efforts to further pursue Pu disposition via a glass waste form ceased. Recent FY05 studies have further investigated the LaBS Frit B formulation as well as development of a newer LaBS formulation denoted as LaBS Frit X. The objectives of this present task were to fabricate plutonium loaded LaBS Frit X glass and perform corrosion testing to provide near-term data that will increase confidence that LaBS glass product is suitable for disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository. Specifically, testing was conducted in an effort to provide data to Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) personnel for use in performance assessment calculations. Plutonium containing LaBS glass with the Frit X composition with a 9.5 wt% PuO{sub 2} loading was prepared for testing. Glass was prepared to support Product Consistency Testing (PCT) at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The glass was thoroughly characterized using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) prior to performance testing. A series of PCTs were conducted at SRNL using quenched Pu Frit X glass with varying exposed surface areas. Effects of isothermal and can-in-canister heat treatments on the Pu Frit X glass were also investigated. Another series of PCTs were performed on these different heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses. Leachates from all these PCTs were analyzed to determine the dissolved concentrations of key elements. Acid stripping of leach vessels was performed to determine the concentration of the glass constituents that may have sorbed on the vessels during leach testing. Additionally, the leachate solutions were ultrafiltered to quantify colloid formation. Characterization of the quenched Pu Frit X glass prior to testing revealed that some crystalline plutonium oxide was present in the glass. The crystalline particles had a disklike morphology and likely formed via coarsening of particles in areas compositionally enriched in plutonium. Similar results had also been observed in previous Pu Frit B studies. Isothermal 1250 C heat-treated Pu Frit X glasses showed two different crystalline phases (PuO{sub 2} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7}), as well as a peak shift in the XRD spectra that is likely due to a solid solution phase PuO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} formation. Micrographs of this glass showed a clustering of some of the crystalline phases. Pu Frit X glass subjected to the can-in-canister heating profile also displayed the two PuO{sub 2} and Nd{sub 2}Hf{sub 2}O{sub 7} phases from XRD analysis. Additional micrographs indicate crystalline phases in this glass were of varying forms (a spherical PuO{sub 2} phase that appeared to range in size from submicron to {approx}5 micron, a dendritic-type phase that was comprised of mixed lanthanides and plutonium, and a minor phase that contained Pu and Hf), and clustering of the phases was also observed.

  13. BS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    BS in Chemical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Chemical Educational Objectives: I. Graduates will have mastered the chemical engineering fundamentals necessary Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http

  14. BS in Mechanical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Mechanical Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    BS in Mechanical Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Mechanical Educational Objectives: The Program Educational Objectives of the Mechanical engineering curriculum to professional practice or to advanced study in mechanical engineering or related fields. II. be cognizant

  15. Author's Short Biography: Olga M. Ramos Gonzlez (BS Zoology UW-Madison; MA Clark University) is a GIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    to artificial light pollution. She has been an amateur astronomer since age 11 and is currently an active member of the Puerto Rico Conservation Trust Light Pollution Task Force. Olga M. Ramos González (BS Univ. De Wisconsin

  16. MECS 2006 - Fabricated Metals | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    supporting documents Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Fabricated Metals More Documents & Publications Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Cement MECS 2006 - Glass...

  17. Determination of the sign of the decay width difference in the B_s system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; C. Abellan Beteta; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; S. Belogurov; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; T. Bird; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; K. de Bruyn; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; Ch. Cauet; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; A. Comerma-Montells; F. Constantin; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; B. Couturier; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; P. N. Y. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; D. Derkach; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; F. Domingo Bonal; S. Donleavy; F. Dordei; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; A. Dziurda; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. Elsby; D. Esperante Pereira; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; O. Francisco; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; D. Gascon; C. Gaspar; R. Gauld; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; E. Greening; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; C. Hadjivasiliou; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; T. Hartmann; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; M. Kaballo; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; I. R. Kenyon; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; R. F. Koopman; P. Koppenburg; M. Korolev; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; C. Lazzeroni; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefèvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. von Loeben; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; H. Lu; J. Luisier; A. Mac Raighne; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; J. Molina Rodriguez; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; B. Muster; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; A. D. Nguyen; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Nomerotski; A. Novoselov; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov

    2012-07-19

    The interference between the K+K- S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in B_s -> J/psi K+K- decays with the K+K- pairs in the region around the phi(1020) resonance is used to determine the variation of the difference of the strong phase between these amplitudes as a function of K+K- invariant mass. Combined with the results from our CP asymmetry measurements in B_s -> J/psi phi decays, we conclude that the B_s mass eigenstate that is almost CP =+1 is lighter and decays faster than the mass eigenstate that is almost CP =-1. This determines the sign of the decay width difference DeltaGamma_s == Gamma_L -Gamma_H to be positive. Our result also resolves the ambiguity in the past measurements of the CP violating phase phi_s to be close to zero rather than pi. These conclusions are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations.

  18. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  19. Patterned Fabric Know - How (Plaids, Stripes, Checks, and Figured Designs). 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anoymous,

    1984-01-01

    Fabric mow-Kbw Contents Design Principles and Patterned Fabrics Pattern Selection Fabric Construction Selecting and Preparing Fabric Kinds of Plaids and Stripes Pri nts Other Patterned Fabrics Combining Patterned Fabrics Amount of Fabric Needed... Fabric Preparation Pattern Placement For a Pleasi ng Effect For Matching Assembling the Garment Fabric Care References 3 4 4 5 5 5 6 7 7 7 7 7 9 10 10 11 PATTERNED FABRIC KNOW-HOW (Plaids, Stripes, Checks and Figured Designs...

  20. Fabrication of implantable microshunt using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bifano, Thomas

    by multiple thick resist patterning, 3 structural material deposition by electroplating, and 4 an easy fabrication process suitable for mass production. These features were realized using electroplating. The developed method involves using a thin gold seed layer deposited via evaporation prior to electroplating

  1. Relating B_s Mixing and B_s->mu+mu- with New Physics - An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Golowich

    2011-09-16

    This document describes my talk (based on work by JoAnne Hewett, Sandip Pakvasa, Alexey Petrov, Gagik Yeghiyan and myself) given at the 2011 Meeting of the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society (8/9/11-8/13/11) hosted by the Physics Department at Brown University. We perform a study of the Standard Model (SM) fit to the mixing quantity Delta M_B_s in order to bound contributions of New Physics (NP) to B_s mixing. We then use this to explore the branching fraction of B_s->mu+mu- in several models of New Physics.

  2. BS in Civil Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Civil Engineering at Syracuse University is accredited by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    BS in Civil Engineering ABET Accreditation The Bachelor of Science program in Civil Engineering Educational Objectives: The educational objectives of the B.S. degree program in Civil Engineering, and profession. III. are prepared for engineering practice and advanced studies in civil

  3. Abstract--The Black-Scholes (B-S) model is the traditional tool for giving a theoretical estimate of the price of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    of the price of European-style options. However, the basic assumptions on the assets and market made in the B-S model are ideal. Furthermore, a lot of factors which might affect the prices of options have not been) are applied to forecast the prices of stock options by using the six basic factors in the B-S model

  4. Digital fabrication in the architectural design process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seely, Jennifer C. K., 1975-

    2004-01-01

    Digital fabrication is affecting the architectural design process due to the increasingly important role it has in the fabrication of architectural models. Many design professionals, professors, and students have experienced ...

  5. 4.212 Design Fabrication, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sass, Lawrence

    Design Fabrication is an introductory course in the field of advanced computing, prototyping and building fabrication. The class is focused on the relationship between design, various forms of computer modeling both explicit ...

  6. Environmentally Benign Flame Retardant Nanocoatings for Fabric 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yu-Chin

    2012-07-16

    A variety of materials were used to fabricate nanocoatings using layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to reduce the flammability of cotton fabric. The most effective brominated flame retardants have raised concerns related to ...

  7. BsTan gnyis gling pa (1480-1535) et la Revelation du Yang tig ye shes mthong grol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achard, Jean-Luc

    2004-01-01

    , BeijingShangwu yishuguan. #1; bsTan gnyis gling pa et la Révélation duYang tig ye shes mthong grol Jean-Luc Achard, CNRS. I. Vie de bsTan gnyis gling pa Padma Tshe dbang rgyal po 1. Notice biographique sTan gnyis gling pa Padma Tshe dbang rgyal po (1480... rendit à Gos sngon dans le ‘O yug.L’adolescent de son rêve reparut miraculeusement et le guida sur les bergesd’un fleuve où il l’enjoignit de creuser. Un de ses amis11 l’aida dans cettetache et ils mirent au jour une pierre brune. Ils la brisèrent et sous...

  8. Designing Imprint Rolls for Fluid Pathway Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David A

    2007-01-01

    optimization will be validated by applying the rolls in the fabrication of micro-fluidic and fuel cell

  9. Fabrication of boron sputter targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); McKernan, Mark A. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high density boron sputtering targets with sufficient mechanical strength to function reliably at typical magnetron sputtering power densities and at normal process parameters. The process involves the fabrication of a high density boron monolithe by hot isostatically compacting high purity (99.9%) boron powder, machining the boron monolithe into the final dimensions, and brazing the finished boron piece to a matching boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) piece, by placing aluminum foil there between and applying pressure and heat in a vacuum. An alternative is the application of aluminum metallization to the back of the boron monolithe by vacuum deposition. Also, a titanium based vacuum braze alloy can be used in place of the aluminum foil.

  10. Revisiting $B_s \\to ?^+?^-$ in the two-Higgs doublet models with $Z_2$ symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Dong Cheng; Ya-Dong Yang; Xing-Bo Yuan

    2015-11-05

    We revisit the rare leptonic decay $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ in the two-Higgs doublet models with a softly broken $Z_2$ symmetry, namely type-I, type-II, type-X and type-Y 2HDMs. We have derived the relevant full one-loop Wilson coefficients of the four 2HDMs from the recent calculation in the aligned two-Higgs doublet model by Li, Lu and Pich, which could be mapped to all the four 2HDMs for both large and small $\\tan\\beta$. It is found that, a new term associated with the soft $Z_2$ symmetry breaking parameter $M$ can be enhanced by $\\tan^2\\beta$ in the type-II 2HDM, which has not been considered in the literature. Imposing both theoretical and experimental constraints, we have renewed the bounds on the parameter spaces of the four 2HDMs. Different from our previous paper, however, we find that all the four 2HDMs give sizable and similar contributions to $\\overline{\\mathcal B}(B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-)$ within the stringently restricted parameter spaces, but very tiny to the mass-eigenstate rate asymmetry $\\mathcal A_{\\Delta\\Gamma}$, which make it unfeasible to discriminate the four types of 2HDM with the correlations between the observables in $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay.

  11. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin Chang; Xiaohui Hu; Junfeng Sun; Yueling Yang

    2015-04-20

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{0}\\phi$ decay for instance, for probing hard-spectator scattering and annihilation contributions.

  12. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Qin; Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^...

  13. Removing Stains from Washable Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Ann Vanderpoorten

    1988-01-01

    unique treatment be cause of chemical make-up or physical characteristics. (Examples: chewing gum, iodine, lead pencil) Stain Removal Products Bleaches Chlorine bleaches contain a hypochlorite com pound. Do not use them on wool, silk, polyurethane... foam, spandex or blends of these fibers; on finishes which are embossed or flame retardant; or on fabrics labeled no chlorine bleach. Avoid contact with metal. Always follow package instructions for dilu tion. Liquid chlorine bleaches lose strength...

  14. The Department of Mathematics at Rowan University is proud to announce the new BS/MA in Math degree track. In five (5) years, you can earn your BS and MA degrees in Mathematics!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassen, Abdul

    of Courses 1st YEAR (Freshmen) 2nd YEAR (Sophomore) 3rd YEAR (Junior) 4th YEAR (Senior) ­ YEAR ONE OF PROGRAM degree track. In five (5) years, you can earn your BS and MA degrees in Mathematics! Recommended Sequence FALL SEMESTER (15 s.h.) SPRING SEMESTER (15 s.h.) 5th YEAR (Graduate Student) ­ YEAR TWO OF PROGRAM

  15. B.S. GEOLOGY (Earth Science Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major The Earth Science Subplan is typically a secondary major accompanying a B.S. in Education.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    B.S. GEOLOGY (Earth Science Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major The Earth Science ­ The Earth or take GEOSCI 131 - Experiencing Geology Lab and GEOSCI 105 - Dynamic Earth 4 (1) (4) 1st year Geology Core Courses: 5 courses, 18 credits Course Credits When to take: GEOSCI 201 ­ History of the Earth

  16. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, D.K.; Allgood, G.O.; Mooney, L.R.; Duncan, M.G.; Turner, J.C.; Treece, D.A.

    1998-10-20

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric. 13 figs.

  17. Computer Science and Engineering, B.S. 2013-14 Degree Requirements Checklist All students must meet the University Requirements.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    2013-14 Computer Science and Engineering, B.S. 2013-14 Degree Requirements Checklist All students Engineering, Computer Science, Information and Computer Science, nor the minors in Information and Computer Science 1) STATS 67 ­ Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Computer Science 1) Basic Science

  18. Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 1 of 23 B.S., B.A, Minor in Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mock, Kenrick

    Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 1 of 23 B.S., B.A, Minor in Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Version 1.3 Adopted by The Computer Science of Academic Affairs: #12;Computer Science Educational Effectiveness Assessment Plan Page 2 of 23 TABLE

  19. Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    Automatic intrusion recovery with system-wide history by Taesoo Kim B.S., Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (2009) S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2011) Submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY June 2014 c Massachusetts

  20. Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering B.S., 2006 Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering M.S., 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Education Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering B.S., 2006 Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering M.S., 2008 The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Chemical study awarded from The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey Ibrahim Ilgaz Soykal

  1. For 2011-2012 Academic Year Revised 7/19/2011 B.S. Chemistry Degree (ACS Certified)*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Free Electives 3 General Education Distribution 6 TOTAL 17 FOURTH YEAR CH4310 Inorganic Chemistry I 3For 2011-2012 Academic Year Revised 7/19/2011 B.S. Chemistry Degree (ACS Certified)* A Four Year Outline FALL SPRING FIRST YEAR CH1150 University Chemistry I AND 3 CH1151 University Chemistry Lab I AND 1

  2. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Molecular Engineering and Nanotechnology Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Molecular ­ Research Preparation I 1 CHE 3820 ­ Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 CHE 4200 ­ Product and Process Design 3 CHE 4600 ­ Process Dynamics and Simulation 2 CHE 4860 ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar II 1 Chemical

  3. Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process Engineering Option

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar I 0 Total 16 Senior Year First Semester CHE 3820 ­ Chemical Engineering ­ Chemical Engineering Seminar II 1 Chemical Engineering Technical Elective 6 Total 14 Second Semester

  4. 6/06/09 BS in Biology, Concentration in Microbiology Bachelor of Science in Biology: Concentration in Microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6/06/09 BS in Biology, Concentration in Microbiology Bachelor of Science in Biology: Concentration in Microbiology Department of Biology College of Science and Engineering Undergraduate Programs Microbiology, but also in chemistry, physics, mathematics, and other areas of biology. Within the undergraduate program

  5. B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated March 2010 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements (BIOC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated March 2010 Bachelor of Science ­ Biochemistry ­ Organic Chemistry Lab I* CHEM 351; 352 (pre-/co-req) 2 FS Biochemistry (12 credits; all upper-level) CHEM 437 ­ Comprehensive Biochemistry I* CHEM 352 4 F CHEM 437L ­Biochemistry Laboratory* CHEM 300; CHEM

  6. B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Requirements (BIOC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adali, Tulay

    B.S. Biochemistry Planning Worksheet. Updated 09/06 Bachelor of Science Biochemistry and Molecular Biochemistry (12 credits; all upper-level) CHEM 437 Comprehensive Biochem I* BIOL 100, CHEM 352 4 F CHEM 437L Biochemistry Laboratory* CHEM 352L; 437 (pre- or co-req) 4 FS CHEM 438 Comprehensive Biochem II* CHEM 437 4

  7. First principle calculations of effective exchange integrals: Comparison between SR (BS) and MR computational results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Kizashi; Nishihara, Satomichi; Saito, Toru; Yamanaka, Shusuke; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Kawakami, Takashi; Yamada, Satoru; Isobe, Hiroshi; Okumura, Mitsutaka

    2015-01-22

    First principle calculations of effective exchange integrals (J) in the Heisenberg model for diradical species were performed by both symmetry-adapted (SA) multi-reference (MR) and broken-symmetry (BS) single reference (SR) methods. Mukherjee-type (Mk) state specific (SS) MR coupled-cluster (CC) calculations by the use of natural orbital (NO) references of ROHF, UHF, UDFT and CASSCF solutions were carried out to elucidate J values for di- and poly-radical species. Spin-unrestricted Hartree Fock (UHF) based coupled-cluster (CC) computations were also performed to these species. Comparison between UHF-NO(UNO)-MkMRCC and BS UHF-CC computational results indicated that spin-contamination of UHF-CC solutions still remains at the SD level. In order to eliminate the spin contamination, approximate spin-projection (AP) scheme was applied for UCC, and the AP procedure indeed corrected the error to yield good agreement with MkMRCC in energy. The CC double with spin-unrestricted Brueckner's orbital (UBD) was furthermore employed for these species, showing that spin-contamination involved in UHF solutions is largely suppressed, and therefore AP scheme for UBCCD removed easily the rest of spin-contamination. We also performed spin-unrestricted pure- and hybrid-density functional theory (UDFT) calculations of diradical and polyradical species. Three different computational schemes for total spin angular momentums were examined for the AP correction of the hybrid (H) UDFT. HUDFT calculations followed by AP, HUDFT(AP), yielded the S-T gaps that were qualitatively in good agreement with those of MkMRCCSD, UHF-CC(AP) and UB-CC(AP). Thus a systematic comparison among MkMRCCSD, UCC(AP) UBD(AP) and UDFT(AP) was performed concerning with the first principle calculations of J values in di- and poly-radical species. It was found that BS (AP) methods reproduce MkMRCCSD results, indicating their applicability to large exchange coupled systems.

  8. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Abraham P. (1428 Whitecliff Way, Walnut Creek, CA 94596); Northrup, M. Allen (923 Creston Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Ahre, Paul E. (1299 Gonzaga Ct., Livermore, CA 94550); Dupuy, Peter C. (1736 Waldo Ct., Modesto, CA 95358)

    1997-01-01

    A mold assembly with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10's of micros (.mu.m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 .mu.m in length up to 150 .mu.m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly.

  9. Polymer micromold and fabrication process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Ahre, P.E.; Dupuy, P.C.

    1997-08-19

    A mold assembly is disclosed with micro-sized features in which the hollow portion thereof is fabricated from a sacrificial mandrel which is surface treated and then coated to form an outer shell. The sacrificial mandrel is then selectively etched away leaving the outer shell as the final product. The sacrificial mandrel is fabricated by a precision lathe, for example, so that when removed by etching the inner or hollow area has diameters as small as 10`s of micros ({micro}m). Varying the inside diameter contours of the mold can be accomplished with specified ramping slopes formed on the outer surface of the sacrificial mandrel, with the inside or hollow section being, for example, 275 {micro}m in length up to 150 {micro}m in diameter within a 6 mm outside diameter (o.d.) mold assembly. The mold assembly itself can serve as a micronozzle or microneedle, and plastic parts, such as microballoons for angioplasty, polymer microparts, and microactuators, etc., may be formed within the mold assembly. 6 figs.

  10. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  11. Fabrication and Characterization of Suspended Carbon Nanotube...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; AIR; CARBON; COATINGS; FABRICATION; NANOTUBES; REMOVAL; SURFACE TENSION; TRANSISTORS...

  12. Method for fabrication of electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.; Barksdale, Randy

    2004-06-22

    Described herein is a method to fabricate porous thin-film electrodes for fuel cells and fuel cell stacks. Furthermore, the method can be used for all fuel cell electrolyte materials which utilize a continuous electrolyte layer. An electrode layer is deposited on a porous host structure by flowing gas (for example, Argon) from the bottomside of the host structure while simultaneously depositing a conductive material onto the topside of the host structure. By controlling the gas flow rate through the pores, along with the process conditions and deposition rate of the thin-film electrode material, a film of a pre-determined thickness can be formed. Once the porous electrode is formed, a continuous electrolyte thin-film is deposited, followed by a second porous electrode to complete the fuel cell structure.

  13. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  14. Apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Edgewood, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for fabricating a microbattery that uses silicon as the structural component, packaging component, and semiconductor to reduce the weight, size, and cost of thin film battery technology is described. When combined with advanced semiconductor packaging techniques, such a silicon-based microbattery enables the fabrication of autonomous, highly functional, integrated microsystems having broad applicability.

  15. Composite metal foil and ceramic fabric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, B.J.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Prater, J.T.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1992-03-24

    The invention comprises new materials useful in a wide variety of terrestrial and space applications. In one aspect, the invention comprises a flexible cloth-like material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of metallic foil. In another aspect, the invention includes a flexible fluid impermeable barrier comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric layer having metal wire woven therein. A metallic foil layer is incontinuously welded to the woven metal wire. In yet another aspect, the invention includes a material comprising a layer of flexible woven ceramic fabric bonded with a layer of an organic polymer. In still another aspect, the invention includes a rigid fabric structure comprising a flexible woven ceramic fabric and a resinous support material which has been hardened as the direct result of exposure to ultraviolet light. Inventive methods for producing such material are also disclosed. 11 figs.

  16. Assignment 4 BS4a Actuarial Science Oxford MT 2011 IX A.4 Inflation, taxation and project appraisal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winkel, Matthias

    Assignment 4 ­ BS4a Actuarial Science ­ Oxford MT 2011 IX A.4 Inflation, taxation and project are indexed by reference to the value of a retail price index with a time lag of 8 months. The retail price index value in September 1996 was Q(-8/12) = 200 and in March 1997 was Q(-2/12) = 206. The issue price

  17. NSDann2BS, a neutron spectrum unfolding code based on neural networks technology and two bonner spheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz-Rodriguez, J. M.; Reyes Alfaro, A.; Reyes Haro, A.; Solis Sanches, L. O.; Miranda, R. Castaneda; Cervantes Viramontes, J. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac (Mexico); Vega-Carrillo, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Ingenieria Electrica. Av. Ramon Lopez Velarde 801. Col. Centro Zacatecas, Zac., Mexico. and Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares. C. Cip (Mexico)

    2013-07-03

    In this work a neutron spectrum unfolding code, based on artificial intelligence technology is presented. The code called ''Neutron Spectrometry and Dosimetry with Artificial Neural Networks and two Bonner spheres'', (NSDann2BS), was designed in a graphical user interface under the LabVIEW programming environment. The main features of this code are to use an embedded artificial neural network architecture optimized with the ''Robust design of artificial neural networks methodology'' and to use two Bonner spheres as the only piece of information. In order to build the code here presented, once the net topology was optimized and properly trained, knowledge stored at synaptic weights was extracted and using a graphical framework build on the LabVIEW programming environment, the NSDann2BS code was designed. This code is friendly, intuitive and easy to use for the end user. The code is freely available upon request to authors. To demonstrate the use of the neural net embedded in the NSDann2BS code, the rate counts of {sup 252}Cf, {sup 241}AmBe and {sup 239}PuBe neutron sources measured with a Bonner spheres system.

  18. Fabrication of an optical component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, Michael A. (Livermore, CA); Aikens, David M. (Pleasanton, CA); Camp, David W. (Oakland, CA); Thomas, Ian M. (Livermore, CA); Kiikka, Craig (Livermore, CA); Sheehan, Lynn M. (Livermore, CA); Kozlowski, Mark R. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for forming optical parts used in laser optical systems such as high energy lasers, high average power lasers, semiconductor capital equipment and medical devices. The optical parts will not damage during the operation of high power lasers in the ultra-violet light range. A blank is first ground using a fixed abrasive grinding method to remove the subsurface damage formed during the fabrication of the blank. The next step grinds and polishes the edges and forms bevels to reduce the amount of fused-glass contaminants in the subsequent steps. A loose abrasive grind removes the subsurface damage formed during the fixed abrasive or "blanchard" removal process. After repolishing the bevels and performing an optional fluoride etch, the surface of the blank is polished using a zirconia slurry. Any subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind will be removed during this zirconia polish. A post polish etch may be performed to remove any redeposited contaminants. Another method uses a ceria polishing step to remove the subsurface damage formed during the loose abrasive grind. However, any residual ceria may interfere with the optical properties of the finished part. Therefore, the ceria and other contaminants are removed by performing either a zirconia polish after the ceria polish or a post ceria polish etch.

  19. Print preview for the fabrication of physical objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carr, David (David Alexander)

    2011-01-01

    This work proposes a new class of design and fabrication interfaces for digitally created objects, which the author terms augmented fabrication machines. By enhancing traditional fabrication machines with rich new input ...

  20. Energies and radial distributions of B_s mesons on the lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Koponen

    2007-03-09

    This is a follow-up to our earlier work for the energies and the charge (vector) and matter (scalar) distributions for S-wave states in a heavy-light meson, where the heavy quark is static and the light quark has a mass about that of the strange quark. We now study excited states of these mesons with higher angular momentum and with radial nodes. The calculation is carried out with dynamical fermions on a 16^3 times 32 lattice with a lattice spacing approximately 0.10 fm. The lattice configurations were generated by the UKQCD Collaboration. Attempts are now being made to understand these results in terms of the Dirac equation. In nature the closest equivalent of this heavy-light system is the B_s meson, which allows us to compare our lattice calculations to experimental results (where available) or give a prediction where the P-wave states should lie. We pay particular attention to the spin-orbit splitting, to see which one of the states (for a given angular momentum L) has the lower energy.

  1. Energies and radial distributions of B_s mesons - the effect of hypercubic blocking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UKQCD Collaboration; J. Koponen

    2007-03-14

    This is a follow-up to our earlier work for the energies and the charge (vector) and matter (scalar) distributions for S-wave states in a heavy-light meson, where the heavy quark is static and the light quark has a mass about that of the strange quark. We study the radial distributions of higher angular momentum states, namely P- and D-wave states, using a "fuzzy" static quark. A new improvement is the use of hypercubic blocking in the time direction, which effectively constrains the heavy quark to move within a 2a hypercube (a is the lattice spacing). The calculation is carried out with dynamical fermions on a 16^3 times 32 lattice with a lattice spacing approximately 0.10 fm generated using the non-perturbatively improved clover action. The configurations were generated by the UKQCD Collaboration using lattice action parameters beta = 5.2, c_SW = 2.0171 and kappa = 0.1350. In nature the closest equivalent of this heavy-light system is the B_s meson. Attempts are now being made to understand these results in terms of the Dirac equation.

  2. Measurements of the Branching fractions for $B_(s) -> D_(s)???$ and $?_b^0 -> ?_c^+???$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; G. Alkhazov; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; F. Archilli; L. Arrabito; A. Artamonov; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; J. J. Back; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; W. Barter; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; S. Benson; J. Benton; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; A. Bien; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bjørnstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; D. Brett; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Büchler-Germann; I. Burducea; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; P. Campana; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; K. Ciba; X. Cid Vidal; G. Ciezarek; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; A. Cook; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; M. Deckenhoff; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; A. Dosil Suárez; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; R. Ekelhof; L. Eklund; Ch. Elsasser; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estéve; A. Falabella; E. Fanchini; C. Färber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; M. Fontana; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; J. Garra Tico; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Göbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gándara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugés; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; C. Haen; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; J. Harrison; P. F. Harrison; J. He; V. Heijne; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; D. Hynds; V. Iakovenko; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; A. Jaeger; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; S. Kandybei; M. Karacson; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; K. Kreplin; M. Kreps; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; D. Lambert; R. W. Lambert; E. Lanciotti; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefévre; A. Leflat; J. Lefrançois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Märki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martín Sánchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Müller; R. Muresan; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; I. Nasteva; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; C. Nguyen-Mau; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; S. Ogilvy; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; J. M. Otalora Goicochea; P. Owen; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson

    2011-09-30

    Branching fractions of the decays $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ relative to $H_b\\to H_c\\pi^-$ are presented, where $H_b$ ($H_c$) represents B^0-bar($D^+$), $B^-$ ($D^0$), B_s^0-bar ($D_s^+$) and $\\Lambda_b^0$ ($\\Lambda_c^+$). The measurements are performed with the LHCb detector using 35${\\rm pb^{-1}}$ of data collected at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV. The ratios of branching fractions are measured to be B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-)/ B(B^0-bar -> D^+\\pi^-) = 2.38\\pm0.11\\pm0.21 B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B^- -> D^0\\pi^-) = 1.27\\pm0.06\\pm0.11 B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(B_s^0-bar -> D_s^+\\pi^-) = 2.01\\pm0.37\\pm0.20 B(\\Lambda_b^0->\\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-) / B(\\Lambda_b^0 -> \\Lambda_c^+\\pi^-) = 1.43\\pm0.16\\pm0.13. We also report measurements of partial decay rates of these decays to excited charm hadrons. These results are of comparable or higher precision than existing measurements.

  3. Fabrication, structure and mechanical properties of indium nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Gyuhyon

    2010-01-01

    followed by the electroplating fabrication method. TheCompression test; Electroplating; Yield phenomena 1.were fabricated via an electroplating method. 2. Procedure

  4. Conical Nanopores Fabricated via a Pressured-Biased Chemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conical Nanopores Fabricated via a Pressured-Biased Chemical Etch. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conical Nanopores Fabricated via a Pressured-Biased Chemical Etch....

  5. Method for fabricating hafnia films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Michael Z [Knoxville, TN

    2007-08-21

    The present invention comprises a method for fabricating hafnia film comprising the steps of providing a substrate having a surface that allows formation of a self-assembled monolayer thereon via covalent bonding; providing an aqueous solution that provides homogeneous hafnium ionic complexes and hafnium nanoclusters wherein the aqueous solution is capable of undergoing homogeneous precipitation under controlled conditions for a desired period of time at a controlled temperature and controlled solution acidity for desired nanocluster nucleation and growth kinetics, desired nanocluster size, desired growth rate of film thickness and desired film surface characteristics. The method further comprising forming the self-assembled monolayer on the surface of the substrate wherein the self-assembled monolayer comprises a plurality of hydrocarbon chains cross-linked together along the surface of the substrate, the hydrocarbon chains being uniformly spaced from one another and wherein each of the hydrocarbon chains having a functional anchoring group at a first end of the chain covalently bonded with the surface of the substrate and each of the hydrocarbon chains having a functional terminating group projected away from the surface wherein the functional terminating group provides a bonding site for the hafnium film to grow; and exposing the substrate to the aqueous solution for a desired period of time at a controlled temperature wherein the hafnium ionic complexes and the hafnium nanoclusters are deposited on the bonding site of the functional terminating group thereby forming the hafnia film wherein the hafnium bonded to the hydrocarbons and to one another provide a uniform ordered arrangement defined by the uniform arrangement of the hydrocarbons.

  6. Fabrication of Niobium sheet for RF cavities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balachandran, Shreyas

    2009-05-15

    This thesis investigated the microstructure and mechanical property of RRR( high purity) and RG (low purity) niobium (Nb) sheet material. RRR Nb is used in the fabrication RF cavities. Our method involves processing bulk ...

  7. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Karan Kartik

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process ...

  8. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; Da Via, C.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  9. The design and construction of fabric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Rosemarie

    2009-01-01

    In its short history, fabric structures have fascinated architects and engineers alike. Architects appreciate their unusual shapes and forms while engineers delight in their "pure" structural expression. Capable of spanning ...

  10. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Technology Development & Fabrication...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    related to Deficiencies in the Fabrication of Safety Significant Embed Plates at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site On April 13, 2010, the U.S....

  11. Fabrication and properties of microporous silicon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Jianzhong

    1994-01-01

    structure as the wafer from which it was fabricated. Oxidization at 800'C converts the porous silicon totally to amorphous silicon dioxide. Oxidation at 600'C produces a mixture of crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon dioxide. The pore structure...

  12. Parametric constructs : computational designs for digital fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araya Goldberg, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    This thesis explores strategies for building design toolchains in order to design, develop and fabricate architectural forms. The hipothesys of this research is that by embedding ruled based procedures addressing generative, ...

  13. Metal plasmas for the fabrication of nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    by Energetic Condensation of Metal Plasmas André AndersD: Appl. Phys. (2006) Metal plasmas for the fabrication ofA review is provided covering metal plasma production, the

  14. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Lin, Shawn-Yu (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  15. Method to fabricate layered material compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, James G.; Lin, Shawn-Yu

    2004-11-02

    A new class of processes suited to the fabrication of layered material compositions is disclosed. Layered material compositions are typically three-dimensional structures which can be decomposed into a stack of structured layers. The best known examples are the photonic lattices. The present invention combines the characteristic features of photolithography and chemical-mechanical polishing to permit the direct and facile fabrication of, e.g., photonic lattices having photonic bandgaps in the 0.1-20.mu. spectral range.

  16. Carbon nanotube collimator fabrication and application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chow, Lee (Orlando, FL); Chai, Guangyu (Orlando, FL); Schenkel, Thomas (San Francisco, CA)

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus, methods, systems and devices for fabricating individual CNT collimators. Micron size fiber coated CNT samples are synthesized with chemical vapor deposition method and then the individual CNT collimators are fabricated with focused ion beam technique. Unfocused electron beams are successfully propagated through the CNT collimators. The CNT nano-collimators are used for applications including single ion implantation and in high-energy physics, and allow rapid, reliable testing of the transmission of CNT arrays for transport of molecules.

  17. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  18. Requirements & Performance Metrics for Next Generation Switch Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabatabaee, Vahid

    Tabatabaee Zagros Networks 2 Research Place Rockville, MD 20850 www.zagrosnetworks.com #12;© 2002 Zagros at Zagros Networks. He received his B.S. degree from Sharif University of Technology, M.S. degree from Zagros Networks Zagros Networks is a fabless semiconductor company headquartered in Rockville, Maryland

  19. Accurate Measurement of 5-Methylcytosine and 5-Hydroxymethylcytosine in Human Cerebellum DNA by Oxidative Bisulfite on an Array (OxBS-Array)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Sarah F.; Beraldi, Dario; Bachman, Martin; Stewart, Sabrina K.; Beck, Stephan; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2015-02-23

    , the average loss of material (as measured by Qubit after bisulfite treatment, according to the manufacturers specifications) for oxBS was 44% and for BS was 38%. The samples were then run on the Infinium 450K chip by Genome Services at the Department... to the manufacturers specifica- tions (http://www.zymoresearch.com/downloads/dl/file/id/126/e2026i.pdf). Analysis The raw idat files produced by the Illumina platform were analysed with the R/Bioconductor package minfi[25]. The applied normalization method...

  20. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, K K; Bruzewicz, C D; Chuang, I L; Ram, R J; Sage, J M; Chiaverini, J

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This is the first demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware, in any modality, utilizing a commercial CMOS process, and it opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  1. Ion traps fabricated in a CMOS foundry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. K. Mehta; A. M. Eltony; C. D. Bruzewicz; I. L. Chuang; R. J. Ram; J. M. Sage; J. Chiaverini

    2014-06-13

    We demonstrate trapping in a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated in a 90-nm CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) foundry process utilizing the top metal layer of the process for the trap electrodes. The process includes doped active regions and metal interconnect layers, allowing for co-fabrication of standard CMOS circuitry as well as devices for optical control and measurement. With one of the interconnect layers defining a ground plane between the trap electrode layer and the p-type doped silicon substrate, ion loading is robust and trapping is stable. We measure a motional heating rate comparable to those seen in surface-electrode traps of similar size. This is the first demonstration of scalable quantum computing hardware, in any modality, utilizing a commercial CMOS process, and it opens the door to integration and co-fabrication of electronics and photonics for large-scale quantum processing in trapped-ion arrays.

  2. Epoxy bond and stop etch fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jerry A. (Sandia Park, NM); Weckwerth, Mark V. (Pleasanton, CA); Baca, Wes E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A class of epoxy bond and stop etch (EBASE) microelectronic fabrication techniques is disclosed. The essence of such techniques is to grow circuit components on top of a stop etch layer grown on a first substrate. The first substrate and a host substrate are then bonded together so that the circuit components are attached to the host substrate by the bonding agent. The first substrate is then removed, e.g., by a chemical or physical etching process to which the stop etch layer is resistant. EBASE fabrication methods allow access to regions of a device structure which are usually blocked by the presence of a substrate, and are of particular utility in the fabrication of ultrafast electronic and optoelectronic devices and circuits.

  3. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, J.L.; Tran, T.D.; Feikert, J.H.; Mayer, S.T.

    1997-06-10

    Fabrication is described for conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive deionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m{sup 2}/gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon composites with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced. 1 fig.

  4. Fabricating solid carbon porous electrodes from powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Tran, Tri D. (Livermore, CA); Feikert, John H. (Livermore, CA); Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Fabrication of conductive solid porous carbon electrodes for use in batteries, double layer capacitors, fuel cells, capacitive dionization, and waste treatment. Electrodes fabricated from low surface area (<50 m.sup.2 /gm) graphite and cokes exhibit excellent reversible lithium intercalation characteristics, making them ideal for use as anodes in high voltage lithium insertion (lithium-ion) batteries. Electrodes having a higher surface area, fabricated from powdered carbon blacks, such as carbon aerogel powder, carbon aerogel microspheres, activated carbons, etc. yield high conductivity carbon compositives with excellent double layer capacity, and can be used in double layer capacitors, or for capacitive deionization and/or waste treatment of liquid streams. By adding metallic catalysts to be high surface area carbons, fuel cell electrodes can be produced.

  5. Multilayer insulation blanket, fabricating apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, J.D.; Niemann, R.C.; Boroski, W.N.

    1992-09-01

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel. 7 figs.

  6. Method of fabricating a multilayer insulation blanket

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonczy, J.D.; Niemann, R.C.; Boroski, W.N.

    1993-07-06

    An improved multilayer insulation blanket for insulating cryogenic structures operating at very low temperatures is disclosed. An apparatus and method for fabricating the improved blanket are also disclosed. In the improved blanket, each successive layer of insulating material is greater in length and width than the preceding layer so as to accommodate thermal contraction of the layers closest to the cryogenic structure. The fabricating apparatus has a rotatable cylindrical mandrel having an outer surface of fixed radius that is substantially arcuate, preferably convex, in cross-section. The method of fabricating the improved blanket comprises (a) winding a continuous sheet of thermally reflective material around the circumference of the mandrel to form multiple layers, (b) binding the layers along two lines substantially parallel to the edges of the circumference of the mandrel, (c) cutting the layers along a line parallel to the axle of the mandrel, and (d) removing the bound layers from the mandrel.

  7. Energy-beam-driven rapid fabrication system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Atwood, Clinton L. (Albuquerque, NM); Greene, Donald L. (Corrales, NM); Griffith, Michelle L. (Albuquerque, NM); Harwell, Lane D. (Albuquerque, NM); Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schmale, David T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An energy beam driven rapid fabrication system, in which an energy beam strikes a growth surface to form a molten puddle thereon. Feed powder is then injected into the molten puddle from a converging flow of feed powder. A portion of the feed powder becomes incorporated into the molten puddle, forcing some of the puddle contents to freeze on the growth surface, thereby adding an additional layer of material. By scanning the energy beam and the converging flow of feed powder across the growth surface, complex three-dimensional shapes can be formed, ready or nearly ready for use. Nearly any class of material can be fabricated using this system.

  8. Design and Fabrication of Micromachined Resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Ritesh Ray; Bhattacharyya, Tarun Kanti

    2012-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) based on-chip resonators offer great potential for sensing and high frequency signal processing applications due to their exceptional features like small size, large frequency-quality factor product, integrability with CMOS ICs, low power consumption etc. This work is mainly aimed at the design, modeling, simulation, and fabrication of micromachined polysilicon disk resonators exhibiting radial-contour mode vibrations. A few other bulk mode modified resonator geometries are also being explored. The resonator structures have been designed and simulated in CoventorWare finite-element platform and fabricated by the PolyMUMPs surface micromachining process.

  9. Prototyping Tangible Input Devices with Digital Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Björn

    . Aside from 3D printers, other classes of digital fabrication hardware, like vinyl cutters, have also have previously investigated the benefits of tangibility in How Bodies Matter. 3D printing holds users of 3D printing can currently create such objects. For example, we surveyed the the online

  10. Method of fabrication of anchored nanostructure materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Methods for fabricating anchored nanostructure materials are described. The methods include heating a nano-catalyst under a protective atmosphere to a temperature ranging from about 450.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. and contacting the heated nano-catalysts with an organic vapor to affix carbon nanostructures to the nano-catalysts and form the anchored nanostructure material.

  11. Method of fabricating a solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pass, Thomas; Rogers, Robert

    2014-02-25

    Methods of fabricating solar cells are described. A porous layer may be formed on a surface of a substrate, the porous layer including a plurality of particles and a plurality of voids. A solution may be dispensed into one or more regions of the porous layer to provide a patterned composite layer. The substrate may then be heated.

  12. Triangular Profile Imprint Molds in Nanograting Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Triangular Profile Imprint Molds in Nanograting Fabrication Zhaoning Yu* and Stephen Y. Chou line widths and smooth edges. A wet chemical etching process is employed during mold preparation abandons the use of mold features with vertical sidewalls. Instead, it uses grating molds with triangle

  13. Fabrication Procedures and Process Sensitivities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This paper details the laboratory processes used to fabricate CdS/CdTe solar cells at the National Renewable with an AM1.5 eciency of 15.4% as verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. SOLAR CELLFabrication Procedures and Process Sensitivities for CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Doug H. Rose*, Falah S

  14. Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Polymer microcantilevers fabricated via multiphoton absorption polymerization Z. Bayindir, Y. Sun polymer cantilevers. Atomic force microscopy has been used to characterize the mechanical properties orders of magnitude smaller than would be predicted from the properties of the bulk polymer.6 If correct

  15. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-17

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing is between now and 2016 when the candidate processes are down-selected in preparation for the MP-1, FSP-1, and MP-2 plate manufacturing campaigns. A number of key risks identified by the FFC are discussed in this plan, with recommended mitigating actions for those activities within FFC, and identification of risks that are impacted by activities in other areas of the Convert Program. The R&D Plan does not include discussion of FFC initiatives related to production-scale manufacturing of fuel (e.g., establishment of the Pilot Line Production Facility), rather, the goal of this plan is to document the R&D activities needed ultimately to enable high-quality and cost-effective production of the fuel by the commercial fuel fabricator. The intent is for this R&D Plan to be a living document that will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to ensure that FFC R&D activities remain properly aligned to the needs of the Convert Program. This version of the R&D Plan represents the first annual review and revision.

  16. The School offers the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A) degrees in computer science.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    The School offers the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A) degrees in computer science. Computer science is the foundation of computing and information technology. Computer scientists and services. The required course work in computer science provides the student with an understanding

  17. Revised April 2011 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised April 2011 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics. This option is intended to prepare students to be secondary school mathematics teachers. Students who complete this option will be certified by The Arizona Department

  18. Revised August 2009 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised August 2009 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics. This option is intended to prepare students to be secondary school mathematics teachers. Students who complete this option will be certified by The Arizona Department

  19. Revised May 2010 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revised May 2010 The Secondary Mathematics Education Program is one option in the College of Science BA or BS degree in Mathematics. This option is intended to prepare students to be secondary school mathematics teachers. Students who complete this option will be certified by The Arizona Department

  20. Suzuki batteries The '96 to present Suzuki DR650SE comes from the factory with a Yuasa YTX9BS battery. This is a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    Suzuki batteries The '96 to present Suzuki DR650SE comes from the factory with a Yuasa YTX9BS battery. This is a highquality AGM (absorbed glass mat) type battery, which is sealed and maintenance free. AGM batteries last much longer than conventional floodedcell batteries in normal service

  1. Art Education Advising Policy (BS) You cannot be fully admitted to the Art Education program (you would be in a pending

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Art Education Advising Policy (BS) You cannot be fully admitted to the Art Education program (you) Internship I, next to last semester, (3 courses maximum including 1 ARE course) ARE 4351 Teaching Art in the Elementary School, Only offered during the Fall term ARE 4356, Teaching Art Appreciation and Criticism, Only

  2. Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    1 Honors B.S. in Biology (Aug 2014) Overview: The H.B.S in Biology is a collaboration between the Honors College and the Biology Department to reward students undertaking and completing a more rigorous, research-oriented curriculum while pursuing their Honors Bachelor's Degree in Biology at the University

  3. Essential Studies Worksheet B.S. in Computer Science I. Communication 9 Credits (6 credits writing and 3 credits Oral Communication)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Essential Studies Worksheet ­ B.S. in Computer Science I. Communication 9 Credits (6 credits writing and 3 credits Oral Communication) Special Emphasis Area: Course: Credits: Semester Completed 492/493 Senior Project 3 Special Emphasis Area requirements that may fall outside of Communication

  4. B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9-10 courses, 33-34 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    B.S. GEOLOGY (Geology Subplan) CHECKLIST of required courses for major Geology Core Courses: 9 - Experiencing Geology Lab and either GEOSCI 103 - Intro to Oceanography or GEOSCI 105 - Dynamic Earth 4 (1) (4 semester GEOSCI 201 ­ History of the Earth 4 1st or 2nd year, spring semester GEOSCI 231 ­ Geological Field

  5. EVALUATION OF VARIOUS FABRICATION TECHNIQUES FOR FABRICATION OF FINE FILAMENT NbTi SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    i c Formation in Fine Filament Nb-Ti Superconductors," lEEK~ of closely spaced fine filaments. Refe ~ences "HanufactureFOR FABRICATION OF FINE FILAMENT NbTi SUPERCONDUCTORS R.M.

  6. Dust Defeats Germ-Killing Fabrics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kelley speculates that dust protected germs from the fabrics' germ-killing surface. "Microbes grow on the dust. And now, because you have all this dust on the fabric, instead of...

  7. Fabrication of high-quality microflexures using micromilling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gafford, Joshua B

    2010-01-01

    This research focuses on the feasibility of using micromilling as a process for fabricating the flexural body of mesoscale nanopositioners. A desire to fabricate non-silicon microflexures for more favorable material ...

  8. Analysis of a Fabric/Desiccant Window Cavity Dehumidifier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunn, B. D.; Grasso, M. M.; Vadlamani, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an exploratory study of a fabric/desiccant window cavity dehumidifier system for possible use in commercial buildings. The objective was to evaluate fabrics commonly used in buildings, and system concepts...

  9. Development of the Direct Fabrication Process for Plutonium Immobilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Congdon, J.W.

    2001-07-10

    The current baseline process for fabricating pucks for the Plutonium Immobilization Program includes granulation of the milled feed prior to compaction. A direct fabrication process was demonstrated that eliminates the need for granulation.

  10. Design and Fabrication of Complex Flexible Structures and Microarchitectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    Design and Fabrication of Complex Flexible Structures and Microarchitectures The ability to design and fabricate complex flexible structures is becoming increasingly important using flexible structures because design tools for creating them are limited and modeling

  11. Project Plan Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Gary L; Taylor, Robin D

    2009-08-01

    In early FY2009, the DOE Office of Science - Nuclear Physics Program reinstated a program for continued production of {sup 252}Cf and other transcurium isotopes at the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The FY2009 major elements of the workscope are as follows: (1) Recovery and processing of seven transuranium element targets undergoing irradiation at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL; (2) Development of a plan to manufacture new targets for irradiation beginning in early- to mid-FY10 to supply irradiated targets for processing Campaign 75 (TRU75); and (3) Refurbishment of the target manufacturing equipment to allow new target manufacture in early FY10 The {sup 252}Cf product from processing Campaign 74 (recently processed and currently shipping to customers) is expected to supply the domestic demands for a period of approximately two years. Therefore it is essential that new targets be introduced for irradiation by the second quarter of FY10 (HFIR cycle 427) to maintain supply of {sup 252}Cf; the average irradiation period is {approx}10 HFIR cycles, requiring about 1.5 calendar years. The strategy for continued production of {sup 252}Cf depends upon repairing and refurbishing the existing pellet and target fabrication equipment for one additional target production campaign. This equipment dates from the mid-1960s to the late 1980s, and during the last target fabrication campaign in 2005- 2006, a number of component failures and operations difficulties were encountered. It is expected that following the target fabrication and acceptance testing of the targets that will supply material for processing Campaign 75 a comprehensive upgrade and replacement of the remote hot-cell equipment will be required prior to subsequent campaigns. Such a major refit could start in early FY 2011 and would take about 2 years to complete. Scope and cost estimates for the repairs described herein were developed, and authorization for the work was received in July 2009 under the Remote Target Fabrication Refurbishment Task of the Enhanced Utilization of Isotope Facilities project (Project Identification Code 2005230) funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. The goal of this project is to recover the capability to produce 4-5 curium targets for the irradiation period starting with HFIR cycle 427, currently scheduled to begin 2/17/10. Assuming success, the equipment would then be used to fabricate 6-7 additional targets to hold for the next irradiation campaign specified by the program. Specific objectives are the return to functionality of the Cubicle 3 Pellet Fabrication Line; Cubicle 2 Target Assembly equipment; and Cubicle 1 Target Inspection and Final Assembly system.

  12. Procedural Design of Imprint Rolls for Fluid Pathway Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2007-01-01

    optimization will be validated by applying the rolls in the fabrication of micro-?uidic and fuel cell

  13. Graphene Device Fabrication and Applications in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Guanxiong

    2012-01-01

    Device Fabrications 2.1 Graphene Samples Preparation We use2.1 Graphene samples preparation ……………………………………………….. 2.2 E-

  14. Method of fabrication of supported liquid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David R.; Hong, Lei; Myers, Christina R.

    2015-11-17

    Method for the fabrication of a supported liquid membrane having a dense layer in contact with a porous layer, and a membrane liquid layer within the interconnected pores of the porous layer. The dense layer is comprised of a solidified material having an average pore size less than or equal to about 0.1 nanometer, while the porous layer is comprised of a plurality of interconnected pores and has an average pore size greater than 10 nanometers. The supported liquid membrane is fabricated through the preparation of a casting solution of a membrane liquid and a volatile solvent. A pressure difference is established across the dense layer and porous layer, the casting solution is applied to the porous layer, and the low viscosity casting solution is drawn toward the dense layer. The volatile solvent is evaporated and the membrane liquid precipitates, generating a membrane liquid layer in close proximity to the dense layer.

  15. Fabrication of glucose biosensors by inkjet printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Tianming; Serban, Simona; Ali, Tarif; Drago, Guido; Derby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Inkjet printing has been used to fabricate glucose sensors using glucose oxidase and screen printed carbon electrodes. By appropriate selection of printing and drying conditions we are able to fabricate sensor structures that show a good linear response to glucose concentration. In order to achieve these structures we must carefully control the spreading and drying of the enzyme solution on the carbon electrode. Carbon electrode suirfaces are hydrophobic and Triton X was used as a surfactant to allow full coverage of the electrode surface. During drying, under ambient conditions the enzyme solution segregates to form a ring deposit (coffee staining). Coffee staining is shown to be deleterious to sensor performance and it can be removed by drying in a reduced humidity environment.

  16. Method of fabrication of electrodes and electrolytes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F.; Morse, Jeffrey D.

    2004-01-06

    Fuel cell stacks contain an electrolyte layer surrounded on top and bottom by an electrode layer. Porous electrodes are prepared which enable fuel and oxidant to easily flow to the respective electrode-electrolyte interface without the need for high temperatures or pressures to assist the flow. Rigid, inert microspheres in combination with thin-film metal deposition techniques are used to fabricate porous anodes, cathodes, and electrolytes. Microshperes contained in a liquid are randomly dispersed onto a host structure and dried such that the microsperes remain in position. A thin-film deposition technique is subsequently employed to deposit a metal layer onto the microsperes. After such metal layer deposition, the microspheres are removed leaving voids, i.e. pores, in the metal layer, thus forming a porous electrode. Successive repetitions of the fabrication process result in the formation of a continuous fuel cell stack. Such stacks may produce power outputs ranging from about 0.1 Watt to about 50 Watts.

  17. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition.

  18. Method of fabricating boron containing coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Jankowski, A.F.

    1999-04-27

    Hard coatings are fabricated from boron nitride, cubic boron nitride, and multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron is formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/cubic boron nitride, is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron and cubic boron nitride, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be discrete or of a blended or graded composition. 3 figs.

  19. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  20. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  1. Innovative concepts for fuel plate fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Thresh, H.R.

    1987-10-01

    A number of fabrication concepts have been and are being explored at ANL. Although specific processes were addressed with silicide fuels in mind, most are applicable to fabrication with any fuel type. Processes include improved comminution procedures for converting U-Si alloy ingots to powder using a roll crusher and an impact mill. Aluminizing of core compacts by ion vapor deposition techniques in vacuum offers prospects for improved plate quality. Other items examined include the possible use of coatings on fuel particles, matrices different from pure Al, and ductile fuel alloys which might be used to produce fuel plates with uranium loadings higher than possible with conventional dispersed-phase powder metallurgy technology.

  2. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, Rueben L. (Los Alamos, NM); Herbst, Richard J. (Los Alamos, NM); Johnson, Karl W. R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  3. Method for fabricating laminated uranium composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman, L.R.

    1983-08-03

    The present invention is directed to a process for fabricating laminated composites of uranium or uranium alloys and at least one other metal or alloy. The laminated composites are fabricated by forming a casting of the molten uranium with the other metal or alloy which is selectively positioned in the casting and then hot-rolling the casting into a laminated plate in or around which the casting components are metallurgically bonded to one another to form the composite. The process of the present invention provides strong metallurgical bonds between the laminate components primarily since the bond disrupting surface oxides on the uranium or uranium alloy float to the surface of the casting to effectively remove the oxides from the bonding surfaces of the components.

  4. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Los Altos, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, Milton A. (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  5. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Los Altos, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, Milton A. (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  6. Method to fabricate hollow microneedle arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM); Schmidt, Carrie (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-11-07

    An inexpensive and rapid method for fabricating arrays of hollow microneedles uses a photoetchable glass. Furthermore, the glass hollow microneedle array can be used to form a negative mold for replicating microneedles in biocompatible polymers or metals. These microneedle arrays can be used to extract fluids from plants or animals. Glucose transport through these hollow microneedles arrays has been found to be orders of magnitude more rapid than natural diffusion.

  7. Method for fabricating pixelated silicon device cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nelson, Jeffrey S.; Anderson, Benjamin John

    2015-08-18

    A method, apparatus and system for flexible, ultra-thin, and high efficiency pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array fabrication is disclosed. A structure and method of creation for a pixelated silicon or other semiconductor photovoltaic solar cell array with interconnects is described using a manufacturing method that is simplified compared to previous versions of pixelated silicon photovoltaic cells that require more microfabrication steps.

  8. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA); Winter, Michael R. (Goleta, CA); Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Allan, Shawn M. (Henrietta, NY); Skala, Dawn M. (Fremont, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  9. Schottky barrier MOSFET systems and fabrication thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

    1997-01-01

    (MOS) device systems-utilizing Schottky barrier source and drain to channel region junctions are disclosed. Experimentally derived results which demonstrate operation of fabricated N-channel and P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices, and of fabricated single devices with operational characteristics similar to (CMOS) and to a non-latching (SRC) are reported. Use of essentially non-rectifying Schottky barriers in (MOS) structures involving highly doped and the like and intrinsic semiconductor to allow non-rectifying interconnection of, and electrical accessing of device regions is also disclosed. Insulator effected low leakage current device geometries and fabrication procedures therefore are taught. Selective electrical interconnection of drain to drain, source to drain, or source to source, of N-channel and/or P-channel Schottky barrier (MOSFET) devices formed on P-type, N-type and Intrinsic semiconductor allows realization of Schottky Barrier (CMOS), (MOSFET) with (MOSFET) load, balanced differential (MOSFET) device systems and inverting and non-inverting single devices with operating characteristics similar to (CMOS), which devices can be utilized in modulation, as well as in voltage controled switching and effecting a direction of rectification.

  10. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  11. Design, Fabrication and Testing of Angled Fiber Suspension for Electrostatic Actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Bryan Edward

    2011-01-01

    carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on nickel by angled, dc,carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated on nickel by angled, dc,

  12. Method of fabricating bifacial tandem solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wojtczuk, Steven J; Chiu, Philip T; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2014-10-07

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  13. Microelectromechanical resonator and method for fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittwer, Jonathan W. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-10

    A method is disclosed for the robust fabrication of a microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator. In this method, a pattern of holes is formed in the resonator mass with the position, size and number of holes in the pattern being optimized to minimize an uncertainty .DELTA.f in the resonant frequency f.sub.0 of the MEM resonator due to manufacturing process variations (e.g. edge bias). A number of different types of MEM resonators are disclosed which can be formed using this method, including capacitively transduced Lame, wineglass and extensional resonators, and piezoelectric length-extensional resonators.

  14. Microelectromechanical resonator and method for fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittwer, Jonathan W. (Albuquerque, NM); Olsson, Roy H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-01-26

    A method is disclosed for the robust fabrication of a microelectromechanical (MEM) resonator. In this method, a pattern of holes is formed in the resonator mass with the position, size and number of holes in the pattern being optimized to minimize an uncertainty .DELTA.f in the resonant frequency f.sub.0 of the MEM resonator due to manufacturing process variations (e.g. edge bias). A number of different types of MEM resonators are disclosed which can be formed using this method, including capacitively transduced Lame, wineglass and extensional resonators, and piezoelectric length-extensional resonators.

  15. Solid Freeform Fabrication of Aesthetic Objects

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hart, George [SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York, United States

    2009-09-01

    Solid Freeform Fabrication (aka. Rapid Prototyping) equipment can produce beautiful three-dimensional objects of exquisite intricacy. To use this technology to its full potential requires spatial visualization in the designer and new geometric algorithms as tools. As both a sculptor and a research professor in the Computer Science department at Stony Brook University, George Hart is exploring algorithms for the design of elaborate aesthetic objects. In this talk, he will describe this work, show many images, and bring many physical models to display.

  16. Batch fabrication of precision miniature permanent magnets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM); Garino, Terry J. (Albuquerque, NM); Venturini, Eugene L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new class of processes for fabrication of precision miniature rare earth permanent magnets is disclosed. Such magnets typically have sizes in the range 0.1 to 10 millimeters, and dimensional tolerances as small as one micron. Very large magnetic fields can be produced by such magnets, lending to their potential application in MEMS and related electromechanical applications, and in miniature millimeter-wave vacuum tubes. This abstract contains simplifications, and is supplied only for purposes of searching, not to limit or alter the scope or meaning of any claims herein.

  17. Solid freeform fabrication using chemically reactive suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morisette, Sherry L. (Belmont, MA); Cesarano, III, Joseph (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Jennifer A. (Urbana, IL); Dimos, Duane B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    The effects of processing parameters and suspension chemorheology on the deposition behavior of SFF components derived from polymeric-based gelcasting suspensions combines the advantages associated with SFF fabrication, including the ability to spatially tailor composition and structure as well as reduced tooling costs, with the improved handling strength afforded by the use of gel based formulations. As-cast free-formed Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 components exhibited uniform particle packing and had minimal macro-defects (e.g., slumping or stair casing) and no discernable micro-defects (e.g., bubbles or cracking).

  18. Multijunction photovoltaic device and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arya, Rajeewa R. (Jamison, PA); Catalano, Anthony W. (Furlong, PA)

    1993-09-21

    A multijunction photovoltaic device includes first and second amorphous silicon PIN photovoltaic cells in a stacked arrangement. An interface layer, composed of a doped silicon compound, is disposed between the two cells and has a lower bandgap than the respective n- and p-type adjacent layers of the first and second cells. The interface layer forms an ohmic contact with the one or the adjacent cell layers of the same conductivity type, and a tunnel junction with the other of the adjacent cell layers. The disclosed device is fabricated by a glow discharge process.

  19. Ceramic nanostructures and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN)

    2009-11-24

    Structures and methods for the fabrication of ceramic nanostructures. Structures include metal particles, preferably comprising copper, disposed on a ceramic substrate. The structures are heated, preferably in the presence of microwaves, to a temperature that softens the metal particles and preferably forms a pool of molten ceramic under the softened metal particle. A nano-generator is created wherein ceramic material diffuses through the molten particle and forms ceramic nanostructures on a polar site of the metal particle. The nanostructures may comprise silica, alumina, titania, or compounds or mixtures thereof.

  20. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  1. Anchored nanostructure materials and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-27

    Anchored nanostructure materials and methods for their fabrication are described. The anchored nanostructure materials may utilize nano-catalysts that include powder-based or solid-based support materials. The support material may comprise metal, such as NiAl, ceramic, a cermet, or silicon or other metalloid. Typically, nanoparticles are disposed adjacent a surface of the support material. Nanostructures may be formed as anchored to nanoparticles that are adjacent the surface of the support material by heating the nano-catalysts and then exposing the nano-catalysts to an organic vapor. The nanostructures are typically single wall or multi-wall carbon nanotubes.

  2. Fabricated Metals (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtrans -ORGANIZATION FY 2013MayUncosted3Fabricated Metals

  3. Synthesis and structural characterization of a new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lingyun; Pan, Shilie; Wang, Ying; Yu, Hongwei; Lin, Xiaoxia; Han, Shujuan

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. • Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5?}, exist in the title compound. • Spectral properties and thermal analysis of Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} were reported. - Abstract: A new rubidium borosulfate, Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16}, has been synthesized using (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} as a source of sulfate ions for the first time. The compound crystallizes in the space group P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 (No. 96) of the tetragonal system with a = 10.148(4) Å, c = 16.689(14) Å, V = 1718.8(17) Å{sup 3}, and Z = 4. Zero-dimensional anion groups, [B(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}]{sup 5?}, a central BO{sub 4} tetrahedron sharing all its four vertices with neighboring sulfate tetrahedra, exist in the title compound, and then the rubidium atoms are situated in the voids of the resulting structure. The IR spectrum confirms the presence of BO{sub 4} and SO{sub 4} units. The UV–vis-NIR diffuse reflectance spectrum exhibits a band gap of about 3.99 eV. The TG-DSC analysis suggests that Rb{sub 5}BS{sub 4}O{sub 16} is an incongruent melting compound.

  4. Nanotube Fabrication byNanotube Fabrication by Anodic Aluminum Oxide,Anodic Aluminum Oxide,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Self--Aligned Processing,Aligned Processing, and Atomic Layerand Atomic Layerand Atomic Layerand Atomic Layer Deposition synthesis by atomic layer deposition (ALD) Significance Realizing nanotechnology benefits requires new combined anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructures with atomic layer deposition (ALD) to fabricate

  5. LIFE Target Fabrication Research Plan Sept 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S; Montesanti, R; Satcher, J; Spadaccini, C; Rose, K; Wang, M; Hamza, A; Alexander, N; Brown, L; Hund, J; Petzoldt, R; Sweet, W; Goodin, D

    2008-11-10

    The target-system for the baseline LIFE fast-ignition target was analyzed to establish a preliminary estimate for the costs and complexities involved in demonstrating the technologies needed to build a prototype LIFE plant. The baseline fast-ignition target upon which this analysis was developed is shown in Figure 1.0-1 below. The LIFE target-system incorporates requirements for low-cost, high throughput manufacture, high-speed, high accuracy injection of the target into the chamber, production of sufficient energy from implosion and recovery and recycle of the imploded target material residue. None of these functions has been demonstrated to date. Existing target fabrication techniques which lead to current 'hot spot' target costs of {approx}$100,000 per target and at a production rate of 2/day are unacceptable for the LIFE program. Fabrication techniques normally used for low-cost, low accuracy consumer products such as toys must be adapted to the high-accuracy LIFE target. This will be challenge. A research program resulting is the demonstration of the target-cycle technologies needed for a prototype LIFE reactor is expected to cost {approx}$51M over the course of 5 years. The effort will result in targets which will cost an estimated $0.23/target at a rep-rate of 20 Hz or about 1.73M targets/day.

  6. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong (Berkeley, CA); He, Rongrui (Berkeley, CA); Goldberger, Joshua (Berkeley, CA); Fan, Rong (El Cerrito, CA); Wu, Yi-Ying (Albany, CA); Li, Deyu (Albany, CA); Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA)

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  7. Method for fabricating a microelectromechanical resonator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wojciechowski, Kenneth E; Olsson, III, Roy H

    2013-02-05

    A method is disclosed which calculates dimensions for a MEM resonator in terms of integer multiples of a grid width G for reticles used to fabricate the resonator, including an actual sub-width L.sub.a=NG and an effective electrode width W.sub.e=MG where N and M are integers which minimize a frequency error f.sub.e=f.sub.d-f.sub.a between a desired resonant frequency f.sub.d and an actual resonant frequency f.sub.a. The method can also be used to calculate an overall width W.sub.o for the MEM resonator, and an effective electrode length L.sub.e which provides a desired motional impedance for the MEM resonator. The MEM resonator can then be fabricated using these values for L.sub.a, W.sub.e, W.sub.o and L.sub.e. The method can also be applied to a number j of MEM resonators formed on a common substrate.

  8. Methods for fabricating a micro heat barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Albert C.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tigges, Chris P.; Vawter, Gregory A.

    2004-01-06

    Methods for fabricating a highly effective, micron-scale micro heat barrier structure and process for manufacturing a micro heat barrier based on semiconductor and/or MEMS fabrication techniques. The micro heat barrier has an array of non-metallic, freestanding microsupports with a height less than 100 microns, attached to a substrate. An infrared reflective membrane (e.g., 1 micron gold) can be supported by the array of microsupports to provide radiation shielding. The micro heat barrier can be evacuated to eliminate gas phase heat conduction and convection. Semi-isotropic, reactive ion plasma etching can be used to create a microspike having a cusp-like shape with a sharp, pointed tip (<0.1 micron), to minimize the tip's contact area. A heat source can be placed directly on the microspikes. The micro heat barrier can have an apparent thermal conductivity in the range of 10.sup.-6 to 10.sup.-7 W/m-K. Multiple layers of reflective membranes can be used to increase thermal resistance.

  9. Redundancy of Supply in the International Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Market: Are Fabrication Services Assured?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seward, Amy M.; Toomey, Christopher; Ford, Benjamin E.; Wood, Thomas W.; Perkins, Casey J.

    2011-11-14

    For several years, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been assessing the reliability of nuclear fuel supply in support of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration. Three international low enriched uranium reserves, which are intended back up the existing and well-functioning nuclear fuel market, are currently moving toward implementation. These backup reserves are intended to provide countries credible assurance that of the uninterrupted supply of nuclear fuel to operate their nuclear power reactors in the event that their primary fuel supply is disrupted, whether for political or other reasons. The efficacy of these backup reserves, however, may be constrained without redundant fabrication services. This report presents the findings of a recent PNNL study that simulated outages of varying durations at specific nuclear fuel fabrication plants. The modeling specifically enabled prediction and visualization of the reactors affected and the degree of fuel delivery delay. The results thus provide insight on the extent of vulnerability to nuclear fuel supply disruption at the level of individual fabrication plants, reactors, and countries. The simulation studies demonstrate that, when a reasonable set of qualification criteria are applied, existing fabrication plants are technically qualified to provide backup fabrication services to the majority of the world's power reactors. The report concludes with an assessment of the redundancy of fuel supply in the nuclear fuel market, and a description of potential extra-market mechanisms to enhance the security of fuel supply in cases where it may be warranted. This report is an assessment of the ability of the existing market to respond to supply disruptions that occur for technical reasons. A forthcoming report will address political disruption scenarios.

  10. Vision Machine & Fabrication Corp. Named Top Small Business Subcontrac...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vision Machine & Fabrication Corp. Named Top Small Business Subcontractor at Jefferson Lab for FY 2014 NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Sept. 10, 2015 - Jefferson Science Associates, the...

  11. Automated Process for the Fabrication of Highly Customized Thermally...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Worcester Polytechnic Institute More Documents & Publications Fabricate-on-Demand Vacuum Insulating Glazings Fenestration Software Tools Low Cost Nanostructured Smart Window...

  12. Scalable Model Checking Beyond Safety - A Communication Fabric Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Sayak

    2013-01-01

    like Petri nets [Murata, 1989] and data-flow networks [Petri nets CHAPTER 3. FORMAL MODEL FOR COMMUNICATION FABRICS and data-flow networks.

  13. Computation and Nanotechnology: Toward the Fabrication of Complex Hierarchical Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Bruce

    Computation and Nanotechnology: Toward the Fabrication of Complex Hierarchical Structures Technical and Nan- otechnology," for the International Journal of Nanotechnology and Molecular Computation 1, 1

  14. Fabrication of Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices Fabrication of Small Diesel Fuel Injector Orifices Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  15. ORNL demonstrates first large-scale graphene fabrication | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL demonstrates first large-scale graphene composite fabrication ORNL's ultrastrong graphene features layers of graphene and polymers and is an effective conductor of...

  16. Microfluidic Fabrication of Hydrogel Microparticles Containing Functionalized Viral Nanotemplates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Christina L.

    We demonstrate rapid microfluidic fabrication of hybrid microparticles composed of functionalized viral nanotemplates directly embedded in polymeric hydrogels. Specifically, genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) ...

  17. Fabrication of Microporous Thin Films from Polyelectrolyte Multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Christopher

    , are established biomaterials finding application as drug delivery systems, enteric coatings for drugs, dental and biomaterial applications. Introduction The fabrication of polyelectrolyte multilayer thin films has received

  18. Characterization and Comparison of Devices Fabricated From Epitaxial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization and Comparison of Devices Fabricated From Epitaxial Graphene on SiC and Electrostatically Transferred Graphene. Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  19. Fabrication of fiber supported ionic liquids and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David R; Wickramanayake, Shan

    2013-02-26

    One or more embodiments relates to the production of a fabricated fiber having an asymmetric polymer network and having an immobilized liquid such as an ionic liquid within the pores of the polymer network. The process produces the fabricated fiber in a dry-wet spinning process using a homogenous dope solution, providing significant advantage over current fabrication methods for liquid-supporting polymers. The fabricated fibers may be effectively utilized for the separation of a chemical species from a mixture based on the selection of the polymer, the liquid, and the solvent utilized in the dope.

  20. Innovative forming and fabrication technologies : new opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.; Hryn, J.; Energy Systems; Kingston Process Metallurgy, Inc.

    2008-01-31

    The advent of light metal alloys and advanced materials (polymer, composites, etc.) have brought the possibility of achieving important energy reductions into the full life cycle of these materials, especially in transportation applications. 1 These materials have gained acceptance in the aerospace industry but use of light metal alloys needs to gain wider acceptance in other commercial transportation areas. Among the main reasons for the relatively low use of these materials are the lack of manufacturability, insufficient mechanical properties, and increased material costs due to processing inefficiencies. Considering the enormous potential energy savings associated with the use of light metal alloys and advanced materials in transportation, there is a need to identify R&D opportunities in the fields of materials fabrication and forming aimed at developing materials with high specific mechanical properties combined with energy efficient processes and good manufacturability. This report presents a literature review of the most recent developments in the areas of fabrication and metal forming focusing principally on aluminum alloys. In the first section of the document, the different sheet manufacturing technologies including direct chill (DC) casting and rolling, spray forming, spray rolling, thin slab, and strip casting are reviewed. The second section of the document presents recent research on advanced forming processes. The various forming processes reviewed are: superplastic forming, electromagnetic forming, age forming, warm forming, hydroforming, and incremental forming. Optimization of conventional forming processes is also discussed. Potentially interesting light metal alloys for high structural efficiency including aluminum-scandium, aluminum-lithium, magnesium, titanium, and amorphous metal alloys are also reviewed. This section concludes with a discussion on alloy development for manufacturability. The third section of the document reviews the latest developments in fiber-reinforced composite materials. Emerging curing processes are presented along with a discussion on the possible developments in biocomposite materials. The fourth section presents recent developments in the fabrication of bulk nanomaterials and nanoparticles reinforced materials. Advanced joining technologies are presented in the fifth section. Future research is proposed in the last section.

  1. Microoptical System And Fabrication Method Therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-03-15

    Microoptical systems with clear aperture of about one millimeter or less are fabricated from a layer of photoresist using a lithographic process to define the optical elements. A deep X-ray source is typically used to expose the photoresist. Exposure and development of the photoresist layer can produce planar, cylindrical, and radially symmetric micro-scale optical elements, comprising lenses, mirrors, apertures, diffractive elements, and prisms, monolithically formed on a common substrate with the mutual optical alignment required to provide the desired system functionality. Optical alignment can be controlled to better than one micron accuracy. Appropriate combinations of structure and materials enable optical designs that include corrections for chromatic and other optical aberrations. The developed photoresist can be used as the basis for a molding operation to produce microoptical systems made of a range of optical materials. Finally, very complex microoptical systems can be made with as few as three lithographic exposures.

  2. Microoptical system and fabrication method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2003-07-08

    Microoptical systems with clear aperture of about one millimeter or less are fabricated from a layer of photoresist using a lithographic process to define the optical elements. A deep X-ray source is typically used to expose the photoresist. Exposure and development of the photoresist layer can produce planar, cylindrical, and radially symmetric micro-scale optical elements, comprising lenses, mirrors, apertures, diffractive elements, and prisms, monolithically formed on a common substrate with the mutual optical alignment required to provide the desired system functionality. Optical alignment can be controlled to better than one micron accuracy. Appropriate combinations of structure and materials enable optical designs that include corrections for chromatic and other optical aberrations. The developed photoresist can be used as the basis for a molding operation to produce microoptical systems made of a range of optical materials. Finally, very complex microoptical systems can be made with as few as three lithographic exposures.

  3. Turbine airfoil fabricated from tapered extrusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marra, John J

    2013-07-16

    An airfoil (30) and fabrication process for turbine blades with cooling channels (26). Tapered tubes (32A-32D) are bonded together in a parallel sequence, forming a leading edge (21), a trailing edge (22), and pressure and suction side walls (23, 24) connected by internal ribs (25). The tapered tubes may be extruded without camber to simplify the extrusion process, then bonded along matching surfaces (34), forming a non-cambered airfoil (28), which may be cambered in a hot forming process and cut (48) to length. The tubes may have tapered walls that are thinner at the blade tip (T1) than at the base (T2), reducing mass. A cap (50) may be attached to the blade tip. A mounting lug (58) may be forged (60) on the airfoil base and then machined, completing the blade for mounting in a turbine rotor disk.

  4. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ardary, Zane L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Reynolds, Carl D. (Clinton, TN)

    1980-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of boron carbide articles having length-to-diameter or width ratios greater than 2 to 1. The process of the present invention is practiced by the steps comprising hot pressing boron carbide powder into article segments or portions in which the segments have a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5, aligning a plurality of the initially hot-pressed segments in a hot-pressing die with the end surfaces of the segments placed in intimate contact with one another, and then hot pressing the aligned segments into an article of the desired configuration. The resulting article exhibits essentially uniform density throughout the structure with the bonds between the segments being equivalent in hardness, strength, and density to the remainder of the article.

  5. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  6. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more »This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  7. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Lipp, G. Daniel (Fort Collins, CO)

    1999-01-01

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb.

  8. Method of fabricating a honeycomb structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holleran, L.M.; Lipp, G.D.

    1999-08-03

    A method of fabricating a monolithic honeycomb structure product involves shaping a first mixture of raw materials and a binder into a green honeycomb, extruding a second mixture of raw materials and a binder into one or more green members that each define an opening extending longitudinally therethrough. The raw materials of the second mixture are compatible with the raw materials of the first mixture. The green honeycomb and member(s) are dried. The binders of the green honeycomb and member(s) are softened at the surfaces that are to be bonded. The green member(s) is inserted into the honeycomb and bonded to the honeycomb to form an assembly thereof, which is then dried and fired to form a unified monolithic honeycomb structure. The insertion is best carried out by mounting a member in the shape of a tube on a mandrel, and inserting the mandrel into the honeycomb opening to bond the tube to the honeycomb. 7 figs.

  9. Target Fabrication: A View from the Users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Christensen, Cindy R.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2004-03-15

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  10. TARGET FABRICATION: A VIEW FROM THE USERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, Cris W.; Christensen, Cindy; Cobble, James; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael S.; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2003-07-18

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in time to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  11. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rollins, Harry W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  12. Tenth target fabrication specialists` meeting: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, L.R.; Stark, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    This tenth meeting of specialists in target fabrication for inertial confinement is unique in that it is the first meeting that was completely unclassified. As a result of the new classification, we were able to invite more foreign participation. In addition to participants from the US, UK, and Canada, representatives from France, Japan, and two Russian laboratories attended, about 115 in all. This booklet presents full papers and poster sessions. Indirect and direct drive laser implosions are considered. Typical topics include: polymer or aluminium or resorcinol/formaldehyde shells, laser technology, photon tunneling microscopy as a characterization tool, foams, coatings, hohlraums, and beryllium capsules. Hydrogen, deuterium, tritium, and beryllium are all considered as fuels.

  13. Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

    2014-02-11

    A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

  14. Methods for freeform fabrication of structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Stephen G. (Albuquerque, NM); Spletzer, Barry L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Rapid prototyping methods and apparatuses that produce structures made of continuous-fiber polymer-matrix composites without the use of molds. Instead of using molds, the composite structure is fabricated patch by patch in layers or wraps, using a two- or three-axis stage connected to a rapidly-reconfigurable forming surface, and a robot arm to position the evolving composite structure, which are both programmable devices. Because programmable devices are included, i.e., a robot and a two- or three-axis stage connected to the reconfigurable forming surface, the control program needed to produce a desired shape can be easily modified to automatically generate the desired shape from an electronic model (e.g., using a CAD/CAM system) of the desired (predetermined) shape.

  15. Deterministic, Nanoscale Fabrication of Mesoscale Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., R M; Shirk, M; Gilmer, G; Rubenchik, A

    2004-09-24

    Neither LLNL nor any other organization has the capability to perform deterministic fabrication of mm-sized objects with arbitrary, {micro}m-sized, 3-dimensional features with 20-nm-scale accuracy and smoothness. This is particularly true for materials such as high explosives and low-density aerogels. For deterministic fabrication of high energy-density physics (HEDP) targets, it will be necessary both to fabricate features in a wide variety of materials as well as to understand and simulate the fabrication process. We continue to investigate, both in experiment and in modeling, the ablation/surface-modification processes that occur with the use of laser pulses that are near the ablation threshold fluence. During the first two years, we studied ablation of metals, and we used sub-ps laser pulses, because pulses shorter than the electron-phonon relaxation time offered the most precise control of the energy that can be deposited into a metal surface. The use of sub-ps laser pulses also allowed a decoupling of the energy-deposition process from the ensuing movement/ablation of the atoms from the solid, which simplified the modeling. We investigated the ablation of material from copper, gold, and nickel substrates. We combined the power of the 1-D hydrocode ''HYADES'' with the state-of-the-art, 3-D molecular dynamics simulations ''MDCASK'' in our studies. For FY04, we have stretched ourselves to investigate laser ablation of carbon, including chemically-assisted processes. We undertook this research, because the energy deposition that is required to perform direct sublimation of carbon is much higher than that to stimulate the reaction 2C + O{sub 2} => 2CO. Thus, extremely fragile carbon aerogels might survive the chemically-assisted process more readily than ablation via direct laser sublimation. We had planned to start by studying vitreous carbon and move onto carbon aerogels. We were able to obtain flat, high-quality vitreous carbon, which was easy to work on, experimentally and relatively easy to model. We were provided with bulk samples of carbon aerogel by Dr. Joe Satcher, but the shop that would have prepared mounted samples for us was overwhelmed by programmatic assignments. We are pursuing aligned carbon nanotubes, provided to us by colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, as an alternative to aerogels. Dr. Gilmer started modeling the laser/thermally accelerated reactions of carbon with H{sub 2}, rather than O{sub 2}, due to limited information on equation of state for CO. We have extended our molecular dynamics models of ablation to include carbon in the form of graphite, vitreous carbon, and aerogels. The computer code has features that allow control of temperature, absorption of shock waves, and for the ejection of material from the computational cell. We form vitreous carbon atomic configurations by melting graphite in a microcanonical cell at a temperature of about 5000K. Quenching the molten carbon at a controlled rate of cooling yields material with a structure close to that of the vitreous carbon produced in the laboratory. To represent the aerogel, we have a computer code that connects ''graphite'' rods to randomly placed points in the 3-D computational cell. Ablation simulations yield results for vitreous carbon similar to our previous results with copper, usually involving the transient melting of the material above the threshold energy density. However, some fracturing in the solid regions occurs in this case, but was never observed in copper. These simulations are continuing, together with studies of the reaction of hydrogen with vitreous graphite at high temperatures. These reactions are qualitatively similar to that of oxygen with the carbon atoms at the surface, and the simulations should provide insight into the applicability of the use of chemical reactions to shape the surfaces of aerogels.

  16. Fabrication of catalyzed ion transport membrane systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Kibby, Charles Leonard

    2013-06-04

    Process for fabricating a catalyzed ion transport membrane (ITM). In one embodiment, an uncatalyzed ITM is (a) contacted with a non-reducing gaseous stream while heating to a temperature and for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM possessing anion mobility; (b) contacted with a reducing gaseous stream for a time period sufficient to provide an ITM having anion mobility and essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry; (c) cooled while contacting the ITM with the reducing gaseous stream to provide an ITM having essentially constant oxygen stoichiometry and no anion mobility; and (d) treated by applying catalyst to at least one of (1) a porous mixed conducting multicomponent metallic oxide (MCMO) layer contiguous with a first side of a dense layer of MCMO and (2) a second side of the dense MCMO layer. In another embodiment, these steps are carried out in the alternative order of (a), (d), (b), and (c).

  17. Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Submitted Glass Concrete Thin Sheets Reinforced with Prestressed Aramid Fabrics Gregor Vilkner Thin sheet concrete crushed glass as aggregate, a multitude of different esthetic effects can be produced, which again open up

  18. Fabrication and structural performance of periodic cellular metal sandwich structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    are important new structures, enabled by novel fabrication and topology design tools. Fabrication protocols deposition [6] or slurry coating [7]. Others utilize hollow spheres [8­10] or aggregates of soluble particles welding (shown) or with an adhesive.The cores can be cut and adhesively bonded to face sheets to create

  19. Assured Fuel Supply: Potential Conversion and Fabrication Bottlenecks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assured Fuel Supply: Potential Conversion and Fabrication Bottlenecks PNNL-16951 DRAFT Authors bottlenecks that may arise in the conversion and fuel fabrication steps when used in conjunction with the U.S.-sponsored Reliable Fuel Supply (RFS) reserve. Paper is also intended to identify pathways for assessing the magnitude

  20. Ultrasonic imaging system for in-process fabric defect detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheen, Shuh-Haw (Naperville, IL); Chien, Hual-Te (Naperville, IL); Lawrence, William P. (Downers Grove, IL); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1997-01-01

    An ultrasonic method and system are provided for monitoring a fabric to identify a defect. A plurality of ultrasonic transmitters generate ultrasonic waves relative to the fabric. An ultrasonic receiver means responsive to the generated ultrasonic waves from the transmitters receives ultrasonic waves coupled through the fabric and generates a signal. An integrated peak value of the generated signal is applied to a digital signal processor and is digitized. The digitized signal is processed to identify a defect in the fabric. The digitized signal processing includes a median value filtering step to filter out high frequency noise. Then a mean value and standard deviation of the median value filtered signal is calculated. The calculated mean value and standard deviation are compared with predetermined threshold values to identify a defect in the fabric.

  1. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T.; Üncü, I. S.; K?l?ncarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  2. Fabrication and Testing of Deflecting Cavities for APS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammosser, John; Wang, Haipeng; Rimmer, Robert; Jim, Henry; Katherine, Wilson; Dhakal, Pashupati; Ali, Nassiri; Jim, Kerby; Jeremiah, Holzbauer; Genfa, Wu; Joel, Fuerst; Yawei, Yang; Zenghai, Li

    2013-09-01

    Jefferson Lab (Newport News, Virginia) in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, IL) has fabricated and tested four first article, 2.8 GHz, deflecting SRF cavities, for Argonne's Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) project. These cavities are unique in many ways including the fabrication techniques in which the cavity cell and waveguides were fabricated. These cavity subcomponents were milled from bulk large grain niobium ingot material directly from 3D CAD files. No forming of sub components was used with the exception of the beam-pipes. The challenging cavity and helium vessel design and fabrication results from the stringent RF performance requirements required by the project and operation in the APS ring. Production challenges and fabrication techniques as well as testing results will be discussed in this paper.

  3. Fabrication of a 238Pu target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D

    2010-11-16

    Precision neutron-induced reaction data are important for modeling the network of isotope production and destruction within a given diagnostic chain. This network modeling has many applications such as the design of advanced fuel cycle for reactors and the interpretation of radiochemical data related to the stockpile stewardship and nuclear forensics projects. Our current funded effort is to improve the neutron-induced reaction data on the short-lived actinides and the specific goal is to improve the neutron capture data on {sup 238}Pu with a half-life of 87.7 years. In this report, the fabrication of a {sup 238}Pu target for the proposed measurement using the DANCE array at LANL is described. The {sup 238}Pu target was fabricated from a sample enriched to 99.35%, acquired from ORNL. A total of 395 {micro}g was electroplated onto both sides of a 3 {micro}m thick Ti foil using a custom-made plating cell, shown in Fig 1. The target-material loaded Ti foil is sandwiched between two double-side aluminized mylar foils with a thickness of 1.4 {micro}m. The mylar foil is glued to a polyimide ring. This arrangement is shown partially in Fig. 2. The assembled target is then inserted into an aluminum container with a wall thickness of 0.76 mm, shown in Fig. 3. A derlin ring is used to keep the target assembly in place. The ends of this cylindrical container are vacuum-sealed by two covers with thin Kapton foils as windows for the beam entrance and exit. Shown in Fig. 4 is details of the arrangement. This target is used for phase I of the proposed measurement on {sup 238}Pu scheduled for Nov 2010 together with the DANCE array to address the safety issues raised by LANL. Shown in Fig. 5 is the preliminary results on the yield spectrum as a function of neutron incident energy with a gate on the total {gamma}-ray energy of equivalent Q value. Since no fission PPAC is employed, the distinction between the capture and fission events cannot be made, which is important for the higher neutron incident energy. However, it indicates that a cross section of less than one barn can be measured. The second phase of this experiment will be carried out in 2011 by assembling a PPAC with the {sup 238}Pu target to extend the measurement to higher neutron incident energies by distinguishing the capture from fission events. The fission cross section becomes dominant for neutron incident energies above 30 keV. This PPAC was developed in FY2010 under the NA22 funding and performed very well for the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu measurements. A new {sup 238}Pu target will be fabricated for the phase II measurement using the same electroplating technique.

  4. Metal Can and Bottle FabricationMetal Can and Bottle Fabrication ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Metal Can and Bottle FabricationMetal Can and Bottle Fabrication ver. 1 ME 4210: Manufacturing Processes and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 1 #12;Metal CansMetal Cans ME 4210: Manufacturing and Engineering Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 3 #12;Metal Cans and BottlesMetal Cans and Bottles ME 4210

  5. Method and instrumentation for the measurement and characterization of MEMS fabricated electrical contacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Melissa B. (Melissa Beth), 1982-

    2010-01-01

    MEMS fabricated electrical contacts consist of two MEMS fabricated surfaces which are physically separated and brought together for the purpose of carrying current. MEMS fabricated electrical contacts are used in a wide ...

  6. Fabrication and Measurements of 500 MHz Double Spoke Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, HyeKyoung; Hopper, Christopher S.; Delayen, Jean R.

    2014-12-01

    A 500 MHz ?0=1 double spoke cavity has been designed and optimized for a high velocity application such as a compact electron accelerator at the Center for Accelerator Science at Old Dominion University [1] and the fabrication was recently completed at Jefferson Lab. The geometry specific to the double spoke cavity required a variety of tooling and fixtures. Also a number of asymmetric weld joints were expected to make it difficult to maintain minimal geometric deviation from the design. This paper will report the fabrication procedure, resulting tolerance from the design, initial test results and the lessons learned from the first ?0=1 double spoke cavity fabrication.

  7. Fuel injector Holes (Fabrication of Micro-Orifices for Fuel Injectors...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    injector Holes (Fabrication of Micro-Orifices for Fuel Injectors) Fuel injector Holes (Fabrication of Micro-Orifices for Fuel Injectors) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

  8. Beyond 3D Printing: The New Dimensions of Additive Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Steven John

    Additive fabrication, often referred to as 3D printing, is the construction of objects by adding material. This stands in contrast to subtractive methods, which involve removing material by means of milling or cutting. ...

  9. Fabrication of metallic nano-slit waveguides with sharp bends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, M.; Ocola, L. E.; Gray, S. K.; Wiederrecht, G.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2008-01-01

    Metallic nanoslit waveguides are promising candidates for ultrahigh-density optical interconnections. A variety of devices based on metallic nanoslit waveguides have already been proposed that show a great superiority over conventional photonic devices for compactness. However very few two-dimensional devices have been experimentally demonstrated with in-plane geometries due to fabrication difficulties. In this article, a feasible process is presented using traditional semiconductor fabrication technologies such as mix-and-match lithography and electroplating, which is capable of fabricating complicated 100 nm wide, 800 nm deep gold slit waveguides with multiple sharp right-angle corners. The process can be extended to volume production manufacturing with minor modifications, thus enabling the fabrication of nanoslit photonic circuits and networks.

  10. Timber tower : a flexible fabrication method for reconfigurable housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, James (James Richard)

    2014-01-01

    "Prefabricating Housing...again", this time it's going to be different. Fabrication machine functionality is bracketed by the physical configuration and componentry of the system. Traditionally, a machine designer engineers ...

  11. Fabrication of Annealed Proton-Exchanged Waveguides for Vertical Integration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webb, Jacob Douglas

    2011-08-08

    There is a drive for improving the surface uniformity of optical waveguide devices in the photonics lab. This report focuses on the exploration of annealed proton exchange (APE) waveguide fabrication on lithium niobate crystal as a method...

  12. 4.510 Digital Design Fabrication, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sass, Lawrence

    This class serves as an introductory subject in advanced computing, rapid prototyping, and CAD/CAM fabrication for architects. It focuses on the relationship between design and various forms of computer modeling as input, ...

  13. Methods and devices for fabricating three-dimensional nanoscale structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.; Jeon, Seokwoo; Park, Jangung

    2010-04-27

    The present invention provides methods and devices for fabricating 3D structures and patterns of 3D structures on substrate surfaces, including symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns of 3D structures. Methods of the present invention provide a means of fabricating 3D structures having accurately selected physical dimensions, including lateral and vertical dimensions ranging from 10s of nanometers to 1000s of nanometers. In one aspect, methods are provided using a mask element comprising a conformable, elastomeric phase mask capable of establishing conformal contact with a radiation sensitive material undergoing photoprocessing. In another aspect, the temporal and/or spatial coherence of electromagnetic radiation using for photoprocessing is selected to fabricate complex structures having nanoscale features that do not extend entirely through the thickness of the structure fabricated.

  14. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, Richard M. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Skulina, Kenneth M. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments m the soft x-ray region.

  15. Nanostructure fabrication by electron and ion beam patterning of nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, David Sun, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Two modes of energetic beam-mediated fabrication have been investigated, namely focused ion beam (FIB) direct-writing of nanoparticles, and a technique for electrostatically patterning ionized inorganic nanoparticles, ...

  16. Graphene Device Fabrication and Applications in Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Guanxiong

    2012-01-01

    that available at UCR cleanroom. References [1] A.K. Geimwork. iv I am thankful to cleanroom stuff Dexter Humphrey,help in training me with cleanroom fabrication skills and

  17. Top-Down, Scalable Fabrication of High Purity Fluorescent Nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Luozhou

    We demonstrate a fabrication technique for high volume production of high quality nanocrystals from bulk chemical vapor deposition diamond. Ramsey and Spin-Echo measurements confirm the long spin coherence of nitrogen ...

  18. The design and analysis of tension fabric structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Miriam Euni

    2007-01-01

    Although tensioned fabric structures are increasingly in demand, since they are comparatively new to the engineering world, there are relatively limited resources available about such structures. This report reviews the ...

  19. Designing liquid repellent surfaces for fabrics, feathers and fog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chhatre, Shreerang S. (Shreerang Sharad)

    2013-01-01

    Omniphobicity refers to a property of surfaces which are not wetted by water, oils, alcohols and other low surface tension liquids. Robust omniphobic surfaces can be applied in many areas including fabrics with chemical / ...

  20. Fabrication and characterization of thermally drawn fiber capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lestoquoy, Guillaume

    We report on the fabrication of all-in-fiber capacitors with poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) as the dielectric material. Electrodes made of conductive polymer are separated by a PVDF thin film within a polycarbonate casing ...

  1. Proceedings of the twelfth target fabrication specialists` meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    Research in fabrication for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) comprises at least three broad categories: targets for high energy density physics on existing drivers, ignition capsule fabrication, and cryogenic fuel layer formation. The latter two are being pursued primarily for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Scientists from over 14 laboratories, universities, and businesses contributed over 100 papers on all aspects of ICF target fabrication. The NIF is well along in construction and photos of poured concrete and exposed steel added to the technical excitement. It was clear from the meeting that there has been significant progress toward the fabrication of an ignition target for NIF and that new techniques are resulting in higher quality targets for high energy density research.

  2. Midas: Fabricating Custom Capacitive Touch Sensors to Prototype Interactive Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    . While digital fabrication techniques such as 3D printing make it easier to prototype the shape of custom processes like 3D printing and CNC ma- chining make it easier to prototype the form of such products

  3. Fabrication process for a gradient index x-ray lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bionta, R.M.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Skulina, K.M.

    1995-01-17

    A process is disclosed for fabricating high efficiency x-ray lenses that operate in the 0.5-4.0 keV region suitable for use in biological imaging, surface science, and x-ray lithography of integrated circuits. The gradient index x-ray optics fabrication process broadly involves co-sputtering multi-layers of film on a wire, followed by slicing and mounting on block, and then ion beam thinning to a thickness determined by periodic testing for efficiency. The process enables the fabrication of transmissive gradient index x-ray optics for the 0.5-4.0 keV energy range. This process allows the fabrication of optical elements for the next generation of imaging and x-ray lithography instruments in the soft x-ray region. 13 figures.

  4. Novel terahertz and nanophotonic lasers : theory, design, and fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jeong-Won

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we will explore numerical modeling and fabrication of laser sources. First, we demonstrate and distinguish experimentally the existence of special type of Fano resonances at k~~0 in a macroscopic two-dimensional ...

  5. Design, fabrication and characterisation of graphene electromechanical resonators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tao

    2015-06-29

    In this thesis, the design, fabrication and characterisation of graphene electromechanical resonators have been presented. Graphene features ultrahigh Young’s modulus and large surface to volume ratio that make it ideal ...

  6. An automated pipette puller for fabrication of glass micropipettes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamizhanban, R.; Sreejith, K. R.; Jayanth, G. R. [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Department of Instrumentation and Applied Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-05-15

    Glass micropipettes are versatile probing tools for performing micro- and nano-manipulation tasks. This paper presents the design and development of an automated pipette puller system for fabrication of glass micropipettes. The pipette puller employs a new strategy for fabrication of micropipettes that enables achieving independent control of their taper, tip diameter, and bend-angle, and also facilitates theoretical derivation of simple, approximate relationships between the pipette shape and the pulling parameters. Subsequently, the design and fabrication of the pipette puller is described, which include that of the pipette heating system, the mechanical motion stages, and the control electronics of the pipette puller. The fabricated pipette puller is experimentally evaluated to demonstrate control of the taper, tip diameter, and the bend-angle of the micropipette. Further, the dependence of the taper and tip diameter on the pulling parameters is evaluated and is shown to be in alignment with the proposed theoretical relationships.

  7. Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels and Zhaoning Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - tively large planar surfaces and provide an effective seal. Wafer bonding requires an absolutely defect-density arrays of nanofluidic channels were first fabricated using NIL. The NIL mold was generated channels on the mold generated

  8. Template-based Ferromagnetic Nanowires and Nanotubes: Fabrication and Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Zhiyuan

    2013-05-01

    This dissertation describes experimental studies of the structures and properties, and their correlations in ferromagnetic nanowires and nanotubes fabricated using porous templates. Ferromagnetic Ni and Fe nanowires with diameters 30 ~ 250 nm were...

  9. Improving Evolutionary Synthesis of MEMS through Fabrication and Testing Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Improving Evolutionary Synthesis of MEMS through Fabrication and Testing Feedback Raffi Kamalian a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) synthesis characterization study, four modifications to the objectives: MEMS, genetic algorithms, resonator design, evolutionary computer-aided design, validation. 1

  10. Fabrication and Characterization of Interpenetrating Metal/Ternary Carbide Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Liangfa

    2015-03-30

    of both the ceramics and metals, specifically metal/ternary carbide composites, hold the greatest promise to provide such multi-functionalities. These composites have not been made because of fabrication limitations. Further explorations of their multi...

  11. Feasibility of Starting a Waterjet Fabrication Plant in Amman, Jordan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Khaled A.

    2010-05-14

    This project is an attempt to investigate the feasibility of starting a waterjet fabrication plant in Amman, Jordan to precisely cut marble, granite, and ceramics. The frame work of the feasibility study included analyzing the proposed product...

  12. Design and fabrication of a multipurpose compliant nanopositioning architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panas, Robert M. (Robert Matthew)

    2013-01-01

    This research focused on generating the knowledge required to design and fabricate a high-speed application flexible, low average cost multipurpose compliant nanopositioner architecture with high performance integrated ...

  13. Fabrication of Controlled Release Devices Using Supercritical Antisolvent Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Lai Yeng

    In this study, the supercritical antisolvent with enhanced mass transfer method (SASEM) is used to fabricate micro and nanoparticles of biocompatible and biodegradable polymer PLGA (poly DL lactide co glycolic acid). This ...

  14. Update on Fabrication of Extrusions for TREAT Trade Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luther, Erik Paul; Leckie, Rafael M.; Dombrowski, David E.; Papin, Pallas A.

    2014-03-05

    This supplemental report describes fuel fabrication efforts conducted for the Idaho National Laboratory Trade Study for the TREAT Conversion project that is exploring the replacement of the HEU (Highly Enriched Uranium) fuel core of the TREAT reactor with LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel. Previous reports have documented fabrication of fuel by the “upgrade” process developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. These experiments supplement an earlier report that describes efforts to increase the graphite content of extruded fuel and minimize cracking.

  15. Electrical pulse fabrication of graphene nanopores in electrolyte solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, Aaron T.; Szalay, Tamas; Lu, Bo; Xie, Ping; Golovchenko, Jene A.

    2015-05-18

    Nanopores in graphene membranes can potentially offer unprecedented spatial resolution for single molecule sensing, but their fabrication has thus far been difficult, poorly scalable, and prone to contamination. We demonstrate an in-situ fabrication method that nucleates and controllably enlarges nanopores in electrolyte solution by applying ultra-short, high-voltage pulses across the graphene membrane. This method can be used to rapidly produce graphene nanopores with subnanometer size accuracy in an apparatus free of nanoscale beams or tips.

  16. Method of fabricating vertically aligned group III-V nanowires

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-11-25

    A top-down method of fabricating vertically aligned Group III-V micro- and nanowires uses a two-step etch process that adds a selective anisotropic wet etch after an initial plasma etch to remove the dry etch damage while enabling micro/nanowires with straight and smooth faceted sidewalls and controllable diameters independent of pitch. The method enables the fabrication of nanowire lasers, LEDs, and solar cells.

  17. Target Fabrication Facility The following gives guidance to the services and support provided by the Target Fabrication Group for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    available on the facilities. Current Target Fabrication Capabilities Thin Film Coating · Thin Film Coating Density Materials · Capabilities to produce foams and aerogels to specific requirements. Medium Rep

  18. Fibers and fabrics with insulating, water-proofing, and flame-resistant properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    2004-04-20

    Fibers, and fabrics produced from the fibers, are made water repellent, fire-retardant and/or thermally insulating by filling void spaces in the fibers and/or fabrics with a powdered material. When the powder is sufficiently finely divided, it clings tenaciously to the fabric's fibers and to itself, resisting the tendency to be removed from the fabric.

  19. 212 PHYSICS EDUCATION The editor welcomes letters, by e-mail to ped@iop.org or by post to Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planin?iè, Gorazd

    to Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. March 2004 A trial of two energies One controversy above Nuffield-inspired imaginative physics teaching also led to what has been described as the `kinetic energy debacle'. This letter sets out what I believe to be the most appropriate approach to teaching about energy

  20. Courses: Hutchins School of Liberal Studies (LIBS) Page 331Sonoma State University 2015-2016 Catalog LiBS 204 MinoritieS in AMeriCAn CineMA (4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    -2016 Catalog LiBS 204 MinoritieS in AMeriCAn CineMA (4) This course is designed to examine the fundamental will be the representations of racial minorities in American cinema from the beginning of the 20th century up to the present cinemas. We will supplement our inquiry through related works of literature and drama, in addition

  1. Ronald J. Chase received the B.S. in Electrical Engineering and M.S. in Physics from the University of Maryland in 1970 and 1975, and a Professional degree in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    (AAPT), Mathematical Association of America (MAA), American Physical Society (APS), Amateur Radio RelayRonald J. Chase received the B.S. in Electrical Engineering and M.S. in Physics from the University and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), American Institute of Physics (AIP), American Association of Physics Teachers

  2. SEIK WENG NG 183 C14A--SIA---CI5A 103.8 (!) CI4B--S1B----C15B 103.4 (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    SEIK WENG NG 183 C14A--SIA---CI5A 103.8 (!) CI4B--S1B----C15B 103.4 (1) CI4A--S3A---4218A 101.8 (1. (1955). Nature (London), 176, 308-310. Ng, S. W. (1992). J. Crystallogr. Spectrosc. Res. 22, 615-618. Ng

  3. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  4. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  5. Surface Micromachine Microfluidics: Design, Fabrication, Packaging, and Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambos, Paul; Eaton, William P.; Shul, Randy; Willison, Christi Gober; Sniegowski, Jeffrey J.; Miller, Samuel L.; Guttierez, Daniel

    1999-06-30

    The field of microfluidics is undergoing rapid growth in terms of new device and system development. Among the many methods of fabricating microfluidic devices and systems, surface micromachining is relatively underrepresented due to difficulties in the introduction of fluids into the very small channels produced, packaging problems, and difficulties in device and system characterization. The potential advantages of using surface micromachining including compatibility with the existing integrated circuit tool set, integration of electronic sensing and actuation with microfluidics, and fluid volume minimization. In order to explore these potential advantages we have developed first generation surface micromachined microfluidic devices (channels) using an adapted pressure sensor fabrication process to produce silicon nitride channels, and the SUMMiT process to produce polysilicon channels. The channels were characterized by leak testing and flow rate vs. pressure measurements. The fabrication processes used and results of these tests are reported in this paper.

  6. Preliminary safety assessment for an IFE target fabrication facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Besenbruch, G E; Goodin, D T

    2000-10-13

    We estimate possible ranges of tritium inventories for an inertial fusion energy (IFE) target fabrication facility producing various types of targets and using various production technologies. Target fill is the key subtask in determining the overall tritium inventory for the plant. By segmenting the inventory into multiple, parallel production lines--each with its own fill canister--and including an expansion tank to limit releases, we are able to ensure that a target fabrication facility would meet the accident dose goals of 10 mSv (1 rem) set forth in the Department of Energy's Fusion Safety Standards. For indirect-drive targets, we calculate release fractions for elements from lithium to bismuth and show that nearly all elements meet the dose goal. Our work suggests directions for future R&D that will help reduce total tritium inventories and increase the flexibility of target fabrication facilities.

  7. Energy conservation in electrostatic fabric filtration of industrial dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ariman, T.

    1981-12-01

    Conservation in energy consumption in industrial fabric filtration systems has become very important due to the substantial increase in energy costs. Recently, an external electric field was utilized in the industrial dust control by fabric filters with very promising initial results. A substantial decrease in the pressure drop and an increase in collection efficiency were observed. The detailed outcome of the experimental research program in electrostatic fabric filtration was presented. The results show that pressure drop decreases substantially with the increased electrostatic field strength for all relevant parameters. Furthermore, the data of the experimental program was utilized to develop a semi-empirical model for the determination of the pressure drop and to establish an Energy-Optimized Design Criteria.

  8. Coated U(Mo) Fuel: As-Fabricated Microstructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emmanuel Perez; Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Ann Leenaers; Sven Van den Berghe; Tom Wiencek

    2014-04-01

    As part of the development of low-enriched uranium fuels, fuel plates have recently been tested in the BR-2 reactor as part of the SELENIUM experiment. These fuel plates contained fuel particles with either Si or ZrN thin film coating (up to 1 µm thickness) around the U-7Mo fuel particles. In order to best understand irradiation performance, it is important to determine the starting microstructure that can be observed in as-fabricated fuel plates. To this end, detailed microstructural characterization was performed on ZrN and Si-coated U-7Mo powder in samples taken from AA6061-clad fuel plates fabricated at 500°C. Of interest was the condition of the thin film coatings after fabrication at a relatively high temperature. Both scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed. The ZrN thin film coating was observed to consist of columns comprised of very fine ZrN grains. Relatively large amounts of porosity could be found in some areas of the thin film, along with an enrichment of oxygen around each of the the ZrN columns. In the case of the pure Si thin film coating sample, a (U,Mo,Al,Si) interaction layer was observed around the U-7Mo particles. Apparently, the Si reacted with the U-7Mo and Al matrix during fuel plate fabrication at 500°C to form this layer. The microstructure of the formed layer is very similar to those that form in U-7Mo versus Al-Si alloy diffusion couples annealed at higher temperatures and as-fabricated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates with Al-Si alloy matrix fabricated at 500°C.

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  10. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, Fred (Livermore, CA); Truher, Joel B. (San Rafael, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-02-03

    A method for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells.

  11. Greenfield Alternative Study LEU-Mo Fuel Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Division of URS

    2008-07-01

    This report provides the initial “first look” of the design of the Greenfield Alternative of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC); a facility to be built at a Greenfield DOE National Laboratory site. The FFC is designed to fabricate LEU-Mo monolithic fuel for the 5 US High Performance Research Reactors (HPRRs). This report provides a pre-conceptual design of the site, facility, process and equipment systems of the FFC; along with a preliminary hazards evaluation, risk assessment as well as the ROM cost and schedule estimate.

  12. Fabrication of polycrystalline thin films by pulsed laser processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitlitsky, F.; Truher, J.B.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Colella, N.J.

    1998-02-03

    A method is disclosed for fabricating polycrystalline thin films on low-temperature (or high-temperature) substrates which uses processing temperatures that are low enough to avoid damage to the substrate, and then transiently heating select layers of the thin films with at least one pulse of a laser or other homogenized beam source. The pulse length is selected so that the layers of interest are transiently heated to a temperature which allows recrystallization and/or dopant activation while maintaining the substrate at a temperature which is sufficiently low to avoid damage to the substrate. This method is particularly applicable in the fabrication of solar cells. 1 fig.

  13. Method of freeform fabrication by selective gelation of powder suspensions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baskaran, S.; Graff, G.L.

    1997-12-09

    The present invention is a novel method for freeform fabrication. Specifically, the method of solid freeform fabrication has the steps of: (a) preparing a slurry by mixing powder particles with a suspension medium and a gelling polysaccharide; (b) making a layer by depositing an amount of said powder slurry in a confined region; (c) hardening a selected portion of the layer by applying a gelling agent to the selected portion; and (d) repeating steps (b) and (c) to make successive layers and forming a layered object. In many applications, it is desirable to remove unhardened material followed by heating to remove gellable polysaccharide then sintering. 2 figs.

  14. Being the Machine: Reconfiguring Agency and Control in Hybrid Fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    in building 3D models from everyday materials by following instructions typically given to 3D printers. Technically, the system uses a single laser point to communicate the position of a 3D printer head. Much like of makers. Author Keywords Hybrid fabrication; art; 3D printing; everyday materials. ACM Classification

  15. A Reconfigurable Fabric for Accelerating Large-Scale Datacenter Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauck, Scott

    A Reconfigurable Fabric for Accelerating Large-Scale Datacenter Services Andrew Putnam, Adrian M, Doug Burger Abstract To advance datacenter capabilities beyond what commodity server designs can,632 servers and FPGAs in a production datacenter and successfully used to accelerate the ranking portion

  16. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2013-05-17

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  17. RESEARCH PAPER Fabrication and characterization of iron oxide nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, John Zhanhu

    stirring for the micron-sized iron oxide particles filled PPy composite fabrication. Keywords Polymer Nanomanufacturing Introduction Polypyrrole (PPy), a conducting conjugated polymer, has attracted much interest due). The conductivity of a conductive polymer is strongly dependent on the doping agents (dopant) with electron donor

  18. EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Todd J.

    1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques Dr. Todd J. Kaiser - Bozeman Screen Printed Solar Cells · Starting wafer is about 0.5 mm thick and 10 x 10 cm2. The wafer is p-type and lightly doped with Boron (1016/cm3) 2 Screen Printed Solar Cells · Saw Damage Etch ­ The starting wafer

  19. DIELECTRIC RESONATOR FABRICATION AND ASSEMBLY METHODS FOR TERAHERTZ METAMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    DIELECTRIC RESONATOR FABRICATION AND ASSEMBLY METHODS FOR TERAHERTZ METAMATERIALS BY JAMES MARK AND ASSEMBLY METHODS FOR TERAHERTZ METAMATERIALS BY JAMES MARK LELAND CRAMER ABSTRACT OF A DISSERTATION was the design and manufacture of a negative index of refraction metamaterial having an isotropic negative

  20. Behind the Scenes at Berkeley Lab - The Mechanical Fabrication Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wells, Russell; Chavez, Pete; Davis, Curtis; Bentley, Brian

    2014-09-15

    Part of the Behind the Scenes series at Berkeley Lab, this video highlights the lab's mechanical fabrication facility and its exceptional ability to produce unique tools essential to the lab's scientific mission. Through a combination of skilled craftsmanship and precision equipment, machinists and engineers work with scientists to create exactly what's needed - whether it's measured in microns or meters.

  1. Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1999-11-13

    Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

  2. Design, Fabrication and Measurement of Integrated Bragg Grating Optical Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Thomas E.

    by . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Deparment Committee on Graduate Students #12;#12;Design, Fabrication. The goal of a Ph.D. program is not only to accomplish spe- cific research goals but also to train one professors, the role of academic adviser unfortunately entails little more than signing forms and reminding

  3. Optically Fabricated Three Dimensional Nanofluidic Mixers for Microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    ) completely fill the cross section of a microfluidic channel. These 3D structures enhance mixing even at small technique for fabricating complex, but well defined, three-dimensional (3D) networks of nanoscale flow paths studies of microfluidic devices that incorporate 3D nanostructures formed using this approach show

  4. Focused Ion Beam Fabricated Non-equilibrium Superconducting Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moseley, Richard William

    . This work concentrates on the use of an FIB instrument for making superconducting devices. It is shown for the first time that planar-bridge (Nb/Cu/Nb) Superconductor/Normalmetal/ Superconductor (SNS) junctions can be reliably fabricated using a standard...

  5. Fukushima, chronique d'un dsastre Fabrice Flipo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Fukushima, chronique d'un désastre Fabrice Flipo A propos de : Les sanctuaires de l'abîme ­ chronique du désastre de Fukushima, Nadine et Thierry Ribault, Éditions de l'Encyclopédie des Nuisances. Ils montrent que Fukushima peut être regardé comme un exemple de démonstration des limites atteintes

  6. ARIES-CS COIL STRUCTURE ADVANCED FABRICATION APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    stellarator concept should result in a fusion power plant with lower capital costs that retains the attractive ~lower capital costs!. Fabrication of the coils and coil structures is one of the more costly elements- tiveness of any power plant is its capital cost. The prem- ise for this study is that a more compact

  7. Utilizing Metalized Fabrics for Liquid and Rip Detection and Localization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, Stephen; Mahan, Cody; Kuhn, Michael J; Rowe, Nathan C

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel technique for utilizing conductive textiles as a distributed sensor for detecting and localizing liquids (e.g., blood), rips (e.g., bullet holes), and potentially biosignals. The proposed technique is verified through both simulation and experimental measurements. Circuit theory is utilized to depict conductive fabric as a bounded, near-infinite grid of resistors. Solutions to the well-known infinite resistance grid problem are used to confirm the accuracy and validity of this modeling approach. Simulations allow for discontinuities to be placed within the resistor matrix to illustrate the effects of bullet holes within the fabric. A real-time experimental system was developed that uses a multiplexed Wheatstone bridge approach to reconstruct the resistor grid across the conductive fabric and detect liquids and rips. The resistor grid model is validated through a comparison of simulated and experimental results. Results suggest accuracy proportional to the electrode spacing in determining the presence and location of discontinuities in conductive fabric samples. Future work is focused on refining the experimental system to provide more accuracy in detecting and localizing events as well as developing a complete prototype that can be deployed for field testing. Potential applications include intelligent clothing, flexible, lightweight sensing systems, and combat wound detection.

  8. Thin film solar cell configuration and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Menezes, Shalini

    2009-07-14

    A new photovoltaic device configuration based on an n-copper indium selenide absorber and a p-type window is disclosed. A fabrication method to produce this device on flexible or rigid substrates is described that reduces the number of cell components, avoids hazardous materials, simplifies the process steps and hence the costs for high volume solar cell manufacturing.

  9. Knit architecture : low tech fabrication techniques in modern design : thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mennel, Kimberly I. (Kimberly Irene)

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to bring the handicraft of knitting into the realm of architecture as a low-tech means of fabrication in a world of high-tech design. This thesis attempts to break knitting down into its most essential ...

  10. Design and Fabrication of a MEMS Capacitive Chemical Sensor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    Design and Fabrication of a MEMS Capacitive Chemical Sensor System Vishal Saxena, Todd J. Plum-- This paper describes the development of a MEMS sensor system to detect volatile compounds. The sensor consists of a MEMS capacitive sensor element monolithically integrated with a sensing circuit. The sensor

  11. Fabrication of asymmetrically coated colloid particles by microcontact printing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    Janus particles,4 non-spherical shaped ``acorn'' particles5,6 and unsymmetrical 3D macromoleculesFabrication of asymmetrically coated colloid particles by microcontact printing techniques Olivier particles by using a microcontact printing technique. Films of water-insoluble ionic surfactants deposited

  12. Biomaterials 26 (2005) 35113519 Fabrication and biocompatibility of polypyrrole implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sur, Mriganka

    2005-01-01

    Biomaterials 26 (2005) 3511­3519 Fabrication and biocompatibility of polypyrrole implants suitable www.elsevier.com/locate/biomaterials 0142-9612/$ - see front matter r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.biomaterials.2004.09.037 ÃCorresponding authors. Division of Biological Engineering

  13. Buffered Crossbar Fabrics Based on Networks on Chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    switching architecture where the buffered crossbar fabric is designed using a Network on Chip (NoC). Instead the switch inputs to its outputs. This results in long delays and consumes high power to drive these wires. In this paper, we propose a novel design for the CICQ switch architecture. Instead of using a dedicated internal

  14. Controlling self-assembly within nanospace for peptide nanoparticle fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chau, Ying

    ,5 Moreover, short peptide building blocks can be designed to enable a bottom-up construction of smart provide natural building blocks for the fabrication of well-ordered structures and advanced materials.4 simultaneously be obtained from the same building blocks.9 Different nanostructure morphologies are desired

  15. Author's personal copy Perforated diode neutron detector modules fabricated from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Author's personal copy Perforated diode neutron detector modules fabricated from high Perforated detectors Perforated diodes a b s t r a c t Compact neutron detectors are being designed that are mass produced from high-purity Si wafers. Each detector has thousands of circular perforations etched

  16. Photonic crystals Fabrication of Tunable Spherical Colloidal Crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Photonic crystals Fabrication of Tunable Spherical Colloidal Crystals Immobilized in Soft Hydrogels** Toshimitsu Kanai, Daeyeon Lee, Ho Cheung Shum, and David A. Weitz* Spherical colloidal crystals are three as photonic crystals in the optical regime.[2] In contrast to conventional film-type colloidal crystals where

  17. NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Hooman

    , such as photonic band-gap materials, high dense data storage, and photonic devices. We have developed a maskless areas, such as photonic band-gap materials [1], high dense data storage [2], and photonic devices [3NANO EXPRESS Fabrication of Large Area Periodic Nanostructures Using Nanosphere Photolithography

  18. Fabrication of High Efficiency, Printable Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    design of OLED: Transparent Anode--ITO Glass substrate Organic layer(s) Metal Cathode Light #12;PRISMFabrication of High Efficiency, Printable Organic Light Emitting Diodes Michael AdamsMichael Adams: Design, fabricate, and characterize high efficiency OLEDs · Introduction · Background on OLEDs · Methods

  19. Nano-fabricated superconducting radio-frequency composites, method for producing nano-fabricated superconducting rf composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norem, James H.; Pellin, Michael J.

    2013-06-11

    Superconducting rf is limited by a wide range of failure mechanisms inherent in the typical manufacture methods. This invention provides a method for fabricating superconducting rf structures comprising coating the structures with single atomic-layer thick films of alternating chemical composition. Also provided is a cavity defining the invented laminate structure.

  20. Fabrication and applications of sub-micron 2D and 3D periodic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fabrication and applications of sub-micron 2D and 3D periodic carbon structures. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fabrication and applications of sub-micron 2D and 3D...

  1. Protocol for the fabrication of enzymatically crosslinked gelatin microchannels for microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, David J.

    Protocol for the fabrication of enzymatically crosslinked gelatin microchannels for microfluidic.256 We have developed a technique for fabricating microfluidic devices from gelatin using a natural, gelatin can be molded into microchannel geometries. The gelatin is crosslinked with the naturally

  2. Fabrication and Performance of Silicon-Embedded Permanent-Magnet Microgenerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrault, Florian

    This paper focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of silicon-packaged permanent-magnet (PM) microgenerators. The use of silicon packaging favors fine control on shape and dimensions in batch fabrication ...

  3. Fabrication and Characterization of Semiconductor Ion Traps for Quantum Information Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Christopher

    the cleanroom to fabricate ion traps in collaboration with Keith Schwab. His frequent fabrication advice memories of my time spent at LPS not just from the draining but strangely satisfying cleanroom work

  4. Constitutive Behavior of a Twaron® Fabric/Natural Rubber Composite: Experiments and Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natarajan, Valliyappan D.

    2011-02-22

    Ballistic fabrics made from high performance polymeric fibers such as Kevlar®, Twaron® and Spectra® fibers and composites utilizing these fabrics are among the leading materials for modern body armor systems. Polymeric ...

  5. Augmented manual fabrication methods for 2D tool positioning and 3D sculpting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivers, Alec (Alec Rothmyer)

    2013-01-01

    Augmented manual fabrication involves using digital technology to assist a user engaged in a manual fabrication task. Methods in this space aim to combine the abilities of a human operator, such as motion planning and ...

  6. Renaissance robotics : novel applications of multipurpose robotic arms spanning design fabrication, utility, and art

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keating, Steven J. (Steven John)

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates, defines, and expands on the use of robotic arms in digital fabrication, design, and art through methods including 3D printing, milling, sculpting, functionally graded fabrication, construction-scale ...

  7. Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709® Fabrics: A Parametric Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, Sireesha

    2011-10-21

    The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709® plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

  8. Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to Measure Tritium...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to Measure Tritium Release and Speciation from LiAlO2 and LiAlO2Zr Cermets Design and Fabrication of In-Reactor Experiment to...

  9. Fabrication of complex oral drug delivery forms by Three Dimensional Printing (tm)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katstra, Wendy E. (Wendy Ellen), 1974-

    2001-01-01

    Three Dimensional Printing 3DPTM is a novel solid freeform fabrication technology that has been applied to the fabrication of complex pharmaceutical drug devices. Limitations of the technology as relating to pharmaceuticals ...

  10. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D.; Waldhauer, Ann

    2015-08-18

    Method of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  11. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David; Waldhauer, Ann

    2012-12-18

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  12. Method of fabricating a solar cell with a tunnel dielectric layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dennis, Tim; Harrington, Scott; Manning, Jane; Smith, David D; Waldhauer, Ann

    2014-04-29

    Methods of fabricating solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are described. Solar cells with tunnel dielectric layers are also described.

  13. Process development for the fabrication of light emitting vacuum field emission triodes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roger T.

    1994-01-01

    . Light emitting diodes and triodes are also fabricated to address the feasibility of their application to flat panel displays....

  14. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous Sintered TieAg Compacts for Biomedical Application Purpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yufeng

    with different Ag content were fabricated by powder metallurgy. The associated hydrothermal treatment with a low Young's modulus were fabricated, by using a special powder metallurgy method[29À31] . In this work TieAg compacts with Ag content of 0%, 1%, 3% and 5% were fabricated by metallurgy process. Ti powder

  15. Stress and fabric for polydisperse, frictionless, dense 2D granular media , S. M. Peyghoon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luding, Stefan

    Stress and fabric for polydisperse, frictionless, dense 2D granular media M. Madadi , S. M For fabric and stress tensor, correlations of microscopic quantities are studied and the influence show that fabric and stress can be factorized into products of some averaged quantities (like

  16. Photodeposition Method For Fabricating A Three-Dimensional, Patterned Polymer Microstructure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walt, David R. (Lexington, MA); Healey, Brian G. (Sommerville, MA)

    2001-03-13

    The present invention is a photodeposition methodology for fabricating a three-dimensional patterned polymer microstructure. A variety of polymeric structures can be fabricated on solid substrates using unitary fiber optic arrays for light delivery. The methodology allows micrometer-scale photopatterning for the fabricated structures using masks substantially larger than the desired dimensions of the microstructure.

  17. Method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Sweatt, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26

    A method to fabricate a tilted logpile photonic crystal requires only two lithographic exposures and does not require mask repositioning between exposures. The mask and photoresist-coated substrate are spaced a fixed and constant distance apart using a spacer and the stack is clamped together. The stack is then tilted at a crystallographic symmetry angle (e.g., 45 degrees) relative to the X-ray beam and rotated about the surface normal until the mask is aligned with the X-ray beam. The stack is then rotated in plane by a small stitching angle and exposed to the X-ray beam to pattern the first half of the structure. The stack is then rotated by 180.degree. about the normal and a second exposure patterns the remaining half of the structure. The method can use commercially available DXRL scanner technology and LIGA processes to fabricate large-area, high-quality tilted logpile photonic crystals.

  18. Chemical Fabrication of Heterometallic Nanogaps for Molecular Transport Junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Yeganeh, Sina; Qin, Lidong; Li, Shuzhou; Xue, Can; Braunschweig, Adam B.; Schatz, George C.; Ratner, Mark A.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2009-01-01

    We report a simple and reproducible method for fabricating heterometallic nanogaps, which are made of two different metal nanorods separated by a nanometer-sized gap. The method is based upon on-wire lithography, which is a chemically enabled technique used to synthesize a wide variety of nanowire-based structures (e.g., nanogaps and disk arrays). This method can be used to fabricate pairs of metallic electrodes, which exhibit distinct work functions and are separated by gaps as small as 2 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a symmetric thiol-terminated molecule can be assembled into such heterometallic nanogaps to form molecular transport junctions (MTJs) that exhibit molecular diode behavior. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the coupling strength between gold and sulfur (Au-S) is 2.5 times stronger than that of Pt-S. In addition, the structures form Raman hot spots in the gap, allowing the spectroscopic characterization of the molecules that make up the MTJs.

  19. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1996-06-11

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined. 4 figs.

  20. Intermetallic alloy welding wires and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Welding wires for welding together intermetallic alloys of nickel aluminides, nickel-iron aluminides, iron aluminides, or titanium aluminides, and preferably including additional alloying constituents are fabricated as two-component, clad structures in which one component contains the primary alloying constituent(s) except for aluminum and the other component contains the aluminum constituent. This two-component approach for fabricating the welding wire overcomes the difficulties associated with mechanically forming welding wires from intermetallic alloys which possess high strength and limited ductilities at elevated temperatures normally employed in conventional metal working processes. The composition of the clad welding wires is readily tailored so that the welding wire composition when melted will form an alloy defined by the weld deposit which substantially corresponds to the composition of the intermetallic alloy being joined.

  1. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1995-05-09

    A high performance capacitor is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The notepad capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  2. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Johnson, G.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-01-23

    A high performance capacitor is described which is fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a ``notepad`` configuration composed of 200--300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The ``notepad`` capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density. 5 figs.

  3. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  4. Fabrication of large area Si cylindric drift detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, W.; Kraner, H.W.; Li, Z.; Rehak, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Hess, F. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Physics

    1993-04-01

    Advanced Si drift detector, a large area cylindrical drift detector (CDD), processing steps, with the exception of the ion implantation, were carried out in the BNL class 100 cleanroom. The double-side planer process technique was developed for the fabrication of CDD. Important improvements of the double-side planer process in this fabrication are the introduction of Al implantation protection mask and the remaining of a 1000 Angstroms oxide layer in the p-window during the implantation. Another important design of the CDD is the structure called ``river,`` which ,allows the current generated on Si-SiO{sub 2} interface to ``flow`` into the guard anode, and thus can minimize the leakage current at the signed anode. The test result showed that most of the signal anodes have the leakage current about 0.3 nA/cm{sup 2} for the best detector.

  5. Boron containing multilayer coatings and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Hard coatings are fabricated from multilayer boron/boron carbide, boron carbide/cubic boron nitride, and boron/boron nitride/boron carbide, and the fabrication thereof involves magnetron sputtering in a selected atmosphere. These hard coatings may be applied to tools and engine and other parts, as well to reduce wear on tribological surfaces and electronic devices. These boron coatings contain no morphological growth features. For example, the boron and boron carbide used in forming the multilayers are formed in an inert (e.g. argon) atmosphere, while the cubic boron nitride is formed in a reactive (e.g. nitrogen) atmosphere. The multilayer boron/boron carbide, and boron carbide/cubic boron nitride is produced by depositing alternate layers of boron, cubic boron nitride or boron carbide, with the alternate layers having a thickness of 1 nanometer to 1 micrometer, and at least the interfaces of the layers may be of a discrete or a blended or graded composition.

  6. Optical systems fabricated by printing-based assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, John (Champaign, IL); Nuzzo, Ralph (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Durham, NC); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC); Baca, Alfred J. (Urbana, IL); Motala, Michael (Champaign, IL); Ahn, Jong-Hyun (Suwon, KR); Park, Sang-II (Savoy, IL); Yu; Chang-Jae (Urbana, IL); Ko, Heung-Cho (Gwangju, KR); Stoykovich; Mark (Dover, NH); Yoon, Jongseung (Urbana, IL)

    2011-07-05

    Provided are optical devices and systems fabricated, at least in part, via printing-based assembly and integration of device components. In specific embodiments the present invention provides light emitting systems, light collecting systems, light sensing systems and photovoltaic systems comprising printable semiconductor elements, including large area, high performance macroelectronic devices. Optical systems of the present invention comprise semiconductor elements assembled, organized and/or integrated with other device components via printing techniques that exhibit performance characteristics and functionality comparable to single crystalline semiconductor based devices fabricated using conventional high temperature processing methods. Optical systems of the present invention have device geometries and configurations, such as form factors, component densities, and component positions, accessed by printing that provide a range of useful device functionalities. Optical systems of the present invention include devices and device arrays exhibiting a range of useful physical and mechanical properties including flexibility, shapeability, conformability and stretchablity.

  7. Optical systems fabricated by printing-based assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John; Nuzzo, Ralph; Meitl, Matthew; Menard, Etienne; Baca, Alfred J; Motala, Michael; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Park, Sang-Il; Yu, Chang-Jae; Ko, Heung Cho; Stoykovich, Mark; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-05-13

    Provided are optical devices and systems fabricated, at least in part, via printing-based assembly and integration of device components. In specific embodiments the present invention provides light emitting systems, light collecting systems, light sensing systems and photovoltaic systems comprising printable semiconductor elements, including large area, high performance macroelectronic devices. Optical systems of the present invention comprise semiconductor elements assembled, organized and/or integrated with other device components via printing techniques that exhibit performance characteristics and functionality comparable to single crystalline semiconductor based devices fabricated using conventional high temperature processing methods. Optical systems of the present invention have device geometries and configurations, such as form factors, component densities, and component positions, accessed by printing that provide a range of useful device functionalities. Optical systems of the present invention include devices and device arrays exhibiting a range of useful physical and mechanical properties including flexibility, shapeability, conformability and stretchablity.

  8. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Davidson, Howard L. (San Carlos, CA); Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  9. Inverter-based GTA welding machines improve fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammons, M.

    2000-05-01

    While known as precision process, many fabricators using the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process fight several common problems that hinder quality, slow production, frustrate the operator and otherwise prevent the process from achieving its full potential. These include a limited ability to tailor the weld bead profile, poor control of the arc direction and arc wandering, poor arc starting, unstable or inconsistent arcs in the AC mode, high-frequency interference with electronics and tungsten contamination. Fortunately, new GTA welding technology--made possible by advances with inverter-based power sources and micro-processor controls--can eliminate common productivity gremlins. Further, new AC/DC inverter-based GTA power sources provide advanced arc shaping capabilities. As a result, many fabricators adopting this new technology have experienced phenomenal production increases, taken on new types of projects and reduced costs. Most importantly, the operators enjoy welding more.

  10. Modelling and fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, A.; Smith, A.W.; Salami, J.

    1991-10-01

    This report covers the research conducted on modelling and development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells during the period May 1989 to August 1990. First, considerable effort was devoted toward developing a ray-tracing program for the photovoltaic community to quantify and optimize surface texturing for solar cells. Second, attempts were made to develop a hydrodynamic model for device simulation. Such a model is somewhat slower than drift-diffusion type models like PC-1D, but it can account for more physical phenomena in the device, such as hot carrier effects, temperature gradients, thermal diffusion, and lattice heat flow. In addition, Fermi-Dirac statistics have been incorporated into the model to deal with heavy doping effects more accurately. Third and final component of the research includes development of silicon cell fabrication capabilities and fabrication of high-efficiency silicon cells. 84 refs., 46 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  12. Method of electrode fabrication for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Russell R. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01

    A process for fabricating cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells by sintering is disclosed. First, a porous metal electrode is fabricated on a solid oxide cell, such as a fuel cell by, for example, sintering, and is then infiltrated with a high volume fraction stabilized zirconia suspension. A second sintering step is used to sinter the infiltrated zirconia to a high density in order to more securely attach the electrode to the solid oxide electrolyte of the cell. High performance fuel electrodes can be obtained with this process. Further electrode performance enhancement may be achieved if stabilized zirconia doped with cerium oxide, chromium oxide, titanium oxide, and/or praseodymium oxide for electronic conduction is used.

  13. Method of electrode fabrication for solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.R.

    1990-11-20

    A process for fabricating cermet electrodes for solid oxide electrochemical cells by sintering is disclosed. First, a porous metal electrode is fabricated on a solid oxide cell, such as a fuel cell by, for example, sintering, and is then infiltrated with a high volume fraction stabilized zirconia suspension. A second sintering step is used to sinter the infiltrated zirconia to a high density in order to more securely attach the electrode to the solid oxide electrolyte of the cell. High performance fuel electrodes can be obtained with this process. Further electrode performance enhancement may be achieved if stabilized zirconia doped with cerium oxide, chromium oxide, titanium oxide, and/or praseodymium oxide for electronic conduction is used. 5 figs.

  14. A solar module fabrication process for HALE solar electric UAVs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, P.G.; Aceves, R.C.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.; Sinton, R.A.; Glenn, G.S.

    1994-12-12

    We describe a fabrication process used to manufacture high power-to-weight-ratio flexible solar array modules for use on high-altitude-long-endurance (HALE) solar-electric unmanned air vehicles (UAVs). These modules have achieved power-to-weight ratios of 315 and 396 W/kg for 150{mu}m-thick monofacial and 110{mu}m-thick bifacial silicon solar cells, respectively. These calculations reflect average module efficiencies of 15.3% (150{mu}m) and 14.7% (110{mu}m) obtained from electrical tests performed by Spectrolab, Inc. under AMO global conditions at 25{degrees}C, and include weight contributions from all module components (solar cells, lamination material, bypass diodes, interconnect wires, and adhesive tape used to attach the modules to the wing). The fabrication, testing, and performance of 32 m{sup 2} of these modules will be described.

  15. High performance capacitors using nano-structure multilayer materials fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palo Alto, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A high performance capacitor fabricated from nano-structure multilayer materials, such as by controlled, reactive sputtering, and having very high energy-density, high specific energy and high voltage breakdown. The multilayer capacitors, for example, may be fabricated in a "notepad" configuration composed of 200-300 alternating layers of conductive and dielectric materials so as to have a thickness of 1 mm, width of 200 mm, and length of 300 mm, with terminals at each end of the layers suitable for brazing, thereby guaranteeing low contact resistance and high durability. The "notepad" capacitors may be stacked in single or multiple rows (series-parallel banks) to increase the voltage and energy density.

  16. Method for fabricating photovoltaic device having improved short wavelength photoresponse

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Catalano, Anthony W. (P.O. Box 557, Rushland, PA 18956)

    1989-07-04

    Amorphous p-i-n silicon photovoltaic cells with improved short wavelength photoresponse are fabricated with reduced p-dopant contamination at the p/i interface. Residual p-dopants are removed by flushing the deposition chamber with a gaseous mixture capable of reacting with excess doping contaminants prior to the deposition of the i-layer and subsequent to the deposition of the p-layer.

  17. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2014-03-04

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  18. Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

  19. Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chern, T.S.; MacFadden, K.O.; Johnson, S.L.

    1997-12-16

    A process is described for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.

  20. Fabrication methods for low impedance lithium polymer electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chern, Terry Song-Hsing (Midlothian, VA); MacFadden, Kenneth Orville (Highland, MD); Johnson, Steven Lloyd (Arbutus, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A process for fabricating an electrolyte-electrode composite suitable for high energy alkali metal battery that includes mixing composite electrode materials with excess liquid, such as ethylene carbonate or propylene carbonate, to produce an initial formulation, and forming a shaped electrode therefrom. The excess liquid is then removed from the electrode to compact the electrode composite which can be further compacted by compression. The resulting electrode exhibits at least a 75% lower resistance.