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Sample records for bruce braine vice

  1. Bruce Hicks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bruce is the sole proprietor of MetCorps, which provides consulting services to several agencies on issues related to the ways in which components of the environment interact.He retired in 2006...

  2. BRUCE MARTIN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BRUCE MARTIN Bruce Martin was appointed in December 2014 as the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) for the U. S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. He is responsible for all aspects of financial management, including the execution of procedures, policies, and programs related to budgeting, accounting, financial review and analysis, and internal controls. In addition, Mr. Martin has administrative responsibility for monitoring and assessing contractor financial

  3. Edward Bruce Held

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Edward Bruce Held is the Acting Administrator and Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security and the former Director of the Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence.

  4. Mr. Bruce Camden

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Bruce Camden Manager of Engineering Jessop Steel 500 Green Street Washington, Pennsylvania 15301 DeprMr. Camden: At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DDE), Oak Ridge ...

  5. Bruce Stockmeier | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Stockmeier ES&H/User Safety Coordinator Telephone (630) 252-9394 E-mail bcs@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Stockmeier, Bruce - Bio.pdf

  6. Presentation by Bruce Edelston Vice President, Energy Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in power system asset replacement; connecting new sources of electricity to demand centers; upgrading for resilience, efficiency and consumer choice; and reducing carbon and other ...

  7. Bruce Brunschwig - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce brunschwig Principal Investigator Email: bsb@caltech.edu Dr. Brunschwig's research interests include: investigating methods to convert sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide to chemical fuels for artificial photosynthesis; materials characterization of semiconductor, semiconductor photoelectrodes, and solid state catalysts; passivation of semiconductor surfaces; interfacing of catalysts to semiconductor surfaces; studies of homogeneous and heterogeneous thermal and photoinduced

  8. Bruce LeBlanc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce LeBlanc - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  9. Bruce Diamond | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bruce Diamond General Counsel Bruce Diamond Bruce Diamond became the General Counsel for the NNSA in February, 2011. Before that, Bruce was DOE Assistant General Counsel for Environment, the senior career environmental attorney for the Department dealing principally with complex issues regarding the clean-up of the nuclear complex and implementation of National Environmental Policy Act obligations. In addition, he was responsible for addressing health and safety issues. Previously, he was a

  10. Bruce E Koel | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Diamond General Counsel Bruce Diamond Bruce Diamond became the General Counsel for the NNSA in February, 2011. Before that, Bruce was DOE Assistant General Counsel for Environment, the senior career environmental attorney for the Department dealing principally with complex issues regarding the clean-up of the nuclear complex and implementation of National Environmental Policy Act obligations. In addition, he was responsible for addressing health and safety issues. Previously, he was a

  11. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9-A Bruce Power Inc. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Order authorizing Bruce Power to export electric energy to Canada. EA-349-A Bruce Power.pdf (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5, 2014

  12. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A Bruce Power Inc. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Order authorizing Bruce Power to export electric energy to Canada. EA-349-A Bruce Power.pdf (1.08 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5, 2014

  13. AEP Climate Change Strategy Bruce Braine

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mountaineer Plant - New Haven, WV Northeastern Plant - Oologah, OK 2 CoalLignite 67% Nat. GasOil ... Demonstrations of CCS at Large Coal-Fired Power Plants National Standards ...

  14. EA-349 Bruce Power, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Power, Inc to export electric energy to Canada PDF icon EA-349 Bruce Power, Inc. More Documents & Publications Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce ...

  15. Meet CMI Researcher Bruce Moyer | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce Moyer CMI focus area leader Bruce Moyer plays a saxaphone. CMI researcher Bruce Moyer is the lead of Focus Area 1, Diversifying Supply. In this role, he oversees projects that will expand the variety of source materials, increase processing efficiency, and find new uses for the abundant non-critical rare earths. To accomplish this task, Bruce draws upon his 34 years of experience in the field of separation science and technology, specializing in both fundamental and applied aspects of

  16. Bruce Held, acting administrator for the National Nuclear Security Administratio

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Bruce Held Announces Retirement After Nearly 40 Years of Public Service Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 2:18pm Bruce Held Retirement After nearly four decades of public service, Bruce Held, Department of Energy's Associate Deputy Secretary, announces retirement from federal govenrment. In July 2013 and with President Obama's approval, Held stepped in to serve as the Acting Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator. He provided

  17. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc Application from Bruce Power Inc to export...

  18. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc. | Department of Energy Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application from Bruce Power to export electric energy to Canada. EA-349-A Bruce Power.pdf (508.39 KB) More Documents & Publications EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5

  19. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc Application from Bruce Power Inc to export electric energy to Canada. Application to export electric energy OE Docket No. EA-349 Bruce Power Inc (1.66 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-349 Bruce Power, Inc. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc.

  20. VBD-0063- In the Matter of Bruce R. Field

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This determination will consider a Motion for Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) by Bruce R. Field (Field). This Motion, dated August 2, 2001, concerns the hearing...

  1. Vice President Biden Remembers Sen. Ted Kennedy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Vice President Biden

    2010-09-01

    Vice President Biden spoke at the Department of Energy this morning and paid tribute to his dear friend, Senator Ted Kennedy.

  2. Aiden Smith Vice President of Transmission Strategy Doug Hart...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aiden Smith Vice President of Transmission Strategy Doug Hart CFO (Chief Financial ... Smith Selected as Vice President of Transmission Strategy Aiden Smith, a former Public ...

  3. Bruce Held Announces Retirement After Nearly 40 Years of Public Service |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Bruce Held Announces Retirement After Nearly 40 Years of Public Service Wednesday, June 10, 2015 - 2:18pm Bruce Held Retirement After nearly four decades of public service, Bruce Held, Department of Energy's Associate Deputy Secretary, announces retirement from federal govenrment. In July 2013 and with President Obama's approval, Held stepped in to serve as the Acting Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and NNSA Administrator. He provided

  4. Acting NNSA Administrator Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Y-12 National Security Complex Acting NNSA Administrator ... Acting NNSA Administrator Bruce Held visits Y-12 National Security Complex Posted: July 25, 2013 - 6:05pm Acting NNSA Administrator Bruce Held visits Y-12 Bruce Held, Acting NNSA Administrator and Acting Undersecretary for Nuclear Security, visited the Y-12 National Security Complex today. Held toured the site and conducted an All Hands meeting at the site's New Hope Center addressing federal and contractor employees. Held (shown

  5. Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Vice, 2010)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Cascades Region (Vice, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  6. JLab Awarded Vice President's Hammer Award | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Awarded Vice President's Hammer Award Jefferson Lab Awarded Vice President's Hammer Award The Directives Review Team at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) has been awarded the Vice President's Hammer Award for its work on the simplification of the Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) requirements given by the U.S. Department of Energy for Jefferson Lab. The Hammer Award is a special recognition given by Vice President Al Gore to teams who have made

  7. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5, 2014 | Department of Energy : Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5, 2014 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc.: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 43 - March 5, 2014 Application from Bruce Power to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-349-A Bruce Power Inc (CN).pdf (252.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy

  8. Arun Majumdar named Vice Chair of SEAB | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arun Majumdar named Vice Chair of SEAB Arun Majumdar named Vice Chair of SEAB December 1, 2014 - 11:38am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy today announced Arun Majumdar, Jay Precourt Provostial Chair Professor at Stanford University, as the Vice Chair of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB). SEAB is the independent advisory board to Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz. The board is comprised of technologists, business executives, academics, and former government officials, and provides

  9. Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toolkit Region(s): Australia & North America UN Region: Northern America Language: English Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) Screenshot Related Tools...

  10. Soil Sampling At Lester Meadow Area (Vice, 2008) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown References Daniel H. Vice (2008) Lester Meadow, Washington- A Geothermal Anomaly Additional References...

  11. Vice President Biden Visits National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Announces First Agreement Under "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" Challenge Vice President Biden Visits National Renewable Energy ...

  12. Nuclear Energy University Program: A Presentation to Vice Presidents...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An overview of the Office of Nuclear Energy's university programs PDF icon Nuclear Energy University Program: A Presentation to Vice Presidents of Research and Development of ...

  13. Ellen C. Ginsberg VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL COUNSEL & SECRETARY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ellen C. Ginsberg VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL COUNSEL & SECRETARY March 20, 2012 Mr. ... Lopatto (Westinghouse Electric Company), and Bud Piland (The Babcock and Wilcox Company). ...

  14. NREL Engineer Named ASHRAE Vice President - News Releases | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Named ASHRAE Vice President August 10, 2010 Sheila J. Hayter, a senior research ... the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). ...

  15. ORISE: Evasius selected as ORAU's vice president and director...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tenn.-Oak Ridge Associated Universities has named Dr. Dean Evasius as vice president and director of science education programs. In this role, Evasius will be responsible for...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human Resources & Communications: Melonie Parker Melonie Parker Vice President, Human Resources & Communications Melonie Parker Melonie D. Parker is Vice President of Human Resources and Communications at Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Sandia Corporation manages and operates Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram Department of Energy laboratory, under contract with the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security

  17. Vice President Biden Announces 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manchester, N.H. - At an event with homeowners and workers who benefited from the program, today in Manchester, New Hampshire, Vice President Joe Biden announced a major Recovery ...

  18. Ellen C. Ginsberg VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL COUNSEL & SECRETARY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    l F: 202.533.0140 l ecg@nei.org Ellen C. Ginsberg VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL COUNSEL & ... Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 Subject: Meeting between ...

  19. Vice President Biden Visits National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Announces

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    First Agreement Under "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" Challenge | Department of Energy Vice President Biden Visits National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Announces First Agreement Under "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" Challenge Vice President Biden Visits National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Announces First Agreement Under "America's Next Top Energy Innovator" Challenge May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Today, while visiting the

  20. Vice President Biden Announces Finalized $535 Million Loan Guarantee for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solyndra | Department of Energy Finalized $535 Million Loan Guarantee for Solyndra Vice President Biden Announces Finalized $535 Million Loan Guarantee for Solyndra September 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis FREMONT, CA - Vice President Joe Biden, appearing via satellite from Washington D.C., today announced the Department of Energy has finalized a $535 million loan guarantee for Solyndra, Inc., which manufactures innovative cylindrical solar photovoltaic panels that provide clean, renewable

  1. Vice President Biden Announces New Private Sector Backing for Five

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pioneering Energy Companies | Department of Energy New Private Sector Backing for Five Pioneering Energy Companies Vice President Biden Announces New Private Sector Backing for Five Pioneering Energy Companies August 30, 2011 - 6:12pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Speaking at the National Clean Energy Summit 4.0 today in Las Vegas, Nevada, Vice President Joe Biden announced another promising milestone for the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E): five

  2. Vice President Biden Announces Recovery Act Funding for 37 Transformational

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Research Projects | Department of Energy Recovery Act Funding for 37 Transformational Energy Research Projects Vice President Biden Announces Recovery Act Funding for 37 Transformational Energy Research Projects April 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - At a Recovery Act Cabinet Meeting today, Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced that the U.S. Department of Energy is awarding $106 million in funding for 37 ambitious research projects that could

  3. Vice President Biden Announces Reopening of Former GM Boxwood Plant |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Reopening of Former GM Boxwood Plant Vice President Biden Announces Reopening of Former GM Boxwood Plant October 27, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Wilmington, DE - As part of the of the Administration's commitment to jumpstarting the production of fuel efficient vehicles in America, Vice President Joe Biden today announced Fisker Automotive is re-opening a shuttered former GM factory in Wilmington, Delaware, to produce long-range, plug-in, electric hybrid vehicles. The

  4. Vice President Biden Launches Home Energy Scoring Program | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Launches Home Energy Scoring Program Vice President Biden Launches Home Energy Scoring Program November 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Biden joined U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu today to announce the launch of the Home Energy Score pilot program. The Home Energy Score will offer homeowners straightforward, reliable information about their homes' energy efficiency. A report provides consumers with a home energy score between 1 and 10, and shows

  5. Vice President Biden Outlines Funding for Smart Grid Initiatives |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Outlines Funding for Smart Grid Initiatives Vice President Biden Outlines Funding for Smart Grid Initiatives April 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - Vice President Joe Biden, on a visit to Jefferson City, Missouri, today with Commerce Secretary Gary Locke, detailed plans by the Department of Energy to develop a smart, strong and secure electrical grid, which will create new jobs and help deliver reliable power more effectively with less impact on the

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Laboratory & Energy and Climate: Marianne Walck Walck Vice President, California Laboratory & Energy and Climate Marianne Walck Dr. Marianne Walck is vice president of Sandia's California laboratory and serves as lead for the Laboratories' Energy and Climate Program. The California laboratory's principal programs include nuclear weapons stewardship; homeland security with a focus on defending against weapons of mass destruction; combustion, transportation, and hydrogen

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Defense Systems and Assessments: James Peery Peery Vice President, Defense Systems and Assessments James Peery James Peery is vice president for Defense Systems and Assessments (DS&A) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DS&A is responsible for developing and integrating advanced science and technology into state-of-the art systems for the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Defense, and other national security agencies. Areas of focus

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy, Nonproliferation, and High-Consequence Security; International, Homeland & Nuclear Security: Jim Chavez Chavez Vice President, Energy, Nonproliferation & High Consequence Security and the International, Homeland & Nuclear Security Program James Chavez Mr. Chavez is Vice President of the Energy, Nonproliferation and High Consequence Security Division and the International, Homeland and Nuclear Security Programs at Sandia National Laboratories. As VP of the Energy,

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Operations Division: Michael Hazen Michael Hazen Vice President, Infrastructure Operations Division Mike Hazen Michael Hazen is vice president of the Infrastructure Operations Division and serves as chief security officer at Sandia National Laboratories, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. In September 2007 he assumed his current position with line responsibilities that include Radiation Protection, Waste Management, Environment, Safety, and Health; Security and

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology, Chief Technology Officer: Rob Leland Robert Leland Vice President, Science & Technology; Chief Technology Officer Robert Leland Robert (Rob) W. Leland is vice president, Science and Technology, and chief technology officer at Sandia National Laboratories, which is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico and Livermore, California. Leland is the executive responsible for leadership and management of corporate research and development and capabilities stewardship at

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: About Sandia: Leadership: Vice President,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weapons Engineering and Product Realization, Chief Engineer for Nuclear Weapons Gary Sanders Vice President, Weapons Engineering and Product Realization, Chief Engineer for Nuclear Weapons Gary A. Sanders Gary A. Sanders is Vice President of Weapons Engineering and Product Realization and the Chief Engineer for Nuclear Weapons at Sandia National Laboratories, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program engineering and science laboratory located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He is the

  12. Medal of Honor recipient Colonel Bruce Crandall visits Y-12 | Y-12 National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Complex recipient ... Medal of Honor recipient Colonel Bruce Crandall visits Y-12 Posted: November 14, 2012 - 4:00pm Medal of Honor recipient Colonel Bruce Crandall visits Y-12 One of 80 living Medal of Honor recipients, Crandall was in East Tennessee to promote the school program Character Counts. The Oak Ridge-Knoxville area will also host the 2014 Medal of Honor Convention. Awarded the nation's highest award for military valor, Crandall flew more than 900 combat missions during

  13. Bruce T. Goodwin, 2002 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bruce T. Goodwin, 2002 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2010's Bruce T. Goodwin, 2002 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page National Security: For his

  14. Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and Funding...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and Funding Opportunities at Solar Power International Conference Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and ...

  15. Secretary Chu and Vice President Biden Highlight Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tune into the video stream at 10:45 AM EDT to watch as Vice President Biden and Secretary Chu outline how these Recovery Act investments will help make cutting-edge technologies more affordable in the marketplace and in turn spur further economic growth and job creation.

  16. R. Bruce Merrifield and Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis: A Historical Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, A R

    2007-12-04

    Bruce Merrifield, trained as a biochemist, had to address three major challenges related to the development and acceptance of solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). The challenges were (1) to reduce the concept of peptide synthesis on a insoluble support to practice, (2) overcome the resistance of synthetic chemists to this novel approach, and (3) establish that a biochemist had the scientific credentials to effect the proposed revolutionary change in chemical synthesis. How these challenges were met is discussed in this article.

  17. Paul J. Regan is Vice President of Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Regan is Vice President of Finance & Business Operations and Chief Financial Officer for Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company. Space Systems is an $8 billion enterprise that employs approximately 15,000 people. The company provides advanced technology systems for national security, civil, and commercial customers. Chief products include major satellite systems; human space flight systems; strategic and missile defense systems; space observatories and interplanetary spacecraft; and a

  18. MULTIPLE LETTERS Mr. James Speir, Vice President Phosphate Operations

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    52. APR 9 1986 MULTIPLE LETTERS Mr. James Speir, Vice President Phosphate Operations International Minerals and Chemical Corporation P.O. Box 7047 Lakeland, Florida 33807 Dear Mr. Speir: The Department of Energy is evaluating the radiological condition of sites that were utilized by the Manhattan Engineer District and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) during the early years of nuclear energy development to determine whether they need remedial action and whether the Department has authority to

  19. VI. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES A. Chair and Vice Chair

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VI. ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES A. Chair and Vice Chair 1. The Chair shall be appointed by the sponsoring Tri-Party agencies, based on the advice and recommendations of Hanford stakeholders. The Chair will be responsible for protecting the interests of all Board members and will act in a fair and balanced manner with respect to the Board's operation, the conduct of Board meetings, and all other activities associated with the Chair's involvement with the Board. The Chair, with the assistance of a

  20. B&W Y-12 names Kevin Corbett Vice President of Quality Assurance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B&W Y-12 names Kevin ... B&W Y-12 names Kevin Corbett Vice President of Quality Assurance Posted: April 23, 2013 - 3:59pm Kevin Corbett, B&W Y-12 Vice President, Quality Assurance ...

  1. W. David Montgomery Senior Vice President NERA Economic Consulting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    W. David Montgomery Senior Vice President NERA Economic Consulting 1255 23rd Street NW, Suite 600 Washington, DC 20037 Tel: 202-466-9294 Fax: 202-466-3605 w.david.Montgomery@NERA.com www.nera.com Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 December 3, 2012 Attn: Deputy Assistant Secretary Christopher Smith Dear Mr. Smith I am transmitting with this letter a clean copy of NERA's report on the macroeconomic impacts of LNG exports from the

  2. Mr. Anthony D. Pantaleoni Vice President Environment, Health & Safety

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    7=cr5rnP 7694 i+lJ Washington, DC 20585 Mr. Anthony D. Pantaleoni Vice President Environment, Health & Safety Crane Company 757 Third Avenue New York, New York 10017 Dear Mr. Pantaleoni: This letter is a followup to the radiological survey performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in August at the former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company in Indian Orchard, Massachusetts. The facility is presently owned by the Crane Company. The radiological survey identified areas of elevated

  3. Bill Reis Named Vice President, Public & Governmental Affairs | Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security Complex Bill Reis Named Vice ... Bill Reis Named Vice President, Public & Governmental Affairs Posted: October 30, 2013 - 10:15am Bill Reis, Vice President, Public & Governmental Affairs OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Bill Reis has been appointed Vice President, Public & Governmental Affairs for B&W Y-12. Reis has worked at Y-12 for 30 years in a variety of roles. He most recently served as Vice President for Environment, Safety & Health. During his tenure, B&W

  4. Bruce Murray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Areas: Pay & leave administration, including incentives, student loan repayments, & waivers; worklife programs, including DOE-Flex/ telework, health & wellness programs,...

  5. Bruce Mah

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Opportunities ESnet Staff & Org Chart Administration Advanced Network Technologies Cybersecurity Infrastructure, Identity & Collaboration Network Engineering Office of the CTO...

  6. On Earth Day Vice President Biden Announces $300 Million in Recovery Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funds for Clean Cities Program | Department of Energy On Earth Day Vice President Biden Announces $300 Million in Recovery Act Funds for Clean Cities Program On Earth Day Vice President Biden Announces $300 Million in Recovery Act Funds for Clean Cities Program April 22, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis LANDOVER, MD - During a visit to the WMATA Carmen Turner Maintenance and Training Facility in Landover, MD, Vice President Joe Biden today announced $300 million in funding from the American Recovery

  7. Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remarks of Kathryn Clay, Ph.D. Vice President of Policy Strategy American Gas Association PUBLIC MEETING ON ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE SITING DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUADRENNIAL ENERGY ...

  8. VICE 2.0 Helps Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-03-01

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) 2.0 online tool estimates financial and emissions benefits of compressed natural gas (CNG) in vehicles.

  9. PHOTOS: Vice President Biden Swears in New Deputy Secretary of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out photos from Vice President Joe Biden's visit to the Department of Energy, where he swore in the Department's new Deputy Secretary.

  10. A.J. Stewart Smith to step down as Princeton University vice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smith to step down as Princeton University vice president for PPPL in 2016 By John Greenwald July 24, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A.J. Stewart Smith (Photo ...

  11. Vice President Biden Releases Report on Recovery Act Impact on Innovation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Releases Report on Recovery Act Impact on Innovation Vice President Biden Releases Report on Recovery Act Impact on Innovation August 24, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Vice President Joe Biden today unveiled a new report, "The Recovery Act: Transforming the American Economy through Innovation," which finds that the Recovery Act's $100 billion investment in innovation is not only transforming the economy and creating new jobs, but helping accelerate

  12. Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings For Middle Class Families | Department of Energy Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And Energy Savings For Middle Class Families Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green Jobs And Energy Savings For Middle Class Families October 19, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Vice President Biden today unveiled Recovery Through Retrofit, a report that builds on the foundation laid in the Recovery Act to expand green job opportunities and boost

  13. ORISE: Evasius selected as ORAU's vice president and director of science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    education programs Evasius selected as ORAU's vice president and director of science education programs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Sept. 10, 2012 FY12-44 Dean Evasius Dean Evasius OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Oak Ridge Associated Universities has named Dr. Dean Evasius as vice president and director of science education programs. In this role, Evasius will be responsible for providing leadership, oversight and direction for ORAU's growing portfolio of science education programs. Supporting 330 federal

  14. McComas named vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab McComas named vice president for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory By Karin Dienst , Princeton University Office of Communications February 10, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook David McComas (Photo by the Southwest Research Institute ) David McComas David McComas, an executive leader in managing various complex technical projects and programs, has been named vice president for the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics

  15. Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities at Solar Power International Conference | Department of Energy Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and Funding Opportunities at Solar Power International Conference Vice President Biden Announces New SunShot Projects and Funding Opportunities at Solar Power International Conference September 21, 2015 - 9:21am Addthis 1 of 5 More than 15,000 solar energy professionals from 75 countries were on hand at Solar Power International (SPI) in Anaheim, CA to network,

  16. Vice President Biden Announces 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act | Department of Energy 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act Vice President Biden Announces 200,000 Homes Weatherized Under the Recovery Act August 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Manchester, N.H. - At an event with homeowners and workers who benefited from the program, today in Manchester, New Hampshire, Vice President Joe Biden announced a major Recovery Act milestone - the weatherizing of 200,000 homes under the Recovery Act. As a result of the Administration's unprecedented

  17. Vice President Biden Announces Plan to Put One Million Advanced Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles on the Road by 2015 | Department of Energy Plan to Put One Million Advanced Technology Vehicles on the Road by 2015 Vice President Biden Announces Plan to Put One Million Advanced Technology Vehicles on the Road by 2015 January 26, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - Today, Vice President Biden, Chair of the Middle Class Task Force, took the "White House to Main Street Tour" to Greenfield, Indiana, where he visited leading manufacturer Ener1, Inc., which produces

  18. Vice President Biden Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announcement of Major New Energy Efficiency Effort | Department of Energy Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities with Announcement of Major New Energy Efficiency Effort Vice President Biden Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities with Announcement of Major New Energy Efficiency Effort April 21, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. -- Vice President Biden will today kick off five days of Administration events around the 40th anniversary of Earth Day with the announcement of the

  19. VICE 2.0 Helps Fleets Evaluate CNG Investments (Fact Sheet), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) Model helps you estimate the financial and emissions benefits you can expect by transitioning to compressed natural gas. Using your fleet-specific data: * Number of vehicles * Vehicle types * Fuel use * Planned vehicle-acquisition schedules VICE calculates and displays: * Return on investment * Payback period * Annual greenhouse gas savings * Fuel availability and useage VICE covers the following vehicle types: * Transit Bus * School Bus *

  20. Vehicle Infrastructure Cash-Flow Estimation--VICE 2.0; Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, G.

    2015-04-02

    This presentation discusses the differences between the original Vehicle and Infrastructure Cash-Flow Evaluation (VICE) Model and the revamped version, VICE 2.0. The enhanced tool can now help assess projects to acquire vehicles and infrastructure, or to acquire vehicles only.

  1. Richard (Rick) F. Ambrose is Executive Vice President of Lockheed Martin's Space Systems Company

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Rick) F. Ambrose is Executive Vice President of Lockheed Martin's Space Systems Company business area and an officer of Lockheed Martin Corporation. Space Systems is a $9.1 billion enterprise that employs approximately 19,000 people. The company provides advanced technology systems for national security, civil, and commercial customers. Chief products include major satellite systems; human space flight systems; strategic and missile defense systems; space observatories and interplanetary

  2. Robert (Bob) Trono is Vice President and Chief Security Officer for Lockheed Martin Corporation.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Bob) Trono is Vice President and Chief Security Officer for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this capacity, he is responsible for leading the corporation's total asset protection, including people, classified information and materials, intellectual and physical property, and facilities in the United States and around the world. He has executive leadership responsibility for the security of international employees, travelers, and facilities; crisis management; counter-intelligence and

  3. Lisa B. Callahan is Vice President of Corporate Internal Audit for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. Callahan is Vice President of Corporate Internal Audit for Lockheed Martin Corporation. In this role, she provides independent, objective assurance and advisory activity to improve operations. Corporate Internal Audit includes Audit Operations and Enterprise Risk Management. Under Callahan's leadership, Corporate Internal Audit determines the adequacy and effectiveness of the Corporation's network of risk management, internal control, and governance processes, as designed and represented by

  4. A.J. Stewart Smith to step down as Princeton University vice president for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL in 2016 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab A.J. Stewart Smith to step down as Princeton University vice president for PPPL in 2016 By John Greenwald July 24, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A.J. Stewart Smith (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) A.J. Stewart Smith Gallery: Smith, second from left, scoring a goal for the Vancouver Carlings during a 1961 Canadian National Lacrosse Championship game. (Photo by Photo courtesy of A.J. Stewart Smith) Smith, second

  5. A.J. Stewart Smith to step down as Princeton University vice president for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPPL in 2016 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab A.J. Stewart Smith to step down as Princeton University vice president for PPPL in 2016 By John Greenwald July 24, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A.J. Stewart Smith (Photo by Elle Starkman/Office of Communications) A.J. Stewart Smith Gallery: Smith, second from left, scoring a goal for the Vancouver Carlings during a 1961 Canadian National Lacrosse Championship game. (Photo by Photo courtesy of A.J. Stewart Smith) Smith, second

  6. A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton's first dean for research, becomes vice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    president for PPPL | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab A.J. Stewart Smith, Princeton's first dean for research, becomes vice president for PPPL By Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research June 28, 2013 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A. J. Stewart Smith (Photo by Elle Starkman/ PPPL Office of Communications) A. J. Stewart Smith A. J. Stewart Smith, the Class of 1909 Professor of Physics, served as Princeton's first dean for research from 2006 to 2013. On July 1 he

  7. TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TEAMING AS A SMALL BUSINESS Brent L. Clark, Vice President Performance Results Corporation 2 WHO IS PERFORMANCE RESULTS CORPORATION? * Incorporated i n A pril 2 000 * SBA C er4fied S mall, W oman---Owned C orpora4on * Kathy C linton O wner a nd P resident * Located a t 6 C anyon R oad, M organtown, W V * Employs o ver 2 30 p ersonnel l ocated a cross 1 6 ci4es a nd 1 3 s tates * 2010 r evenue w as $ 25M, p rojected t o e xceed $30M i n 2 011 * Primary c lients a re t he D OE, D OJ, C DC, a nd A

  8. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Chair; Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Rafael Bras; Albert Carnesale;

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Rafael Bras; Albert Carnesale; Deborah Jin; Paul Joskow (via teleconference); Michael McQuade; Richard Meserve; and Dan Reicher Date and Time: December 3, 2014, 9:00 AM - 12:15 PM MST Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Education Center 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, CO Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Karen Gibson, Designated Federal Officer; Corey Williams-Allen, Deputy Designated Federal Officer;

  9. Evaluating Investments in Natural Gas Vehicles and Infrastructure for Your Fleet: Vehicle Infrastructure Cash-Flow Estimation -- VICE 2.0; Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, John

    2015-04-02

    Presentation by Senior Engineer John Gonzales on Evaluating Investments in Natural Gas Vehicles and Infrastructure for Your Fleet using the Vehicle Infrastructure Cash-flow Estimation (VICE) 2.0 model.

  10. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Signature

  11. Signature of Edward Bruce Held Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  12. Signature of Edward Bruce Held

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

  13. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public Meeting Committee Members: John Deutch, Chair; Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Richard A. Meserve; Rafael L.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Arun Majumdar, Vice Chair; Richard A. Meserve; Rafael L. Bras; Deborah Jin; Michael McQuade; Francis Beinecke; Cherry Murray; Ram Shenoy Date and Time: June 17, 2015, 8:30 AM - 11:30 AM EST Location: Applied Research Center, Garden Room, 301 Gateway Drive, Aiken, SC Purpose: Meeting of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) SEAB Staff: Karen Gibson, Designated Federal Officer; Corey Williams-Allen, Deputy Designated Federal Officer; Matthew Schaub, Deputy Director DOE Staff: Secretary

  14. July 28, 2010, Science, Technology and Innovation Yacov Shamash Vice President for Economic Development and Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences Stony Brook University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science, Technology and Innovation Yacov Shamash Vice President for Economic Development and Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences Stony Brook University Center for Strategic and International Studies Washingon, D.C. July 28, 2010 1 Federal Influences on Research Collaboration  Science is still "the endless frontier"  Continuing support for basic/investigator- initiated research  New emphasis on economic impacts:  NIH i6 Challenge  DOE Energy Innovation Hubs

  15. Many Voices Working for the Community

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bob Hatcher David Hemelright, Vice Chair Bruce Hicks Howard Holmes Jennifer Kasten Ross Landenberger 1 Jan Lyons David Martin, Chair Fay Martin Scott McKinney Donald Mei...

  16. Vice President, Transmission System Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The VP for Transmission System Operations provides strategic leadership, direction, and oversight of the people, business processes, and systems that are responsible for the safe, reliable, and...

  17. Mr. James Schaus Vice President

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Schaus: This is to notify you that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has designated the former Bliss & Laughlin Steel Company facility for remedial action as a part of the ...

  18. EA-349-A Bruce Power.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  19. EA-349_Bruce_Power.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  20. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cost and Economic Impacts of Pending EPA Regulations Bruce Braine Vice President, Strategic Policy Analysis EIA Energy Conference April 2011 2 AEP's Generation Fleet ~39,000 MW Capacity ~80% of coal is in AEP-East Coal/Lignite 66% Gas/Oil 22% Nuclear 6% Pumped Storage/ Hydro/Wind 6% 5.2 million customers in 11 states Industry-leading size and scale of assets: Asset Size Industry Rank Domestic Generation ~39,000 MW # 2 Transmission ~39,000 miles # 1 Distribution ~214,000 miles # 1 AEP -

  1. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargent, III, Thornton W.; Shulgin, Alexander T.; Mathis, Chester A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula I is administered to one animal: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R.sub.3 is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R.sub.4 is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R.sub.4 is not isopropyl and when R.sub.4 is methyl, R.sub.3 is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen.

  2. Rapid brain scanning radiopharmaceutical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargent, T.W. III; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.

    1987-03-03

    A method for detecting the blood flow in animals, particularly in the brain, is provided wherein a detectable amount of a novel radioactive compound of the formula 1 is administered to one animal: as given in figure in patent wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are independently alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms or benzyl; R[sub 3] is alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms, benzyl, cyclopropylalkyl of 4 to 6 carbon atoms, or cyanoalkyl of 2 to 6 carbon atoms; R[sub 4] is hydrogen, benzyl or alkyl of 1 to 6 carbon atoms; with the provisos that R[sub 4] is not isopropyl and when R[sub 4] is methyl, R[sub 3] is not benzyl; and X is a radioactive halogen. 2 figs.

  3. Solar Brain Srl | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brain Srl Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Brain Srl Place: Rome, Italy Zip: 189 Sector: Solar Product: Rome-based solar and alternative energy company. References: Solar...

  4. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in ...

  5. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in ... diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. ...

  6. Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is a self-financed federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant, providing about one-third of the...

  7. William M. Gausman Vice President - Asset Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    As part of this review, a risk assessment was also conducted that evaluated the work to be performed, factors that could prevent the work from being completed and efforts that ...

  8. Carol Cala is the Corporate Vice President

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carmelo Melendez About Us Carmelo Melendez - Director, Office of Asset Management Mr. Melendez is the Agency's Property Executive, Senior Real Property Officer (SRPO), Head of Contracting Activity (HCA) for Real Estate and Office Director for Asset Management within the Office of Management. His portfolio covers Real Estate, Facility & Infrastructure, and Personal/Industrial Property Management and Policy. In this position, he is responsible for policy, guidance, and oversight of DOE's Real

  9. Geisha Williams Executive Vice President, Electric Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The upshot of this transformation is that we have to make huge new investments in basic infrastructure - and in the digital and other supporting technologies that allow for this ...

  10. Analysis of brain patterns using temporal measures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-08-11

    A set of brain data representing a time series of neurophysiologic activity acquired by spatially distributed sensors arranged to detect neural signaling of a brain (such as by the use of magnetoencephalography) is obtained. The set of brain data is processed to obtain a dynamic brain model based on a set of statistically-independent temporal measures, such as partial cross correlations, among groupings of different time series within the set of brain data. The dynamic brain model represents interactions between neural populations of the brain occurring close in time, such as with zero lag, for example. The dynamic brain model can be analyzed to obtain the neurophysiologic assessment of the brain. Data processing techniques may be used to assess structural or neurochemical brain pathologies.

  11. BrainMap `95 workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    The fourth annual BrainMap workshop was held at La Mansion del Rio Hotel in San Antonio December 3--4, 1995. The conference title was ``Human Brain Mapping and Modeling.`` The meeting was attended by 137 registered participants and 30 observers from 82 institutions representing 12 countries. The meeting focused on the technical issues associated with brain mapping and modeling. A total of 23 papers were presented covering the following topics: spatial normalization and registration; functional image analysis; metanalysis and modeling; and new horizons in biological databases. The full program with abstracts was available on the Research Imaging Center`s web site. A book will be published by John Wiley and Sons prior to the end of 1998.

  12. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes ... a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. ...

  13. The Brain: Key To a Better Computer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain: Key To a Better Computer - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare The Brain: Key To a Better Computer ...

  14. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print Wednesday, 28 October 2015 00:00 A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's ...

  15. 6.20 Mapping Human Brain Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 612011 6.20 Mapping Human Brain Function Many mysteries of the human brain have been unraveled by positron emission tomography (PET), an imaging tool used worldwide to diagnose ...

  16. Bruce Held Announces Retirement After Nearly 40 Years of Public...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    This Site Budget IG Web Policy Privacy No Fear Act Accessibility FOIA Sitemap Federal Government The White House DOE.gov USA.gov Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA...

  17. R. Bruce van Dover > ProfessorMaterials Science and Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topical Group on Magnetism and Its Applications, a unit of the American Physical Society. Research Prof. van Dover's research is currently focused on exploring the properties of...

  18. Bruce Hallbert Idaho National Laboratory T he Nuclear Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Figure 2 shows the receiving ultrasonic radio frequency signals received from a smooth ... Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface Technologies (NPIC&HMIT), pp. ...

  19. Bruce Beihoff, Technical Director of Industry Relations, Wisconsin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The vertically integrated utility in the centralized-model ran the base-load generators around the clock while the peaking units operated as needed to accommodate changing loads. ...

  20. Colonel Bruce P. Crandall, Medal of Honor recipient visits Oak...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ridge's three government sites and a driving tour of the city of Oak Ridge. This is the man who, on November 14, 1965, commanded a flight of 16 helicopters lifting troops into the...

  1. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural Basis of Behavior Signals in our brains are propagated with voltage and

  2. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural Basis of Behavior Signals in our brains are propagated with voltage and

  3. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print Wednesday, 28 October 2015 00:00 A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray crystallographic studies a fluorescent protein (CaMPARI) that allows the permanent marking of active brain cells. The protein was then used to study live changes via fluorescence in the active nerve cells in brains of fruit flies, zebrafish, and mice. The Neural

  4. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print Wednesday, 28 January 2015 00:00 With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function.

  5. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  6. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  7. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  8. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases affecting the brain and its ability to make new connections and recall memories. Some of the most important players in the brain's normal function are the glutamate receptors, which are involved in nervous-system development and function. These molecules transmit signals between nerve cells and are critical to learning and

  9. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity Print A team of scientists from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus designed and validated via x-ray...

  10. Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brain Receptor Structures Key to Future Therapeutics Print With an aging population in America, it is more important than ever to discover ways to treat or prevent diseases...

  11. Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation ...

  12. Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain imaging...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    brain imaging by tunable multi-spectral Event-Related Optical Signal (EROS). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report on LDRD project 130784 : functional brain ...

  13. Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Authors: Tooker, A C ; Madsen, T E ; Crowell, A ; ...

  14. Other: Multiscale Simulation of Blood Flow in Brain Arteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multiscale Simulation of Blood Flow in Brain Arteries with an Aneurysm Citation Details Title: Multiscale Simulation of Blood Flow in Brain Arteries with an Aneurysm

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Protection: Blast Pressure Sensors in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Traumatic Brain Injury Protection: Blast Pressure ... Technology Marketing Summary The cost of treating traumatic brain injury (TBI) is ...

  16. The blood-brain barrier penetration and distribution of PEGylated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain Citation Details ... fluorescein-doped magnetic silica nanoparticles in rat brain PEGylated PAMAM ...

  17. Large-Scale Simulation of Brain Tissue: Blue Brain Project, EPFL | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Digital reconstruction of pyramidal cells Digital reconstruction of pyramidal cells. Blue Brain Project, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Large-Scale Simulation of Brain Tissue: Blue Brain Project, EPFL PI Name: Fabien Delalondre PI Email: fabien.delalondre@epfl.ch Institution: Ecole Federale Polytechnique de Lausanne Allocation Program: ESP Year: 2015 Research Domain: Biological Sciences Tier 1 Science Project Science This ESP project will be used to

  18. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but also leads to an understanding of what causes the brain to malfunction, such as in autism, diseases, and mental disorders. CaMPARI expression in zebrafish larvae under various...

  19. A Designed Protein Maps Brain Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CaMPARI is an outstanding new tool for mapping brain activity, but it could be made even ... information about CaMPARI, as well as the DNA needed to produce it and the zebrafish ...

  20. miRNAs in brain development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function.

  1. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R.; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J.; Singh, M.

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  2. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos

  3. Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Visualizing Brain Metals in Health and Disease figure 1 Fig. 1. Rapid-scanning x-ray fluorescence mapping ex perimental setup. Synchrotron x-rays at 11 keV passed through a 50 µm aperture (Ap). The beam intensity was monitored with a N2-filled ion chamber (I0). The brain slice was mounted vertically on a motorized stage (St) at 45° to the incident x-ray beam and raster scanned in the beam. A 13-element Ge detector (Ge) was positioned at a 90° angle to the beam. We all require iron, copper and

  4. Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proton Radiography Of Brain Mockup Scientists examine proton radiography of brain mockup The use of such a high-energy proton beam is ideal for imaging small tumors within patients for targeted proton therapy. March 25, 2013 Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head Proton radiograph of a high-fidelity mockup of a human head. Proton radiography, which was invented at Los Alamos, employs a high-energy proton beam to image the properties and behavior of materials. Los Alamos

  5. BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain BigNeuron: Unlocking the Secrets of the Human Brain Berkeley Researchers and Supercomputers to Help Create a Standard 3D Neuron ...

  6. Vice President Biden Releases Report on Recovery Act Impact on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    we are unleashing the American innovation machine to change the way we use and produce energy in this country," said Secretary Chu. "Just as importantly, these breakthroughs are...

  7. Vice President Biden Unveils Report Focused on Expanding Green...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... When applied on a national scale, the program could save ... efficiency funding for cities, counties, and Indian tribes. ... financing - and to make energy efficiency easy and ...

  8. Peter S. Winokur, Chainnan Jessie H. Roberson, Vice Chainnan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Board believes that this Recommendation contains no information that is classified or ... Accordingly, the ventilation systems for the DSTs were previously classified as ...

  9. COMMISSIONERS AL LITTLEFIELD, PRESIDENT JIM COOK, VICE PRESIDENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SECRETARY OFFICERS AND STAFF DAVID L. JOHNSON, P.E. GENERALMANAGER JULIA A. ANDERSON, AUDITOR MARK E.FREDLUND, TREASURER GREGORY J. PETERKA ENGINEERING MANAGER PUBLIC...

  10. Vice President Biden Announces New Private Sector Backing for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pumped throughout the battery. This "flow battery" can store renewable energy such as wind and solar power and then release that energy into the grid during peak load times. OPX...

  11. From iron(III) precursor to magnetite and vice versa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gotic, M.; Jurkin, T.; Music, S.

    2009-10-15

    The syntheses of nanosize magnetite particles by wet-chemical oxidation of Fe{sup 2+} have been extensively investigated. In the present investigation the nanosize magnetite particles were synthesised without using the Fe(II) precursor. This was achieved by {gamma}-irradiation of water-in-oil microemulsion containing only the Fe(III) precursor. The corresponding phase transformations were monitored. Microemulsions (pH {approx} 12.5) were {gamma}-irradiated at a relatively high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h. Upon 1 h of {gamma}-irradiation the XRD pattern of the precipitate showed goethite and unidentified low-intensity peaks. Upon 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, reductive conditions were achieved and substoichiometric magnetite ({approx}Fe{sub 2.71}O{sub 4}) particles with insignificant amount of goethite particles found in the precipitate. Hydrated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), organic radicals and hydrogen gas as radiolytic products were responsible for the reductive dissolution of iron oxide in the microemulsion and the reduction Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+}. Upon 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the precipitate exhibited dual behaviour, it was a more oxidised product than the precipitate obtained after 6 h of {gamma}-irradiation, but it contained magnetite particles in a more reduced form ({approx}Fe{sub 2.93}O{sub 4}). It was presumed that the reduction and oxidation processes existed as concurrent competitive processes in the microemulsion. After 18 h of {gamma}-irradiation the pH of the medium shifted from the alkaline to the acidic range. The high dose rate of {approx}22 kGy/h was directly responsible for this shift to the acidic range. At a slightly acidic pH a further reduction of Fe{sup 3+} {yields} Fe{sup 2+} resulted in the formation of more stoichiometric magnetite particles, whereas the oxidation conditions in the acidic medium permitted the oxidation Fe{sup 2+} {yields} Fe{sup 3+}. The Fe{sup 3+} was much less soluble in the acidic medium and it hydrolysed and recrystallised as goethite. The {gamma}-irradiation of the microemulsion for 25 h at a lower dose rate of 16 kGy/h produced pure substoichiometric nanosize magnetite particles of about 25 nm in size and with the stoichiometry of Fe{sub 2.83}O{sub 4}.

  12. ENERGY TRANSFER Shelley Corman Executive Vice President, Interstate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pipelines ENERGY TRANSFER ASSETS * Map is a general depiction of Energy Transfer assets 2 More than 72,000 miles of natural gas, NGL, crude, and refined products pipelines ...

  13. Vice President Biden Announces Plan to Put One Million Advanced...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    which produces advanced lithium-ion battery systems for electric vehicles, grid ... Advancing innovative vehicle and battery technologies through increased R&D: Increased ...

  14. Vice President Biden Presents Malcolm Baldrige National Quality...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    "The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is a great honor for both Honeywell and the NNSA," said Tony Brancato, President of Honeywell FM&T. "Our people represent a tradition ...

  15. Bill Reis Named Vice President, Public & Governmental Affairs...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reis is replacing Jud Simmons, who is returning to his responsibilities at The Babcock & Wilcox Company following his assignment as B&W Y-12's acting Director for Public & ...

  16. STATEMENT FOR THE RECORD Shelley A. Corman, Executive Vice President...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    gas liquids, refined products, and crude oil pipelines. (Map of the assets) I am ... Our "legacy" pipeline systems were built to transport Gulf Coast, Midcontinent, San Juan ...

  17. Melissa Lavinson Vice President Federal Affairs and Policy, Chief...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Enhancing efficiency in electricity generation, transmission and distribution; and ... the first state to establish a utility business model that encouraged utilities to pursue ...

  18. Opening Statement of James D. Steffes Executive Vice President...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Second Installment Electricity: Generation to End Use Stakeholder Meeting 5: ... In other words, our business model is designed to help our customers - from individuals and ...

  19. Mr. A. F. Vondrasek Vice President and General Manager Agricultural...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... of those facilities utilized under an Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) raw materials ... These measurements, made at randomly selected 2 ,- .- points, consisted of gamma-ray ...

  20. Vice President Biden to Visit National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to clothing. Press Contact: Harvey Greene, 954-579-9499, greeneh@dolphins.nfl.com Note: Mult box, power and wireless internet are available on site Media contact(s): (202) 586-4940...

  1. Vice President Biden Announces New Private Sector Backing for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... These "thermoelectric" devices are also being designed to remove heat so they can be used as efficient cooling systems. Primus Power (Hayward, CA) - ARPA-E funding 2 million - ...

  2. Cris Eugster, Executive Vice President, Chief Generation & Strategy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Our generation portfolio is one of the most diversified in the state and includes natural gas, nuclear, coal, solar, wind, landfill gas, and energy efficiencydemand response. ...

  3. MULTIPLE LETTERS Mr. James Speir, Vice President Phosphate Operations

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... and Site Decommissioning Projects Office of Nuclear Energy 2 Enclosures cc: A. Smith, Superfund Coordinator EPA Region IV, Atlanta, Georgia l-4. Snyder, EPA, Washington, ...

  4. Vice President Biden Announces Recovery Act Funding for 37 Transformat...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to make electric vehicles more affordable; and remove the carbon pollution from coal-fired power plants in a more cost-effective way. "Thanks to the Recovery Act, dozens of ...

  5. Vice President Biden Announces Finalized $535 Million Loan Guarantee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... of solar panels, which can generate electricity equivalent to 3 or 4 coal fired power plants. This plant will produce about as many new solar panels as the US produced in 2005. ...

  6. Shorter-Course Whole-Brain Radiotherapy for Brain Metastases in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk; Evers, Jasmin N.; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Lohynska, Radka; Schild, Steven E.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Many patients with brain metastases receive whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) alone. Using 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy in 2 weeks is the standard regimen in most centers. Regarding the extraordinarily poor survival prognosis of elderly patients with multiple brain metastases, a shorter WBRT regimen would be preferable. This study compared 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy in elderly patients ({>=}65 years). Methods and Materials: Data from 455 elderly patients who received WBRT alone for brain metastases were retrospectively analyzed. Survival and local (= intracerebral) control of 293 patients receiving 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy were compared with 162 patients receiving 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy. Eight additional potential prognostic factors were investigated including age, gender, Karnofsky performance score (KPS), primary tumor, number of brain metastases, interval from tumor diagnosis to WBRT, extracerebral metastases, and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class. Results: The 6-month overall survival rates were 29% after 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy and 21% after 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy (p = 0.020). The 6-month local control rates were 12% and 10%, respectively (p = 0.32). On multivariate analysis, improved overall survival was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), only one to three brain metastases (p = 0.029), no extracerebral metastasis (p = 0.012), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Improved local control was associated with KPS {>=} 70 (p < 0.001), breast cancer (p = 0.029), and lower RPA class (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Shorter-course WBRT with 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy was not inferior to 10 Multiplication-Sign 3 Gy with respect to overall survival or local control in elderly patients. 5 Multiplication-Sign 4 Gy appears preferable for the majority of these patients.

  7. Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    figures Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports figures Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers, sports figures A new detection approach originally developed for tuberculosis diagnostics is being adapted as a tool for determining traumatic brain injury April 28, 2015 The LANL and SMT collaborators (left to right): Donald Shields, Aaron Anderson, Paul Smith, Nicholas Hengartner, Dr. Donald Becker, Harshini Mukundan (co-PI), Laurie

  8. COLLOQUIUM: Consciousness and the Social Brain | Princeton Plasma Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab September 25, 2013, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Consciousness and the Social Brain Professor Michael Graziano Princeton University Presentation: Office presentation icon Presentation What is consciousness and how can a brain, a mere collection of neurons, create it? In my lab we are developing a theoretical and experimental approach to these questions. The theory begins with our ability to attribute awareness to others. The human brain has a complex circuitry

  9. Positron Scanner for Locating Brain Tumors

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Rankowitz, S.; Robertson, J. S.; Higinbotham, W. A.; Rosenblum, M. J.

    1962-03-01

    A system is described that makes use of positron emitting isotopes for locating brain tumors. This system inherently provides more information about the distribution of radioactivity in the head in less time than existing scanners which use one or two detectors. A stationary circular array of 32 scintillation detectors scans a horizontal layer of the head from many directions simultaneously. The data, consisting of the number of counts in all possible coincidence pairs, are coded and stored in the memory of a Two-Dimensional Pulse-Height Analyzer. A unique method of displaying and interpreting the data is described that enables rapid approximate analysis of complex source distribution patterns. (auth)

  10. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2010-01-08

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  11. Tightly Coupled Atomistic-Continuum Simulations of Brain Blood...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tightly Coupled Atomistic-Continuum Simulations of Brain Blood Flow on Petaflop Supercomputers Authors: L. Grinberg, J. A. Insley, D. Fedosov, V. Morozov, M. E. Papka, G. E. ...

  12. Complex Networks - A Key to Understanding Brain Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olaf Sporns

    2008-01-23

    The brain is a complex network of neurons, engaging in spontaneous and evoked activity that is thought to be the main substrate of mental life.  How this complex system works together to process information and generate coherent cognitive states, even consciousness, is not yet well understood.  In my talk I will review recent studies that have revealed characteristic structural and functional attributes of brain networks, and discuss efforts to build computational models of the brain that are informed by our growing knowledge of brain anatomy and physiology.

  13. Incidence of Leukoencephalopathy After Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebi, Junko; Sato, Hisashi; Nakajima, Masaru; Shishido, Fumio

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of leukoencephalopathy after whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 111 patients who underwent WBRT for brain metastases from April 2001 through March 2008 and had evaluable computed tomography (CT) and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at least 1 month after completion of WBRT. We evaluated the leukoencephalopathy according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0. The patients who had brain tumor recurrence after WBRT were censored at the last follow-up CT or MRI without recurrence. To evaluate the risk factors for leukoencephalopathy, bivariate analysis was performed using a logistic regression analysis adjusted for follow-up time. Factors included in the analysis were age, gender, dose fractionation, 5-fluorouracil, methotrexate, cisplatin, and other chemotherapeutic agents. Results: The median age of the 111 patients was 60.0 years (range, 23-89 years). The median follow-up was 3.8 months (range, 1.0-38.1 months). Leukoencephalopathy developed in 23 of the 111 patients. Grades 1, 2, and 3 were observed in 8, 7, and 8 patients, respectively. The incidence was 34.4% (11 of 32), 42.9% (6 of 14), 66.7% (2 of 3), and 100% (2 of 2) of the patients who were followed up for ≥6, ≥12, ≥24, and ≥36 months, respectively. In the bivariate analysis, older age (≥65 years) was significantly correlated with higher risk of leukoencephalopathy (odds ratio 3.31; 95% confidence interval 1.15-9.50; P=.03). Conclusions: The incidence of leukoencephalopathy after WBRT was 34.4% with ≥6 months follow-up, and increased with longer follow-up. Older age was a significant risk factor. The schedule of WBRT for patients with brain metastases should be carefully determined, especially for favorable patients.

  14. Regulation of brain copper homeostasis by the brain barrier systems: Effects of Fe-overload and Fe-deficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monnot, Andrew D.; Behl, Mamta; Ho, Sanna; Zheng, Wei

    2011-11-15

    Maintaining brain Cu homeostasis is vital for normal brain function. The role of systemic Fe deficiency (FeD) or overload (FeO) due to metabolic diseases or environmental insults in Cu homeostasis in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and brain tissues remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate how blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-SCF barrier (BCB) regulated Cu transport and how FeO or FeD altered brain Cu homeostasis. Rats received an Fe-enriched or Fe-depleted diet for 4 weeks. FeD and FeO treatment resulted in a significant increase (+ 55%) and decrease (- 56%) in CSF Cu levels (p < 0.05), respectively; however, neither treatment had any effect on CSF Fe levels. The FeD, but not FeO, led to significant increases in Cu levels in brain parenchyma and the choroid plexus. In situ brain perfusion studies demonstrated that the rate of Cu transport into the brain parenchyma was significantly faster in FeD rats (+ 92%) and significantly slower (- 53%) in FeO rats than in controls. In vitro two chamber Transwell transepithelial transport studies using primary choroidal epithelial cells revealed a predominant efflux of Cu from the CSF to blood compartment by the BCB. Further ventriculo-cisternal perfusion studies showed that Cu clearance by the choroid plexus in FeD animals was significantly greater than control (p < 0.05). Taken together, our results demonstrate that both the BBB and BCB contribute to maintain a stable Cu homeostasis in the brain and CSF. Cu appears to enter the brain primarily via the BBB and is subsequently removed from the CSF by the BCB. FeD has a more profound effect on brain Cu levels than FeO. FeD increases Cu transport at the brain barriers and prompts Cu overload in the CNS. The BCB plays a key role in removing the excess Cu from the CSF.

  15. Whole Brain Irradiation With Hippocampal Sparing and Dose Escalation on Multiple Brain Metastases: A Planning Study on Treatment Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokic, Vesna; Wiedenmann, Nicole; Fels, Franziska; Schmucker, Marianne; Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca-Ligia

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new treatment planning strategy in patients with multiple brain metastases. The goal was to perform whole brain irradiation (WBI) with hippocampal sparing and dose escalation on multiple brain metastases. Two treatment concepts were investigated: simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) and WBI followed by stereotactic fractionated radiation therapy sequential concept (SC). Methods and Materials: Treatment plans for both concepts were calculated for 10 patients with 2-8 brain metastases using volumetric modulated arc therapy. In the SIB concept, the prescribed dose was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain and 51 Gy in 12 fractions to individual brain metastases. In the SC concept, the prescription was 30 Gy in 12 fractions to the whole brain followed by 18 Gy in 2 fractions to brain metastases. All plans were optimized for dose coverage of whole brain and lesions, simultaneously minimizing dose to the hippocampus. The treatment plans were evaluated on target coverage, homogeneity, and minimal dose to the hippocampus and organs at risk. Results: The SIB concept enabled more successful sparing of the hippocampus; the mean dose to the hippocampus was 7.55 {+-} 0.62 Gy and 6.29 {+-} 0.62 Gy, respectively, when 5-mm and 10-mm avoidance regions around the hippocampus were used, normalized to 2-Gy fractions. In the SC concept, the mean dose to hippocampus was 9.8 {+-} 1.75 Gy. The mean dose to the whole brain (excluding metastases) was 33.2 {+-} 0.7 Gy and 32.7 {+-} 0.96 Gy, respectively, in the SIB concept, for 5-mm and 10-mm hippocampus avoidance regions, and 37.23 {+-} 1.42 Gy in SC. Conclusions: Both concepts, SIB and SC, were able to achieve adequate whole brain coverage and radiosurgery-equivalent dose distributions to individual brain metastases. The SIB technique achieved better sparing of the hippocampus, especially when a10-mm hippocampal avoidance region was used.

  16. "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen, Department of Physics, Harvard University USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN PPPL Entrance Procedures ...

  17. System Provides Clear Brain Scans of Awake, Unrestrained Mice | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab System Provides Clear Brain Scans of Awake, Unrestrained Mice System Provides Clear Brain Scans of Awake, Unrestrained Mice dynamic imaging of mice Three markers attached to the head of a mouse enable the AwakeSPECT system to obtain detailed, functional images of the brain of a conscious mouse as it moves around. NEWPORT NEWS, Va., April 9 - Setting a mouse free to roam might alarm most people, but not so for nuclear imaging researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas

  18. monolayers BUNKER,BRUCE C.; CARPICK,ROBERT W.; ASSINK,ROGER A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    P.; GULLEY,GERALD L. 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SYNTHESIS; AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS; THIN FILMS; SILANES; HYDROLYSIS;...

  19. Take a Closer Look at the Brain | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Take a Closer Look at the Brain Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on ...

  20. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Proffitt, James

    2011-02-08

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  1. Using biomarkers to identify traumatic brain injury for soldiers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically results from a blow to the head, and it afflicts a significant percentage of US troops deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan. As such, TBI has ...

  2. Decade of the Brain 1990--2000: Maximizing human potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The US Decade of the Brain offers scientists throughout the Federal Government a unique opportunity to advance and apply scientific knowledge about the brain and nervous system. During the next 10 years, scientists hope to maximize human potential through studies of human behavior, senses and communication, learning and memory, genetic/chemical alterations, and environmental interactions. Progress in these areas should lead to reductions in mortality from brain and nervous system disorders and to improvements in the quality of life. This report identifies nine research areas that could form the basis of an integrated program in the brain and behavioral sciences. A chart summarizing the Federal activities in these nine areas may be found at the back of the report. In addition, three areas that span the nine research areas -- basic research, technology and international activities -- are considered.

  3. Scientists model brain structure to help computers recognize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The team tried developing a computer model based on human neural structure and function, ... Introspectively, we know that the human brain solves this problem very well. We only have ...

  4. COLLOQUIUM: Your Restless Brain: Changing Continually Throughout the Day

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Night | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Upcoming Events Events Calendar Colloquia Archive Science On Saturday Archive Research Education Organization Contact Us Upcoming Events Events Calendar Colloquia Archive Science On Saturday Archive Events April 2, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Your Restless Brain: Changing Continually Throughout the Day and Night Professor Barry Jacobs Princeton University Presentation: File WC02APR2014_BJacob.pptx As you read this, your brain is

  5. Consciousness and the Social Brain | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2015, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium Consciousness and the Social Brain Professor Michael Graziano, Department of Psychology Princeton University Presentation: Office presentation icon Presentation Abstract: PDF icon Graziano.pdf Science on Saturday, January 10, 2015, "Consciousness and The Social Brain", Professor Michael Graziano, Princeton University Contact Information Website: Science on Saturday Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz-Arias, Science Education

  6. Brain teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradbury Science Museum Brain teasers exhibit opens at museum Brain Teasers traveling exhibit opens at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum The interactive exhibit is a collection of more than 20 puzzles and mind benders. December 4, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  7. Site Specific Advisory Board Elects Officers for FY 2014 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 4 Site Specific Advisory Board Elects Officers for FY 2014 September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) elected its FY 2014 officers during its September board meeting. Dave Hemelright, Bruce Hicks, and Lisa Hagy will serve as chair, vice chair, and secretary respectively. The new officers will preside over their first meeting October 9 at the DOE Information Center, 1 Science.gov Way in Oak Ridge. Hemelright was the vice chair for FY 2013

  8. Effect of prophylactic hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation-induced brain injury after stereotactic radiosurgery of brain metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohguri, Takayuki . E-mail: ogurieye@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Imada, Hajime; Kohshi, Kiyotaka; Kakeda, Shingo; Ohnari, Norihiro; Morioka, Tomoaki; Nakano, Keita; Konda, Nobuhide; Korogi, Yukunori

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prophylactic effect of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for radiation-induced brain injury in patients with brain metastasis treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: The data of 78 patients presenting with 101 brain metastases treated with SRS between October 1994 and September 2003 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 32 patients with 47 brain metastases were treated with prophylactic HBO (HBO group), which included all 21 patients who underwent subsequent or prior radiotherapy and 11 patients with common predictors of longer survival, such as inactive extracranial tumors and younger age. The other 46 patients with 54 brain metastases did not undergo HBO (non-HBO group). Radiation-induced brain injuries were divided into two categories, white matter injury (WMI) and radiation necrosis (RN), on the basis of imaging findings. Results: Radiation-induced brain injury occurred in 5 lesions (11%) in the HBO group (2 WMIs and 3 RNs) and in 11 (20%) in the non-HBO group (9 WMIs and 2 RNs). The WMI was less frequent for the HBO group than for the non-HBO group (p = 0.05), although multivariate analysis by logistic regression showed that WMI was not significantly correlated with HBO (p = 0.07). The 1-year actuarial probability of WMI was significantly better for the HBO group (2%) than for the non-HBO group (36%) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The present study showed a potential value of prophylactic HBO for Radiation-induced WMIs, which justifies further evaluation to confirm its definite benefit.

  9. Unlocking the Secrets of Brain Signals (4K)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-17

    Scientists have for the first time determined, at atomic-scale resolution, the 3-D structure of a protein complex that provides the ultrafast trigger for chemicals messages sent between nerve cells in our brains. The discovery, which provides a new understanding of the molecular machinery driving brain function, builds on decades of research at Stanford University, the Stanford School of Medicine and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was made possible by SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source, an ultrabright X-ray laser.

  10. Preliminary Results of Whole Brain Radiotherapy With Concurrent Trastuzumab for Treatment of Brain Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chargari, Cyrus; Idrissi, Hind Riahi; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Bollet, Marc A.; Dieras, Veronique; Campana, Francois; Cottu, Paul; Fourquet, Alain; Kirova, Youlia M.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To assess the use of trastuzumab concurrently with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between April 2001 and April 2007, 31 patients with brain metastases from human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-positive breast cancer were referred for WBRT with concurrent trastuzumab. At brain progression, the median age was 55 years (range, 38-73), and all patients had a performance status of 0-2. The patients received trastuzumab 2 mg/kg weekly (n = 17) or 6 mg/kg repeated every 21 days (n = 14). In 26 patients, concurrent WBRT delivered 30 Gy in 10 daily fractions. In 6 patients, other fractionations were chosen because of either poor performance status or patient convenience. Results: After WBRT, radiologic responses were observed in 23 patients (74.2%), including 6 (19.4%) with a complete radiologic response and 17 (54.8%) with a partial radiologic response. Clinical responses were observed in 27 patients (87.1%). The median survival time from the start of WBRT was 18 months (range, 2-65). The median interval to brain progression was 10.5 months (range, 2-27). No Grade 2 or greater acute toxicity was observed. Conclusion: The low toxicity of trastuzumab concurrently with WBRT should probably not justify delays. Although promising, these preliminary data warrant additional validation of trastuzumab as a potential radiosensitizer for WBRT in brain metastases from breast cancer in the setting of a clinical trial.

  11. Brain surgery breathes new life into aging plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makansi, J.

    2006-04-15

    Unlike managing the human aging process, extending the life of a power plant often includes brain surgery, modernizing its control and automation system. Lately, such retrofits range from wholesale replacing of existing controls to the addition of specific control elements that help optimize performance. Pending revisions to safety codes and cybersecurity issues also need to be considered. 4 figs.

  12. Dysfunction of mitochondrial dynamics in the brains of scrapie-infected mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Hong-Seok; Choi, Yeong-Gon; Shin, Hae-Young; Oh, Jae-Min; Park, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Jae-Il; Carp, Richard I.; Choi, Eun-Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Sun

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • Mfn1 and Fis1 are significantly increased in the hippocampal region of the ME7 prion-infected brain, whereas Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the infected brain. • Dlp1 is significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction of the hippocampus in the infected brain. • Neuronal mitochondria in the prion-infected brains are enlarged and swollen compared to those of control brains. • There are significantly fewer mitochondria in the ME7-infected brain compared to the number in control brain. - Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common and prominent feature of many neurodegenerative diseases, including prion diseases; it is induced by oxidative stress in scrapie-infected animal models. In previous studies, we found swelling and dysfunction of mitochondria in the brains of scrapie-infected mice compared to brains of controls, but the mechanisms underlying mitochondrial dysfunction remain unclear. To examine whether the dysregulation of mitochondrial proteins is related to the mitochondrial dysfunction associated with prion disease, we investigated the expression patterns of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins in the brains of ME7 prion-infected mice. Immunoblot analysis revealed that Mfn1 was up-regulated in both whole brain and specific brain regions, including the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, of ME7-infected mice compared to controls. Additionally, expression levels of Fis1 and Mfn2 were elevated in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively, of the ME7-infected brain. In contrast, Dlp1 expression was significantly reduced in the hippocampus in the ME7-infected brain, particularly in the cytosolic fraction. Finally, we observed abnormal mitochondrial enlargement and histopathological change in the hippocampus of the ME7-infected brain. These observations suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction, which is presumably caused by the dysregulation of mitochondrial fusion and fission proteins, may contribute to the

  13. Source localization of brain activity using helium-free interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dammers, Jürgen Chocholacs, Harald; Eich, Eberhard; Boers, Frank; Faley, Michael; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Jon Shah, N.

    2014-05-26

    To detect extremely small magnetic fields generated by the human brain, currently all commercial magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems are equipped with low-temperature (low-T{sub c}) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors that use liquid helium for cooling. The limited and increasingly expensive supply of helium, which has seen dramatic price increases recently, has become a real problem for such systems and the situation shows no signs of abating. MEG research in the long run is now endangered. In this study, we report a MEG source localization utilizing a single, highly sensitive SQUID cooled with liquid nitrogen only. Our findings confirm that localization of neuromagnetic activity is indeed possible using high-T{sub c} SQUIDs. We believe that our findings secure the future of this exquisitely sensitive technique and have major implications for brain research and the developments of cost-effective multi-channel, high-T{sub c} SQUID-based MEG systems.

  14. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  15. Treatment of Five or More Brain Metastases With Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Grant K.; Suh, John H.; Reuther, Alwyn M.; Vogelbaum, Michael A.; Barnett, Gene H.; Angelov, Lilyana; Weil, Robert J.; Neyman, Gennady; Chao, Samuel T.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To examine the outcomes of patients with five or more brain metastases treated in a single session with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods and Materials: Sixty-four patients with brain metastases treated with SRS to five or more lesions in a single session were reviewed. Primary disease type, number of lesions, Karnofsky performance score (KPS) at SRS, and status of primary and systemic disease at SRS were included. Patients were treated using dosing as defined by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 90-05, with adjustments for critical structures. We defined prior whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as WBRT completed >1 month before SRS and concurrent WBRT as WBRT completed within 1 month before or after SRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazard regression were used to determine which patient and treatment factors predicted overall survival (OS). Results: The median OS after SRS was 7.5 months. The median KPS was 80 (range, 60-100). A KPS of {>=}80 significantly influenced OS (median OS, 4.8 months for KPS {<=}70 vs. 8.8 months for KPS {>=}80, p = 0.0097). The number of lesions treated did not significantly influence OS (median OS, 6.6 months for eight or fewer lesions vs. 9.9 months for more than eight, p = nonsignificant). Primary site histology did not significantly influence median OS. On multivariate Cox modeling, KPS and prior WBRT significantly predicted for OS. Whole-brain radiotherapy before SRS compared with concurrent WBRT significantly influenced survival, with a risk ratio of 0.423 (95% confidence interval 0.191-0.936, p = 0.0338). No significant differences were observed when no WBRT was compared with concurrent WBRT or when the no WBRT group was compared with prior WBRT. A KPS of {<=}70 predicted for poorer outcomes, with a risk ratio of 2.164 (95% confidence interval 1.157-4.049, p = 0.0157). Conclusions: Stereotactic radiosurgery to five or more brain lesions is an effective treatment option for patients with

  16. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  17. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  18. NNSA research and capabilities shed light on the human brain | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) and capabilities shed light on the human brain Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 3:57pm From a brain-inspired supercomputer for physics simulations to materials science from the structure of cow eyes, NNSA's laboratories are adept at linking biology with technology to benefit both fields of study. In June, which is Alzheimer's and Brain Awareness Month, Americans reflect on the nation's sixth leading cause of death-dementia. Research at NNSA's laboratories

  19. Parallel Paradigm for Ultraparallel Multi-Scale Brain Blood Flow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Parallel Paradigm for Ultraparallel Multi-Scale Brain Blood Flow Simulations Authors: Grinberg, L., Karniadakis, G.E. In this paper we present one approach in building a scalable solver NekTarG for solution of multi-scale and large size problems [1]. NekTarG has been designed for multi-scale blood modeling. The macro-vascular scales describing the flow dynamics in large vessels are coupled to the mesovascular scales unfolding dynamics of

  20. High-Tech Brain Implant Predicts, Prevents Epileptic Seizures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ANL-IN-08-043) - Energy Innovation Portal High-Tech Brain Implant Predicts, Prevents Epileptic Seizures (ANL-IN-08-043) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> Prototype of a seven-element cooling probe with cooling head containing inlet and outlet reservoirs for coolant flow.</p> Prototype of a seven-element cooling probe with cooling head containing inlet and outlet reservoirs for coolant flow. Technology Marketing Summary Epilepsy, a seizure

  1. High performance nanobio photocatalyst for targeted brain cancer therapy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozhkova, E.; Ulasov, I.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Lesniak, M.; Rajh, T.; Lai, B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2009-09-01

    We report pronounced and specific antiglioblastoma cell phototoxicity of 5 nm TiO{sub 2} particles covalently tethered to an antibody via a dihydroxybenzene bivalent linker. The linker application enables absorption of a visible part of the solar spectrum by the nanobio hybrid. The phototoxicity is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that initiate programmed death of the cancer cell. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) was applied for direct visualization of the nanobioconjugate distribution through a single brain cancer cell at the submicrometer scale.

  2. Conformable actively multiplexed high-density surface electrode array for brain interfacing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, John; Kim, Dae-Hyeong; Litt, Brian; Viventi, Jonathan

    2015-01-13

    Provided are methods and devices for interfacing with brain tissue, specifically for monitoring and/or actuation of spatio-temporal electrical waveforms. The device is conformable having a high electrode density and high spatial and temporal resolution. A conformable substrate supports a conformable electronic circuit and a barrier layer. Electrodes are positioned to provide electrical contact with a brain tissue. A controller monitors or actuates the electrodes, thereby interfacing with the brain tissue. In an aspect, methods are provided to monitor or actuate spatio-temporal electrical waveform over large brain surface areas by any of the devices disclosed herein.

  3. NNSA's missions get a boost from brain-inspired, radically different...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NNSA's missions get a boost from brain-inspired, radically different computer design ... LLNL deputy associate director for Data Science. "The potential capabilities neuromorphic ...

  4. Repeat Courses of Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS), Deferring Whole-Brain Irradiation, for New Brain Metastases After Initial SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shultz, David B.; Modlin, Leslie A.; Jayachandran, Priya; Von Eyben, Rie; Gibbs, Iris C.; Choi, Clara Y.H.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R.; Hancock, Steven L.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To report the outcomes of repeat stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), deferring whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT), for distant intracranial recurrences and identify factors associated with prolonged overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods: We retrospectively identified 652 metastases in 95 patients treated with 2 or more courses of SRS for brain metastases, deferring WBRT. Cox regression analyzed factors predictive for OS. Results: Patients had a median of 2 metastases (range, 1-14) treated per course, with a median of 2 courses (range, 2-14) of SRS per patient. With a median follow-up after first SRS of 15 months (range, 3-98 months), the median OS from the time of the first and second course of SRS was 18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-24) and 11 months (95% CI 6-17), respectively. On multivariate analysis, histology, graded prognostic assessment score, aggregate tumor volume (but not number of metastases), and performance status correlated with OS. The 1-year cumulative incidence, with death as a competing risk, of local failure was 5% (95% CI 4-8%). Eighteen (24%) of 75 deaths were from neurologic causes. Nineteen patients (20%) eventually received WBRT. Adverse radiation events developed in 2% of SRS sites. Conclusion: Multiple courses of SRS, deferring WBRT, for distant brain metastases after initial SRS, seem to be a safe and effective approach. The graded prognostic assessment score, updated at each course, and aggregate tumor volume may help select patients in whom the deferral of WBRT might be most beneficial.

  5. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda; Reed, Warren

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  6. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clapp, Ned E.; Hively, Lee M.

    1997-01-01

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness.

  7. Method and apparatus for extraction of low-frequency artifacts from brain waves for alertness detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clapp, N.E.; Hively, L.M.

    1997-05-06

    Methods and apparatus automatically detect alertness in humans by monitoring and analyzing brain wave signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave (EEG or MEG) data from the subject, digitizing the data, separating artifact data from raw data, and comparing trends in f-data to alertness indicators, providing notification of inadequate alertness. 4 figs.

  8. Secretary Chu to Join Vice President Biden at Middle Class Task...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Steven Chu, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis, and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Shaun Donovan. The event will be open press. Additional media details are...

  9. Vice President Biden Kicks Off Five Days of Earth Day Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the selection of 25 communities for up to 452 million in Recovery Act funding to "ramp-up" energy efficiency building ... The models created through this program are expected to save ...

  10. On Earth Day Vice President Biden Announces $300 Million in Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of our nation's vehicle fleet, help to reduce carbon emissions and increase energy security by helping reduce U.S. dependence to foreign oil. This funding adds to the...

  11. Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Visits Los Alamos...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Winnefield was at LANL to receive a wide variety of classified briefings that covered the broad spectrum of national security science at LANL. Winnefield was briefed by the LANL's ...

  12. B&W Y-12 names Bill Tindal Vice President for Production | Y...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duling, who has accepted a position at Nuclear Fuel Services, a subsidiary of Babcock & Wilcox Nuclear Operations Group, Inc., in Erwin, Tenn. "Bill is uniquely suited for this ...

  13. On Earth Day Vice President Biden Announces $300 Million in Recovery...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... support refueling infrastructure for alternative fuels, including biofuels and natural gas. ... It will also boost investments in clean renewable energy generation from the wind, sun, ...

  14. Collimator design for a multipinhole brain SPECT insert for MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Audenhaege, Karen; Van Holen, Roel; Vanhove, Christian; Vandenberghe, Stefaan

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is an important clinical tool, with unique tracers for studying neurological diseases. Nowadays, most commercial SPECT systems are combined with x-ray computed tomography (CT) in so-called SPECT/CT systems to obtain an anatomical background for the functional information. However, while CT images have a high spatial resolution, they have a low soft-tissue contrast, which is an important disadvantage for brain imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), on the other hand, has a very high soft-tissue contrast and does not involve extra ionizing radiation. Therefore, the authors designed a brain SPECT insert that can operate inside a clinical MRI. Methods: The authors designed and simulated a compact stationary multipinhole SPECT insert based on digital silicon photomultiplier detector modules, which have shown to be MR-compatible and have an excellent intrinsic resolution (0.5 mm) when combined with a monolithic 2 mm thick LYSO crystal. First, the authors optimized the different parameters of the SPECT system to maximize sensitivity for a given target resolution of 7.2 mm in the center of the field-of-view, given the spatial constraints of the MR system. Second, the authors performed noiseless simulations of two multipinhole configurations to evaluate sampling and reconstructed resolution. Finally, the authors performed Monte Carlo simulations and compared the SPECT insert with a clinical system with ultrahigh-resolution (UHR) fan beam collimators, based on contrast-to-noise ratio and a visual comparison of a Hoffman phantom with a 9 mm cold lesion. Results: The optimization resulted in a stationary multipinhole system with a collimator radius of 150.2 mm and a detector radius of 172.67 mm, which corresponds to four rings of 34 diSPM detector modules. This allows the authors to include eight rings of 24 pinholes, which results in a system volume sensitivity of 395 cps/MBq. Noiseless simulations

  15. Multipinhole collimator with 20 apertures for a brain SPECT application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Tzu-Cheng; Ellin, Justin R.; Shrestha, Uttam; Seo, Youngho; Huang, Qiu; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Several new technologies for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) instrumentation with parallel-hole collimation have been proposed to improve detector sensitivity and signal collection efficiency. Benefits from improved signal efficiency include shorter acquisition times and lower dose requirements. In this paper, the authors show a possibility of over an order of magnitude enhancement in photon detection efficiency (from 7.6 × 10{sup −5} to 1.6 × 10{sup −3}) for dopamine transporter (DaT) imaging of the striatum over the conventional SPECT parallel-hole collimators by use of custom-designed 20 multipinhole (20-MPH) collimators with apertures of 0.75 cm diameter. Methods: Quantifying specific binding ratio (SBR) of {sup 123}I-ioflupane or {sup 123}I-iometopane’s signal at the striatal region is a common brain imaging method to confirm the diagnosis of the Parkinson’s disease. The authors performed imaging of a striatal phantom filled with aqueous solution of I-123 and compared camera recovery ratios of SBR acquired between low-energy high-resolution (LEHR) parallel-hole collimators and 20-MPH collimators. Results: With only two-thirds of total acquisition time (20 min against 30 min), a comparable camera recovery ratio of SBR was achieved using 20-MPH collimators in comparison to that from the LEHR collimator study. Conclusions: Their systematic analyses showed that the 20-MPH collimator could be a promising alternative for the DaT SPECT imaging for brain over the traditional LEHR collimator, which could give both shorter scan time and improved diagnostic accuracy.

  16. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  17. Tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response in the developing mouse brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haiping; Wang, Xin; Ke, Zun-Ji; Comer, Ashley L.; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2015-03-15

    Accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes ER stress, resulting in the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress and UPR are associated with many neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders. The developing brain is particularly susceptible to environmental insults which may cause ER stress. We evaluated the UPR in the brain of postnatal mice. Tunicamycin, a commonly used ER stress inducer, was administered subcutaneously to mice of postnatal days (PDs) 4, 12 and 25. Tunicamycin caused UPR in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of mice of PD4 and PD12, which was evident by the upregulation of ATF6, XBP1s, p-eIF2α, GRP78, GRP94 and MANF, but failed to induce UPR in the brain of PD25 mice. Tunicamycin-induced UPR in the liver was observed at all stages. In PD4 mice, tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was observed in layer II of the parietal and optical cortex, CA1–CA3 and the subiculum of the hippocampus, the cerebellar external germinal layer and the superior/inferior colliculus. Tunicamycin-induced caspase-3 activation was also shown on PD12 but to a much lesser degree and mainly located in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, deep cerebellar nuclei and pons. Tunicamycin did not activate caspase-3 in the brain of PD25 mice and the liver of all stages. Similarly, immature cerebellar neurons were sensitive to tunicamycin-induced cell death in culture, but became resistant as they matured in vitro. These results suggest that the UPR is developmentally regulated and the immature brain is more susceptible to ER stress. - Highlights: • Tunicamycin caused a development-dependent UPR in the mouse brain. • Immature brain was more susceptible to tunicamycin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. • Tunicamycin caused more neuronal death in immature brain than mature brain. • Tunicamycin-induced neuronal death is region-specific.

  18. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  19. Ionic charge transport between blockages: Sodium cation conduction in freshly excised bulk brain tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emin, David; Akhtari, Massoud; Ellingson, B. M.; Mathern, G. W.

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the transient-dc and frequency-dependent electrical conductivities between blocking electrodes. We extend this analysis to measurements of ions’ transport in freshly excised bulk samples of human brain tissue whose complex cellular structure produces blockages. The associated ionic charge-carrier density and diffusivity are consistent with local values for sodium cations determined non-invasively in brain tissue by MRI (NMR) and diffusion-MRI (spin-echo NMR). The characteristic separation between blockages, about 450 microns, is very much shorter than that found for sodium-doped gel proxies for brain tissue, >1 cm.

  20. A hungry brain slurps up a kid's energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4 September, 2014 - 15:40 Human energy can be considered a type of renewable energy. Science News reports on how children's brains use almost half of the energy their bodies...

  1. Differential metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal in liver, lung and brain of mice and rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Ruijin; Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Mishin, Vladimir; Richardson, Jason R.; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Debra L.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.

    2014-08-15

    The lipid peroxidation end-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is generated in tissues during oxidative stress. As a reactive aldehyde, it forms Michael adducts with nucleophiles, a process that disrupts cellular functioning. Liver, lung and brain are highly sensitive to xenobiotic-induced oxidative stress and readily generate 4-HNE. In the present studies, we compared 4-HNE metabolism in these tissues, a process that protects against tissue injury. 4-HNE was degraded slowly in total homogenates and S9 fractions of mouse liver, lung and brain. In liver, but not lung or brain, NAD(P)+ and NAD(P)H markedly stimulated 4-HNE metabolism. Similar results were observed in rat S9 fractions from these tissues. In liver, lung and brain S9 fractions, 4-HNE formed protein adducts. When NADH was used to stimulate 4-HNE metabolism, the formation of protein adducts was suppressed in liver, but not lung or brain. In both mouse and rat tissues, 4-HNE was also metabolized by glutathione S-transferases. The greatest activity was noted in livers of mice and in lungs of rats; relatively low glutathione S-transferase activity was detected in brain. In mouse hepatocytes, 4-HNE was rapidly taken up and metabolized. Simultaneously, 4-HNE-protein adducts were formed, suggesting that 4-HNE metabolism in intact cells does not prevent protein modifications. These data demonstrate that, in contrast to liver, lung and brain have a limited capacity to metabolize 4-HNE. The persistence of 4-HNE in these tissues may increase the likelihood of tissue injury during oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Lipid peroxidation generates 4-hydroxynonenal, a highly reactive aldehyde. • Rodent liver, but not lung or brain, is efficient in degrading 4-hydroxynonenal. • 4-hydroxynonenal persists in tissues with low metabolism, causing tissue damage.

  2. A planning study of simultaneous integrated boost with forward IMRT for multiple brain metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Xiaodong; Ni, Lingqin; Hu, Wei; Chen, Weijun; Ying, Shenpeng; Gong, Qiangjun; Liu, Yanmei

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dose conformity and feasibility of whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were generated for 10 patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases on Pinnacle 6.2 Treatment Planning System. The prescribed dose was 30 Gy to the whole brain (planning target volume [PTV]{sub wbrt}) and 40 Gy to individual brain metastases (PTV{sub boost}) simultaneously, and both doses were given in 10 fractions. The maximum diameters of individual brain metastases ranged from 1.6 to 6 cm, and the summated PTVs per patient ranged from 1.62 to 69.81 cm{sup 3}. Conformity and feasibility were evaluated regarding conformation number and treatment delivery time. One hundred percent volume of the PTV{sub boost} received at least 95% of the prescribed dose in all cases. The maximum doses were less than 110% of the prescribed dose to the PTV{sub boost}, and all of the hot spots were within the PTV{sub boost}. The volume of the PTV{sub wbrt} that received at least 95% of the prescribed dose ranged from 99.2% to 100%. The mean values of conformation number were 0.682. The mean treatment delivery time was 2.79 minutes. Ten beams were used on an average in these plans. Whole-brain radiotherapy with a simultaneous integrated boost by forward intensity-modulated radiation therapy in 1 to 3 brain metastases is feasible, and treatment delivery time is short.

  3. Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Ansa Maer; Scherwath, Angela; Ernst, Gundula; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Bremer, Michael; Steinmann, Diana

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in

  4. SU-E-T-549: Modeling Relative Biological Effectiveness of Protons for Radiation Induced Brain Necrosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirkovic, D; Peeler, C; Grosshans, D; Titt, U; Taleei, R; Mohan, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a model of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons as a function of dose and linear energy transfer (LET) for induction of brain necrosis using clinical data. Methods: In this study, treatment planning information was exported from a clinical treatment planning system (TPS) and used to construct a detailed Monte Carlo model of the patient and the beam delivery system. The physical proton dose and LET were computed in each voxel of the patient volume using Monte Carlo particle transport. A follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study registered to the treatment planning CT was used to determine the region of the necrosis in the brain volume. Both, the whole brain and the necrosis volumes were segmented from the computed tomography (CT) dataset using the contours drawn by a physician and the corresponding voxels were binned with respect to dose and LET. The brain necrosis probability was computed as a function of dose and LET by dividing the total volume of all necrosis voxels with a given dose and LET with the corresponding total brain volume resulting in a set of NTCP-like curves (probability as a function of dose parameterized by LET). Results: The resulting model shows dependence on both dose and LET indicating the weakness of the constant RBE model for describing the brain toxicity. To the best of our knowledge the constant RBE model is currently used in all clinical applications which may Result in increased rate of brain toxicities in patients treated with protons. Conclusion: Further studies are needed to develop more accurate brain toxicity models for patients treated with protons and other heavy ions.

  5. Brains, Knees, . . . and now Batteries | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brains, Knees, . . . and now Batteries Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 02.01.12 Brains, Knees, . . . and now Batteries Magnetic

  6. "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen, Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Physics, Harvard University | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab February 18, 2012, 9:30am Science On Saturday "USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN", Prof. Adam Cohen, Department of Physics, Harvard University USING LASERS TO CONTROL AND PROBE THE BRAIN PPPL Entrance Procedures Visitor Information, Directions, Security at PPPL As a federal facility, the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory is operating under heightened security measures because of the events of September 11,

  7. Metastasis Infiltration: An Investigation of the Postoperative Brain-Tumor Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raore, Bethwel; Schniederjan, Matthew; Prabhu, Roshan; Brat, Daniel J.; Shu, Hui-Kuo; Olson, Jeffrey J.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: This study aims to evaluate brain infiltration of metastatic tumor cells past the main tumor resection margin to assess the biological basis for the use of stereotactic radiosurgery treatment of the tumor resection cavity and visualized resection edge or clinical target volume. Methods and Materials: Resection margin tissue was obtained after gross total resection of a small group of metastatic lesions from a variety of primary sources. The tissue at the border of the tumor and brain tissue was carefully oriented and processed to evaluate the presence of tumor cells within brain tissue and their distance from the resection margin. Results: Microscopic assessment of the radially oriented tissue samples showed no tumor cells infiltrating the surrounding brain tissue. Among the positive findings were reactive astrocytosis observed on the brain tissue immediately adjacent to the tumor resection bed margin. Conclusions: The lack of evidence of metastatic tumor cell infiltration into surrounding brain suggests the need to target only a narrow depth of the resection cavity margin to minimize normal tissue injury and prevent treatment size-dependent stereotactic radiosurgery complications.

  8. Phase 3 Trials of Stereotactic Radiosurgery With or Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for 1 to 4 Brain Metastases: Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahgal, Arjun; Aoyama, Hidefumi; Kocher, Martin; Neupane, Binod; Collette, Sandra; Tago, Masao; Shaw, Prakesh; Beyene, Joseph; Chang, Eric L.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials evaluating stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) with or without whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for patients presenting with 1 to 4 brain metastases. Method and Materials: Three trials were identified through a literature search, and IPD were obtained. Outcomes of interest were survival, local failure, and distant brain failure. The treatment effect was estimated after adjustments for age, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) score, number of brain metastases, and treatment arm. Results: A total of 364 of the pooled 389 patients met eligibility criteria, of whom 51% were treated with SRS alone and 49% were treated with SRS plus WBRT. For survival, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.04) favoring SRS alone in patients ≤50 years of age, and no significant differences were observed in older patients. Hazard ratios (HRs) for patients 35, 40, 45, and 50 years of age were 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.24-0.90), 0.52 (95% CI = 0.29-0.92), 0.58 (95% CI = 0.35-0.95), and 0.64 (95% CI = 0.42-0.99), respectively. Patients with a single metastasis had significantly better survival than those who had 2 to 4 metastases. For distant brain failure, age was a significant effect modifier (P=.043), with similar rates in the 2 arms for patients ≤50 of age; otherwise, the risk was reduced with WBRT for patients >50 years of age. Patients with a single metastasis also had a significantly lower risk of distant brain failure than patients who had 2 to 4 metastases. Local control significantly favored additional WBRT in all age groups. Conclusions: For patients ≤50 years of age, SRS alone favored survival, in addition, the initial omission of WBRT did not impact distant brain relapse rates. SRS alone may be the preferred treatment for this age group.

  9. Response of rat brain protein synthesis to ethanol and sodium barbital

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, S.; Greenberg, S.A.; Do, K.; Grey, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) depressants such as ethanol and barbiturates under acute or chronic conditions can induce changes in rat brain protein synthesis. While these data demonstrate the individual effects of drugs on protein synthesis, the response of brain protein synthesis to alcohol-drug interactions is not known. The goal of the present study was to determine the individual and combined effects of ethanol and sodium barbital on brain protein synthesis and gain an understanding of the mechanisms by which these alterations in protein synthesis are produced. Specifically, the in vivo and in vitro effects of sodium barbital (one class of barbiturates which is not metabolized by the hepatic tissue) were examined on brain protein synthesis in rats made physically dependent upon ethanol. Using cell free brain polysomal systems isolated from Control, Ethanol and 24 h Ethanol Withdrawn rats, data show that sodium barbital, when intubated intragastrically, inhibited the time dependent incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by all three groups of ribosomes. Under these conditions, the Ethanol Withdrawn group displayed the largest inhibition of the /sup 14/C) leucine incorporation into protein when compared to the Control and Ethanol groups. In addition, sodium barbital when added at various concentrations in vitro to the incubation medium inhibited the incorporation of /sup 14/C) leucine into protein by Control and Ethanol polysomes. The inhibitory effects were also obtained following preincubation of ribosomes in the presence of barbital but not cycloheximide. Data suggest that brain protein synthesis, specifically brain polysomes, through interaction with ethanol or barbital are involved in the functional development of tolerance. These interactions may occur through proteins or polypeptide chains or alterations in messenger RNA components associated with the ribosomal units.

  10. A Multi-institutional Study of Factors Influencing the Use of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgson, David C.; Charpentier, Anne-Marie; Cigsar, Candemir; Atenafu, Eshetu G.; Ng, Angela; Bahl, Guarav; Zadeh, Gelareh; San Miguel, John; Menard, Cynthia; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases is a relatively well-studied technology with established guidelines regarding patient selection, although its implementation is technically complex. We evaluated the extent to which local availability of SRS affected the treatment of patients with brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 3030 patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for brain metastases in 1 of 7 cancer centers in Ontario. Clinical data were abstracted for a random sample of 973 patients. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the use of SRS as a boost within 4 months following WBRT or at any time following WBRT. Results: Of 898 patients eligible for analysis, SRS was provided to 70 (7.8%) patients at some time during the course of their disease and to 34 (3.8%) patients as a boost following WBRT. In multivariable analyses, factors significantly associated with the use of SRS boost following WBRT were fewer brain metastases (odds ratio [OR] = 6.50), controlled extracranial disease (OR = 3.49), age (OR = 0.97 per year of advancing age), and the presence of an on-site SRS program at the hospital where WBRT was given (OR = 12.34; all P values were <.05). Similarly, availability of on-site SRS was the factor most predictive of the use of SRS at any time following WBRT (OR = 5.98). Among patients with 1-3 brain metastases, good/fair performance status, and no evidence of active extracranial disease, SRS was provided to 40.3% of patients who received WBRT in a hospital that had an on-site SRS program vs 3.0% of patients who received WBRT at a hospital without SRS (P<.01). Conclusions: The availability of on-site SRS is the factor most strongly associated with the provision of this treatment to patients with brain metastases and appears to be more influential than accepted clinical eligibility factors.

  11. Static jaw collimation settings to minimize radiation dose to normal brain tissue during stereotactic radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Eun Young; Zhang Xin; Yan Yulong; Sharma, Sunil; Penagaricano, Jose; Moros, Eduardo; Corry, Peter

    2012-01-01

    At University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) intracranial stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is performed by using a linear accelerator with an add-on micromultileaf collimator (mMLC). In our clinical setting, static jaws are automatically adapted to the furthest edge of the mMLC-defined segments with 2-mm (X jaw) and 5-mm (Y jaw) margin and the same jaw values are applied for all beam angles in the treatment planning system. This additional field gap between the static jaws and the mMLC allows additional radiation dose to normal brain tissue. Because a radiosurgery procedure consists of a single high dose to the planning target volume (PTV), reduction of unnecessary dose to normal brain tissue near the PTV is important, particularly for pediatric patients whose brains are still developing or when a critical organ, such as the optic chiasm, is near the PTV. The purpose of this study was to minimize dose to normal brain tissue by allowing minimal static jaw margin around the mMLC-defined fields and different static jaw values for each beam angle or arc. Dose output factors were measured with various static jaw margins and the results were compared with calculated doses in the treatment planning system. Ten patient plans were randomly selected and recalculated with zero static jaw margins without changing other parameters. Changes of PTV coverage, mean dose to predefined normal brain tissue volume adjacent to PTV, and monitor units were compared. It was found that the dose output percentage difference varied from 4.9-1.3% for the maximum static jaw opening vs. static jaw with zero margins. The mean dose to normal brain tissue at risk adjacent to the PTV was reduced by an average of 1.9%, with negligible PTV coverage loss. This dose reduction strategy may be meaningful in terms of late effects of radiation, particularly in pediatric patients. This study generated clinical knowledge and tools to consistently minimize dose to normal brain tissue.

  12. Effects of Cell Phone Radiofrequency Signal Exposure on Brain Glucos Metabolism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Vaska, P.; Fowler, J.S.; Telang, F.; Alexoff, D.; Logan, J.; Wong, C.

    2011-03-01

    The dramatic increase in use of cellular telephones has generated concern about possible negative effects of radiofrequency signals delivered to the brain. However, whether acute cell phone exposure affects the human brain is unclear. To evaluate if acute cell phone exposure affects brain glucose metabolism, a marker of brain activity. Randomized crossover study conducted between January 1 and December 31, 2009, at a single US laboratory among 47 healthy participants recruited from the community. Cell phones were placed on the left and right ears and positron emission tomography with ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose injection was used to measure brain glucose metabolism twice, once with the right cell phone activated (sound muted) for 50 minutes ('on' condition) and once with both cell phones deactivated ('off' condition). Statistical parametric mapping was used to compare metabolism between on and off conditions using paired t tests, and Pearson linear correlations were used to verify the association of metabolism and estimated amplitude of radiofrequency-modulated electromagnetic waves emitted by the cell phone. Clusters with at least 1000 voxels (volume >8 cm{sup 3}) and P < .05 (corrected for multiple comparisons) were considered significant. Brain glucose metabolism computed as absolute metabolism ({micro}mol/100 g per minute) and as normalized metabolism (region/whole brain). Whole-brain metabolism did not differ between on and off conditions. In contrast, metabolism in the region closest to the antenna (orbitofrontal cortex and temporal pole) was significantly higher for on than off conditions (35.7 vs 33.3 {micro}mol/100 g per minute; mean difference, 2.4 [95% confidence interval, 0.67-4.2]; P = .004). The increases were significantly correlated with the estimated electromagnetic field amplitudes both for absolute metabolism (R = 0.95, P < .001) and normalized metabolism (R = 0.89; P < .001). In healthy participants and compared with no exposure, 50-minute

  13. G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 is involved in brain development during zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Yanan; Liu, Xiaochun; Zhu, Pei; Li, Jianzhen; Sham, Kathy W.Y.; Cheng, Shuk Han; Li, Shuisheng; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Christopher H.K.; Lin, Haoran

    2013-05-24

    Highlights: •The Gper expression was detected in the developing brain of zebrafish. •Gper morpholino knockdown induced apoptosis of brain cells. •Gper morpholino knockdown reduced expression in neuron markers. •Zebrafish Gper may be involved in neuronal development. -- Abstract: G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (Gper, formerly known as GPR30) is found to be a trophic and protective factor in mediating action of estrogen in adult brain, while its role in developing brain remains to be elucidated. Here we present the expression pattern of Gper and its functions during embryogenesis in zebrafish. Both the mRNA and protein of Gper were detected throughout embryogenesis. Whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) revealed a wide distribution of gper mRNAs in various regions of the developing brain. Gper knockdown by specific morpholinos resulted in growth retardation in embryos and morphological defects in the developing brain. In addition, induced apoptosis, decreased proliferation of the brain cells and maldevelopment of sensory and motor neurons were also found in the morphants. Our results provide novel insights into Gper functions in the developing brain, revealing that Gper can maintain the survival of the brain cells, and formation and/or differentiation of the sensory and motor neurons.

  14. Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Surgery Followed by Local Brain Radiotherapy and Surgery Followed by Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Patients With Single Brain Metastasis: Single-Center Retrospective Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Narita, Yoshitaka; Miyakita, Yasuji; Ohno, Makoto; Sumi, Minako; Mayahara, Hiroshi; Kayama, Takamasa; Shibui, Soichiro

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Data comparing the clinical outcomes of local brain radiotherapy (LBRT) and whole brain RT (WBRT) in patients with a single brain metastasis after tumor removal are limited. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed to compare the patterns of treatment failure, cause of death, progression-free survival, median survival time, and Karnofsky performance status for long-term survivors among patients who underwent surgery followed by either LBRT or WBRT between 1990 and 2008 at the National Cancer Center Hospital. Results: A total of 130 consecutive patients were identified. The median progression-free survival period among the patients who received postoperative LBRT (n = 64) and WBRT (n = 66) was 9.7 and 11.5 months, respectively (p = .75). The local recurrence rates (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 12.1%) and intracranial new metastasis rate (LBRT, 42.2% vs. WBRT, 33.3%) were similar in each arm. The incidence of leptomeningeal metastasis was also equivalent (LBRT, 9.4% vs. WBRT, 10.6%). The median survival time for the LBRT and WBRT patients was 13.9 and 16.7 months, respectively (p = .88). A neurologic cause of death was noted in 35.6% of the patients in the LBRT group and 36.7% of the WBRT group (p = .99). The Karnofsky performance status at 2 years was comparable between the two groups. Conclusions: The clinical outcomes of LBRT and WBRT were similar. A prospective evaluation is warranted.

  15. New Breast Cancer Recursive Partitioning Analysis Prognostic Index in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwinska, Anna; Murawska, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to present a new breast cancer recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) prognostic index for patients with newly diagnosed brain metastases as a guide in clinical decision making. Methods and Materials: A prospectively collected group of 441 consecutive patients with breast cancer and brain metastases treated between the years 2003 and 2009 was assessed. Prognostic factors significant for univariate analysis were included into RPA. Results: Three prognostic classes of a new breast cancer RPA prognostic index were selected. The median survival of patients within prognostic Classes I, II, and III was 29, 9, and 2.4 months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Class I included patients with one or two brain metastases, without extracranial disease or with controlled extracranial disease, and with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) of 100. Class III included patients with multiple brain metastases with KPS of {<=}60. Class II included all other cases. Conclusions: The breast cancer RPA prognostic index is an easy and valuable tool for use in clinical practice. It can select patients who require aggressive treatment and those in whom whole-brain radiotherapy or symptomatic therapy is the most reasonable option. An individual approach is required for patients from prognostic Class II.

  16. Intensity-modulated radiosurgery with rapidarc for multiple brain metastases and comparison with static approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jiazhu; Pawlicki, Todd; Rice, Roger; Mundt, Arno J.; Sandhu, Ajay; Lawson, Joshua; Murphy, Kevin T.

    2012-04-01

    Rotational RapidArc (RA) and static intensity-modulated radiosurgery (IMRS) have been used for brain radiosurgery. This study compares the 2 techniques from beam delivery parameters and dosimetry aspects for multiple brain metastases. Twelve patients with 2-12 brain lesions treated with IMRS were replanned using RA. For each patient, an optimal 2-arc RA plan from several trials was chosen for comparison with IMRS. Homogeneity, conformity, and gradient indexes have been calculated. The mean dose to normal brain and maximal dose to other critical organs were evaluated. It was found that monitor unit (MU) reduction by RA is more pronounced for cases with larger number of brain lesions. The MU-ratio of RA and IMRS is reduced from 104% to 39% when lesions increase from 2 to 12. The dose homogeneities are comparable in both techniques and the conformity and gradient indexes and critical organ doses are higher in RA. Treatment time is greatly reduced by RA in intracranial radiosurgery, because RA uses fewer MUs, fewer beams, and fewer couch angles.

  17. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  18. Synchrotron radiation imaging is a powerful tool to image brain microvasculature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Mengqi; Sun, Danni; Xie, Yuanyuan; Xia, Jian; Long, Hongyu; Hu, Kai; Xiao, Bo; Peng, Guanyun

    2014-03-15

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) imaging is a powerful experimental tool for micrometer-scale imaging of microcirculation in vivo. This review discusses recent methodological advances and findings from morphological investigations of cerebral vascular networks during several neurovascular pathologies. In particular, it describes recent developments in SR microangiography for real-time assessment of the brain microvasculature under various pathological conditions in small animal models. It also covers studies that employed SR-based phase-contrast imaging to acquire 3D brain images and provide detailed maps of brain vasculature. In addition, a brief introduction of SR technology and current limitations of SR sources are described in this review. In the near future, SR imaging could transform into a common and informative imaging modality to resolve subtle details of cerebrovascular function.

  19. Enhanced-locality fiber-optic two-photon-fluorescence live-brain interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Anokhin, K. V.; Kilin, S. Ya.; Sakoda, K.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-02-24

    Two-photon excitation is shown to substantially enhance the locality of fiber-based optical interrogation of strongly scattering biotissues. In our experiments, a high-numerical-aperture, large-core-are fiber probe is used to deliver the 200-fs output of a 100-MHz mode-locked ytterbium fiber laser to samples of live mouse brain, induce two-photon fluorescence of nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond markers in brain sample. Fiber probes with a high numerical aperture and a large core area are shown to enable locality enhancement in fiber-laser–fiber-probe two-photon brain excitation and interrogation without sacrificing the efficiency of fluorescence response collection.

  20. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haixing H.; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-02-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (~34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models.

  1. Toxicogenomic profiling in maternal and fetal rodent brains following gestational exposure to chlorpyrifos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreira, Estefania G.; Yu Xiaozhong; Robinson, Joshua F.; Griffith, Willian; Hong, Sung Woo; Beyer, Richard P.; Bammler, Theo K.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2010-06-15

    Considering the wide variety of effects that have been reported to occur in the developmental neurotoxicity of chlorpyrifos (CP) and the lack of consensus on their dependence of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity inhibition, we applied microarray technology to explore dose-dependent alterations in transcriptional response in the fetal and maternal C57BL/6 mouse brain after daily gestational exposure (days 6 to 17) to CP (2, 4, 10, 12 or 15 mg/kg, sc). We identified significantly altered genes across doses and assessed for overrepresentation of Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and KEGG pathways. We further clustered genes based on their expression profiles across doses and repeated the GO/pathways analysis for each cluster. The dose-effect relationship of CP on gene expression, both at the gene and pathway levels was non-monotonic and not necessarily related to brain AChE inhibition. The largest impact was observed in the 10 mg/kg dose group which was also the LOAEL for brain AChE inhibition. In the maternal brain, lower doses (4 mg/kg) influenced GO categories and pathways such as cell adhesion, behavior, lipid metabolism, long-term potentiation, nervous system development, neurogenesis, synaptic transmission. In the fetal brain, lower doses (2 and/or 4 mg/kg) significantly altered cell division, translation, transmission of nerve impulse, chromatin modification, long-term potentiation. In addition, some genes involved in nervous system development and signaling were shown to be specifically influenced by these lower CP doses. Our approach was sensitive and reflected the diversity of responses known to be disrupted by CP and highlighted possible additional consequences of CP neurotoxicity, such as disturbance of the ubiquitin proteasome system.

  2. SU-E-T-56: Brain Metastasis Treatment Plans for Contrast-Enhanced Synchrotron Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obeid, L; Adam, J; Tessier, A; Vautrin, M; Benkebil, M; Sihanath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Iodine-enhanced radiotherapy is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of an iodinated contrast agent in brain tumors with irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays. The aim of this study is to compare dynamic stereotactic arc-therapy and iodineenhanced SSRT. Methods: Five patients bearing brain metastasis received a standard helical 3D-scan without iodine. A second scan was acquired 13 min after an 80 g iodine infusion. Two SSRT treatment plans (with/without iodine) were performed for each patient using a dedicated Monte Carlo (MC) treatment planning system (TPS) based on the ISOgray TPS. Ten coplanar beams (6×6 cm2, shaped with collimator) were simulated. MC statistical error objective was less than 5% in the 50% isodose. The dynamic arc-therapy plan was achieved on the Iplan Brainlab TPS. The treatment plan validation criteria were fixed such that 100% of the prescribed dose is delivered at the beam isocentre and the 70% isodose contains the whole target volume. The comparison elements were the 70% isodose volume, the average and maximum doses delivered to organs at risk (OAR): brainstem, optical nerves, chiasma, eyes, skull bone and healthy brain parenchyma. Results: The stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy remains the best technique in terms of dose conformation. Iodine-enhanced SSRT presents similar performances to dynamic arc-therapy with increased brainstem and brain parenchyma sparing. One disadvantage of SSRT is the high dose to the skull bone. Iodine accumulation in metastasis may increase the dose by 20–30%, allowing a normal tissue sparing effect at constant prescribed dose. Treatment without any iodine enhancement (medium-energy stereotactic radiotherapy) is not relevant with degraded HDVs (brain, parenchyma and skull bone) comparing to stereotactic dynamic arc-therapy. Conclusion: Iodine-enhanced SSRT exhibits a good potential for brain metastasis treatment regarding the dose distribution and OAR criteria.

  3. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  4. What Art Can Tell Us About The Brain | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 15, 2014, 9:30am to 11:00am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium What Art Can Tell Us About The Brain Dr. Margaret Livingstone, Professor of Neurobiology Harvard University, Department of Neurobiology Presentation: Office presentation icon Presentation Abstract: PDF icon Margaret Livingstone.pdf Science On Saturday, March 15, 2014, "What Art Can Tell Us About The Brain" Contact Information Coordinator(s): Deedee Ortiz dortiz@pppl.gov Host(s): Ronald Hatcher rhatcher@pppl.gov PPPL

  5. Skull Flexure from Blast Waves: A Mechanism for Brain Injury with Implications for Helmet Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, W C; King, M J; Blackman, E G

    2009-04-30

    Traumatic brain injury [TBI] has become a signature injury of current military conflicts, with debilitating, costly, and long-lasting effects. Although mechanisms by which head impacts cause TBI have been well-researched, the mechanisms by which blasts cause TBI are not understood. From numerical hydrodynamic simulations, we have discovered that non-lethal blasts can induce sufficient skull flexure to generate potentially damaging loads in the brain, even without a head impact. The possibility that this mechanism may contribute to TBI has implications for injury diagnosis and armor design.

  6. Dynamic functional imaging of brain glucose utilization using fPET-FDG

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Villien, Marjorie; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Catana, Ciprian; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Sander, Christin Y.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; et al

    2014-06-14

    We report that glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and yet the dynamic response of glucose utilization to changes in brain activity is still not fully understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism using 2-[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, FDG PET in its current form provides an integral (or average) of glucose consumption over tens of minutes and lacks the temporal information to capture physiological alterations associated with changes in brain activity induced by tasks or drug challenges. Traditionally, changes in glucose utilization are inferred by comparing two separate scans, which significantly limits themore » utility of the method. We report a novel method to track changes in FDG metabolism dynamically, with higher temporal resolution than exists to date and within a single session. Using a constant infusion of FDG, we demonstrate that our technique (termed fPET-FDG) can be used in an analysis pipeline similar to fMRI to define within-session differential metabolic responses. We use visual stimulation to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Ultimately, this new method has a great potential to be used in research protocols and clinical settings since fPET-FDG imaging can be performed with most PET scanners and data acquisition and analysis are straightforward. fPET-FDG is a highly complementary technique to MRI and provides a rich new way to observe functional changes in brain metabolism.« less

  7. Dynamic functional imaging of brain glucose utilization using fPET-FDG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villien, Marjorie; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; Mandeville, Joseph B.; Catana, Ciprian; Polimeni, Jonathan R.; Sander, Christin Y.; Zürcher, Nicole R.; Chonde, Daniel B.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Rosen, Bruce R.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2014-06-14

    We report that glucose is the principal source of energy for the brain and yet the dynamic response of glucose utilization to changes in brain activity is still not fully understood. Positron emission tomography (PET) allows quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism using 2-[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However, FDG PET in its current form provides an integral (or average) of glucose consumption over tens of minutes and lacks the temporal information to capture physiological alterations associated with changes in brain activity induced by tasks or drug challenges. Traditionally, changes in glucose utilization are inferred by comparing two separate scans, which significantly limits the utility of the method. We report a novel method to track changes in FDG metabolism dynamically, with higher temporal resolution than exists to date and within a single session. Using a constant infusion of FDG, we demonstrate that our technique (termed fPET-FDG) can be used in an analysis pipeline similar to fMRI to define within-session differential metabolic responses. We use visual stimulation to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Ultimately, this new method has a great potential to be used in research protocols and clinical settings since fPET-FDG imaging can be performed with most PET scanners and data acquisition and analysis are straightforward. fPET-FDG is a highly complementary technique to MRI and provides a rich new way to observe functional changes in brain metabolism.

  8. Imaging Nicotine in Rat Brain Tissue by Use of Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Thomas, Mathew; Carson, James P.; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Laskin, Julia

    2013-01-15

    Imaging mass spectrometry offers simultaneous detection of drugs, drug metabolites and endogenous substances in a single experiment. This is important when evaluating effects of a drug on a complex organ system such as the brain, where there is a need to understand how regional drug distribution impacts function. Nicotine is an addictive drug and its action in the brain is of high interest. Here we use nanospray desorption electrospray ionization, nano-DESI, imaging to discover the localization of nicotine in rat brain tissue after in vivo administration of nicotine. Nano-DESI is a new ambient technique that enables spatially-resolved analysis of tissue samples without special sample pretreatment. We demonstrate high sensitivity of nano-DESI imaging that enables detection of only 0.7 fmole nicotine per pixel in the complex brain matrix. Furthermore, by adding deuterated nicotine to the solvent, we examined how matrix effects, ion suppression, and normalization affect the observed nicotine distribution. Finally, we provide preliminary results suggesting that nicotine localizes to the hippocampal substructure called dentate gyrus.

  9. Salvage Radiosurgery for Brain Metastases: Prognostic Factors to Consider in Patient Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, Goldie; Zadeh, Gelareh; Gingras-Hill, Geneviève; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Laperriere, Normand J.; Bernstein, Mark; Jiang, Haiyan; Ménard, Cynthia; Chung, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is offered to patients for recurrent brain metastases after prior brain radiation therapy (RT), but few studies have evaluated the efficacy of salvage SRS or factors to consider in selecting patients for this treatment. This study reports overall survival (OS), intracranial progression-free survival (PFS), and local control (LC) after salvage SRS, and factors associated with outcomes. Methods and Materials: This is a retrospective review of patients treated from 2009 to 2011 with salvage SRS after prior brain RT for brain metastases. Survival from salvage SRS and from initial brain metastases diagnosis (IBMD) was calculated. Univariate and multivariable (MVA) analyses included age, performance status, recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) class, extracranial disease control, and time from initial RT to salvage SRS. Results: There were 106 patients included in the analysis with a median age of 56.9 years (range 32.5-82 years). A median of 2 metastases were treated per patient (range, 1-12) with a median dose of 21 Gy (range, 12-24) prescribed to the 50% isodose. With a median follow-up of 10.5 months (range, 0.1-68.2), LC was 82.8%, 60.1%, and 46.8% at 6 months, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively. Median PFS was 6.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9-7.6). Median OS was 11.7 months (95% CI = 8.1-13) from salvage SRS, and 22.1 months from IBMD (95% CI = 18.4-26.8). On MVA, age (P=.01; hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04; 95% CI = 1.01-1.07), extracranial disease control (P=.004; HR = 0.46; 95% CI = 0.27-0.78), and interval from initial RT to salvage SRS of at least 265 days (P=.001; HR = 2.46; 95% CI = 1.47-4.09) were predictive of OS. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that patients can have durable local control and survival after salvage SRS for recurrent brain metastases. In particular, younger patients with controlled extracranial disease and a durable response to initial brain RT are likely to benefit from salvage SRS.

  10. Impact of spot size on plan quality of spot scanning proton radiosurgery for peripheral brain lesions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dongxu Dirksen, Blake; Hyer, Daniel E.; Buatti, John M.; Sheybani, Arshin; Dinges, Eric; Felderman, Nicole; TenNapel, Mindi; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the plan quality of proton spot scanning (SS) radiosurgery as a function of spot size (in-air sigma) in comparison to x-ray radiosurgery for treating peripheral brain lesions. Methods: Single-field optimized (SFO) proton SS plans with sigma ranging from 1 to 8 mm, cone-based x-ray radiosurgery (Cone), and x-ray volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were generated for 11 patients. Plans were evaluated using secondary cancer risk and brain necrosis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Results: For all patients, secondary cancer is a negligible risk compared to brain necrosis NTCP. Secondary cancer risk was lower in proton SS plans than in photon plans regardless of spot size (p = 0.001). Brain necrosis NTCP increased monotonically from an average of 2.34/100 (range 0.42/100–4.49/100) to 6.05/100 (range 1.38/100–11.6/100) as sigma increased from 1 to 8 mm, compared to the average of 6.01/100 (range 0.82/100–11.5/100) for Cone and 5.22/100 (range 1.37/100–8.00/100) for VMAT. An in-air sigma less than 4.3 mm was required for proton SS plans to reduce NTCP over photon techniques for the cohort of patients studied with statistical significance (p = 0.0186). Proton SS plans with in-air sigma larger than 7.1 mm had significantly greater brain necrosis NTCP than photon techniques (p = 0.0322). Conclusions: For treating peripheral brain lesions—where proton therapy would be expected to have the greatest depth-dose advantage over photon therapy—the lateral penumbra strongly impacts the SS plan quality relative to photon techniques: proton beamlet sigma at patient surface must be small (<7.1 mm for three-beam single-field optimized SS plans) in order to achieve comparable or smaller brain necrosis NTCP relative to photon radiosurgery techniques. Achieving such small in-air sigma values at low energy (<70 MeV) is a major technological challenge in commercially available proton therapy systems.