National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for browser interactive query

  1. Test Drive EIA's New Interactive Electricity Data Browser

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIA recently launched an interactive electricity data browser on a test website that allows users to search in one location much of EIA’s electricity data and to customize it to meet their information needs. Test it out and provide your feedback!

  2. ANL's Map and Data Browser

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-07-13

    The MaD browser is a web browser Java applet developed to display and interact with vector graphic (map) objects, relational database tables, and other data sources. It was designed for use in remedial action projects to quickly and widely disseminate sampling results but is generally applicable to many other mapping situations. Its primary value is its simplicity and general availability.

  3. Coal Data Browser

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Browser - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration ... Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel ... about this project. 12192015 - Florida, United States ...

  4. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) ...

  5. Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-02-29

    The Berkeley Quantitative Genome Browser provides graphical browsing functionality for genomic data organized, at a minimum, by sequence and position. While supporting the annotation browsing features typical of many other genomic browsers, additional emphasis is placed on viewing and utilizing quantitative data. Data may be read from GFF, SGR, FASTA or any column delimited format. Once the data has been read into the browser's buffer, it may be searched. filtered or subjected to mathematical transformation.more » The browser also supplies some graphical design manipulation functionality geared towards preparing figures for presentations or publication. A plug-in mechanism enables development outside the core functionality that adds more advanced or esoteric analysis capabilities. BBrowse's development and distribution is open-source and has been built to run on Linux, OSX and MS Windows operating systems.« less

  6. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Browser Interface (WBUI) Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems:

  7. LDAP Browser/Editor

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-07-18

    The LDAP Browser/Editor provides a user-friendly Java-based interface to LDAP databases with tightly integrated browsing and editing capabilities. Entirely written in Java with help of the JFC (Swingset) and JNDI class libraries. It connects to any X.500, LDAP v2 and v3 servers and supports editing of multiple-value attributes.

  8. Query | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Query Query Query Query_1.pdf PDF icon Query More Documents & Publications DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report July 29, 2013 DOE EO 13563 January 2014 Update Report and Burden Reduction Efforts DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December 18, 2012

  9. Electricity Data Browser | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Browser AgencyCompany Organization: U.S. Energy Information Administration Sector: Energy Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools User Interface: Website Website:...

  10. Fermilab | Fermilab Time and Labor | Browser Compatibility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desk ticket or by visiting their office on the ground floor of Wilson Hall. Windows Computers Operating System Web Browser Java Plug-in Windows 7 (32 bit) Internet Explorer 7, 8,...

  11. LDAP Browser/Editor: Work Easily with Directories | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory LDAP Browser/Editor: Work Easily with Directories LDAP Browser/Editor: Work Easily with Directories Now there's a tool that makes LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) directories easier to access. Argonne's LDAP Browser/Editor, unique among Java-based browsers, provides full editing functionality for working with the information in LDAP directories. Directory managers can easily modify the contents of LDAP databases. Users also can configure different editors or viewers,

  12. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Query-Driven Visualization of Large Data Sets. In IEEE Visualization 2005, Minneapolis, MN, October 23-25, 2005, IEEE Computer Society Press. 2 Kesheng Wu, Ekow J. Otoo, and Arie ...

  13. Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) software design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, D.D.

    1996-09-30

    The purpose of this document is to provide an ``as-built`` design description for the Requirements Management System Browser (RMSB) application. The Graphical User Interface (GUI) and database structure design are described for the RMSB application, referred to as the ``Browser.`` The RMSB application provides an easy to use PC-based interface to browse systems engineering data stored and managed in a UNIX software application. The system engineering data include functions, requirements, and architectures that make up the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) technical baseline.

  14. Query

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 10292007 10282008 Milton, Ingrid USDA DOEEE 4152007 4152008 National Defense Moore, Richard DOEEE UniversityICAF 812006 6302008 Morrissey, Alyssa DOEEE OECDIEA ...

  15. SPARQL Query Form | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    where a ?Concept LIMIT 100 Display Results As: Auto HTML Spreadsheet XML JSON Javascript NTriples RDFXML Rigorous check of the query Execution timeout, in milliseconds,...

  16. INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser. If you are using IE9, you can also view the interactive here

  17. compound queries | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or...

  18. ask queries | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or...

  19. Browser Testing Suite for Websites Outside of the Energy.gov Drupal Environment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When developing an EERE website or application outside the Energy.gov Drupal environment, you are required to test its performance on the browsers most used by EERE's visitors.

  20. An Application of Multivariate Statistical Analysis for Query-Driven Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gosink, Luke J.; Garth, Christoph; Anderson, John C.; Bethel, E. Wes; Joy, Kenneth I.

    2010-03-01

    Abstract?Driven by the ability to generate ever-larger, increasingly complex data, there is an urgent need in the scientific community for scalable analysis methods that can rapidly identify salient trends in scientific data. Query-Driven Visualization (QDV) strategies are among the small subset of techniques that can address both large and highly complex datasets. This paper extends the utility of QDV strategies with a statistics-based framework that integrates non-parametric distribution estimation techniques with a new segmentation strategy to visually identify statistically significant trends and features within the solution space of a query. In this framework, query distribution estimates help users to interactively explore their query's solution and visually identify the regions where the combined behavior of constrained variables is most important, statistically, to their inquiry. Our new segmentation strategy extends the distribution estimation analysis by visually conveying the individual importance of each variable to these regions of high statistical significance. We demonstrate the analysis benefits these two strategies provide and show how they may be used to facilitate the refinement of constraints over variables expressed in a user's query. We apply our method to datasets from two different scientific domains to demonstrate its broad applicability.

  1. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets UsingFast

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bitmap Indices (Conference) | SciTech Connect UsingFast Bitmap Indices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets UsingFast Bitmap Indices Large scale scientific data is often stored in scientific data formats such as FITS, netCDF and HDF. These storage formats are of particular interest to the scientific user community since they provide multi-dimensional storage and retrieval. However, one of the drawbacks of these storage

  2. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets usingFast

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bitmap Indices (Conference) | SciTech Connect usingFast Bitmap Indices Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets usingFast Bitmap Indices Large scale scientific data is often stored in scientific data formats such as FITS, netCDF and HDF. These storage formats are of particular interest to the scientific user community since they provide multi-dimensional storage and retrieval. However, one of the drawbacks of these storage

  3. Oregon Certified Water Right Examiners Query Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Oregon Certified Water Right Examiners Query Webpage Citation State of...

  4. Increasing ask query limit | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    via json. For example, this query only returns two entries: http:en.openei.orgservicesrestutilityrates?versionlatest&formatjsonplain&offset9998&limit30&detailb...

  5. Query-Driven Visualization and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebel, Oliver; Bethel, E. Wes; Prabhat, Mr.; Wu, Kesheng

    2012-11-01

    This report focuses on an approach to high performance visualization and analysis, termed query-driven visualization and analysis (QDV). QDV aims to reduce the amount of data that needs to be processed by the visualization, analysis, and rendering pipelines. The goal of the data reduction process is to separate out data that is "scientifically interesting'' and to focus visualization, analysis, and rendering on that interesting subset. The premise is that for any given visualization or analysis task, the data subset of interest is much smaller than the larger, complete data set. This strategy---extracting smaller data subsets of interest and focusing of the visualization processing on these subsets---is complementary to the approach of increasing the capacity of the visualization, analysis, and rendering pipelines through parallelism. This report discusses the fundamental concepts in QDV, their relationship to different stages in the visualization and analysis pipelines, and presents QDV's application to problems in diverse areas, ranging from forensic cybersecurity to high energy physics.

  6. HDF5-FastQuery: An API for Simplifying Access to Data Storage,Retrieval, Indexing and Querying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Gosink, Luke; Shalf, John; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu,Kesheng

    2006-06-15

    This work focuses on research and development activities that bridge a gap between fundamental data management technology index, query, storage and retrieval and use of such technology in computational and computer science algorithms and applications. The work has resulted in a streamlined applications programming interface (API) that simplifies data storage and retrieval using the HDF5 data I/O library, and eases use of the FastBit compressed bitmap indexing software for data indexing/querying. The API, which we call HDF5-FastQuery, will have broad applications in domain sciences as well as associated data analysis and visualization applications.

  7. Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or...

  8. T-703: Cisco Unified Communications Manager Open Query Interface Lets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remote Users Obtain Database Contents | Department of Energy 703: Cisco Unified Communications Manager Open Query Interface Lets Remote Users Obtain Database Contents T-703: Cisco Unified Communications Manager Open Query Interface Lets Remote Users Obtain Database Contents August 26, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in Cisco Unified Communications Manager. A remote user can obtain database contents PLATFORM: Cisco Unified Communications Manager 6.x, 7.x, 8.0, 8.5

  9. INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? December 7, 2015 - 4:41pm Addthis This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser. If you are using IE9, you can also view the interactive here Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer KEY FACTS New interactive lets you compare annual carbon emissions of U.S.

  10. Query optimization for graph analytics on linked data using SPARQL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Seokyong; Lee, Sangkeun; Lim, Seung -Hwan; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju

    2015-07-01

    Triplestores that support query languages such as SPARQL are emerging as the preferred and scalable solution to represent data and meta-data as massive heterogeneous graphs using Semantic Web standards. With increasing adoption, the desire to conduct graph-theoretic mining and exploratory analysis has also increased. Addressing that desire, this paper presents a solution that is the marriage of Graph Theory and the Semantic Web. We present software that can analyze Linked Data using graph operations such as counting triangles, finding eccentricity, testing connectedness, and computing PageRank directly on triple stores via the SPARQL interface. We describe the process of optimizing performance of the SPARQL-based implementation of such popular graph algorithms by reducing the space-overhead, simplifying iterative complexity and removing redundant computations by understanding query plans. Our optimized approach shows significant performance gains on triplestores hosted on stand-alone workstations as well as hardware-optimized scalable supercomputers such as the Cray XMT.

  11. Large-Scale Continuous Subgraph Queries on Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, Sutanay; Holder, Larry; Chin, George; Feo, John T.

    2011-11-30

    Graph pattern matching involves finding exact or approximate matches for a query subgraph in a larger graph. It has been studied extensively and has strong applications in domains such as computer vision, computational biology, social networks, security and finance. The problem of exact graph pattern matching is often described in terms of subgraph isomorphism which is NP-complete. The exponential growth in streaming data from online social networks, news and video streams and the continual need for situational awareness motivates a solution for finding patterns in streaming updates. This is also the prime driver for the real-time analytics market. Development of incremental algorithms for graph pattern matching on streaming inputs to a continually evolving graph is a nascent area of research. Some of the challenges associated with this problem are the same as found in continuous query (CQ) evaluation on streaming databases. This paper reviews some of the representative work from the exhaustively researched field of CQ systems and identifies important semantics, constraints and architectural features that are also appropriate for HPC systems performing real-time graph analytics. For each of these features we present a brief discussion of the challenge encountered in the database realm, the approach to the solution and state their relevance in a high-performance, streaming graph processing framework.

  12. Towards Optimal Multi-Dimensional Query Processing with BitmapIndices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2005-09-30

    Bitmap indices have been widely used in scientific applications and commercial systems for processing complex, multi-dimensional queries where traditional tree-based indices would not work efficiently. This paper studies strategies for minimizing the access costs for processing multi-dimensional queries using bitmap indices with binning. Innovative features of our algorithm include (a) optimally placing the bin boundaries and (b) dynamically reordering the evaluation of the query terms. In addition, we derive several analytical results concerning optimal bin allocation for a probabilistic query model. Our experimental evaluation with real life data shows an average I/O cost improvement of at least a factor of 10 for multi-dimensional queries on datasets from two different applications. Our experiments also indicate that the speedup increases with the number of query dimensions.

  13. V-204: A specially crafted query can cause BIND to terminate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    affected source distributions may crash with assertion failures triggered in the same fashion. IMPACT: A specially crafted DNS query could cause the DNS service to terminate...

  14. Minimizing I/O Costs of Multi-Dimensional Queries with BitmapIndices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotem, Doron; Stockinger, Kurt; Wu, Kesheng

    2006-03-30

    Bitmap indices have been widely used in scientific applications and commercial systems for processing complex,multi-dimensional queries where traditional tree-based indices would not work efficiently. A common approach for reducing the size of a bitmap index for high cardinality attributes is to group ranges of values of an attribute into bins and then build a bitmap for each bin rather than a bitmap for each value of the attribute. Binning reduces storage costs,however, results of queries based on bins often require additional filtering for discarding it false positives, i.e., records in the result that do not satisfy the query constraints. This additional filtering,also known as ''candidate checking,'' requires access to the base data on disk and involves significant I/O costs. This paper studies strategies for minimizing the I/O costs for ''candidate checking'' for multi-dimensional queries. This is done by determining the number of bins allocated for each dimension and then placing bin boundaries in optimal locations. Our algorithms use knowledge of data distribution and query workload. We derive several analytical results concerning optimal bin allocation for a probabilistic query model. Our experimental evaluation with real life data shows an average I/O cost improvement of at least a factor of 10 for multi-dimensional queries on datasets from two different applications. Our experiments also indicate that the speedup increases with the number of query dimensions.

  15. Cyber Graph Queries for Geographically Distributed Data Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Jonathan W.; Collins, Michael; Kearns, Aaron; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Saia, Jared

    2015-05-01

    We present new algorithms for a distributed model for graph computations motivated by limited information sharing we first discussed in [20]. Two or more independent entities have collected large social graphs. They wish to compute the result of running graph algorithms on the entire set of relationships. Because the information is sensitive or economically valuable, they do not wish to simply combine the information in a single location. We consider two models for computing the solution to graph algorithms in this setting: 1) limited-sharing: the two entities can share only a polylogarithmic size subgraph; 2) low-trust: the entities must not reveal any information beyond the query answer, assuming they are all honest but curious. We believe this model captures realistic constraints on cooperating autonomous data centers. We have algorithms in both setting for s - t connectivity in both models. We also give an algorithm in the low-communication model for finding a planted clique. This is an anomaly- detection problem, finding a subgraph that is larger and denser than expected. For both the low- communication algorithms, we exploit structural properties of social networks to prove perfor- mance bounds better than what is possible for general graphs. For s - t connectivity, we use known properties. For planted clique, we propose a new property: bounded number of triangles per node. This property is based upon evidence from the social science literature. We found that classic examples of social networks do not have the bounded-triangles property. This is because many social networks contain elements that are non-human, such as accounts for a business, or other automated accounts. We describe some initial attempts to distinguish human nodes from automated nodes in social networks based only on topological properties.

  16. U-039: ISC Update: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and working to produce patches which avoid the crash.

  17. U-038: BIND 9 Resolver crashes after logging an error in query.c

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A remote server can cause the target connected client to crash. Organizations across the Internet are reporting crashes interrupting service on BIND 9 nameservers performing recursive queries. Affected servers crash after logging an error in query.c with the following message: "INSIST(! dns_rdataset_isassociated(sigrdataset))" Multiple versions are reported as being affected, including all currently supported release versions of ISC BIND 9. ISC is actively investigating the root cause and working to produce patches which avoid the crash.

  18. How can I query data on OpenEI and generate a map? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    How can I query data on OpenEI and generate a map? Home > Groups > Developer I'd like to have an Ask or SPARQL query display as a map in the OpenEI wiki section. What are the...

  19. STEO Data Browser

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Tools A-Z Index All Reports & Publications EIA Survey Forms EIA Beta Policies PrivacySecurity Copyright & Reuse Accessibility Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov ...

  20. Electricity Data Browser

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Tools A-Z Index All Reports & Publications EIA Survey Forms EIA Beta Policies PrivacySecurity Copyright & Reuse Accessibility Related Sites U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov ...

  1. Tool For Editing Structured Query Language Text Within ORACLE Forms Applications

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-02-01

    SQTTEXT is an ORACLE SQL*Forms application that allows a programmer to view and edit all the Structured Query Language (SQL) text for a given application on one screen. This application is an outgrowth of the prototyping of an on-line system dictionary for the Worldwide Household Goods Information system for Transportation-Modernization decision support system being prototyped by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, but it can be applied to all SQL*Forms software development, debugging, and maintenance.

  2. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional database

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Tang, Diane L.; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2010-05-11

    A method and system for producing graphics. A hierarchical structure of a database is determined. A visual table, comprising a plurality of panes, is constructed by providing a specification that is in a language based on the hierarchical structure of the database. In some cases, this language can include fields that are in the database schema. The database is queried to retrieve a set of tuples in accordance with the specification. A subset of the set of tuples is associated with a pane in the plurality of panes.

  3. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Tang, Diane L.; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2006-08-08

    A method and system for producing graphics. A hierarchical structure of a database is determined. A visual table, comprising a plurality of panes, is constructed by providing a specification that is in a language based on the hierarchical structure of the database. In some cases, this language can include fields that are in the database schema. The database is queried to retrieve a set of tuples in accordance with the specification. A subset of the set of tuples is associated with a pane in the plurality of panes.

  4. Thematic World Wide Web Visualization System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-10-10

    WebTheme is a system designed to facilitate world wide web information access and retrieval through visualization. It consists of two principal pieces, a WebTheme Server which allows users to enter in a query and automatocally harvest and process information of interest, and a WebTheme browser, which allows users to work with both Galaxies and Themescape visualizations of their data within a JAVA capable world wide web browser. WebTheme is an Internet solution, meaning that accessmore » to the server and the resulting visualizations can all be performed through the use of a WWW browser. This allows users to access and interact with SPIRE (Spatial Paradigm for Information Retrieval and Exploration) based visualizations through a web browser regardless of what computer platforms they are running on. WebTheme is specifically designed to create databases by harvesting and processing WWW home pages available on the Internet.« less

  5. EIA Open Data - Intro - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Open Data Introduction Register Register Forgot Your API Key? API Terms of Service API Browser API Documentation Query overview Series Query Geoset Query Relation Query Category Query Series Categories Query Updates Data Query Search Data Query Excel Add-In Download / Overview User Guide Installation Instructions Release Notes FAQs Embed Graphs & Maps Bulk Data Files The U.S. Energy Information Administration is committed to enhancing the value of its free and open data by making it

  6. OCIO Technology Summit: Data Analytics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at the Energy Information Administration demonstrated the Electricity Data Browser influence on creating the visualization of data, bringing together maps, query tools, and...

  7. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs The login nodes on Genepool should not be used for heavy interactive work. These login nodes are shared amoungst all Genepool users so heavy CPU or memory usage will affect other Genepool users. 10 nodes have been reserved on Genepool for high priority and interactive work. Each user can use up to 2 slots at a time in the high priority queue. Use the qlogin command to run jobs interactively. The example below shows how to request an

  8. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and

  9. Electric Power Annual 2014 - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for...

  10. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -q debug -l mppwidth48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -q flag specifies the...

  11. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs To run an interactive job on Hopper's compute nodes you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. The following command requests 2 nodes using the interactive queue. hopper% qsub -I -q debug -l mppwidth=48 The -I flag specifies an interactive job. The -q flag specifies the name of the queue and -l mppwidth determines the number of nodes to allocate for your job, but not as you might expect. The

  12. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Overview To run interactive jobs on Cori, you must request the number of nodes you want and have the system allocate resources from the pool of free nodes. To request an interactive session, the salloc command must be issued. For example, the following command requests 2 nodes in the debug partition for 30 min. % salloc -N 2 -p debug -t 00:30:00 salloc may be issued with several options. For the complete list of all options for salloc, refer to the SLURM salloc

  13. FastBit: Interactively Searching Massive Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kesheng; Ahern, Sean; Bethel, E. Wes; Chen, Jacqueline; Childs, Hank; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Geddes, Cameron; Gu, Junmin; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Koegler, Wendy; Lauret, Jerome; Meredith, Jeremy; Messmer, Peter; Otoo, Ekow; Perevoztchikov, Victor; Poskanzer, Arthur; Prabhat,; Rubel, Oliver; Shoshani, Arie; Sim, Alexander; Stockinger, Kurt; Weber, Gunther; Zhang, Wei-Ming

    2009-06-23

    As scientific instruments and computer simulations produce more and more data, the task of locating the essential information to gain insight becomes increasingly difficult. FastBit is an efficient software tool to address this challenge. In this article, we present a summary of the key underlying technologies, namely bitmap compression, encoding, and binning. Together these techniques enable FastBit to answer structured (SQL) queries orders of magnitude faster than popular database systems. To illustrate how FastBit is used in applications, we present three examples involving a high-energy physics experiment, a combustion simulation, and an accelerator simulation. In each case, FastBit significantly reduces the response time and enables interactive exploration on terabytes of data.

  14. Interactive Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Jobs Interactive Jobs Serial Code or Commands Franklin is a massively parallel high-performance computing platform and is intended and designed to run large parallel codes. While it is possible to run serial jobs on Franklin, it is discouraged. Any code or command that is not preceeded by the aprun command will execute serially on a service (usually login) node. The login nodes are for executing general UNIX shell commands, building code, and submitting jobs intended to run on the

  15. Energy API Browser | OpenEI

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of interest to center. Selected API information will be displayed below. Alternatively, you can download a CSV with this API data. Last reviewed on 08.23.2013 Powered by OpenEI...

  16. Layer Information for Interactive State Maps

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Shapefile (see query system for most current data.) DGPSU NERC Regions North American ... U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management 312016 3112016 - DFGPSU Oil and Gas Wells ...

  17. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the concerns of low-level file organization issues. ... std::vector& variablenames, const char * ... Heber, Scientific Data Management in the Coming Decade, In ...

  18. Complex Queries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity Markets Afghanistan-NREL Mission Afghanistan-NREL Resource Maps and Toolkits China-NREL Cooperation Dominica Island-NREL Cooperation Egypt-NREL Energy Activities...

  19. EIA-176 Query System 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. Example Queries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avoca, New York Avoca, Pennsylvania Avoca, Wisconsin Avocado Heights, California Avon Lake, Ohio Avon Park, Florida Avon, Alabama Avon, Colorado Avon, Connecticut Avon,...

  1. Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr; Scott W. White

    2002-06-01

    This annual report describes progress of the project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. This project, funded by the Department of Energy, is a cooperative project that assembles a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project is working to provide advanced distributed computing solutions to link database servers across the five states into a single system where data is maintained at the local level but is accessed through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. Each individual state has strengths in data gathering, data manipulation and data display, including GIS mapping, custom application development, web development, and database design. Sharing of expertise provides the critical mass of technical expertise to improve CO{sub 2} databases and data access in all states. This project improves the flow of data across servers in the five states and increases the amount and quality of available digital data. The MIDCARB project is developing improved online tools to provide real-time display and analyze CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The system links together data from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  2. Event heap: a coordination infrastructure for dynamic heterogeneous application interactions in ubiquitous computing environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, Bradley E.; Fox, Armando; Winograd, Terry A.; Hanrahan, Patrick M.

    2010-04-20

    An efficient and adaptive middleware infrastructure called the Event Heap system dynamically coordinates application interactions and communications in a ubiquitous computing environment, e.g., an interactive workspace, having heterogeneous software applications running on various machines and devices across different platforms. Applications exchange events via the Event Heap. Each event is characterized by a set of unordered, named fields. Events are routed by matching certain attributes in the fields. The source and target versions of each field are automatically set when an event is posted or used as a template. The Event Heap system implements a unique combination of features, both intrinsic to tuplespaces and specific to the Event Heap, including content based addressing, support for routing patterns, standard routing fields, limited data persistence, query persistence/registration, transparent communication, self-description, flexible typing, logical/physical centralization, portable client API, at most once per source first-in-first-out ordering, and modular restartability.

  3. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. You can do this locally on PDSF by following

  4. Interactive (login) Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive (login) Nodes Interactive (login) Nodes There are 3 interactive nodes at PDSF, pdsf[6-8].nersc.gov, that should be accessed via ssh to pdsf.nersc.gov. These are the gateways to accessing the rest of PDSF. Users can submit batch jobs as well as view and manipulate their files and directories from the interactive nodes. The configuration of the interactive nodes is shown in the table below. Processor Clock Speed (GHz) Architecture Cores Total Memory (GB) Scratch Space (GB) Intel Xeon

  5. Learning from Semantic Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Learning from Semantic Interactions Most machine learning tools used in geospatial mapping can only learn from labels. Learning from Semantic Interactions LANL's new machine learning tools can learn from semantic user interactions to produce more accurate mappings Point of Contact: Reid Porter, ISR Division, 665-7508, rporter@lanl.gov Current Phase - LDRD: * Develop theory and algorithms for tools and demonstrate impact in image analysis applications in materials microscopy. Phase 2 - Geospatial

  6. Weak Interaction | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weak Interaction February 22, 2011 Jefferson Lab has an accelerator designed to do incisive medium energy physics. This program is dominated by experiments aimed at developing our...

  7. ERHIC INTERACTION REGION DESIGN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MONTAG,C.PARKER,B.PTITSYN,V.TEPIKIAN,S.WANG,D.WANG,F.

    2003-10-13

    This paper presents the current interaction region design status of the ring-ring version of the electron-ion collider eRHIC (release 2.0).

  8. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  9. Elementary particle interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bugg, W.M.; Condo, G.T.; Handler, T.; Hart, E.L.; Ward, B.F.L.; Close, F.E.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1990-10-01

    This report discusses freon bubble chamber experiments exposed to {mu}{sup +} and neutrinos, photon-proton interactions; shower counter simulations; SLD detectors at the Stanford Linear Collider, and the detectors at the Superconducting Super Collider; elementary particle interactions; physical properties of dielectric materials used in High Energy Physics detectors; and Nuclear Physics. (LSP)

  10. Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions Regional Climate Vulnerabilities and Resilience Solutions This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser.

  11. Steven Weinberg, Weak Interactions, and Electromagnetic Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Steven Weinberg and Weak and Electromagnetic Interactions Resources with Additional Information Steven Weinberg Courtesy Dr. Steven Weinberg Steven "Weinberg is a professor of physics and astronomy at UT [The University of Texas] Austin and is founding director of the Theory Group in the College of Natural Sciences. [He is] well known for his development of a field theory that unifies the electromagnetic and weak nuclear forces, and for other major contributions to physics and cosmology ...

  12. Performance Profiles Table Browser: T-1. Selected Financial Items

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Markets & Finance Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Market Prices and Uncertainty Charts Archive Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Electricity Financial markets Financial reporting system Recurring All reports Browse by Tag Alphabetical Frequency Tag Cloud ‹ See All Markets & Finance Data Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2009 Release Date: February 25, 2011 | Next Release Date: December 2011 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0206(2009) Table: T-1. Selected

  13. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/MetadataBrowserServlet?typ

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H4 PERCENT OF HOUSING UNITS IN SAMPLE BY OCCUPANCY STATUS 2 Universe: Housing units H5 URBAN AND RURAL 7 Universe: Housing units H6 OCCUPANCY STATUS 3 Universe: Housing...

  14. Jefferson Lab Electronic Media - Please Upgrade your Browser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Web Design Photography Video Portfolio print version Web Resources JLab Web Usage Policy Posting JLab WWW Documents JLab Web Templates Search Engine Tips for Web Administrators ...

  15. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/MetadataBrowserServlet?typ

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... population 15 years and over P159A POVERTY STATUS IN 1999 BY AGE (WHITE ALONE) 17 Universe: White alone population for whom poverty status is determined P159B POVERTY STATUS ...

  16. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    if the node of choice is not immediately available Start an interactive session in the debug queue qsh -l debug1 -now no qlogin -l debug1 -now no This is useful when the cluster...

  17. Laser Plasma Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Plasma Interactions Laser Plasma Interactions Understanding and controlling laser produced plasmas for fusion and basic science Contact David Montgomery (505) 665-7994 Email John Kline (505) 667-7062 Email Thomson scattering is widely used to measure plasma temperature, density, and flow velocity in laser-produced plasmas at Trident, and is also used to detect plasma waves driven by unstable and nonlinear processes. A typical configuration uses a low intensity laser beam (2nd, 3rd, or 4th

  18. Human-machine interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsythe, J. Chris (Sandia Park, NM); Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM); Abbott, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Brannon, Nathan G. (Albuquerque, NM); Bernard, Michael L. (Tijeras, NM); Speed, Ann E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  19. Achromatic Interaction Point Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guimei Wang,, Yaroslav Derbenev, S.Alex Bogacz, P. Chevtsov, Andre Afanaciev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland P. Johnson

    2009-05-01

    Designers of high-luminosity energy-frontier muon colliders must provide strong beam focusing in the interaction regions. However, the construction of a strong, aberration-free beam focus is difficult and space consuming, and long straight sections generate an off-site radiation problem due to muon decay neutrinos that interact as they leave the surface of the earth. Without some way to mitigate the neutrino radiation problem, the maximum c.m. energy of a muon collider will be limited to about 3.5 TeV. A new concept for achromatic low beta design is being developed, in which the interaction region telescope and optical correction elements, are installed in the bending arcs. The concept, formulated analytically, combines space economy, a preventative approach to compensation for aberrations, and a reduction of neutrino flux concentration. An analytical theory for the aberration-free, low beta, spatially compact insertion is being developed.

  20. Dike/Drift Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Gaffiney

    2004-11-23

    This report presents and documents the model components and analyses that represent potential processes associated with propagation of a magma-filled crack (dike) migrating upward toward the surface, intersection of the dike with repository drifts, flow of magma in the drifts, and post-magma emplacement effects on repository performance. The processes that describe upward migration of a dike and magma flow down the drift are referred to as the dike intrusion submodel. The post-magma emplacement processes are referred to as the post-intrusion submodel. Collectively, these submodels are referred to as a conceptual model for dike/drift interaction. The model components and analyses of the dike/drift interaction conceptual model provide the technical basis for assessing the potential impacts of an igneous intrusion on repository performance, including those features, events, and processes (FEPs) related to dike/drift interaction (Section 6.1).

  1. History of Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  2. Nucleon-nucleon interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiringa, R.B.

    1996-12-31

    Nucleon-nucleon interactions are at the heart of nuclear physics, bridging the gap between QCD and the effective interactions appropriate for the shell model. We discuss the current status of {ital NN} data sets, partial-wave analyses, and some of the issues that go into the construction of potential models. Our remarks are illustrated by reference to the Argonne {ital v}{sub 18} potential, one of a number of new potentials that fit elastic nucleon-nucleon data up to 350 MeV with a {Chi}{sup 2} per datum near 1. We also discuss the related issues of three-nucleon potentials, two-nucleon charge and current operators, and relativistic effects. We give some examples of calculations that can be made using these realistic descriptions of {ital NN} interactions. We conclude with some remarks on how our empirical knowledge of {ital NN} interactions may help constrain models at the quark level, and hence models of nucleon structure.

  3. Electron: Cluster interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheidemann, A.A.; Kresin, V.V.; Knight, W.D.

    1994-02-01

    Beam depletion spectroscopy has been used to measure absolute total inelastic electron-sodium cluster collision cross sections in the energy range from E {approximately} 0.1 to E {approximately} 6 eV. The investigation focused on the closed shell clusters Na{sub 8}, Na{sub 20}, Na{sub 40}. The measured cross sections show an increase for the lowest collision energies where electron attachment is the primary scattering channel. The electron attachment cross section can be understood in terms of Langevin scattering, connecting this measurement with the polarizability of the cluster. For energies above the dissociation energy the measured electron-cluster cross section is energy independent, thus defining an electron-cluster interaction range. This interaction range increases with the cluster size.

  4. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly 34 includes an optical panel 10 having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides 12 stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces 16, 18. A light source 20 provides an image beam 22 to the panel first face 16 for being channeled through the waveguides 12 and emitted from the panel second face 18 in the form of a viewable light image 24a. A remote device 38 produces a response beam 40 over a discrete selection area 36 of the panel second face 18 for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides 12 toward the panel first face 16. A light sensor 42,50 is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides 12 for detecting the response beam 40 therein for providing interactive capability.

  5. Interactive optical panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, J.T.

    1995-10-03

    An interactive optical panel assembly includes an optical panel having a plurality of ribbon optical waveguides stacked together with opposite ends thereof defining panel first and second faces. A light source provides an image beam to the panel first face for being channeled through the waveguides and emitted from the panel second face in the form of a viewable light image. A remote device produces a response beam over a discrete selection area of the panel second face for being channeled through at least one of the waveguides toward the panel first face. A light sensor is disposed across a plurality of the waveguides for detecting the response beam therein for providing interactive capability. 10 figs.

  6. ELEMENTARY PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EFREMENKO, YURI; HANDLER, THOMAS; KAMYSHKOV, YURI; SIOPSIS, GEORGE; SPANIER, STEFAN

    2013-07-30

    The High-Energy Elementary Particle Interactions group at UT during the last three years worked on the following directions and projects: Collider-based Particle Physics; Neutrino Physics, particularly participation in NO?A, Double Chooz, and KamLAND neutrino experiments; and Theory, including Scattering amplitudes, Quark-gluon plasma; Holographic cosmology; Holographic superconductors; Charge density waves; Striped superconductors; and Holographic FFLO states.

  7. Interactive Activity Detection Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Detection Tools Interactive Activity Detection Tools Tools for detecting specified activities in video data provide a key intelligence capability. High numbers of false alarms, however, reduce tool effectiveness and analyst patience. User feedback reduces false alarms * This project will reduce the number of false alarms generated by activity detection tools (including single vehicle start / stop, multi-vehicle meetings and coordinated driving patterns) by exploiting user feedback in a

  8. Interactive Comparative Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparative Analysis Interactive Comparative Analysis We can learn the correlations between sensors and modalities that differentiate activities (or operating modes) by using transfer learning. Our new approach to data fusion and signature discovery has a number of advantages and applications: * Finding correlations that differentiate datasets requires less data than finding correlations that explain datasets. * The differences between datasets are smaller in number, and often easier to

  9. Querying Allocations Using cbank | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cbank -r mira -p PROJECTNAME For further documentation on Clusterbank, use the command "man cbank." Determining Allocation Requirements up Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP...

  10. Table Name query? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 06:39 Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hello-Sorry for the delay in... Use of DynamicAggregationProcessor I submitted a pull...

  11. Natural Gas Annual Respondent Query System

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Volumes in Thousand Cubic Feet, Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Form EIA-176 * User Guide * Definitions, Sources, & Notes Natural Gas Deliveries (2011 - 2014)...

  12. Image subregion querying using color correlograms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jing (Ossining, NY); Kumar, Shanmugasundaram Ravi (San Jose, CA); Mitra, Mandar (Calcutta, IN); Zhu, Wei-Jing (Ossining, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A color correlogram (10) is a representation expressing the spatial correlation of color and distance between pixels in a stored image. The color correlogram (10) may be used to distinguish objects in an image as well as between images in a plurality of images. By intersecting a color correlogram of an image object with correlograms of images to be searched, those images which contain the objects are identified by the intersection correlogram.

  13. Detection of molecular interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, John T. (Berkeley, CA); Baksh, Michael M. (Fremont, CA); Jaros, Michal (Brno, CH)

    2012-02-14

    A method and assay are described for measuring the interaction between a ligand and an analyte. The assay can include a suspension of colloidal particles that are associated with a ligand of interest. The colloidal particles are maintained in the suspension at or near a phase transition state from a condensed phase to a dispersed phase. An analyte to be tested is then added to the suspension. If the analyte binds to the ligand, a phase change occurs to indicate that the binding was successful.

  14. Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Relativistic Laser-Matter Interactions Enabling the next generation of intense particle accelerators Contact Juan Fernandez (505) 667-6575 Email Short-pulse ion acceleration The Trident facility is a world-class performer in the area of ion acceleration from laser-solid target interactions. Trident has demonstrated over 100 MeV protons at intensities of 8x1020 W/cm2 with efficiencies approaching 5%. These intense relativistic interactions can be diagnosed

  15. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit...

  16. Theoretical studies of molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, W.A. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This research program is directed at extending fundamental knowledge of atoms and molecules including their electronic structure, mutual interaction, collision dynamics, and interaction with radiation. The approach combines the use of ab initio methods--Hartree-Fock (HF) multiconfiguration HF, configuration interaction, and the recently developed quantum Monte Carlo (MC)--to describe electronic structure, intermolecular interactions, and other properties, with various methods of characterizing inelastic and reaction collision processes, and photodissociation dynamics. Present activity is focused on the development and application of the QMC method, surface catalyzed reactions, and reorientation cross sections.

  17. Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on DOE’s Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) presented at the PEM fuel cell pre-solicitation meeting held May 26, 2005 in Arlington, VA.

  18. Strong interactions in air showers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, Dennis D.

    2015-03-02

    We study the role new gauge interactions in extensions of the standard model play in air showers initiated by ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Hadron-hadron events remain dominated by quantum chromodynamics, while projectiles and/or targets from beyond the standard model permit us to see qualitative differences arising due to the new interactions.

  19. Microsoft Word - HAR 2000 paper.DOC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    was to make the information available to users in an interactive electronic form using web browser technology. After the disturbance was seeded with native species and...

  20. Measuring the Monitoring User Interactive Experiences on Franklin Interactive Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Node Responsiveness Richard Gerber User Services Group National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA June 9, 2008 Introduction Anecdotal reports of slow interactive response on Franklin's login nodes have been documented via comments on the 2007 NERSC User Survey. Users report that sluggish command-line response at times makes it difficult to work. The cause, or causes, of the poor response time is unknown. In an attempt to

  1. HDF5-FastQuery: Accelerating Complex Queries on HDF Datasets...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: International Conference on Scientific andStatistical Database Management (SSDBM 2006), Vienna, Austria, July 3 -5,2006 Research Org: Ernest Orlando ...

  2. Interactive Map Shows Geothermal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The free interactive online map posted recently by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries is part of a U.S. Department of Energy project to expand the knowledge of geothermal energy potential nationwide.

  3. Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application.

  4. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that suggest new kinds of devices. Particle Physics in Your Pencil Quantum electrodynamics, or QED, is the theory of many-body interactions first invented in the 1950s by...

  5. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Wednesday, 31 October 2007 00:00 Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose

  6. Fundamental Interactions - Research - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamental Interactions Production of 46V with MARS. Energy loss versus position on Y axis. The Standard Model, which unifies the strong, electromagnetic and weak forces, has been remarkably successful in describing the interactions of quarks and leptons. However, the model is incomplete, and it is the goal of this research program to sensitively probe its limits. Though in most cases we use the nucleus as a micro-laboratory for testing the Standard Model, the implications of the results extend

  7. Interactive Grid | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educational Resources » Interactive Grid Interactive Grid Each time you flick a light switch or press a power button, you enjoy the benefits of the nation's incredible electric grid. The grid is a complex network of people and machinery working around the clock to produce and deliver electricity to millions of homes across the nation. The electric grid works so well, Americans often think about it only when they receive their electric bills, or in those rare instances when there is a power

  8. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    interactions with clay minerals with results suggesting that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs which may concentrate within the interlayer space as...

  9. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates and Esters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: ...

  10. Elementary Particles and Weak Interactions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Lee, T. D.; Yang, C. N.

    1957-01-01

    Some general patterns of interactions between various elementary particles are reviewed and some general questions concerning the symmetry properties of these particles are studied. Topics are included on the theta-tau puzzle, experimental limits on the validity of parity conservation, some general discussions on the consequences due to possible non-invariance under P, C, and T, various possible experimental tests on invariance under P, C, and T, a two-component theory of the neutrino, a possible law of conservation of leptons and the universal Fermi interactions, and time reversal invariance and Mach's principle. (M.H.R.)

  11. Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-01

    The mission of the Grid Interaction Technical Team (GITT) is to support a transition scenario to large scale grid-connected vehicle charging with transformational technology, proof of concept and information dissemination. The GITT facilitates technical coordination and collaboration between vehicle-grid connectivity and communication activities among U.S. DRIVE government and industry partners.

  12. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes

  13. Strongly interacting parton matter equilibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozvenchuk, V.; Linnyk, O.; Bratkovskaya, E.; Gorenstein, M.; Cassing, W.

    2012-07-15

    We study the kinetic and chemical equilibration in 'infinite' parton matter within the Parton-Hadron-String Dynamics transport approach. The 'infinite' matter is simulated within a cubic box with periodic boundary conditions initialized at different energy densities. Particle abundances, kinetic energy distributions, and the detailed balance of the off-shell quarks and gluons in the strongly-interacting quarkgluon plasma are addressed and discussed.

  14. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes

  15. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes

  16. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes

  17. Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surprising Quasiparticle Interactions in Graphene Print Until now, the world's electronics have been dominated by silicon, whose properties, while excellent, significantly limit the size and power consumption of today's computer chips. In order to develop ever smaller and more efficient devices, scientists have turned their attention to carbon, which can be formed into nanostructures like nanotubes, whose properties can be tuned from metallic to semiconducting. However, using carbon nanotubes

  18. Simulating Turbine-Turbine Interaction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine-Turbine Interaction - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  19. Weak interactions at the SSC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q/sup 2/ at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of ..sqrt.. s,L = 40Tev, 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agarwal, Deborah; McParland, Charles; Perry, Marcia

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  1. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik Teoman Turgut, O.

    2013-12-15

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: Schrdinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  2. Ocean current wave interaction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.G.

    1980-09-20

    A numerical model has been developed to incorporate refraction of ocean surface gravity waves by major ocean currents. The model is initialized with directional wave spectra and verified with aircraft synthetic aperture radar X band spectra, laser profilometer spectra, and pitch and roll buoy data. Data collected during the Marineland test experiment are used as surface truth observations for the wave-current study. Evidence of Gulf Stream refraction and trapping of surface waves as well as caustics in the current is shown and modeled assuming a nonuniform Gulf Stream distribution. Frequency and directional resolution of the wave spectral distribution and the current refraction patterns illustrates the need for further study of ocean current-wave interaction in wave refraction studies.

  3. Stressor Interactions in Ecological Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clements, Will; Luoma, Samuel N.; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Hatch, Audrey; Jepson, Paul; Reynoldson, Trefor; Thom, Ronald M.

    2001-12-03

    Here we ask what types of field studies can best detect interactions among stressors and allow us to separate and rank the relative importance of individual stressors in systems receiving multiple disturbances (natural and/or anthropogenic). If multiple stressor responses are common in nature, then single variable tests, such as analysis of a biomarker in isolation or along a surmised gradient, or studies that exclude variables other than pollutants, could be insensitive to all but the most extreme influences of contamination. Preponderance of evidence approaches will be similarly insensitive if designs are too simplistic. A combination of persistent and intensive study of exposure and response in the field, study of critical ecosystem-specific and organism-specific processes, as well as iteration with experimental studies, are useful (and perhaps necessary) strategies to discern interactions among stressors. As our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for changes at lower levels of organization improves, responses to complex stressors become more predictable. This improved mechanistic understanding could lead to a similar degree of understanding for responses at higher levels of biological organization. Below we discuss three examples where researchers have attempted to identify and quantify the relative importance of individual stressors in systems receiving complex stressors. The first example demonstrates how intensive field studies identified multiple stressors and how a management plan resulted in mitigation of these stressors. The second example describes a series of field experiments designed to identify the relative importance of water quality and substrate quality on benthic macroinvertebrates in a metal-polluted stream. The final example illustrates the difficulty of sorting out the direct and indirect influences of global climate change on populations.

  4. Magnetic dipole interactions in crystals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnston, David

    2016-01-13

    The influence of magnetic dipole interactions (MDIs) on the magnetic properties of local-moment Heisenberg spin systems is investigated. A general formulation is presented for calculating the eigenvalues λ and eigenvectors μ ˆ of the MDI tensor of the magnetic dipoles in a line (one dimension, 1D), within a circle (2D) or a sphere (3D) of radius r surrounding a given moment μ → i for given magnetic propagation vectors k for collinear and coplanar noncollinear magnetic structures on both Bravais and non-Bravais spin lattices. Results are calculated for collinear ordering on 1D chains, 2D square and simple-hexagonal (triangular) Bravais lattices,more » 2D honeycomb and kagomé non-Bravais lattices, and 3D cubic Bravais lattices. The λ and μ ˆ values are compared with previously reported results. Calculations for collinear ordering on 3D simple tetragonal, body-centered tetragonal, and stacked triangular and honeycomb lattices are presented for c/a ratios from 0.5 to 3 in both graphical and tabular form to facilitate comparison of experimentally determined easy axes of ordering on these Bravais lattices with the predictions for MDIs. Comparisons with the easy axes measured for several illustrative collinear antiferromagnets (AFMs) are given. The calculations are extended to the cycloidal noncollinear 120 ° AFM ordering on the triangular lattice where λ is found to be the same as for collinear AFM ordering with the same k. The angular orientation of the ordered moments in the noncollinear coplanar AFM structure of GdB 4 with a distorted stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland spin-lattice geometry is calculated and found to be in disagreement with experimental observations, indicating the presence of another source of anisotropy. Similar calculations for the undistorted 2D and stacked 3D Shastry-Sutherland lattices are reported. The thermodynamics of dipolar magnets are calculated using the Weiss molecular field theory for quantum spins, including the magnetic transition temperature T m and the ordered moment, magnetic heat capacity, and anisotropic magnetic susceptibility χ versus temperature T . The anisotropic Weiss temperature θ p in the Curie-Weiss law for T>T m is calculated. A quantitative study of the competition between FM and AFM ordering on cubic Bravais lattices versus the demagnetization factor in the absence of FM domain effects is presented. The contributions of Heisenberg exchange interactions and of the MDIs to T m and to θ p are found to be additive, which simplifies analysis of experimental data. Some properties in the magnetically-ordered state versus T are presented, including the ordered moment and magnetic heat capacity and, for AFMs, the dipolar anisotropy of the free energy and the perpendicular critical field. The anisotropic χ for dipolar AFMs is calculated both above and below the Néel temperature T N and the results are illustrated for a simple tetragonal lattice with c/a>1, c/a=1 (cubic), and c/a<1 , where a change in sign of the χ anisotropy is found at c/a=1 . Finally, following the early work of Keffer [Phys. Rev. 87, 608 (1952)], the dipolar anisotropy of χ above T N =69 K of the prototype collinear Heisenberg-exchange-coupled tetragonal compound MnF 2 is calculated and found to be in excellent agreement with experimental single-crystal literature data above 130 K, where the smoothly increasing deviation of the experimental data from the theory on cooling from 130 K to T N is deduced to arise from dynamic short-range collinear c -axis AFM ordering in this temperature range driven by the exchange interactions.« less

  5. Interactivity vs. fairness in networked linux systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wenji; Crawford, Matt; ,

    2007-01-01

    In general, the Linux 2.6 scheduler can ensure fairness and provide excellent interactive performance at the same time. However, our experiments and mathematical analysis have shown that the current Linux interactivity mechanism tends to incorrectly categorize non-interactive network applications as interactive, which can lead to serious fairness or starvation issues. In the extreme, a single process can unjustifiably obtain up to 95% of the CPU! The root cause is due to the facts that: (1) network packets arrive at the receiver independently and discretely, and the 'relatively fast' non-interactive network process might frequently sleep to wait for packet arrival. Though each sleep lasts for a very short period of time, the wait-for-packet sleeps occur so frequently that they lead to interactive status for the process. (2) The current Linux interactivity mechanism provides the possibility that a non-interactive network process could receive a high CPU share, and at the same time be incorrectly categorized as 'interactive.' In this paper, we propose and test a possible solution to address the interactivity vs. fairness problems. Experiment results have proved the effectiveness of the proposed solution.

  6. L3 Interactive Data Language

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-05

    The L3 system is a computational steering environment for image processing and scientific computing. It consists of an interactive graphical language and interface. Its purpose is to help advanced users in controlling their computational software and assist in the management of data accumulated during numerical experiments. L3 provides a combination of features not found in other environments; these are: - textual and graphical construction of programs - persistence of programs and associated data - directmore » mapping between the scripts, the parameters, and the produced data - implicit hierarchial data organization - full programmability, including conditionals and functions - incremental execution of programs The software includes the l3 language and the graphical environment. The language is a single-assignment functional language; the implementation consists of lexer, parser, interpreter, storage handler, and editing support, The graphical environment is an event-driven nested list viewer/editor providing graphical elements corresponding to the language. These elements are both the represenation of a users program and active interfaces to the values computed by that program.« less

  7. STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction at SRS Structural Mechanics - SRS October 25, 2011 PDF...

  8. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock...

  9. Catalyst Support Interactions | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the reactivity of metal catalyst particles. The research team will also study the adhesion properties by simulating the interactions between metal particles of different sizes...

  10. Frank Wilczek, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of matter under extreme conditions, such as occurred in the earliest moments of the Big Bang. Also, it permits the construction of unified models of particle interactions,...

  11. Apogee Interactive Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Georgia Zip: GE 30084 Sector: Services Product: Apogee Interactive provides a full-service of online technology solutions and consulting services to the energy industry...

  12. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Interactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactions Between Clouds and Radiation in the Multiscale Modelling Framework Cole, Jason Meteorological Service of Canada Barker, Howard Meteorological Service of Canada...

  14. Visualize energy APIs with a new OpenEI browser | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 31 August, 2012 - 12:54 APIs Big Data cleanweb data OpenEI OpenEI has created a simple way to see energy APIs available...

  15. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-01

    We introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions at longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.

  16. Dynamical Symmetries Reflected in Realistic Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sviratcheva, K.D.; Draayer, J.P.; /Louisiana State U.; Vary, J.P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-06

    Realistic nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, derived within the framework of meson theory or more recently in terms of chiral effective field theory, yield new possibilities for achieving a unified microscopic description of atomic nuclei. Based on spectral distribution methods, a comparison of these interactions to a most general Sp(4) dynamically symmetric interaction, which previously we found to reproduce well that part of the interaction that is responsible for shaping pairing-governed isobaric analog 0{sup +} states, can determine the extent to which this significantly simpler model Hamiltonian can be used to obtain an approximate, yet very good description of low-lying nuclear structure. And furthermore, one can apply this model in situations that would otherwise be prohibitive because of the size of the model space. In addition, we introduce a Sp(4) symmetry breaking term by including the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction in the analysis and examining the capacity of this extended model interaction to imitate realistic interactions. This provides a further step towards gaining a better understanding of the underlying foundation of realistic interactions and their ability to reproduce striking features of nuclei such as strong pairing correlations or collective rotational motion.

  17. TOUGH Pitzer Ion-Interaction Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-10-23

    The TOUGHREACT Pitzer ion-interaction model version was developed based on the previous versions of TOUGHREACT. The main extensions include the Pitzer ion-interaction model for ionic activity calculation of solutions over a broad range of concentrations and the coupling of the vapor-pressure-lowering effect of salinity to phase partitioning.

  18. Plant Microbe Interactions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plant Microbe Interactions Plant Microbe Interactions This presentation was given by Catherine Ronning at the Symbiosis Conference. PDF icon symbiosis_conference_ronning.pdf More Documents & Publications Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis Conference Speaker and Attendee List Biosystems Design

  19. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van den Berg, R.; Brandino, G. P.; El Araby, O.; Konik, R. M.; Gritsev, V.; Caux, J. -S.

    2014-10-14

    In this study, we introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free induction decay and spin echo simulations we characterize the combined effect of both types of interactions on the decoherence of the electron spin, for external fields ranging from low to high values. We show that for spin echo simulations the hyperfine interaction is the dominant source of decoherence at short times for low fields, and competes with the dipole-dipole interactions atmore » longer times. On the contrary, at high fields the main source of decay is due to the dipole-dipole interactions. In the latter regime an asymmetry in the echo is observed. Furthermore, the non-decaying fraction previously observed for zero field free induction decay simulations in quantum dots with only hyperfine interactions, is destroyed for longer times by the mean-field treatment of the dipolar interactions.« less

  20. NATIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION DATABASE AND GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (NATCARB) FORMER TITLE-MIDCONTINENT INTERACTIVE DIGITAL CARBON ATLAS AND RELATIONAL DATABASE (MIDCARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy R. Carr

    2004-07-16

    This annual report describes progress in the third year of the three-year project entitled ''Midcontinent Interactive Digital Carbon Atlas and Relational Database (MIDCARB)''. The project assembled a consortium of five states (Indiana, Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky and Ohio) to construct an online distributed Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) and Geographic Information System (GIS) covering aspects of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) geologic sequestration (http://www.midcarb.org). The system links the five states in the consortium into a coordinated regional database system consisting of datasets useful to industry, regulators and the public. The project has been extended and expanded as a ''NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)'' to provide national coverage across the Regional CO{sub 2} Partnerships, which currently cover 40 states (http://www.natcarb.org). Advanced distributed computing solutions link database servers across the five states and other publicly accessible servers (e.g., USGS) into a single system where data is maintained and enhanced at the local level but is accessed and assembled through a single Web portal and can be queried, assembled, analyzed and displayed. This project has improved the flow of data across servers and increased the amount and quality of available digital data. The online tools used in the project have improved in stability and speed in order to provide real-time display and analysis of CO{sub 2} sequestration data. The move away from direct database access to web access through eXtensible Markup Language (XML) has increased stability and security while decreasing management overhead. The MIDCARB viewer has been simplified to provide improved display and organization of the more than 125 layers and data tables that have been generated as part of the project. The MIDCARB project is a functional demonstration of distributed management of data systems that cross the boundaries between institutions and geographic areas. The MIDCARB system addresses CO{sub 2} sequestration and other natural resource issues from sources, sinks and transportation within a spatial database that can be queried online. Visualization of high quality and current data can assist decision makers by providing access to common sets of high quality data in a consistent manner.

  1. T-703: Cisco Unified Communications Manager Open Query Interface...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The vendor has issued a fix. Applied Mitigation Bulletin Addthis Related Articles V-231: Cisco Identity Services Engine Discloses Authentication Credentials to Remote Users V-036: ...

  2. Category:Query Results Templates | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. D Template:DefineVariables L Template:LabelActivities Template:LabelValuePair S Template:SubPageListHelper Retrieved...

  3. Improving Estimation Accuracy of Aggregate Queries on Data Cubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of estimation of a target database from summary databases derived from a base data cube. We show that such estimates can be derived by choosing a primary database which uses a proxy database to estimate the results. This technique is common in statistics, but an important issue we are addressing is the accuracy of these estimates. Specifically, given multiple primary and multiple proxy databases, that share the same summary measure, the problem is how to select the primary and proxy databases that will generate the most accurate target database estimation possible. We propose an algorithmic approach for determining the steps to select or compute the source databases from multiple summary databases, which makes use of the principles of information entropy. We show that the source databases with the largest number of cells in common provide the more accurate estimates. We prove that this is consistent with maximizing the entropy. We provide some experimental results on the accuracy of the target database estimation in order to verify our results.

  4. High-energy cosmic ray interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Ralph; Orellana, Mariana; Reynoso, Matias M.; Vila, Gabriela S.

    2009-04-30

    Research into hadronic interactions and high-energy cosmic rays are closely related. On one hand--due to the indirect observation of cosmic rays through air showers--the understanding of hadronic multiparticle production is needed for deriving the flux and composition of cosmic rays at high energy. On the other hand the highest energy particles from the universe allow us to study the characteristics of hadronic interactions at energies far beyond the reach of terrestrial accelerators. This is the summary of three introductory lectures on our current understanding of hadronic interactions of cosmic rays.

  5. Cooperative Tertiary Interaction Network Guides RNA Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrouzi, Reza; Roh, Joon Ho; Kilburn, Duncan; Briber, R.M.; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2013-04-08

    Noncoding RNAs form unique 3D structures, which perform many regulatory functions. To understand how RNAs fold uniquely despite a small number of tertiary interaction motifs, we mutated the major tertiary interactions in a group I ribozyme by single-base substitutions. The resulting perturbations to the folding energy landscape were measured using SAXS, ribozyme activity, hydroxyl radical footprinting, and native PAGE. Double- and triple-mutant cycles show that most tertiary interactions have a small effect on the stability of the native state. Instead, the formation of core and peripheral structural motifs is cooperatively linked in near-native folding intermediates, and this cooperativity depends on the native helix orientation. The emergence of a cooperative interaction network at an early stage of folding suppresses nonnative structures and guides the search for the native state. We suggest that cooperativity in noncoding RNAs arose from natural selection of architectures conducive to forming a unique, stable fold.

  6. Interacting vacuum energy in the dark sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chimento, L. P.; Carneiro, S.

    2015-03-26

    We analyse three cosmological scenarios with interaction in the dark sector, which are particular cases of a general expression for the energy flux from vacuum to matter. In the first case the interaction leads to a transition from an unstable de Sitter phase to a radiation dominated universe, avoiding in this way the initial singularity. In the second case the interaction gives rise to a slow-roll power-law inflation. Finally, the third scenario is a concordance model for the late-time universe, with the vacuum term decaying into cold dark matter. We identify the physics behind these forms of interaction and show that they can be described as particular types of the modified Chaplygin gas.

  7. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-02-20

    Object oriented software for computing generalized electromagnetic interactions between structures in the frequency domains. The software is based on integral equations. There is also a static integral equation capability.

  8. Recent Neutrino Interaction Measurements Mike Wilking TRIUMF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino Interaction Measurements Mike Wilking TRIUMF PIC Conference, 3-Sept-2010 Neutrinos: more than just missing E T ... ! Interactions and Oscillations * Neutrino oscillation experiments have now moved into the realm of precision physics * Cross section uncertainties are now becoming an important factor in interpreting oscillation data * The next generation of accelerator-based neutrino experiments all take place at the ~1 GeV neutrino energy scale * In the last few years, several new cross

  9. Frank Wilczek, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frank Wilczek, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction Resources with Additional Information H. David Politzer Photo Credit: Donna Coveney, MIT Frank Wilczek, a winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction", has had multiple connections with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These include his being the Leland J. Haworth Distinguished Scientist from 1994 - 1997. Wilczek shares the Nobel prize with David

  10. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds Island in the South Atlantic Ocean. Warm African winds combine with the cool sea surface temperatures and form a large stratocumulus deck, transitioning to year-round trade-wind shallow cumulus at the location of Ascension Island. These clouds and myriad aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions will be studied. Using a portable observatory, or ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), that contains some of most advanced atmospheric research instrumentation for cloud,

  11. Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding Radionuclide Interactions with Layered Materials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Wang, Yifeng Publication Date: 2014-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1241847 Report Number(s): SAND2014-18612C 540411 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Materials Science &

  12. BETO Quiz - Interactive Content | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BETO Quiz - Interactive Content BETO Quiz - Interactive Content Welcome to the Bioenergy Quiz! Navigate through the quiz by clicking on the circular buttons and selecting the correct answers to the questions. Use the scrollbar to move down the page and view all of the information displayed. Hover over words and phrases highlighted in orange for an explanation of terms. Share the information by clicking on the buttons in the Share This block. Use the arrow button found in the bottom right-hand

  13. Excitation picture of an interacting Bose gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kira, M.

    2014-12-15

    Atomic BoseEinstein condensates (BECs) can be viewed as macroscopic objects where atoms form correlated atom clusters to all orders. Therefore, the presence of a BEC makes the direct use of the cluster-expansion approachlucrative e.g.in semiconductor quantum opticsinefficient when solving the many-body kinetics of a strongly interacting Bose. An excitation picture is introduced with a nonunitary transformation that describes the system in terms of atom clusters within the normal component alone. The nontrivial properties of this transformation are systematically studied, which yields a cluster-expansion friendly formalism for a strongly interacting Bose gas. Its connections and corrections to the standard HartreeFockBogoliubov approach are discussed and the role of the order parameter and the Bogoliubov excitations are identified. The resulting interaction effects are shown to visibly modify number fluctuations of the BEC. Even when the BEC has a nearly perfect second-order coherence, the BEC number fluctuations can still resolve interaction-generated non-Poissonian fluctuations. - Highlights: Excitation picture expresses interacting Bose gas with few atom clusters. Semiconductor and BEC many-body investigations are connected with cluster expansion. Quantum statistics of BEC is identified in terms of atom clusters. BEC number fluctuations show extreme sensitivity to many-body correlations. Cluster-expansion friendly framework is established for an interacting Bose gas.

  14. DIP: The Database of Interacting Proteins

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DIP Database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. By interaction, the DIP Database creators mean that two amino acid chains were experimentally identified to bind to each other. The database lists such pairs to aid those studying a particular protein-protein interaction but also those investigating entire regulatory and signaling pathways as well as those studying the organisation and complexity of the protein interaction network at the cellular level. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. It is a relational database that can be searched by protein, sequence, motif, article information, and pathBLAST. The website also serves as an access point to a number of projects related to DIP, such as LiveDIP, The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) and JDIP. Users have free and open access to DIP after login. [Taken from the DIP Guide and the DIP website] (Specialized Interface) (Registration Required)

  15. Method and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xavier, Patrick G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-08-08

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions between bodies. The method comprises representing two bodies undergoing translations and rotations by two hierarchical swept volume representations. Interactions such as nearest approach and collision can be modeled based on the swept body representations. The present invention can serve as a practical tool in motion planning, CAD systems, simulation systems, safety analysis, and applications that require modeling time-based interactions. A body can be represented in the present invention by a union of convex polygons and convex polyhedra. As used generally herein, polyhedron includes polygon, and polyhedra includes polygons. The body undergoing translation can be represented by a swept body representation, where the swept body representation comprises a hierarchical bounding volume representation whose leaves each contain a representation of the region swept by a section of the body during the translation, and where the union of the regions is a superset of the region swept by the surface of the body during translation. Interactions between two bodies thus represented can be modeled by modeling interactions between the convex hulls of the finite sets of discrete points in the swept body representations.

  16. Identifying dark matter interactions in monojet searches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Rentala, Vikram

    2014-05-01

    We study the discrimination of quark-initiated jets from gluon-initiated jets in monojet searches for dark matter using the technique of averaged jet energy profiles. We demonstrate our results in the context of effective field theories of dark matter interactions with quarks and gluons, but our methods apply more generally to a wide class of models. Different effective theories of dark matter and the standard model backgrounds each have a characteristic quark/gluon fraction for the leading jet. When used in conjunction with the traditional cut-and-count monojet search, the jet energy profile can be used to set stronger bounds on contact interactions of dark matter. In the event of a discovery of a monojet excess at the 14 TeV LHC, contact interactions between dark matter with quarks or with gluons can be differentiated at the 95% confidence level. For a given rate at the LHC, signal predictions at direct detection experiments for different dark matter interactions can span five orders of magnitude. The ability to identify these interactions allows us to make a tighter connection between LHC searches and direct detection experiments.

  17. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  18. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  19. New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency...

  20. Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactions between ...

  1. REN21 Renewables Interactive Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Map1 The REN21 Renewables Interactive Map provides information on renewable energy policies, expansion targets, current shares, installed capacity, current...

  2. Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Presentation given at the 16th Directions in...

  3. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer code for performing finite element analyses of soil-structure interaction during seismic ground motions. It was...

  4. Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear Seismic SSI Analysis Techniques Non-Linear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) Method for Developing Non-Linear...

  5. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - ...

  6. First-principles studies of hydrogen interaction with ultrathin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    First-principles studies of hydrogen interaction with ultrathin Mg and Mg-based alloy films Prev Next Title: First-principles studies of hydrogen interaction with ultrathin...

  7. Simple Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Models for better air quality (SIM-air) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Simple Interactive Models (SIM-air) AgencyCompany Organization:...

  8. Gas-Alloy Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arroyave, Raymundo; Gao, Michael

    2012-12-01

    The understanding of the stability of metals and alloys against oxidation and other detrimental reactions, to the catalysis of important chemical reactions and the minimization of defects associated with processing and synthesis have one thing in common: At the most fundamental level, all these scientific/engineering problems involve interactions between metals and alloys (in the solid or liquid state) and gaseous atmospheres at elevated temperatures. In this special issue, we have collected a series of articles that illustrate the application of different theoretical, computational, and experimental techniques to investigate gas-alloy interactions.

  9. Application Programming Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercial Buildings » Analysis Tools » Building Performance Database » Application Programming Interface Application Programming Interface While the BPD platform offers various browser-based analysis tools, third parties can also access the database through an Application Programming Interface (API). Using the API, users can query the same analytical tools available through the web interface, without compromising the security or anonymity of the database. The API enables the sharing of

  10. Identifying dark matter interactions in monojet searches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Rentala, Vikram

    2014-05-22

    We study the discrimination of quark-initiated jets from gluon-initiated jets in monojet searches for dark matter using the technique of averaged jet energy profiles. We demonstrate our results in the context of effective field theories of dark matter interactions with quarks and gluons, but our methods apply more generally to a wide class of models. Different effective theories of dark matter and the standard model backgrounds each have a characteristic quark/gluon fraction for the leading jet. When used in conjunction with the traditional cut-and-count monojet search, the jet energy profile can be used to set stronger bounds on contact interactionsmore » of dark matter. In the event of a discovery of a monojet excess at the 14 TeV LHC, contact interactions between dark matter with quarks or with gluons can be differentiated at the 95% confidence level. For a given rate at the LHC, signal predictions at direct detection experiments for different dark matter interactions can span five orders of magnitude. Lastly, the ability to identify these interactions allows us to make a tighter connection between LHC searches and direct detection experiments.« less

  11. 2010 Atomic & Molecular Interactions Gordon Research Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Martinez

    2010-07-23

    The Atomic and Molecular Interactions Gordon Conferences is justifiably recognized for its broad scope, touching on areas ranging from fundamental gas phase and gas-condensed matter collision dynamics, to laser-molecule interactions, photophysics, and unimolecular decay processes. The meeting has traditionally involved scientists engaged in fundamental research in gas and condensed phases and those who apply these concepts to systems of practical chemical and physical interest. A key tradition in this meeting is the strong mixing of theory and experiment throughout. The program for 2010 conference continues these traditions. At the 2010 AMI GRC, there will be talks in 5 broadly defined and partially overlapping areas of intermolecular interactions and chemical dynamics: (1) Photoionization and Photoelectron Dynamics; (2) Quantum Control and Molecules in Strong Fields; (3) Photochemical Dynamics; (4) Complex Molecules and Condensed Phases; and (5) Clusters and Reaction Dynamics. These areas encompass many of the most productive and exciting areas of chemical physics, including both reactive and nonreactive processes, intermolecular and intramolecular energy transfer, and photodissociation and unimolecular processes. Gas phase dynamics, van der Waals and cluster studies, laser-matter interactions and multiple potential energy surface phenomena will all be discussed.

  12. Interaction Region Issues at the NLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Maruyama, T.; /SLAC

    2007-09-26

    Two detector concepts are being investigated for the Next Linear Collider. This paper discusses the current design of the interaction region for one of them, based on a 6 Tesla solenoid and silicon based tracking. Topics include masking layout, backgrounds and the suppression of final quadrupole jitter. All calculations are based on the 1 TeV design parameters.

  13. How Much Do You Consume? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Do You Consume? Want to view this interactive graphic in all its glory? Upgrade to a modern browser How much energy do you use? See how much energy someone like you used in...

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NCVweb: An Interactive Web-Based Tool for Viewing ARM Data S. Moore and S. Bottone Mission ... NCVweb is such a tool and allows for easy viewing of ARM datasets using a Web browser. ...

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 11_Interactive Session on NMMSS _Monday...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Interactive Session on NMMSS Fundamentals (Including SAMS) Pete Dessaules, NNSA James Crabtree, NNSA NMMSS Analysts, LINK...

  16. Cooperative Interactions Boost Adsorption Performance | Center for Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Cooperative Interactions Boost Adsorption Performance

  17. PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) PDF icon PIA - Industry Interactive Procurement System (IIPS) More Documents & Publications Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline

  18. Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses in the inhomogeneous media

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses in the inhomogeneous media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses in the inhomogeneous media Pulse interactions affect pulse qualities during the propagation. Interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses are investigated to improve pulse qualities in the inhomogeneous media. In order to describe the interactions between butterfly-shaped pulses, analytic

  19. Pseudopotentials of the particles interactions in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Muratov, M. M.

    2011-10-15

    This article discusses the effective interaction potentials in a complex dusty plasma. The interaction of electrons with atoms and the interaction between dusty particles are studied by the method of the dielectric response function. In the effective interaction, potential between electron and atom the quantum effects of diffraction were taken into account. On the curve of the interaction potential between dust particles under certain conditions the oscillations can be observed.

  20. MEIC Detector and Interaction Region at Jlab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Zhiwen

    2015-09-01

    The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is envisioned as the next-generation US facility for exploring the strong interaction. The Medium-energy EIC (MEIC) is the first stage of the EIC at Jefferson Lab (JLab). It's aimed at mapping the spin and spatial structure of the quark and gluon sea in the nucleon, understanding the emergence of hadronic matter from color charge, and probing the gluon fields in nuclei. A full-acceptance detector is designed to measure the complete final state. Its interaction region allows spectators tagged with high resolution to catch all nuclear and partonic target fragments. The combination of a high luminosity, polarized lepton and ion beams, and detectors fully integrated with the accelerator will allow MEIC to be a unique opportunity to make breakthroughs in the study of nucleon structure and QCD dynamics.

  1. Momentum-space Argonne V18 interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veerasamy, S.; Polyzou, W. N.

    2011-09-15

    This paper gives a momentum-space representation of the Argonne V18 potential as an expansion in products of spin-isospin operators with scalar coefficient functions of the momentum transfer. Two representations of the scalar coefficient functions for the strong part of the interaction are given. One is as an expansion in an orthonormal basis of rational functions and the other as an expansion in Chebyshev polynomials on different intervals. Both provide practical and efficient representations for computing the momentum-space potential that do not require integration or interpolation. Programs based on both expansions are available as supplementary material. Analytic expressions are given for the scalar coefficient functions of the Fourier transform of the electromagnetic part of the Argonne V18. A simple method for computing the partial-wave projections of these interactions from the operator expressions is also given.

  2. Seismic modal analysis and system interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Chi Wen ); Wang, Chung Yi ); Chen, W.W. ); Gutierrez, B. . Savannah River Site)

    1993-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the technical papers presented at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers 1993 Pressure Vessels and Piping Conference on July 25--29 in Denver, Colorado. This volume contains sixteen papers presented under the session title of Modal Analysis and Systems Interactions Techniques. The intent of these sessions is to provide a common forum for the researchers to have a broad exchange of views on many pressing subjects concerning the design and analysis of nuclear and waste facilities.

  3. Foundation of Hydrodynamics of Strongly Interacting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and quantum mechanics have many elements in common, as the density field and velocity fields are common variables that can be constructed in both descriptions. Starting with the Schroedinger equation and the Klein-Gordon for a single particle in hydrodynamical form, we examine the basic assumptions under which a quantum system of particles interacting through their mean fields can be described by hydrodynamics.

  4. CMI Organizational Interactions | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI Organizational Interactions CMI Affiliates: CMI Affiliates will be informed about CMI research outcomes and provide intput to CMI. Affiliates pay an annual fee based on the organization type, and sign a Membership Agreement. CMI Affiliates may become Team members or sponsor research in other ways with different levels of financial commitment and ownership of intellectual property. CMI Associates: CMI Associates may use the unique capabilities and expertise of CMI via DOE-approved contractual

  5. Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4: Defect-Carrier Interactions - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  6. Modeling of laser interactions with composite materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Boley, Charles D.

    2013-05-07

    In this study, we develop models of laser interactions with composite materials consisting of fibers embedded within a matrix. A ray-trace model is shown to determine the absorptivity, absorption depth, and optical power enhancement within the material, as well as the angular distribution of the reflected light. We also develop a macroscopic model, which provides physical insight and overall results. We show that the parameters in this model can be determined from the ray trace model.

  7. ANTENNA-COUPLED LIGHT-MATTER INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NOVOTNY, LUKAS

    2014-01-10

    This project is focused on antenna-coupled photon emission from single quantum emitters. The properties of optical antennas are tailored to control different photophysical parameters, such as the excited state lifetime, the saturation intensity, and the quantum yield [3]. Using a single molecule coupled to an optical antenna whose position and properties can be controllably adjusted we established a detailed and quantitative understanding of light-matter interactions in nanoscale environments. We have studied various quantum emitters: single molecules [11], quantum dots [7], rareearth ions [2], and NV centers in diamond [19]. We have systematically studied the interaction of these emitters with optical antennas. The overall objective was to establish a high-level of control over the light-matter interaction. In order to eliminate the coupling to the environment, we have taken a step further and explored the possibility of levitating the quantum emitter in high vacuum. What started as a side-project soon became a main activity in our research program and led us to the demonstration of vacuum trapping and cooling of a nanoscale particle [14].

  8. Intense Magnetized Plasma-Wall Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Bruno S.; Fuelling, Stephan

    2013-11-30

    This research project studied wall-plasma interactions relevant to fusion science. Such interactions are a critical aspect of Magneto-Inertial Fusion (MIF) because flux compression by a pusher material, in particular the metal for the liner approach to MIF, involves strong eddy current heating on the surface of the pusher, and probably interactions and mixing of the pusher with the interior fuel during the time when fusion fuel is being burned. When the pusher material is a metal liner, high-energy-density conditions result in fascinating behavior. For example, "warm dense matter" is produced, for which material properties such as resistivity and opacity are not well known. In this project, the transformation into plasma of metal walls subjected to pulsed megagauss magnetic fields was studied with an experiment driven by the UNR 1 MA Zebra generator. The experiment was numerically simulated with using the MHRDR code. This simple, fundamental high-energy-density physics experiment, in a regime appropriate to MIF, has stimulated an important and fascinating comparison of numerical modeling codes and tables with experiment. In addition, we participated in developing the FRCHX experiment to compress a field-reversed-configuration (FRC) plasma with a liner, in collaboration with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratory and Los Alamos National Lab, and we helped develop diagnostics for the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) at LANL. Last, but not least, this project served to train students in high-energy-density physics.

  9. Interaction and merging of two sinistral filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Liu, Yu; Li, Haidong; Wang, Haimin; Ji, Haisheng; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, we report the interaction and subsequent merging of two sinistral filaments (F1 and F2) occurring at the boundary of AR 9720 on 2001 December 6. The two filaments were close and nearly perpendicular to each other. The interaction occurred after F1 was erupted and the eruption was impeded by a more extended filament channel (FC) standing in the way, in which F2 was embedded. The erupted material ran into FC along its axis, causing F1 and F2 to merge into a single structure that subsequently underwent a large-amplitude to-and-fro motion. A significant plasma heating process was observed in the merging process, making the mixed material largely disappear from the H? passband, but appear in Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope 195 images for a while. These observations can serve as strong evidence of merging reconnection between the two colliding magnetic structures. A new sinistral filament was formed along FC after the cooling of the merged and heated material. No coronal mass ejection was observed to be associated with the event; though, the eruption was accompanied by a two-ribbon flare with a separation motion, indicating that the eruption had failed. This event shows that, in addition to overlying magnetic fields, such an interaction is an effective restraint to make a filament eruption fail in this way.

  10. Method of and apparatus for modeling interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Budge, Kent G.

    2004-01-13

    A method and apparatus for modeling interactions can accurately model tribological and other properties and accommodate topological disruptions. Two portions of a problem space are represented, a first with a Lagrangian mesh and a second with an ALE mesh. The ALE and Lagrangian meshes are constructed so that each node on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh is in a known correspondence with adjacent nodes in the ALE mesh. The interaction can be predicted for a time interval. Material flow within the ALE mesh can accurately model complex interactions such as bifurcation. After prediction, nodes in the ALE mesh in correspondence with nodes on the surface of the Lagrangian mesh can be mapped so that they are once again adjacent to their corresponding Lagrangian mesh nodes. The ALE mesh can then be smoothed to reduce mesh distortion that might reduce the accuracy or efficiency of subsequent prediction steps. The process, from prediction through mapping and smoothing, can be repeated until a terminal condition is reached.

  11. Peppytides: Interactive Models of Polypeptide Chains

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Zuckermann, Ron; Chakraborty, Promita; Derisi, Joe

    2014-10-28

    Peppytides are scaled, 3D-printed models of polypeptide chains that can be folded into accurate protein structures. Designed and created by Berkeley Lab Researcher, Promita Chakraborty, and Berkeley Lab Senior Scientist, Dr. Ron Zuckermann, Peppytides are accurate physical models of polypeptide chains that anyone can interact with and fold intro various protein structures - proving to be a great educational tool, resulting in a deeper understanding of these fascinating structures and how they function. Build your own Peppytide model and learn about how nature's machines fold into their intricate architectures!

  12. LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HEDL-TME 78-15 uc-20 LITHIUM LITERATURE REVIEW: LITHIUM'S PROPERTIES AND INTERACTIONS Hanf ord Engineering Development Laboratory -~ - - , . .. . D.W. Jeppson J.L. Ballif W.W. Yuan B.E. Chou - - - . - . - -- r - N O T l C E n ~ h u mpon w prepared as an account of work iponrored by the United States Government. Neither the Unitcd States nor the United Stater Department of Energy. nor any of their employees, nor any of then contractor^, subcontractors. or their employees, maker any warranty,

  13. Peppytides: Interactive Models of Polypeptide Chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuckermann, Ron; Chakraborty, Promita; Derisi, Joe

    2014-01-21

    Peppytides are scaled, 3D-printed models of polypeptide chains that can be folded into accurate protein structures. Designed and created by Berkeley Lab Researcher, Promita Chakraborty, and Berkeley Lab Senior Scientist, Dr. Ron Zuckermann, Peppytides are accurate physical models of polypeptide chains that anyone can interact with and fold intro various protein structures - proving to be a great educational tool, resulting in a deeper understanding of these fascinating structures and how they function. Build your own Peppytide model and learn about how nature's machines fold into their intricate architectures!

  14. Spinorbit interaction mediated molecular dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokkonen, E. Jnkl, K.; Kettunen, J. A.; Heinsmki, S.; Karpenko, A.; Huttula, M.; Lytynoja, T.; Division of Theoretical Chemistry and Biology, School of Biotechnology, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm

    2014-05-14

    The effect of the spinorbit interaction to photofragmentation is investigated in the mercury(II) bromide (HgBr{sub 2}) molecule. Changes in the fragmentation between the two spinorbit components of Hg 5d photoionization, as well as within the molecular-field-splitted levels of these components are observed. Dissociation subsequent to photoionization is studied with synchrotron radiation and photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectroscopy. The experimental results are accompanied by relativistic ab initio analysis of the photoelectron spectrum.

  15. Study of Laser Interaction with Thin Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boley, C D; Cutter, K P; Fochs, S N; Pax, P H; Rotter, M D; Rubenchik, A M; Yamamoto, R M

    2009-03-06

    For many targets of interest, the thickness is small compared to the conduction length during the engagement. In addition, the laser-material interaction region can be treated as flat. We have studied this regime with our 25 kW solid-state laser. We have demonstrated that airflow can reduce by approximately 40% the energy required to break through a thin target. This reduction is caused by the bulging of the softened material and the tearing and removal of the material by aerodynamic forces. We present elastic modeling which explains these results.

  16. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light...

  17. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the...

  18. Neutron Beta Decay as a Probe of Weak Interactions (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Neutron Beta Decay as a Probe of Weak Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron Beta Decay as a Probe of Weak Interactions You are accessing a...

  19. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-09-08

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earths surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earths surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  20. A Tool for Interactive Protein Manipulation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-28

    ProteinShop is a graphical environment that facilitates a solution to the protein prediction problem through a combination of unique features and capabilities. These include: 1. Helping researchers automatically generate 3D protein structures from scratcW by using the sequence of amino acids and secondary structure specifications as input. 2. Enabling users to apply their accumulated biochemical knowledge and intuition during the interactive manipulation of structures. 3. FacIlitating interactive comparison and analysis of alternative structures through visualizationmore » of free energy computed during modeling. 4. Accelerating discovery of low-energy configurations by applying local optimizations plug-in to user-selected protein structures. ProteinShop v.2.0 includes the following new features: - Visualizes multiple-domain structures - Automatically creates a user-specified number of beta-sheet configurations - Provides the interface and the libraries for energy visualization and local minimization of protein structures - Reads standard POB files without previous editing« less

  1. Laser–plasma interactions for fast ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-04-17

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser- plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multidimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity, f-number and wavelength are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale fast ignition problem.

  2. Laser–plasma interactions for fast ignition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-04-17

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser- plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multidimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporalmore » evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity, f-number and wavelength are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale fast ignition problem.« less

  3. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S.more » enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.« less

  4. Interaction of cadmium with phosphate on goethite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venema, P.; Hiemstra, T.; Riemsdijk, W.H. van

    1997-08-01

    Interactions between different ions are of importance in understanding chemical processes in natural systems. In this study simultaneous adsorption of phosphate and cadmium on goethite is studied in detail. The charge distribution (CD)-multisite complexation (MUSIC) model has been successful in describing extended data sets of cadmium adsorption and phosphate adsorption on goethite. In this study, the parameters of this model for these two data sets were combined to describe a new data set of simultaneous adsorption of cadmium and phosphate on goethite. Attention is focused on the surface speciation of cadmium. With the extra information that can be obtained from the interaction experiments, the cadmium adsorption model is refined. For a perfect description of the data, the singly coordinated surface groups at the 110 face of goethite were assumed to form both monodentate and bidentate surface species with cadmium. The CD-MUSIC model is able to describe data sets of both simultaneous and single adsorption of cadmium and phosphate with the same parameters. The model calculations confirmed the idea that only singly coordinated surface groups are reactive for specific ion binding.

  5. High Temperature Interactions of Antimony with Nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.

    2012-07-01

    In this chapter, the surface and bulk interactions of antimony with the Ni-based anodes in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) will be discussed. High fuel flexibility is a significant advantage of SOFCs, allowing the direct use of fossil and bio fuels without a hydrogen separation unit. Synthesis gas derived from coal and biomass consists of a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and steam, but finite amounts of tars and trace impurities such as S, Se, P, As, Sb, Cd, Pb, Cl, etc, are also always present. While synthesis gas is commonly treated with a series of chemical processes and scrubbers to remove the impurities, complete purification is not economical. Antimony is widely distributed in coals. During coal gasification antimony is volatilized, such that contact with the SOFC anodes and other SOFC parts, e.g., interconnect, current collecting wires, fuel gas supplying tubing, is most likely. This chapter addresses the following topics: high temperature Ni - Sb interactions; alteration phase, Ni3Sb, Ni5Sb2, NiSb, formation; thermochemical modeling; impact of Sb on the electrocatalytic activity of Ni toward the fuel oxidation and the presence of other impurities (sulfur, in particular); converted anode structural instability during long-term SOFC operation; comparison with nickel heterogeneous catalysts.

  6. Wave-particle Interactions In Rotating Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2011-01-11

    Wave-particle interactions in EB rotating plasmas feature an unusual effect: particles are diffused by waves in both potential energy and kinetic energy. This wave-particle interaction generalizes the alpha channeling effect, in which radio frequency waves are used to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. In rotating plasmas, the alpha particles may be removed at low energy through the loss cone, and the energy lost may be transferred to the radial electric field. This eliminates the need for electrodes in the mirror throat, which have presented serious technical issues in past rotating plasma devices. A particularly simple way to achieve this effect is to use a high azimuthal mode number perturbation on the magnetic field. Rotation can also be sustained by waves in plasmas without a kinetic energy source. This type of wave has been considered for plasma centrifuges used for isotope separation. Energy may also be transferred from the electric field to particles or waves, which may be useful for ion heating and energy generation.

  7. ARM - Field Campaign - LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds govCampaignsLASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds Campaign Links Science Plan Related Campaigns LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Supplemental Measurements 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds - Cloud Radar at St. Helena 2016.06.01, Zuidema, AMF Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : LASIC: Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with

  8. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; CHIRALITY; EXCHANGE INTERACTIONS; KONDO EFFECT; MAGNETIC FIELDS; QUANTUM DOTS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE ...

  9. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Wednesday, 27 January 2010 00:00 Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning

  10. US DRIVE Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap US DRIVE Grid Interaction Technical Team Roadmap PDF icon gitt_roadmap_june2013.pdf More Documents & Publications Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: EV - Smart Grid Research & Interoperability Activities

  11. USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS | Department of Energy USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATIONS Purpose This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs). PDF icon Use of Voluntary

  12. On dark degeneracy and interacting models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, S.; Borges, H.A. E-mail: humberto@ufba.br

    2014-06-01

    Cosmological background observations cannot fix the dark energy equation of state, which is related to a degeneracy in the definition of the dark sector components. Here we show that this degeneracy can be broken at perturbation level by imposing two observational properties on dark matter. First, dark matter is defined as the clustering component we observe in large scale structures. This definition is meaningful only if dark energy is unperturbed, which is achieved if we additionally assume, as a second condition, that dark matter is cold, i.e. non-relativistic. As a consequence, dark energy models with equation-of-state parameter ?1 ? ? < 0 are reduced to two observationally distinguishable classes with ? = ?1, equally competitive when tested against observations. The first comprises the ?CDM model with constant dark energy density. The second consists of interacting models with an energy flux from dark energy to dark matter.

  13. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to μν decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore » the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  14. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to ?? decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance of the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.

  15. Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muggli, P.; Allen, B.; Fang, Y.; Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Kusche, K.; Fedurin, M.; Vieira, J.; Martins, J.; Silva, L.

    2012-12-21

    Three regimes of relativistic beam - plasma interaction can in principle be reached at the ATF depending on the relative transverse and longitudinal size of the electron bunch when compared to the cold plasma collisionless skin depth c?{omega}{sub pe}: the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA), the self-modulation instability (SMI), and the current filamentation instability (CFI) regime. In addition, by choosing the bunch density, the linear, quasi-nonlinear and non linear regime of the PWFA can be reached. In the case of the two instabilities, the bunch density determines the growth rate and therefore the occurrence or not of the instability. We briefly describe these three regimes and outline results demonstrating that all these regime have or will be reached experimentally. We also outline planned and possible follow-on experiments.

  16. Species interactions differ in their genetic robustness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chubiz, Lon M.; Granger, Brian R.; Segre, Daniel; Harcombe, William R.

    2015-04-14

    Conflict and cooperation between bacterial species drive the composition and function of microbial communities. Stability of these emergent properties will be influenced by the degree to which species' interactions are robust to genetic perturbations. We use genome-scale metabolic modeling to computationally analyze the impact of genetic changes when Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica compete, or cooperate. We systematically knocked out in silico each reaction in the metabolic network of E. coli to construct all 2583 mutant stoichiometric models. Then, using a recently developed multi-scale computational framework, we simulated the growth of each mutant E. coli in the presence of S. enterica. The type of interaction between species was set by modulating the initial metabolites present in the environment. We found that the community was most robust to genetic perturbations when the organisms were cooperating. Species ratios were more stable in the cooperative community, and community biomass had equal variance in the two contexts. Additionally, the number of mutations that have a substantial effect is lower when the species cooperate than when they are competing. In contrast, when mutations were added to the S. enterica network the system was more robust when the bacteria were competing. These results highlight the utility of connecting metabolic mechanisms and studies of ecological stability. Cooperation and conflict alter the connection between genetic changes and properties that emerge at higher levels of biological organization.

  17. Self-interaction corrections in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2014-05-14

    Self-interaction corrections for Kohn-Sham density functional theory are reviewed for their physical meanings, formulations, and applications. The self-interaction corrections get rid of the self-interaction error, which is the sum of the Coulomb and exchange self-interactions that remains because of the use of an approximate exchange functional. The most frequently used self-interaction correction is the Perdew-Zunger correction. However, this correction leads to instabilities in the electronic state calculations of molecules. To avoid these instabilities, several self-interaction corrections have been developed on the basis of the characteristic behaviors of self-interacting electrons, which have no two-electron interactions. These include the von Weizscker kinetic energy and long-range (far-from-nucleus) asymptotic correction. Applications of self-interaction corrections have shown that the self-interaction error has a serious effect on the states of core electrons, but it has a smaller than expected effect on valence electrons. This finding is supported by the fact that the distribution of self-interacting electrons indicates that they are near atomic nuclei rather than in chemical bonds.

  18. MAP: How Climate Change Threatens America's Energy Infrastructure in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Every Region | Department of Energy How Climate Change Threatens America's Energy Infrastructure in Every Region MAP: How Climate Change Threatens America's Energy Infrastructure in Every Region October 9, 2015 - 10:28am Addthis This interactive map is not viewable in your browser. Please view it in a modern browser. Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Matt Dozier Matt Dozier Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

  19. Bilayer membrane interactions with nanofabricated scaffolds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collier, Patrick C.

    2015-07-29

    Membrane function is facilitated by lateral organization within the lipid bilayer, including phase-separation of lipids into more ordered domains (lipid rafts) and anchoring of the membrane to a cytoskeleton. These features have proven difficult to reproduce in model membrane systems such as black lipid membranes, unilamellar vesicles and supported bilayers. However, advances in micro/nanofabrication have resulted in more realistic synthetic models of membrane-cytoskeleton interactions that can help uncover the design rules responsible for biological membrane formation and organization. This review will focus on describing micro-/nanostructured scaffolds that can emulate the connections of a cellular membrane to an underlying “cytoskeleton”. Thismore » includes molecular-based scaffolds anchored to a solid substrate through surface chemistry, solid-state supports modified by material deposition, lithography and etching, the creation of micro/nanoporous arrays, integration with microfluidics, and droplet-based bilayers at interfaces.Model systems such as these are increasing our understanding of structure and organization in cell membranes, and how they result in the emergence of functionality at the nanoscale.« less

  20. Cell–scaffold interaction within engineered tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Haiping; Liu, Yuanyuan Jiang, Zhenglong; Chen, Weihua; Yu, Yongzhe; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-05-01

    The structure of a tissue engineering scaffold plays an important role in modulating tissue growth. A novel gelatin–chitosan (Gel–Cs) scaffold with a unique structure produced by three-dimensional printing (3DP) technology combining with vacuum freeze-drying has been developed for tissue-engineering applications. The scaffold composed of overall construction, micro-pore, surface morphology, and effective mechanical property. Such a structure meets the essential design criteria of an ideal engineered scaffold. The favorable cell–matrix interaction supports the active biocompatibility of the structure. The structure is capable of supporting cell attachment and proliferation. Cells seeded into this structure tend to maintain phenotypic shape and secreted large amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) and the cell growth decreased the mechanical properties of scaffold. This novel biodegradable scaffold has potential applications for tissue engineering based upon its unique structure, which acts to support cell growth. - Highlights: • The scaffold is not only for providing a surface for cell residence but also for determining cell phenotype and retaining structural integrity. • The mechanical property of scaffold can be affected by activities of cell. • The scaffold provides a microenvironment for cell attachment, growth, and migration.

  1. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  2. Atlas Multimedia Educational Lab for Interactive Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    AMELIA is an application with focus on particle physics processes in ATLAS. This will allow students and othe users to decode the collision events that unfold after the head-on collisions of protons at the Large hadron Collider. AMELIA uses the Irrlicht engine for the 3D graphics and wxWidgets for the interface. It uses the best aspects of technical animation and allows users to control 3D representations of collision events and to manipulate 3D models ofmore » the detector and see how particles are detected as they pass through. It allows the user to rotate, zoom and select virtual pieces of the ATLAS detector and events. The characteristics of the events (momentum etc.) can also be read, and one can select tracks for analysis, activate context-oriented media, etc. This framework intends to integrate different types of media into a single product. This way, videos, animations, sound, interactive visualization and data analysis will be bound together in the same package.-« less

  3. Energy Events | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Events Jump to: navigation, search Upcoming Events You need to have JavaScript enabled to view the interactive timeline. Further results for this query.WEEKMONTHYEAREvent:Preparing...

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Jon Weers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Areas of expertise Interactive web applications (PHP, jQuery, javascript, Python, Mongo, MySQL) Custom visualizations Project management User interface design Primary...

  5. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion® membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Govind, Niranjan; Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-23

    Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions, namely, solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  6. LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION IN HEAVY ION OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PTITSIN,V.; FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-07

    In heavy ion operation the LHC interaction region at IP2 will have a low-{beta} optics for collisions. The dynamic aperture is therefore sensitive to magnetic field errors in the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. The authors investigate the effect of the magnetic field errors on the dynamic aperture and evaluate the effectiveness of local interaction region correctors. The dynamic aperture and the tune space are computed for different crossing angles.

  7. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow

  8. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow

  9. Simulations Yield Clues to How Cells Interact With Surroundings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Yield Clues to How Cells Interact With Surroundings Simulations Yield Clues to How Cells Interact With Surroundings Berkeley Lab research has implications for cancer, atherosclerosis research March 21, 2013 Dan Krotz, dakrotz@lbl.gov NMA2.gif Click on this image to to see how integrin's transmembrane and extracellular domains swing about a hinge-like region that links them. (Credit: Mofrad lab) Your cells are social butterflies. They constantly interact with their surroundings,

  10. Aqua-vanadyl ion interaction with Nafion membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vijayakumar, Murugesan; Govind, Niranjan; Li, Bin; Wei, Xiaoliang; Nie, Zimin; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-23

    Lack of comprehensive understanding about the interactions between Nafion membrane and battery electrolytes prevents the straightforward tailoring of optimal materials for redox flow battery applications. In this work, we analyzed the interaction between aqua-vanadyl cation and sulfonic sites within the pores of Nafion membranes using combined theoretical and experimental X-ray spectroscopic methods. Molecular level interactions, namely, solvent share and contact pair mechanisms are discussed based on Vanadium and Sulfur K-edge spectroscopic analysis.

  11. Grain-grain interaction in stationary dusty plasma (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Grain-grain interaction in stationary dusty plasma Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Grain-grain interaction in stationary dusty plasma We present a particle-in-cell simulation study of the steady-state interaction between two stationary dust grains in uniform stationary plasma. Both the electrostatic force and the shadowing force on the grains are calculated explicitly. The electrostatic force is always repulsive. For two grains of the same size, the electrostatic

  12. Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the MC3E sounding array (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactions between cumulus convection and its environment as revealed by the MC3E sounding array This study attempts to understand interactions between midlatitude convective systems and their environments through a heat and moisture budget analysis using the sounding data

  13. Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production at a linear collider (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider If a contact interaction type correction to a Standard Model process is observed, studying its detailed properties can provide information on the fundamental physics responsible for

  14. The Effects of Climate Sensitivity and Carbon Cycle Interactions on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mitigation Policy Stringency (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Effects of Climate Sensitivity and Carbon Cycle Interactions on Mitigation Policy Stringency Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effects of Climate Sensitivity and Carbon Cycle Interactions on Mitigation Policy Stringency Climate sensitivity and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks interact to determine how global carbon and energy cycles will change in the future. While the science of these connections is well

  15. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow

  16. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow

  17. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter Print Schemes that use one light pulse to manipulate interactions of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach has opened new research directions in fields like quantum computing and nonlinear optics, while also spawning entirely new research areas, such as electromagnetically induced transparency and slow

  18. Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water | Department of Energy Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water Experiment-Based Model for the Chemical Interactions between Geothermal Rocks, Supercritical Carbon Dioxide and Water presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver,

  19. Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Effects on Aquatic Organisms (EMF, Acoustics and Physical Interaction) Office presentation icon 59_emf_pnnl_copping_v3.ppt More Documents & Publications Effects on Aquatic Organisms (Acoustics and Toxicity) Effects on the Physical Environment (Hydrodynamics, and Water Quality Food Web) Categorizing and Evaluating the Effects of Stressors

  20. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Esters (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates and Esters Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates and Esters Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only

  1. The Role of Solvent Heterogeneity in Determining the Dispersion Interaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Between Nanoassemblies (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect The Role of Solvent Heterogeneity in Determining the Dispersion Interaction Between Nanoassemblies Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Role of Solvent Heterogeneity in Determining the Dispersion Interaction Between Nanoassemblies Understanding fundamental nanoassembly processes on intermediate scales beween the molecular and the continuum requires an in-depth analysis of the coupling between particle interactions and

  2. INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers INTERACTIVE: Energy Intensity and Carbon Intensity by the Numbers February 19, 2016 - 11:53am Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Watch our CO2 drop dramatically compared to other countries in this interactive Curious about the total amount of carbon we emit into the atmosphere? Compare countries from around the globe using this tool. If

  3. Grid-Interactive Renewable Water Heating Economic and Environmental Value

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Grid-Interactive Renewable Water Heating Economic and Environmental Value Grid-interactive renewable water heaters have smart controls that quickly change their charge rate and charge level, factoring in renewable generation and other critical needs of the grid; thereby significantly reducing carbon emissions and bringing a new dimension of conservation and efficiency to the electric grid. The Steffes grid-interactive renewable water heater controller provides utilities with an affordable and

  4. Bridging Research Interactions Through Collaborative Development Grants in Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE Bridging Research Interactions through collaborative Development Grants in Energy (BRIDGE) program funds collaborative research teams to significantly lower the cost of solar energy systems...

  5. Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Full toroidal imaging of non-axisymmetric plasma material interaction in the National Spherical Torus eXperiment divertor Citation Details In-Document Search...

  6. Itinerant effects and enhanced magnetic interactions in Bi-based...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and enhanced magnetic interactions in Bi-based multilayer cuprates Dean, M. P. M. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Department of Condensed Matter...

  7. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  8. Probing novel scalar and tensor interactions from (ultra)cold...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Probing novel scalar and tensor interactions from (ultra)cold neutrons to the LHC Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Probing novel scalar and tensor ...

  9. Quasiparticle random-phase approximation with interactions from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quasiparticle random-phase approximation with interactions from the Similarity Renormalization Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quasiparticle random-phase ...

  10. Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with -peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Targeting diverse ...

  11. Properties of Nuclear Matter Within the JISP16 NN Interaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Properties of Nuclear Matter Within the JISP16 NN Interaction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Properties of Nuclear Matter Within the JISP16 NN...

  12. Compressible Turbulence and Interactions with Shock Waves and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (RMI) Why it Matters: Shockturbulence interaction is a fundamental phenomenon in fluid mechanics that occurs in a wide range of interesting problems in various...

  13. An analytical study of tribofilms generated by the interaction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An analytical study of tribofilms generated by the interaction of ashless antiwear additives with ZDDP using XANES and nano-indentation Title An analytical study of tribofilms...

  14. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Results and Priority Questions This fact sheet summarizes what is known about bird and bat interactions with land-based wind power in North America, including habitat...

  15. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment Dolinski, M J 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS;...

  16. SGP Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interaction Campaign (CLASIC): Science and Implementation Plan June 2007 Mark A. Miller, Principal Investigator and The CLASIC Steering Committee: Roni Avissar, Larry Berg,...

  17. REN21 Renewables Interactive Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TOOL Name: REN21's Renewables Interactive Map AgencyCompany Organization: Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable...

  18. High Island Densities and Long Range Repulsive Interactions:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    long range repulsive interactions. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations support this conclusion. In addition to answering an outstanding...

  19. Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction and...

  20. Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring new physics ...

  1. Dynamic Control of Spin Sates in Interacting Magnetic Elements...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Dynamic Control of Spin Sates in Interacting Magnetic Elements DOE Grant Recipients Argonne National...

  2. USE OF VOLUNTARY CONSENSUS STANDARDS AND INTERACTION WITH STANDARDS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs)....

  3. NETL - Bituminous Baseline Performance and Cost Interactive Tool...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    from the Cost and Performance Baseline for Fossil Energy Plants - Bituminous Coal and Natural Gas to Electricity report. The tool provides an interactive summary of the full...

  4. H. David Politzer, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    H. David Politzer, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction Resources with Additional Information H. David Politzer Photo Credit: California Institute of Technology H. David...

  5. Interaction Between Carbon Markets and Renewable Energy Markets (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, G. L.; Milford, J.; Bird, L.

    2006-10-03

    This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, 2006 in Boulder, Colorado, discusses the interaction between carbon markets and renewable energy markets.

  6. On the interaction of solutes with grain boundaries (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on November 1, 2016 Title: On the interaction ... become publicly available on November 1, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1016...

  7. Effect of Coulomb interaction on multi-electronwave packet dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiokawa, T.; Takada, Y.; Konabe, S.; Hatsugai, Y.; Muraguchi, M.; Endoh, T.; Shiraishi, K.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the effect of Coulomb interaction on electron transport in a one-dimensional nanoscale structure using a multi-electron wave packet approach. To study the time evolution, we numerically solve the time-dependent Hartree-Fock equation, finding that the electron wave packet dynamics strongly depends on the Coulomb interaction strength. When the Coulomb interaction is large, each electron wave packet moves separately in the presence of an electric field. With weak Coulomb interaction, however, the electron wave packets overlap, forming and moving as one collective wave packet.

  8. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center (LMI-EFRC) is excited to offer this free public webinar on Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency ...

  9. Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Smart Grid Technology Interactive Model Share Description As our attention turns to new cars that run partially or completely on electricity, how can we redesign our electric grid...

  10. Effect of alcohols on aqueous lysozyme-lysozyme interactions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Effect of alcohols on aqueous lysozyme-lysozyme interactions from static light-scattering measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of alcohols on aqueous...

  11. Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    skin. By uncovering these longitudinal patterns, this study promotes a more better understanding of microbe-human interactions within the built environment. less Authors:...

  12. THE PARITY NON-CONSERVING ELECTRON-NUCLEON INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commins, E.D.; Bucksbaum, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    We present general ideas concerning the neutral weak eq interaction. Then we describe the salient features of the Weinberg-Salam model, discuss in detail the principles and methods of the SLAC polarized electron scattering experiment and atomic physics experiments, and summarize neutral weak interaction results and their implications.

  13. Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    cells to engineered nanomaterials. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Biomolecular interactions and responses of human epithelial and macrophage cells to engineered nanomaterials. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are increasingly being used in commercial products, particularly in the biomedical, cosmetic, and clothing industries. For

  14. Single particle density of trapped interacting quantum gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bala, Renu; Bosse, J.; Pathak, K. N.

    2015-05-15

    An expression for single particle density for trapped interacting gases has been obtained in first order of interaction using Greens function method. Results are easily simplified for homogeneous quantum gases and are found to agree with famous results obtained by Huang-Yang-Luttinger and Lee-Yang.

  15. Self-consistent Models of Strong Interaction with Chiral Symmetry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Nambu, Y.; Pascual, P.

    1963-04-01

    Some simple models of (renormalizable) meson-nucleon interaction are examined in which the nucleon mass is entirely due to interaction and the chiral ( gamma {sub 5}) symmetry is "broken'' to become a hidden symmetry. It is found that such a scheme is possible provided that a vector meson is introduced as an elementary field. (auth)

  16. Size-exclusion chromatography system for macromolecular interaction analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stevens, Fred J.

    1988-01-01

    A low pressure, microcomputer controlled system employing high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) allows for precise analysis of the interaction of two reversibly associating macromolecules such as proteins. Since a macromolecular complex migrates faster than its components during size-exclusion chromatography, the difference between the elution profile of a mixture of two macromolecules and the summation of the elution profiles of the two components provides a quantifiable indication of the degree of molecular interaction. This delta profile is used to qualitatively reveal the presence or absence of significant interaction or to rank the relative degree of interaction in comparing samples and, in combination with a computer simulation, is further used to quantify the magnitude of the interaction in an arrangement wherein a microcomputer is coupled to analytical instrumentation in a novel manner.

  17. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup ?3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  18. Interactions of Hydrogen Isotopes and Oxides with Metal Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2008-08-01

    Understanding and accounting for interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their oxides with metal surfaces is important for persons working with tritium systems. Reported data from several investigators have shown that the processes of oxidation, adsorption, absorption, and permeation are all coupled and interactive. A computer model has been developed for predicting the interaction of hydrogen isotopes and their corresponding oxides in a flowing carrier gas stream with the walls of a metallic tube, particularly at low hydrogen concentrations. An experiment has been constructed to validate the predictive model. Predictions from modeling lead to unexpected experiment results.

  19. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  20. Top 5 Interactives and Maps of 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interactives and Maps of 2015 Top 5 Interactives and Maps of 2015 December 17, 2015 - 3:00pm Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Well gang, we've done it again. We've made a full rotation around the sun and we're back after 940 million kilometers to share our favorite interactives, quizzes and maps of 2015. Click each to explore the most interesting energy topics of 2015. 1) How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? With the recent

  1. Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'t Hooft interaction in pentaquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dmitrasinovic, V.

    2005-05-01

    We review critically the predictions of pentaquarks in the quark model, in particular, those based on the flavor-spin-dependent (Glozman-Riska) hyperfine interaction and the color-spin (one-gluon-exchange Fermi-Breit) one. We include the antiquark interactions and find that: (1) the exotic SU(3) multiplets are not substantially affected in the flavor-spin model, whereas some of the nonexotic multiplets are; and (2) the variational upper bound on the {xi}{sup --}-{theta}{sup +} mass difference in the color-spin hyperfine interaction model is substantially reduced. This leads us to the U{sub A}(1) symmetry breaking Kobayashi-Kondo-Maskawa-'tHooft interaction. We discuss some of its phenomenological consequences for pentaquarks.

  2. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that can be controlled by varying the properties of the optical control beam. Problems arise, however, when the probe pulse lies in the x-ray regime because x rays interact...

  3. Understanding Small Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coupling Experiment with Theory | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Understanding Small Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with Theory

  4. The Electron-Phonon Interaction as Studied by Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Lynch

    2004-09-30

    With recent advances in energy and angle resolution, the effects of electron-phonon interactions are manifest in many valence-band photoelectron spectra (PES) for states near the Fermi level in metals.

  5. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  6. Novel QCD Effects from Initial and Final State Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2007-09-12

    Initial-state and final-state interactions which are conventionally neglected in the parton model, have a profound effect in QCD hard-scattering reactions. The effects, which arise from gluon exchange between the active and spectator quarks, cause leading-twist single-spin asymmetries, diffractive deep inelastic scattering, diffractive hard hadronic reactions, and the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering also leads to nuclear shadowing and non-universal antishadowing of nuclear structure functions through multiple scattering reactions in the nuclear target. Factorization-breaking effects are particularly important for hard hadron interactions since both initial-state and final-state interactions appear. Related factorization breaking effects can also appear in exclusive electroproduction reactions and in deeply virtual Compton scattering. None of the effects of initial-state and final-state interactions are incorporated in the light-front wavefunctions of the target hadron computed in isolation.

  7. Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-Document Search Title: Local Three-Nucleon Interaction from Chiral Effective Field Theory You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech...

  8. Observation of Stueckelberg oscillations in dipole-dipole interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditzhuijzen, C. S. E. van; Tauschinsky, Atreju; Van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.

    2009-12-15

    We have observed Stueckelberg oscillations in the dipole-dipole interaction between Rydberg atoms with an externally applied radio-frequency field. The oscillating rf field brings the interaction between cold Rydberg atoms in two separated volumes into resonance. We observe multiphoton transitions when varying the amplitude of the rf field and the static electric field offset. The angular momentum states we use show a quadratic Stark shift, which leads to a fundamentally different behavior than linearly shifting states. Both cases are studied theoretically using the Floquet approach and are compared. The amplitude of the sidebands, related to the interaction strength, is given by the Bessel function in the linearly shifting case and by the generalized Bessel function in the quadratically shifting case. The oscillatory behavior of both functions corresponds to Stueckelberg oscillations, an interference effect described by the semiclassical Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg model. The measurements prove coherent dipole-dipole interaction during at least 0.6 mus.

  9. Interactions Between Energy Security and Climate Change: A Focus...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Energy Security Resource Type: Publications Website: www.sciencedirect.comscience?obMImg&imagekeyB6V2W-52SN633-5-1&cd Cost: Free Interactions Between Energy...

  10. Using Light to Control How X Rays Interact with Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of another with matter are well developed in the visible-light regime where an optical control pulse influences how an optical probe pulse interacts with a medium. This approach...

  11. NEUTRINO-NUCLEUS NEUTRAL CURRENT ELASTIC INTERACTIONS MEASUREMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... From the EM interaction term we identify the coupling constant as the electric charge: e g sin W gg g 2 + g 2 . 2.7 Incorporating Quarks In principle, the quark sector is ...

  12. Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Molecular conformations, interactions, and properties associated with drug efficiency and clinical performance among VEGFR TK inhibitors Print Monday, 17 September 2012 00:00 Pictured are crystals that contain VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase in complex with an inhibitor from a class of potent anticancer

  13. HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HISTORY OF WEAK INTERACTIONS. × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical

  14. H. David Politzer, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H. David Politzer, Asymptotic Freedom, and Strong Interaction Resources with Additional Information H. David Politzer Photo Credit: California Institute of Technology H. David Politzer has won the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics 'for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction'. 'Politzer, a professor of theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology, shares the prize with David Gross and Frank Wilczek. The key discovery celebrated by [the] prize was

  15. Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Particles (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 9, 2016 Title: Model for Thermal Relic Dark Matter of Strongly Interacting Massive Particles Authors: Hochberg, Yonit ; Kuflik, Eric ; Murayama, Hitoshi ; Volansky, Tomer ; Wacker, Jay G. Publication Date: 2015-07-10 OSTI Identifier: 1193520 Grant/Contract Number: AC02-05CH11231

  16. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Determination of Contact Angles. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Abstract not provided. Authors: Tenney, Craig M ; Cygan, Randall T. Publication Date: 2013-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1106710 Report Number(s):

  17. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}DBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0{nu}DBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are

  18. Quasiparticle random-phase approximation with interactions from the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Similarity Renormalization Group (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Quasiparticle random-phase approximation with interactions from the Similarity Renormalization Group Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quasiparticle random-phase approximation with interactions from the Similarity Renormalization Group Authors: Hergert, H. ; Papakonstantinou, P. ; Roth, R. Publication Date: 2011-06-16 OSTI Identifier: 1099608 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review C

  19. Interaction Between Like-Charged Colloidal Spheres in Electrolyte Solutions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Interaction Between Like-Charged Colloidal Spheres in Electrolyte Solutions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction Between Like-Charged Colloidal Spheres in Electrolyte Solutions No abstract prepared. Authors: Bratko, Dusan ; Prausnitz, John M. ; Wu, Jianzhong Publication Date: 1998-11-01 OSTI Identifier: 7360 Report Number(s): LBNL--42523 TRN: US200305%%423 DOE Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource

  20. Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interaction and Coalescence of Nanovoids and Dynamic Fracture in Silica Glass: Multimiilion-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations Authors: Nomura, K ; Chen, Y C ; Kalia, R K ; Nakano, A ; Vashishta, P ;

  1. Interactions of Plakoglobin and [beta]-Catenin with Desmosomal Cadherins

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    BASIS OF SELECTIVE EXCLUSION OF [alpha]- AND [beta]-CATENIN FROM DESMOSOMES (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Interactions of Plakoglobin and [beta]-Catenin with Desmosomal Cadherins BASIS OF SELECTIVE EXCLUSION OF [alpha]- AND [beta]-CATENIN FROM DESMOSOMES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactions of Plakoglobin and [beta]-Catenin with Desmosomal Cadherins BASIS OF SELECTIVE EXCLUSION OF [alpha]- AND [beta]-CATENIN FROM DESMOSOMES Plakoglobin and {beta}-catenin are

  2. Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strong influence of coadsorbate interaction on CO desorption dynamics on Ru(0001) probed by ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and ab initio simulations We show that coadsorbed oxygen

  3. Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Accepted Manuscript: Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin Title: Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin Background: Americans spend the vast majority of their lives in built environments. Even traditionally outdoor pursuits, such as exercising, are often now performed indoors. Bacteria that colonize these indoor ecosystems are primarily derived from the human

  4. Interactive protein manipulation (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Interactive protein manipulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactive protein manipulation × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the

  5. Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium literature review: lithium's properties and interactions × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  6. Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    substrates (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates Title: Magnus-induced ratchet effects for skyrmions interacting with asymmetric substrates Authors: Reichhardt, C. ; Ray, D. ; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson Publication Date: 2015-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1239044 Grant/Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Type: Published Article Journal Name: New Journal of Physics Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume:

  7. Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first hyperpolarizabilities of asymmetric π-conjugated systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab initio molecular orbital-configuration interaction based quantum master equation (MOQME) approach to the dynamic first

  8. Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Athletic equipment microbiota are shaped by interactions with human skin Background: Americans spend the vast majority of their lives in built environments. Even traditionally outdoor pursuits, such as exercising, are often now performed indoors. Bacteria that colonize these indoor ecosystems are primarily derived from the human microbiome.

  9. PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential | Department of Energy Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential February 24, 2012 - 11:30am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Adding offshore wind to the U.S. renewable energy portfolio promises access to a large,

  10. Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions Advanced Characterization of Particles and Particle-Cell Interactions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PDF icon 2004_deer_cowin.pdf More Documents & Publications Real-Time Simultaneous Measurements of Size, Density, and Composition of Single Ultrafine Diesel Tailpipe Particles ACES: Evaluation of Tissue Response to Inhaled

  11. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefings, news releases, telephone, email, informational materials, and the LM website. To assess the effectiveness of LM's communication with stakeholders

  12. Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions … an important trait for biomass

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    production of bioenergy crops? | Department of Energy Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions … an important trait for biomass production of bioenergy crops? Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions … an important trait for biomass production of bioenergy crops? This presentation was given by Heike Bucking at the Symbiosis Conference. PDF icon symbiosis_conference_bucking.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-005436: Categorical Exclusion Determination Symbiosis Conference Speaker and Attendee

  13. INTERACTIVE: How Much Carbon Do Countries Emit? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    If you are using IE9, you can also view the interactive here Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and Cartographic Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer KEY FACTS New interactive lets you compare annual carbon emissions of U.S. states with other countries. Enter up to 10 countries to visualize carbon emissions per person or in total. Flip back and forth between per capita and total emissions for a full picture of carbon dioxide emissions

  14. Observing Interactions as they happen: Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopies of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Materials | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Observing Interactions as they happen: Ultrafast Optical Spectroscopies of Quantum Materials Wednesday, January 13, 2016 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Giacomo Coslovich, LCLS Program Description Quantum materials exhibit strong and competing interactions between their fundamental constituents, leading to exotic properties such as high-temperature superconductivity and nanoscale charge and spin

  15. Fundamental Interactions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fundamental Interactions Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Fundamental Interactions Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Research emphasis is placed on structural and dynamical studies of atoms, molecules, and nanostructures, and the description of their

  16. NREL Launches Interactive Tool for Developing a Cleaner Energy Future -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Launches Interactive Tool for Developing a Cleaner Energy Future January 9, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has created an energy analysis tool to help individuals and educators experiment with future energy use scenarios. The interactive Buildings, Industry, Transportation, Electricity, and Transportation Scenarios (BITES) allows users to explore how changes in energy demand and supply can impact carbon dioxide

  17. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) watch now The recorded presentations and panel discussion are now available for online viewing. The Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center (LMI-EFRC) is excited to offer this free public webinar on Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion. The LMI-EFRC is made up of world leaders creating new optical materials and innovative photonic designs that engineer and control light-material interactions, with the goal of

  18. Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coupling Experiment with Theory | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with Theory Previous Next List Lee, Jason S.; Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Britt, David K.; Brown, Craig M.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Smit, Berend; Long, Jeffrey R.; and Queen, Wendy L.. Understanding Small-Molecule Interactions in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Coupling Experiment with

  19. Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration Grid Interaction Tech Team, and International Smart Grid Collaboration 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss067_hardy_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Grid Connectivity Research, Development & Demonstration Projects Grid Interaction Tech Team Codes and Standards to Support Vehicle Electrification

  20. Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Factors Impacting EGR Cooler Fouling - Main Effects and Interactions Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. PDF icon deer10_styles.pdf More Documents & Publications Identification and Control of Factors that Affect EGR Cooler Fouling The Impact of PM and HC on EGR Cooler Fouling EGR Cooler Fouling -

  1. Ultrafast Terahertz Probes of Interacting Dark Excitons in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chirality-Specific Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Terahertz Probes of Interacting Dark Excitons in Chirality-Specific Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast Terahertz Probes of Interacting Dark Excitons in Chirality-Specific Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Authors: Luo, Liang ; Chatzakis, Ioannis ; Patz, Aaron ; Wang, Jigang Publication Date: 2015-03-13 OSTI

  2. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the

  3. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications October 14, 2014 - 11:08am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 2 - Preserve, protect, and share records and information. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefings, news releases, telephone,

  4. Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications Analysis of LM Stakeholder Interaction and External Communications The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) makes every effort to communicate with its stakeholders through public and small group meetings, conferences, briefings, news releases, telephone, email, informational materials, and the LM website. To assess the effectiveness of LM's communication with stakeholders

  5. Home Energy Score Interactive Graphic | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interactive Graphic Home Energy Score Interactive Graphic The Home Energy Score is similar to a vehicle's miles-per-gallon rating. The Home Energy Score allows homeowners to compare the energy performance of their homes to other homes nationwide. It also provides homeowners with suggestions for improving their homes' efficiency. The process starts with a Home Energy Score Assessor collecting energy information during a brief home walk-through. Using the Home Energy Scoring Tool, developed by the

  6. EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History EM Launches First-Ever Interactive Timeline on Cleanup's History March 5, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Visitors to EM's booth at the annual Waste Management Symposia international conference participate in demonstrations of the new timeline. Visitors to EM's booth at the annual Waste Management Symposia international conference participate in demonstrations of the new timeline. The timeline details EM’s key

  7. The intermountain power project commissioning - Subsynchronous torsional interaction tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.T.; Peterson, K.J. ); Pinko, R.J.; Kankam, M.D.; Baker, D.H. )

    1988-10-01

    Subsyncronous torsional vibration as a result of electrochemical interaction between the HVDC controls and a turbine-generator was first discovered during the commissioning of the Square Butte Project in 1977. The level of interaction between the HVDC controls and the turbine-generator depends on several interacting factors: the characteristic torsional frequencies of the turbine-generator, the bandwidth of the HVDC controls and the relative strength of the connecting ac system. For the Intermountain Power Project (IPP), early analysis of these interacting factors indicated that there exist definite potential for subsynchronous oscillation to occur. The calculated torsional frequencies of the IPP units showed that the first mode frequency is 14.0 Hz and is within the typical bandwidth of an HVDC control which is between 10-20 Hz. The HVDC controls, therefore, can influence the torsional stability of the IPP units. Further, the IPP turbine-generators are required to operate isolated on the HVDC rectifier terminal, with no other interconnecting ac network. This ''radial'' mode of operation will result in maximum interaction between the converter station and the IPP units. It became obvious that special measure must be implemented in the design of the IPP HVDC control system to modify its typical characteristics to avoid the occurrence of the subsynchronous oscillation. This paper presents the results of the subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) tests that were performed during the commissioning of the IPP Unit 1 and the HVDC Transmission system.

  8. Influence of symmetry-conserving higher order interactions in the interacting boson model on the first. beta. and. gamma. band in rotational nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanthournout, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Symmetry-conserving higher order interactions in the SU(3) limit of the interacting boson model remove the degeneracy in the first {beta} and {gamma} band predicted by the original interacting boson model. It is possible, also for the fourth order interactions, to predict this removal using quantities describing odd-even staggering effects. Numerical tests confirm the influence of these interactions on the first bands of SU(3) nuclei.

  9. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequencymore » demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.« less

  10. An Improved Design for a Super-B Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.K.; Seeman, J.; Wienands, U.; Bettoni, S.; Biagini, M.E.; Raimondi, P.; Paoloni, E.; /INFN, Pisa

    2008-07-25

    We present an improved design for a Super-B interaction region. The new design attempts to minimize the bending of the two colliding beams which results from shared magnetic elements near the Interaction Point (IP). The total crossing angle at the IP is increased from 34 mrad to 50 mrad and the distance from the IP to the first quadrupole is increased. Although the two beams still travel through this shared magnet, these changes allow for a new magnetic field design with a septum which gives the magnet two magnetic centers. This greatly reduces the beam bending from this shared quadrupole and thereby reduces the radiative bhabha background for the detector as well as any beam emittance growth from the bending. We describe the new design for the interaction region.

  11. Model-independent analyses of dark-matter particle interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anand, Nikhil; Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Haxton, W. C.

    2015-03-24

    A model-independent treatment of dark-matter particle elastic scattering has been developed, yielding the most general interaction for WIMP-nucleon low-energy scattering, and the resulting amplitude has been embedded into the nucleus, taking into account the selection rules imposed by parity and time-reversal. One finds that, in contrast to the usual spin-independent/spin-dependent (SI/SD) formulation, the resulting cross section contains six independent nuclear response functions, three of which are associated with possible velocity-dependent interactions. We find that current experiments are four orders of magnitude more sensitive to derivative couplings than is apparent in the standard SI/SD treatment, which necessarily associated such interactions withmore » cross sections proportional to v2T ~ 10⁻⁶, where vT is the WIMP velocity relative to the center of mass of the nuclear target.« less

  12. Interacting spin-2 fields in the Stckelberg picture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noller, Johannes; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Scargill, James H.C. E-mail: james.scargill@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-02-01

    We revisit and extend the 'Effective field theory for massive gravitons' constructed by Arkani-Hamed, Georgi and Schwartz in the light of recent progress in constructing ghost-free theories with multiple interacting spin-2 fields. We show that there exist several dual ways of restoring gauge invariance in such multi-gravity theories, find a generalised Fierz-Pauli tuning condition relevant in this context and highlight subtleties in demixing tensor and scalar modes. The generic multi-gravity feature of scalar mixing and its consequences for higher order interactions are discussed. In particular we show how the decoupling limit is qualitatively changed in theories of interacting spin-2 fields. We relate this to dRGT (de Rham, Gabadadze, Tolley) massive gravity, Hassan-Rosen bigravity and the multi-gravity constructions by Hinterbichler and Rosen. As an additional application we show that EBI (Eddington-Born-Infeld) bigravity and higher order generalisations thereof possess ghost-like instabilities.

  13. Human-computer interface including haptically controlled interactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2005-10-11

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing that provides haptic feedback to control interface interactions such as scrolling or zooming within an application. Haptic feedback in the present method allows the user more intuitive control of the interface interactions, and allows the user's visual focus to remain on the application. The method comprises providing a control domain within which the user can control interactions. For example, a haptic boundary can be provided corresponding to scrollable or scalable portions of the application domain. The user can position a cursor near such a boundary, feeling its presence haptically (reducing the requirement for visual attention for control of scrolling of the display). The user can then apply force relative to the boundary, causing the interface to scroll the domain. The rate of scrolling can be related to the magnitude of applied force, providing the user with additional intuitive, non-visual control of scrolling.

  14. Signature Product Code for Predicting Protein-Protein Interactions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-09-25

    The SigProdV1.0 software consists of four programs which together allow the prediction of protein-protein interactions using only amino acid sequences and experimental data. The software is based on the use of tensor products of amino acid trimers coupled with classifiers known as support vector machines. Essentially the program looks for amino acid trimer pairs which occur more frequently in protein pairs which are known to interact. These trimer pairs are then used to make predictionsmore » about unknown protein pairs. A detailed description of the method can be found in the paper: S. Martin, D. Roe, J.L. Faulon. "Predicting protein-protein interactions using signature products," Bioinformatics, available online from Advance Access, Aug. 19, 2004.« less

  15. INTERACTING QUARK MATTER EQUATION OF STATE FOR COMPACT STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraga, Eduardo S.; Kurkela, Aleksi; Vuorinen, Aleksi

    2014-02-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) studies of the thermodynamics of hot quark-gluon plasma demonstrate the importance of accounting for the interactions of quarks and gluons if one wants to investigate the phase structure of strongly interacting matter. Motivated by this observation and using state-of-the-art results from perturbative QCD, we construct a simple, effective equation of state (EOS) for cold quark matter that consistently incorporates the effects of interactions and furthermore includes a built-in estimate of the inherent systematic uncertainties. This goes beyond the MIT bag model description in a crucial way, yet leads to an EOS that is equally straightforward to use. We also demonstrate that, at moderate densities, our EOS can be made to smoothly connect to hadronic EOSs, with the two exhibiting very similar behavior near the matching region. The resulting hybrid stars are seen to have masses similar to those predicted by the purely nucleonic EOSs.

  16. Interactive savings calculations for RCS measures, six case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    Many Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audits are based, in whole or in part, on the RCS Model Audit. This audit calculates the savings for each measure independently, that is, as if no other conservation actions were taken. This method overestimates the total savings due to a group of measures, and an explanatory warning is given to the customer. Presenting interactive results to consumers would increase the perceived credibility of the audit results by eliminating the need for the warning about uncalculated interactive effects. An increased level of credibility would hopefully lead to an increased level of conservation actions based on the audit results. Because many of the existing RCS audits are based on the RCS Model Audit, six case studies were produced to show that the Model Audit algorithms can be used to produce interactive savings estimates. These six Model Audit case studies, as well as two Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit cases, are presented along with a discussion of the calculation methods used.

  17. Dynamic control of spin states in interacting magnetic elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jain, Shikha; Novosad, Valentyn

    2014-10-07

    A method for the control of the magnetic states of interacting magnetic elements comprising providing a magnetic structure with a plurality of interacting magnetic elements. The magnetic structure comprises a plurality of magnetic states based on the state of each interacting magnetic element. The desired magnetic state of the magnetic structure is determined. The active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the desired magnetic state is determined. Each magnetic element of the magnetic structure is then subjected to an alternating magnetic field or electrical current having a frequency and amplitude below the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of said desired magnetic state and above the active resonance frequency and amplitude curve of the current state of the magnetic structure until the magnetic state of the magnetic structure is at the desired magnetic state.

  18. Beam-machine Interaction at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boccone, V.; Bruce, R.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F. Esposito, L.S.; Ferrari, A.; Lechner, A.; Mereghetti, A.; Nowak, E.; Shetty, N.V.; Skordis, E.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V.

    2014-06-15

    The radiation field generated by a high energy and intensity accelerator is of concern in terms of element functionality threat, component damage, electronics reliability, and material activation, but also provides signatures that allow actual operating conditions to be monitored. The shower initiated by an energetic hadron involves many different physical processes, down to slow neutron interactions and fragment de-excitation, which need to be accurately described for design purposes and to interpret operation events. The experience with the transport and interaction Monte Carlo code FLUKA at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), operating at CERN with 4 TeV proton beams (and equivalent magnetic rigidity Pb beams) and approaching nominal luminosity and energy, is presented. Design, operation and upgrade challenges are reviewed in the context of beam-machine interaction account and relevant benchmarking examples based on radiation monitor measurements are shown.

  19. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  20. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weathersby, Stephen; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  1. Loschmidt echo in one-dimensional interacting Bose gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelas, K.; Seva, T.; Buljan, H.

    2011-12-15

    We explore Loschmidt echo in two regimes of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases: the strongly interacting Tonks-Girardeau (TG) regime, and the weakly interacting mean-field regime. We find that the Loschmidt echo of a TG gas decays as a Gaussian when small (random and time independent) perturbations are added to the Hamiltonian. The exponent is proportional to the number of particles and the magnitude of a small perturbation squared. In the mean-field regime the Loschmidt echo shows richer behavior: it decays faster for larger nonlinearity, and the decay becomes more abrupt as the nonlinearity increases; it can be very sensitive to the particular realization of the noise potential, especially for relatively small nonlinearities.

  2. Multi-time Schrdinger equations cannot contain interaction potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrat, Sren; Tumulka, Roderich

    2014-03-15

    Multi-time wave functions are wave functions that have a time variable for every particle, such as ?(t{sub 1},x{sub 1},...,t{sub N},x{sub N}). They arise as a relativistic analog of the wave functions of quantum mechanics but can be applied also in quantum field theory. The evolution of a wave function with N time variables is governed by N Schrdinger equations, one for each time variable. These Schrdinger equations can be inconsistent with each other, i.e., they can fail to possess a joint solution for every initial condition; in fact, the N Hamiltonians need to satisfy a certain commutator condition in order to be consistent. While this condition is automatically satisfied for non-interacting particles, it is a challenge to set up consistent multi-time equations with interaction. We prove for a wide class of multi-time Schrdinger equations that the presence of interaction potentials (given by multiplication operators) leads to inconsistency. We conclude that interaction has to be implemented instead by creation and annihilation of particles, which, in fact, can be done consistently [S. Petrat and R. Tumulka, Multi-time wave functions for quantum field theory, Ann. Physics (to be published)]. We also prove the following result: When a cut-off length ? > 0 is introduced (in the sense that the multi-time wave function is defined only on a certain set of spacelike configurations, thereby breaking Lorentz invariance), then the multi-time Schrdinger equations with interaction potentials of range ? are consistent; however, in the desired limit ? ? 0 of removing the cut-off, the resulting multi-time equations are interaction-free, which supports the conclusion expressed in the title.

  3. Interactions and the θ term in one-dimensional gapped systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interactions and the term in one-dimensional gapped systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Interactions and the term in one-dimensional gapped systems Authors: ...

  4. Interaction energy and itinerant ferromagnetism in a strongly interacting Fermi gas in the absence of molecule formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Lianyi

    2014-11-26

    In this study, we investigate the interaction energy and the possibility of itinerant ferromagnetism in a strongly interacting Fermi gas at zero temperature in the absence of molecule formation. The interaction energy is obtained by summing the perturbative contributions of Galitskii-Feynman type to all orders in the gas parameter. It can be expressed by a simple phase-space integral of an in-medium scattering phase shift. In both three and two dimensions (3D and 2D), the interaction energy shows a maximum before reaching the resonance from the Bose-Einstein condensate side, which provides a possible explanation of the experimental measurements of the interactionmore » energy. This phenomenon can be theoretically explained by the qualitative change of the nature of the binary interaction in the medium. The appearance of an energy maximum has significant effects on the itinerant ferromagnetism. In 3D, the ferromagnetic transition is reentrant and itinerant ferromagnetism exists in a narrow window around the energy maximum. In 2D, the present theoretical approach suggests that itinerant ferromagnetism does not exist, which reflects the fact that the energy maximum becomes much lower than the energy of the fully polarized state.« less

  5. Thermal Decomposition of IMX-104: Ingredient Interactions Govern Thermal Insensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maharrey, Sean; Wiese-Smith, Deneille; Highley, Aaron M.; Steill, Jeffrey D.; Behrens, Richard; Kay, Jeffrey J.

    2015-04-01

    This report summarizes initial studies into the chemical basis of the thermal insensitivity of INMX-104. The work follows upon similar efforts investigating this behavior for another DNAN-based insensitive explosive, IMX-101. The experiments described demonstrate a clear similarity between the ingredient interactions that were shown to lead to the thermal insensitivity observed in IMX-101 and those that are active in IMX-104 at elevated temperatures. Specifically, the onset of decomposition of RDX is shifted to a lower temperature based on the interaction of the RDX with liquid DNAN. This early onset of decomposition dissipates some stored energy that is then unavailable for a delayed, more violent release.

  6. Mixtures of Strongly Interacting Bosons in Optical Lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buonsante, P.; Penna, V.; Giampaolo, S. M.; Illuminati, F.; Vezzani, A.

    2008-06-20

    We investigate the properties of strongly interacting heteronuclear boson-boson mixtures loaded in realistic optical lattices, with particular emphasis on the physics of interfaces. In particular, we numerically reproduce the recent experimental observation that the addition of a small fraction of {sup 41}K induces a significant loss of coherence in {sup 87}Rb, providing a simple explanation. We then investigate the robustness against the inhomogeneity typical of realistic experimental realizations of the glassy quantum emulsions recently predicted to occur in strongly interacting boson-boson mixtures on ideal homogeneous lattices.

  7. Photodetachment of hydrogen negative ions with screened Coulomb interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Song Bin; Chen, Xiang Jun; Wang, Jian Guo; Janev, R. K.; Qu, Yi Zhi

    2010-06-15

    The effects of Coulomb interaction screening on photodetachment cross sections of hydrogen negative ions below the n =2 excitation threshold is investigated by using the R-matrix method with pseudostates. The contributions of Feshbach and shape resonances to H{sup -} photodetachment cross section are presented when screening length (D) varies from D = {infinity} to D = 4.6 a.u. It is found that the interaction screening has dramatic effects on the photodetachment cross sections of hydrogen negative ions in the photoelectron energy region around the n = 2 excitation threshold by strongly affecting the evolution of near-threshold resonances.

  8. Interacting spins and holes in zigzag edge nanographene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, Sudipta; Wakabayashi, Katsunori

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated charge and spin gap properties of zigzag edge graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) modeled within Hubbard Hamiltonian with onsite electron-electron interaction using semi-empirical many-body configuration interaction (CI) method. The charge gap behavior resembles the mean-field results, showing minima near Dirac point. We have observed unprecedented gap-less spin excitations over the flat band region. Moreover, doping the ZGNRs with holes reduces both the charge and spin gaps, inducing metallic and magnetic behavior, which can be exploited to fabricate spintronic devices.

  9. Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4'-bipyridine (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4'-bipyridine Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4'-bipyridine A new spin crossover coordination polymer (SCO-CPs) of Fe(II)-4,4'-bipyridine

  10. Electrostatic interactions between peptides and the molecular chaperone

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DnaK (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electrostatic interactions between peptides and the molecular chaperone DnaK Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electrostatic interactions between peptides and the molecular chaperone DnaK No abstract prepared. Authors: Liu, Wei ; Bratko, Dusan ; Prausnitz, J.M. ; Blanch, H.W. Publication Date: 2003-01-30 OSTI Identifier: 824843 Report Number(s): LBNL--52181 R&D Project: 402201; TRN: US200419%%371 DOE Contract Number: AC03-76SF00098

  11. Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions Dr. John P. Krasting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions Dr. John P. Krasting geophysical fluid dynamics Laboratory Wednesday, Jan 23, 2013 - 4:15PM MBG AUDITORIUM Refreshments at 4:00PM The PrinceTon Plasma Physics laboraTory is a U.s. DeParTmenT of energy faciliTy The interactions between Earth's carbon cycle and climate are key to understanding both past and future climate change. NOAA-GFDL developed two coupled climate- carbon cycle models - or Earth System Models (ESMs) - that are able to simulate

  12. Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter - Research - Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Interactions of Highly Charged Ions With Matter Spectrum of K x rays from a vanadium The interaction of high-energy heavy-ions with matter is a topic of importance in many areas of science. For example, the mechanisms whereby highly ionized atoms de-excite and return to charge neutrality are of great concern in the design of thermonuclear fusion reactors, where energy transfer to impurity ions injected from the walls of the containment vessel can seriously affect the plasma

  13. COLLOQUIUM: Ensemble Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab January 23, 2013, 4:15pm to 6:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Ensemble Modeling of Climate-Carbon Cycle Interactions Dr. John Krasting Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Abstract: PDF icon COLL.01.23.13.pdf The interactions between Earth's carbon cycle and climate are key to understanding both past and future climate change. NOAA-GFDL developed two coupled climate-carbon cycle models - or Earth System Models (ESMs) - that are able to simulate these

  14. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernndez-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  15. Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Targeting diverse protein-protein interaction interfaces with α/β-peptides derived from the Z-domain scaffold Peptide-based agents derived from well-defined scaffolds offer an alternative to antibodies for selective and high-affinity recognition of

  16. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of

  17. Have You Seen Our New Interactive Facebook Promotions? | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Seen Our New Interactive Facebook Promotions? Have You Seen Our New Interactive Facebook Promotions? August 4, 2011 - 6:36am Addthis If you haven't seen the Energy Savers Facebook page in a while, you'll want to check it out. The Department of Energy is partnering with the Ad Council to show consumers how easy it is to save money by saving energy, including videos, quizzes, and quick facts. Check out the new "Saving Energy Saves You Money" tab on our Facebook page! Have you

  18. Background:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS Recommended Browsers for iSupplier Portal Recommended Microsoft Internet Explorer Browser Settings (MSIE) Recommended Firefox Browser Settings Recommended...

  19. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments XML Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XML Service This XML service is a mechanism for searching the DOE R&D Accomplishments Database, full-text documents, and Web pages, either through a query string in a browser or via a computer application. It is based upon open standards Web protocols and facilitates communications and collaborations of applications and people. Search results are returned in an XML format. This format can be easily parsed, making it simple to add to a federated search. Specifics about the DOE R&D

  20. EIA Open Data - Qb - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    API Query Browser EIA Data Sets API CALL TO USE: http://api.eia.gov/category/?api_key=YOUR_API_KEY_HERE&category_id=371 Children Categories: Electricity State Energy Data System (SEDS) Petroleum Natural Gas Total Energy Coal Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Energy Outlook Crude Oil Imports International Energy Data U.S. Electric System Operating Data Search by: Keyword(s) Series ID Search Search results Filter search results Data set Geography Frequency Units Last updated Reset search 0Page

  1. UQ Pipeline Lorenz Portlet

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    This is web client software that can help initiate UQ Pipeline jobs on LLNL's LC compute systems and visually shows the status of such jobs in a browser window. The web client interacts with LC's interactive compute nodes using (LLNL) Lorenz REST API to initiate action and obtain status data in JSON format.

  2. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  3. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Supersedes DOE O 1230.2. Admin Chg 1, dated 11-6-09, supersedes DOE O 144.1.

  4. Vorticity dynamics after the shockturbulence interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  5. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  6. Neutrinoless double beta decay in the microscopic interacting boson model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iachello, F. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory Yale University New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States)

    2009-11-09

    The results of a calculation of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay in the closure approximation in several nuclei within the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM-2) are presented and compared with those calculated in the shell model (SM) and quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA)

  7. Department of Energy American Indian Tribal Government Interactions and Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-01-16

    This Order communicates Departmental, programmatic, and field responsibilities for interacting with American Indian Governments and transmits the Department of Energy's American Indian and Alaska Native Tribal Government Policy and its guiding principles, the Framework for Implementation of the Policy. Cancels DOE O 1230.2.

  8. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavitytunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.60.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, an acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.

  9. Mitigation of wind tunnel wall interactions in subsonic cavity flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Henfling, John F.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Pruett, Brian Owen Matthew

    2015-03-06

    In this study, the flow over an open aircraft bay is often represented in a wind tunnel with a cavity. In flight, this flow is unconfined, though in experiments, the cavity is surrounded by wind tunnel walls. If untreated, wind tunnel wall effects can lead to significant distortions of cavity acoustics in subsonic flows. To understand and mitigate these cavity–tunnel interactions, a parametric approach was taken for flow over an L/D = 7 cavity at Mach numbers 0.6–0.8. With solid tunnel walls, a dominant cavity tone was observed, likely due to an interaction with a tunnel duct mode. Furthermore, anmore » acoustic liner opposite the cavity decreased the amplitude of the dominant mode and its harmonics, a result observed by previous researchers. Acoustic dampeners were also placed in the tunnel sidewalls, which further decreased the dominant mode amplitudes and peak amplitudes associated with nonlinear interactions between cavity modes. This then indicates that cavity resonance can be altered by tunnel sidewalls and that spanwise coupling should be addressed when conducting subsonic cavity experiments. Though mechanisms for dominant modes and nonlinear interactions likely exist in unconfined cavity flows, these effects can be amplified by the wind tunnel walls.« less

  10. Vorticity dynamics after the shock–turbulence interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviatemore » the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.« less

  11. Boosted dark matter signals uplifted with self-interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Mohlabeng, Gopolang; Park, Jong -Chul

    2015-04-01

    We explore detection prospects of a non-standard dark sector in the context of boosted dark matter. We focus on a scenario with two dark matter particles of a large mass difference, where the heavier candidate is secluded and interacts with the standard model particles only at loops, escaping existing direct and indirect detection bounds. Yet its pair annihilation in the galactic center or in the Sun may produce boosted stable particles, which could be detected as visible Cherenkov light in large volume neutrino detectors. In such models with multiple candidates, self-interaction of dark matter particles is naturally utilized in themoreassisted freeze-out mechanism and is corroborated by various cosmological studies such as N-body simulations of structure formation, observations of dwarf galaxies, and the small scale problem. We show that self-interaction of the secluded (heavier) dark matter greatly enhances the capture rate in the Sun and results in promising signals at current and future experiments. We perform a detailed analysis of the boosted dark matter events for Super-Kamiokande, Hyper-Kamiokande and PINGU, including notable effects such as evaporation due to self-interaction and energy loss in the Sun.less

  12. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Contact Secretary of Energy Steven Chu visits Caltech labs For more information or questions about the Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center, please email lmi-efrc@caltech.edu or call LMI Administrator Tiffany Kimoto at 626-395-1566.

  13. Unconventional interaction between vortices in a polarized Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stojanovic, Vladimir M.; Vincent Liu, W. Kim, Yong Baek

    2008-04-15

    Recently, a homogeneous superfluid state with a single gapless Fermi surface was predicted to be the ground state of an ultracold Fermi gas with spin population imbalance in the regime of molecular Bose-Einstein condensation. We study vortices in this novel state using a symmetry-based effective field theory, which captures the low-energy physics of gapless fermions and superfluid phase fluctuations. This theory is applicable to all spin-imbalanced ultracold Fermi gases in the superfluid regime, regardless of whether the original fermion-pairing interaction is weak or strong. We find a remarkable, unconventional form of the interaction between vortices. The presence of gapless fermions gives rise to a spatially oscillating potential, akin to the RKKY indirect-exchange interaction in non-magnetic metals. We compare the parameters of the effective theory to the experimentally measurable quantities and further discuss the conditions for the verification of the predicted new feature. Our study opens up an interesting question as to the nature of the vortex lattice resulting from the competition between the usual repulsive logarithmic (2D Coulomb) and predominantly attractive fermion-induced interactions.

  14. Wavevortex interactions in the nonlinear Schrdinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Yuan Bhler, Oliver

    2014-02-15

    This is a theoretical study of wavevortex interaction effects in the two-dimensional nonlinear Schrdinger equation, which is a useful conceptual model for the limiting dynamics of superfluid quantum condensates at zero temperature. The particular wavevortex interaction effects are associated with the scattering and refraction of small-scale linear waves by the straining flows induced by quantized point vortices and, crucially, with the concomitant nonlinear back-reaction, the remote recoil, that these scattered waves exert on the vortices. Our detailed model is a narrow, slowly varying wavetrain of small-amplitude waves refracted by one or two vortices. Weak interactions are studied using a suitable perturbation method in which the nonlinear recoil force on the vortex then arises at second order in wave amplitude, and is computed in terms of a Magnus-type force expression for both finite and infinite wavetrains. In the case of an infinite wavetrain, an explicit asymptotic formula for the scattering angle is also derived and cross-checked against numerical ray tracing. Finally, under suitable conditions a wavetrain can be so strongly refracted that it collapses all the way onto a zero-size point vortex. This is a strong wavevortex interaction by definition. The conditions for such a collapse are derived and the validity of ray tracing theory during the singular collapse is investigated.

  15. Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Christopher; Cortinas, Susan

    2015-02-02

    Final Report for Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

  16. October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting- Wednesday, October 22nd Soil Structure Interaction Presentations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentations for the Soil Structure Interaction session at the October 2014 Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) Meeting.

  17. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Gler, zgr; Krkloglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the authors' evaluation, the authors conclude that the registration approaches are sufficiently accurate for initializing 2D/3D registration in the OR setting, both when a tracking system is not in use (gesture based approach), and when a tracking system is already in use (AR based approach)

  18. Probing contact interactions at high energy lepton colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, K.; Godfrey, S.; Hewett, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    Fermion compositeness and other new physics can be signaled by the presence of a strong four-fermion contact interaction. Here the authors present a study of {ell}{ell}qq and {ell}{ell}{ell}{prime}{ell}{prime} contact interactions using the reactions: {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} {ell}{prime}{sup +} {ell}{prime}{sup {minus}}, b{anti b}, c{anti c} at future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear colliders with {radical}s = 0.5--5 TeV and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders with {radical}s = 0.5, 4 TeV. They find that very large compositeness scales can be probed at these machines and that the use of polarized beams can unravel their underlying helicity structure.

  19. Interactions between silver nanoparticles and polyvinyl alcohol nanofibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, H. L.; Wu, C. M.; Lin, F. D.; Rick, J.

    2014-08-15

    The interaction of polyvinylalcohol (PVA) nanofibers with silver (Ag) nanoparticles (mean diameter 8nm) has been modeled using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The physical adsorption of PVA through the hydroxyl group, to the Ag, and its corresponding molecular orientation was compared with experimental results obtained from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of the same material. A good agreement was found between the computational model of the vibrational spectrum of the adsorbate and the experimentally observed SERS. In general, aliphatic capping molecules are used to passivate the surface of Ag{sub 55} nanocrystals (55 = atomic number of Ag). In this study, a DFT simulation was employed to show binding energies and electron contour map analyses of Ag{sub 55} with PVA. Here we show that the PVA interacts with the Ag nanoparticle's surface, through the OH group, thereby contributing significantly to the increase in SERS activity.

  20. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J.; Zwicknagl, G.; Schuh, D.; Wegscheider, W.

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  1. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  2. Hard probes of strongly-interacting atomic gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishida, Yusuke

    2012-06-18

    We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

  3. Detailed Investigations of Interactions between Ionizing Radiation and Neutral Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landers, Allen L

    2014-03-31

    We are investigating phenomena that stem from the many body dynamics associated with ionization of an atom or molecule by photon or charged particle. Our program is funded through the Department of Energy EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership Award in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. We are using variations on the well established COLTRIMS technique to measure ions and electrons ejected during these interactions. Photoionization measurements take place at the Advanced Light Source at LBNL as part of the ALS-COLTRIMS collaboration with the groups of Reinhard Drner at Frankfurt and Ali Belkacem at LBNL. Additional experiments on charged particle impact are conducted locally at Auburn University where we are studying the dissociative molecular dynamics following interactions with either ions or electrons over a velocity range of 1 to 12 atomic units.

  4. On consistent kinetic and derivative interactions for gravitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noller, Johannes

    2015-04-17

    The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new candidate family of kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field — analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the ‘Jordan’ and ‘Einstein’ frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

  5. Interaction between Supersonic Disintegrating Liquid Jets and Their Shock Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Kyoung-Su; Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Liu, X.; Wang Jin; Lai, M.-C.; Tate, Mark W.; Ercan, Alper; Renzi, Matthew J.; Schuette, Daniel R.; Gruner, Sol M.

    2009-02-20

    We used ultrafast x radiography and developed a novel multiphase numerical simulation to reveal the origin and the unique dynamics of the liquid-jet-generated shock waves and their interactions with the jets. Liquid-jet-generated shock waves are transiently correlated to the structural evolution of the disintegrating jets. The multiphase simulation revealed that the aerodynamic interaction between the liquid jet and the shock waves results in an intriguing ambient gas distribution in the vicinity of the shock front, as validated by the ultrafast x-radiography measurements. The excellent agreement between the data and the simulation suggests the combined experimental and computational approach should find broader applications in predicting and understanding dynamics of highly transient multiphase flows.

  6. Actinide Dioxides in Water: Interactions at the Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandrov, Vitaly; Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Hayun, Shmuel; Asta, Mark; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2011-12-15

    A comprehensive understanding of chemical interactions between water and actinide dioxide surfaces is critical for safe operation and storage of nuclear fuels. Despite substantial previous research, understanding the nature of these interactions remains incomplete. In this work, we combine accurate calorimetric measurements with first-principles computational studies to characterize surface energies and adsorption enthalpies of water on two fluorite-structured compounds, ThO? and CeO?, that are relevant for understanding the behavior of water on actinide oxide surfaces more generally. We determine coverage-dependent adsorption enthalpies and demonstrate a mixed molecular and dissociative structure for the first hydration layer. The results show a correlation between the magnitude of the anhydrous surface energy and the water adsorption enthalpy. Further, they suggest a structural model featuring one adsorbed water molecule per one surface cation on the most stable facet that is expected to be a common structural signature of water adsorbed on actinide dioxide compounds.

  7. ENERGETIC PHOTON AND ELECTRON INTERACTIONS WITH POSITIVE IONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phaneuf, Ronald A.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this research is a deeper understanding of the complex multi-electron interactions that govern inelastic processes involving positive ions in plasma environments, such as those occurring in stellar cares and atmospheres, x-ray lasers, thermonuclear fusion reactors and materials-processing discharges. In addition to precision data on ionic structure and transition probabilities, high resolution quantitative measurements of ionization test the theoretical methods that provide critical input to computer codes used for plasma modeling and photon opacity calculations. Steadily increasing computational power and a corresponding emphasis on simulations gives heightened relevance to precise and accurate benchmark data. Photons provide a highly selective probe of the internal electronic structure of atomic and molecular systems, and a powerful means to better understand more complex electron-ion interactions.

  8. The 2mrad Crossing Angle Interaction Region and Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, R.; U., Manchester; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Dadoun, O.; Bambade, P.; Parker, B.; Keller, L.; Moffeit, K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Carter, J.; Royal Holloway, U.of London; Napoly, O.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    A complete optics design for the 2mrad crossing angle interaction region and extraction line was presented at Snowmass 2005. Since this time, the design task force has been working on developing and improving the performance of the extraction line. The work has focused on optimizing the final doublet parameters and on reducing the power losses resulting from the disrupted beam transport. In this paper, the most recent status of the 2mrad layout and the corresponding performance are presented.

  9. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Jon Custer Jon Custer Manager Parriott Carley Parriott Admin. Asst. Resources R&D 100 Award IBA Table (HTML) IBA Table (135KB GIF) IBA Table (1.2MB PDF) IBA Table (33MB TIF) SIMNRA SRIM Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS) Ion Beam Materials Research Laboratory

  10. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Barium Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Barium Symbol: Ba Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight (Average): 137.3269 Mass (amu) 129.906277 131.905042 133.904490 134.905668 135.904556 136.905816 137.905236 Abundance 0.10600

  11. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Iodine Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Iodine Symbol: I Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight (Average): 126.9045 Mass (amu) 126.904477 Abundance 100.0000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy Ion BackScattering)

  12. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Lanthanum Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Lanthanum Symbol: La Atomic Number: 57 Atomic Weight (Average): 138.9054 Mass (amu) 137.907114 138.906355 Abundance 0.09000 99.91000 IBA Techniques to Analyze: HIBS (Heavy

  13. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Radiation-Solid Interactions: IBA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table (HTML): Xenon Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Xenon Symbol: Xe Atomic Number: 54 Atomic Weight (Average): 131.2931 Mass (amu) 123.906120 125.905624 127.903531 128.904780 129.903510 130.905076 131.904148 133.905395

  14. Crossing contours in the interacting boson approximation (IBA) symmetry triangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.

    2006-11-15

    Constant contours of basic observables are discussed in the context of the interacting boson approximation (IBA) symmetry triangle. Contours that exhibit orthogonal crossing within the triangle are presented as a method for determining a set of parameter values for a particular nucleus and trajectories for isotopic chains. A set of contours that highlights a class of nuclei that are outside the two-parameter IBA-1 Hamitonian space is also presented.

  15. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  16. The interaction of katabatic winds and mountain waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poulos, G.S.

    1997-01-01

    The variation in the oft-observed, thermally-forced, nocturnal katabatic winds along the east side of the Rocky Mountains can be explained by either internal variability or interactions with various other forcings. Though generally katabatic flows have been studied as an entity protected from external forcing by strong thermal stratification, this work investigates how drainage winds along the Colorado Front Range interact with, in particular, topographically forced mountain waves. Previous work has shown, based on measurements taken during the Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain 1993 field program, that the actual dispersion in katabatic flows is often greater than reflected in models of dispersion. The interaction of these phenomena is complicated and non-linear since the amplitude, wavelength and vertical structure of mountain waves developed by flow over the Rocky Mountain barrier are themselves partly determined by the evolving atmospheric stability in which the drainage flows develop. Perturbations to katabatic flow by mountain waves, relative to their more steady form in quiescent conditions, are found to be caused by both turbulence and dynamic pressure effects. The effect of turbulent interaction is to create changes to katabatic now depth, katabatic flow speed, katabatic jet height and, vertical thermal stratification. The pressure effect is found to primarily influence the variability of a given katabatic now through the evolution of integrated column wave forcing on surface pressure. Variability is found to occur on two scales, on the mesoscale due to meso-gamma scale mountain wave evolution, and on the microscale, due to wave breaking. Since existing parameterizations for the statically stable case are predominantly based on nearly flat terrain atmospheric measurements under idealized or nearly quiescent conditions, it is no surprise that these parameterizations often contribute to errors in prediction, particularly in complex terrain.

  17. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  18. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  19. Tsung-Dao Lee, Weak Interactions, and Nonconservation of Parity

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tsung-Dao Lee, Weak Interactions, and Nonconservation of Parity Resources with Additional Information Tsung-Dao Lee Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory T. D. Lee "has devoted his long career to the study of the theoretical aspects of particle and nuclear physics. In 1957, Lee and Chen Ning Yang won the Nobel Prize in physics for disproving a tenet of physics known as the conservation of parity. Their finding was based on research carried out at Brookhaven's particle accelerator, the

  20. Chen Ning Yang, Weak Interactions, and Parity Violation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chen Ning Yang, Weak Interactions, and Parity Violation Resources with Additional Information * Yang Honored C.N. Yang Courtesy of Brookhaven National Laboratory Chen Ning Yang shared the 1957 Nobel Prize for Physics with Tsung Dao Lee "for their penetrating investigation of the so-called parity laws which has led to important discoveries regarding the elementary particles". "Yang and Lee made a fundamental theoretical breakthrough of non-conservation of parity. Because of the

  1. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Program Schedule Abstract Submission Hotel & Travel Register Event Photos Redefining the Limits of Photovoltaic Efficiency Sunday, July 29, 2012 California Institute of Technology Hameetman Auditorium at the Cahill Center [map] 8:30 am - 5:30 pm Co-organized by the Resnick Sustainability Institute and the Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI) Energy Frontier Research Center this one-day workshop brings together leaders from industry, academia and

  2. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Program Hotel & Travel Presentations Event Photos Accelerating the Development of Earth-Abundant Thin-Film Photovoltaics Millikan Board Room [map] California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA The Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion (LMI) Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), the Resnick Sustainability Institute, and the Quantum Energy and Sustainable Solar Technologies (QESST) Energy Research Center (ERC) are offering a two-day workshop on Accelerating

  3. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) New approaches to full spectrum solar energy conversion California Institute of Technology Hall Auditorium, Gates-Thomas Laboratory [map] LIVE Internet Broadcast [watch recorded event online] [download flyer] watch now The recorded presentations and panel discussion are now available for online viewing. The Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center (LMI-EFRC) is excited to offer this free public webinar on New Approaches to Full

  4. Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimize Adverse Motor and Adjustable Speed Drive Interactions Electronic adjustable speed drives (ASDs) are extremely effcient and valuable assets to motor systems. They allow precise process control and provide energy savings within systems that do not need to operate continuously at full output. The most common ASD design sold today is the pulse-width-modulated (PWM) variable frequency drive (VFD) with a fast-rise-time insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) to reduce switching losses and

  5. Interactive Uses of the NSDL: .Atmospheric Visualization Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Uses of the NSDL: Atmospheric Visualization Collection C. M. Klaus, E. N. Vernon, T. McCollum, T. R. Gobble, H. M. Anthony, and D. Johnson Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois K. Andrew Eastern Illinois University Charleston, Illinois G. G. Mace University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah C. P. Bahrmann University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma User Interfaces The National Science Digital Library (NSDL) has three user interfaces for accessing data images. 1. The Geophysical Focus

  6. COLLOQUIUM: Handling Plasma Wall Interactions on ITER | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab June 8, 2015, 4:15pm to 6:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Handling Plasma Wall Interactions on ITER Dr. Richard Pitts ITER Although the ITER machine design is essentially complete, with almost all major systems into the procurement phase, there are many physics issues which remain open and require continued investigation during the machine construction years in preparation for both early operation and the high performance burning plasma phases. Boundary physics and the

  7. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Refractive Index Design via Porous Etched Si as part of RG-3 research efforts (Chris Gladden, LBNL) The Scientific Vision of the "Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center" (LMI-EFRC) is to tailor the morphology, complex dielectric structure, and electronic properties of matter so as to sculpt the flow of sunlight and heat, enabling light conversion to electrical and chemical energy with unprecedented efficiency. The

  8. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) Events image Perovskite Solar Cells: Towards New Materials and New Applications Nripan Mathews, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore November 3, 2014, 11:15 am 101 Guggenheim Lab, Lees-Kubota Hall 2013 workshop Approaches to Ultrahight Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion We are excited to offer this FREE public webinar featuring presentations and an interactive panel discussion with LMI-EFRC photovoltaic experts! March 7, 2013, 8:30-10:30 am PST Hameetman Auditorium,

  9. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) New approaches to full spectrum solar energy conversion California Institute of Technology Hall Auditorium, Gates-Thomas Laboratory [map] LIVE Internet Broadcast [download flyer] watch now The recorded presentations and panel discussion are now available for online viewing. The Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion Energy Frontier Research Center (LMI-EFRC) is excited to offer this free public webinar on New Approaches to Full Spectrum Solar Energy Conversion.

  10. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of color, i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such chromatic interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the colored and colorless systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the colorless patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding colored one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  11. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  12. Conformation and interactions of dopamine hydrochloride in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callear, Samantha K.; Imberti, Silvia; Johnston, Andrew; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2015-01-07

    The aqueous solution of dopamine hydrochloride has been investigated using neutron and X-ray total scattering data together with Monte-Carlo based modelling using Empirical Potential Structure Refinement. The conformation of the protonated dopamine molecule is presented and the results compared to the conformations found in crystal structures, dopamine-complexed protein crystal structures and predicted from theoretical calculations and pharmacophoric models. It is found that protonated dopamine adopts a range of conformations in solution, highlighting the low rotational energy barrier between different conformations, with the preferred conformation being trans-perpendicular. The interactions between each of the species present (protonated dopamine molecules, water molecules, and chloride anions) have been determined and are discussed with reference to interactions observed in similar systems both in the liquid and crystalline state, and predicted from theoretical calculations. The expected strong hydrogen bonds between the strong hydrogen bond donors and acceptors are observed, together with evidence of weaker CH hydrogen bonds and π interactions also playing a significant role in determining the arrangement of adjacent molecules.

  13. Modeling attacker-defender interactions in information networks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Michael Joseph

    2010-09-01

    The simplest conceptual model of cybersecurity implicitly views attackers and defenders as acting in isolation from one another: an attacker seeks to penetrate or disrupt a system that has been protected to a given level, while a defender attempts to thwart particular attacks. Such a model also views all non-malicious parties as having the same goal of preventing all attacks. But in fact, attackers and defenders are interacting parts of the same system, and different defenders have their own individual interests: defenders may be willing to accept some risk of successful attack if the cost of defense is too high. We have used game theory to develop models of how non-cooperative but non-malicious players in a network interact when there is a substantial cost associated with effective defensive measures. Although game theory has been applied in this area before, we have introduced some novel aspects of player behavior in our work, including: (1) A model of how players attempt to avoid the costs of defense and force others to assume these costs; (2) A model of how players interact when the cost of defending one node can be shared by other nodes; and (3) A model of the incentives for a defender to choose less expensive, but less effective, defensive actions.

  14. Galvano-rotational effect induced by electroweak interactions in pulsars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvornikov, Maxim

    2015-05-21

    We study electroweakly interacting particles in rotating matter. The existence of the electric current along the axis of the matter rotation is predicted in this system. This new galvano-rotational effect is caused by the parity violating interaction between massless charged particles in the rotating matter. We start with the exact solution of the Dirac equation for a fermion involved in the electroweak interaction in the rotating frame. This equation includes the noninertial effects. Then, using the obtained solution, we derive the induced electric current which turns out to flow along the rotation axis. We study the possibility of the appearance of the galvano-rotational effect in dense matter of compact astrophysical objects. The particular example of neutron and hypothetical quark stars is discussed. It is shown that, using this effect, one can expect the generation of toroidal magnetic fields comparable with poloidal ones in old millisecond pulsars. We also briefly discuss the generation of the magnetic helicity in these stars. Finally we analyze the possibility to apply the galvano-rotational effect for the description of the asymmetric neutrino emission from a neutron star to explain pulsars kicks.

  15. The interaction of intense subpicosecond laser pulses with underdense plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coverdale, C.A.

    1995-05-11

    Laser-plasma interactions have been of interest for many years not only from a basic physics standpoint, but also for their relevance to numerous applications. Advances in laser technology in recent years have resulted in compact laser systems capable of generating (psec), 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} laser pulses. These lasers have provided a new regime in which to study laser-plasma interactions, a regime characterized by L{sub plasma} {ge} 2L{sub Rayleigh} > c{tau}. The goal of this dissertation is to experimentally characterize the interaction of a short pulse, high intensity laser with an underdense plasma (n{sub o} {le} 0.05n{sub cr}). Specifically, the parametric instability known as stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) is investigated to determine its behavior when driven by a short, intense laser pulse. Both the forward Raman scatter instability and backscattered Raman instability are studied. The coupled partial differential equations which describe the growth of SRS are reviewed and solved for typical experimental laser and plasma parameters. This solution shows the growth of the waves (electron plasma and scattered light) generated via stimulated Raman scatter. The dispersion relation is also derived and solved for experimentally accessible parameters. The solution of the dispersion relation is used to predict where (in k-space) and at what frequency (in {omega}-space) the instability will grow. Both the nonrelativistic and relativistic regimes of the instability are considered.

  16. Interaction Region Design and Detector Integration at JLab's MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Fanglei; Brindza, Paul D.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Ent, Rolf; Morozov, Vasiliy; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel A.; Zhang, Yuhong; Hyde, Charles E.; Sullivan, Michael

    2013-12-01

    The Electron Ion Collider (EIC) will be a next-generation facility for the study of the strong interaction (QCD). JLab?s MEIC is designed for high luminosities of up to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1. This is achieved in part due to an aggressively small beta-star, which imposes stringent requirements on the collider rings? dynamical properties. Additionally, one of the unique features of MEIC is a full-acceptance detector with a dedicated, small-angle, high-resolution detection system, capable of covering a wide range of momenta (and charge-to-mass ratios) with respect to the original ion beam to enable access to new physics. The detector design relies on a number of features, such as a 50 mrad beam crossing angle, large-aperture ion and electron final focusing quads and spectrometer dipoles as well as a large machine-element-free detection space downstream of the final focusing quads. We present an interaction region design developed with close integration of the detector and beam dynamical aspects. The dynamical aspect of the design rests on a symmetry-based concept for compensation of non-linear effects. The optics and geometry have been optimized to accommodate the detection requirements and to ensure the interaction region?s modularity for easiness of integration into the collider ring lattices. As a result, the design offers an excellent detector performance combined with the necessary non-linear dynamical properties.

  17. Interfacial dislocation motion and interactions in single-crystal superalloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, B.; Raabe, D.; Roters, F.; Arsenlis, A.

    2014-10-01

    The early stage of high-temperature low-stress creep in single-crystal superalloys is characterized by the rapid development of interfacial dislocation networks. Although interfacial motion and dynamic recovery of these dislocation networks have long been expected to control the subsequent creep behavior, direct observation and hence in-depth understanding of such processes has not been achieved. Incorporating recent developments of discrete dislocation dynamics models, we simulate interfacial dislocation motion in the channel structures of single-crystal superalloys, and investigate how interfacial dislocation motion and dynamic recovery are affected by interfacial dislocation interactions and lattice misfit. Different types of dislocation interactions are considered: self, collinear, coplanar, Lomer junction, glissile junction, and Hirth junction. The simulation results show that strong dynamic recovery occurs due to the short-range reactions of collinear annihilation and Lomer junction formation. The misfit stress is found to induce and accelerate dynamic recovery of interfacial dislocation networks involving self-interaction and Hirth junction formation, but slow down the steady interfacial motion of coplanar and glissile junction forming dislocation networks. The insights gained from these simulations on high-temperature low-stress creep of single-crystal superalloys are also discussed.

  18. Collider effects of unparticle interactions in multiphoton signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, T. M.; Frank, Mariana; Turan, Ismail

    2009-12-01

    A new model of physics, with a hidden conformal sector which manifests itself as an unparticle coupling to standard model particles effectively through higher dimensional operators, predicts strong collider signals due to unparticle self-interactions. We perform a complete analysis of the most spectacular of these signals at the hadron collider, pp(p){yields}{gamma}{gamma}{gamma}{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}gg. These processes can go through the three-point unparticle self-interactions as well as through some s and t channel diagrams with one and/or two unparticle exchanges. We study the contributions of individual diagrams classified with respect to the number of unparticle exchanges and discuss their effect on the cross sections at the Tevatron and the LHC. We also restrict the Tevatron bound on the unknown coefficient of the three-point unparticle correlator. With the availability of data from the Tevatron, and the advent of the data emerging from the LHC, these interactions can provide a clear and strong indication of unparticle physics and distinguish this model from other beyond the standard model scenarios.

  19. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris (Palo Alto, CA); Tang, Diane L. (Palo Alto, CA); Hanrahan, Patrick (Portola Valley, CA)

    2012-03-20

    In response to a user request, a computer generates a graphical user interface on a computer display. A schema information region of the graphical user interface includes multiple operand names, each operand name associated with one or more fields of a multi-dimensional database. A data visualization region of the graphical user interface includes multiple shelves. Upon detecting a user selection of the operand names and a user request to associate each user-selected operand name with a respective shelf in the data visualization region, the computer generates a visual table in the data visualization region in accordance with the associations between the operand names and the corresponding shelves. The visual table includes a plurality of panes, each pane having at least one axis defined based on data for the fields associated with a respective operand name.

  20. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Tang, Diane L.; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2015-11-10

    A computer displays a graphical user interface on its display. The graphical user interface includes a schema information region and a data visualization region. The schema information region includes a plurality of fields of a multi-dimensional database that includes at least one data hierarchy. The data visualization region includes a columns shelf and a rows shelf. The computer detects user actions to associate one or more first fields with the columns shelf and to associate one or more second fields with the rows shelf. The computer generates a visual table in the data visualization region in accordance with the user actions. The visual table includes one or more panes. Each pane has an x-axis defined based on data for the one or more first fields, and each pane has a y-axis defined based on data for the one or more second fields.

  1. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Tang, Diane L; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2015-03-03

    A computer displays a graphical user interface on its display. The graphical user interface includes a schema information region and a data visualization region. The schema information region includes multiple operand names, each operand corresponding to one or more fields of a multi-dimensional database that includes at least one data hierarchy. The data visualization region includes a columns shelf and a rows shelf. The computer detects user actions to associate one or more first operands with the columns shelf and to associate one or more second operands with the rows shelf. The computer generates a visual table in the data visualization region in accordance with the user actions. The visual table includes one or more panes. Each pane has an x-axis defined based on data for the one or more first operands, and each pane has a y-axis defined based on data for the one or more second operands.

  2. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris (Palo Alto, CA); Tang, Diane L. (Palo Alto, CA); Hanrahan, Patrick (Portola Valley, CA)

    2011-02-01

    In response to a user request, a computer generates a graphical user interface on a computer display. A schema information region of the graphical user interface includes multiple operand names, each operand name associated with one or more fields of a multi-dimensional database. A data visualization region of the graphical user interface includes multiple shelves. Upon detecting a user selection of the operand names and a user request to associate each user-selected operand name with a respective shelf in the data visualization region, the computer generates a visual table in the data visualization region in accordance with the associations between the operand names and the corresponding shelves. The visual table includes a plurality of panes, each pane having at least one axis defined based on data for the fields associated with a respective operand name.

  3. Computer systems and methods for the query and visualization of multidimensional databases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stolte, Chris; Tang, Diane L; Hanrahan, Patrick

    2014-04-29

    In response to a user request, a computer generates a graphical user interface on a computer display. A schema information region of the graphical user interface includes multiple operand names, each operand name associated with one or more fields of a multi-dimensional database. A data visualization region of the graphical user interface includes multiple shelves. Upon detecting a user selection of the operand names and a user request to associate each user-selected operand name with a respective shelf in the data visualization region, the computer generates a visual table in the data visualization region in accordance with the associations between the operand names and the corresponding shelves. The visual table includes a plurality of panes, each pane having at least one axis defined based on data for the fields associated with a respective operand name.

  4. Request queues for interactive clients in a shared file system of a parallel computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin

    2015-08-18

    Interactive requests are processed from users of log-in nodes. A metadata server node is provided for use in a file system shared by one or more interactive nodes and one or more batch nodes. The interactive nodes comprise interactive clients to execute interactive tasks and the batch nodes execute batch jobs for one or more batch clients. The metadata server node comprises a virtual machine monitor; an interactive client proxy to store metadata requests from the interactive clients in an interactive client queue; a batch client proxy to store metadata requests from the batch clients in a batch client queue; and a metadata server to store the metadata requests from the interactive client queue and the batch client queue in a metadata queue based on an allocation of resources by the virtual machine monitor. The metadata requests can be prioritized, for example, based on one or more of a predefined policy and predefined rules.

  5. neutrinos matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  6. Apparatus and method for determining microscale interactions based on compressive sensors such as crystal structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAdams, Harley; AlQuraishi, Mohammed

    2015-04-21

    Techniques for determining values for a metric of microscale interactions include determining a mesoscale metric for a plurality of mesoscale interaction types, wherein a value of the mesoscale metric for each mesoscale interaction type is based on a corresponding function of values of the microscale metric for the plurality of the microscale interaction types. A plurality of observations that indicate the values of the mesoscale metric are determined for the plurality of mesoscale interaction types. Values of the microscale metric are determined for the plurality of microscale interaction types based on the plurality of observations and the corresponding functions and compressed sensing.

  7. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uar, A.; opuro?lu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Ar?kan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (?0.5) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45 before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100 were obtained.

  8. Progress in Long Scale Length Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenzer, S H; Arnold, P; Bardsley, G; Berger, R L; Bonanno, G; Borger, T; Bower, D E; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S C; Campbell, K; Chrisp, M P; Cohen, B I; Constantin, G; Cooper, F; Cox, J; Dewald, E; Divol, L; Dixit, S; Duncan, J; Eder, D; Edwards, J; Erbert, G; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Froula, D H; Gardner, S D; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Gregori, G; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Hall, T; Hammel, B A; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermes, G; Hinkel, D; Holder, J; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hsing, W; Huber, S; James, T; Johnson, S; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kamperschroer, J H; Kauffman, R; Kelleher, T; Knight, J; Kirkwood, R K; Kruer, W L; Labiak, W; Landen, O L; Langdon, A B; Langer, S; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lee, F D; Lund, D; MacGowan, B; Marshall, S; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Mackinnon, A J; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K; Marshall, C; Mertens, E; Meezan, N; Miller, G; Montelongo, S; Moody, J D; Moses, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Ng, E; Niemann, C; Nikitin, A; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rekow, V; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Rhodes, M

    2003-11-11

    The first experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have employed the first four beams to measure propagation and laser backscattering losses in large ignition-size plasmas. Gas-filled targets between 2 mm and 7 mm length have been heated from one side by overlapping the focal spots of the four beams from one quad operated at 351 nm (3{omega}) with a total intensity of 2 x 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The targets were filled with 1 atm of CO{sub 2} producing of up to 7 mm long homogeneously heated plasmas with densities of n{sub e} = 6 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} and temperatures of T{sub e} = 2 keV. The high energy in a NIF quad of beams of 16kJ, illuminating the target from one direction, creates unique conditions for the study of laser plasma interactions at scale lengths not previously accessible. The propagation through the large-scale plasma was measured with a gated x-ray imager that was filtered for 3.5 keV x rays. These data indicate that the beams interact with the full length of this ignition-scale plasma during the last {approx}1 ns of the experiment. During that time, the full aperture measurements of the stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering show scattering into the four focusing lenses of 6% for the smallest length ({approx}2 mm). increasing to 12% for {approx}7 mm. These results demonstrate the NIF experimental capabilities and further provide a benchmark for three-dimensional modeling of the laser-plasma interactions at ignition-size scale lengths.

  9. Understanding WIMP-baryon interactions with direct detection: a roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gluscevic, Vera; Peter, Annika H.G. E-mail: apeter@physics.osu.edu

    2014-09-01

    We study prospects of dark-matter direct-detection searches for probing non-relativistic effective theory for WIMP-baryon scattering. We simulate a large set of noisy recoil-energy spectra for different scattering scenarios (beyond the standard momentum-independent contact interaction), for Generation 2 and futuristic experiments. We analyze these simulations and quantify the probability of successfully identifying the operator governing the scattering, if a WIMP signal is observed. We find that the success rate depends on a combination of factors: the WIMP mass, the mediator mass, the type of interaction, and the experimental energy window. For example, for a 20 GeV WIMP, Generation 2 is only likely to identify the right operator if the interaction is Coulomb-like, and is unlikely to do so in any other case. For a WIMP with a mass of 200 GeV or higher, success is almost guaranteed. We also find that, regardless of the scattering model and the WIMP parameters, a single Generation 2 experiment is unlikely to successfully discern the momentum dependence of the underlying operator on its own, but prospects improve drastically when experiments with different target materials and energy windows are analyzed jointly. Furthermore, we examine the quality of parameter estimation and degeneracies in the multi-dimensional parameter space of the effective theory. We find in particular that the resulting WIMP mass estimates can be severely biased if data are analyzed assuming the standard (momentum-independent) operator while the actual operator has momentum-dependence. Finally, we evaluate the ultimate reach of direct detection, finding that the prospects for successful operator selection prior to reaching the irreducible backgrounds are excellent, if the signal is just below the current limits, but slim if Generation 2 does not report WIMP detection.

  10. Investigation of Cellular Interactions of Nanoparticles by Helium Ion Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Shutthanandan, V.; Xie, Yumei; Tolic, Ana; Williams, Nolann G.; Orr, Galya

    2011-06-01

    The helium ion mircroscope (HIM) probes light elements (e.g. C, N, O, P) with high contrast due to the large variation in secondary electron yield, which minimizes the necessity of specimen staining. A defining characteristic of HIM is its remarkable capability to neutralize charge by the implementation of an electron flood gun, which eliminates the need for coating non-conductive specimens for imaging at high resolution. In addition, the small convergence angle in HeIM offers a large depth of field (~5x FE-SEM), enabling tall structures to be viewed in focus within a single image. Taking advantage of these capabilities, we investigate the interactions of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) at the surface of alveolar type II epithelial cells grown at the air-liquid interface (ALI). The increasing use of nanomaterials in a wide range of commercial applications has the potential to increase human exposure to these materials, but the impact of such exposure on human health is still unclear. One of the main routs of exposure is the respiratory tract, where alveolar epithelial cells present a vulnerable target at the interface with ambient air. Since the cellular interactions of NPs govern the cellular response and ultimately determine the impact on human health, our studies will help delineating relationships between particle properties and cellular interactions and response to better evaluate NP toxicity or biocompatibility. The Rutherford backscattered ion (RBI) is a helium ions imaging mode, which backscatters helium ions from every element except hydrogen, with a backscatter yield that depends on the atomic number of the target. Energy-sensitive backscatter analysis is being developed, which when combined with RBI image information, supports elemental identification at helium ion nanometer resolution. This capability will enable distinguishing NPs from cell surface structures with nanometer resolution.

  11. Peripheral NN scattering from subtractive renormalization of chiral interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, E. F.; Szpigel, S.; Timteo, V. S.

    2014-11-11

    We apply five subtractions in the Lippman-Schwinger (LS) equation in order to perform a non-perturbative renormalization of chiral N3LO nucleon-nucleon interactions. Here we compute the phase shifts for the uncoupled peripheral waves at renormalization scales between 0.1 fm{sup ?1} and 1 fm{sup ?1}. In this range, the results are scale invariant and provide an overall good agreement with the Nijmegen partial wave analysis up to at least E{sub lab} = 150 MeV, with a cutoff at ? = 30 fm{sup ?1}.

  12. Wave chaos in quantum systems with point interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albeverio, S. (Ruhr Univ. Bochum (West Germany) CERFIM, Locarno (Switzerland)); Seba, P. (Ruhr Univ. Bochum (West Germany) Univ. of Essen (West Germany))

    1991-07-01

    The authors study perturbations {cflx H} of the quantized version {cflx H}{sub 0} of integrable Hamiltonian systems by point interactions. They relate the eigenvalues of {cflx H} to the zeros of a certain meromorphic function {xi}. Assuming the eigenvalues of {cflx H}{sub 0} are Poisson distributed, they get detailed information on the joint distribution of the zeros of {xi} and give bounds on the probability density for the spacings of eigenvalues of {cflx H}. Their results confirm the wave chaos phenomenon, as different from the quantum chaos phenomenon predicted by random matrix theory.

  13. Probing Quark-Gluon Interactions with Transverse Polarized Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, K.; Rondon, O. A.; Crabb, D.; Day, D.; Frlez, E.; Lindgren, R.; McKee, P.; Norum, B.; Pocanic, D.; Prok, Y.; Sawatzky, B.; Smith, C.; Tajima, S.; Wang, K.; Zeier, M.; Zhu, H.; Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Ahmidouch, A.

    2010-09-03

    We have extracted QCD matrix elements from our data on doubly polarized inelastic scattering of electrons on nuclei. We find the higher twist matrix element d{sub 2}-tilde, which arises strictly from quark-gluon interactions, to be unambiguously nonzero. The data also reveal an isospin dependence of higher twist effects if we assume that the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule is valid. The fundamental Bjorken sum rule obtained from the a{sub 0} matrix element is satisfied at our low momentum transfer.

  14. Semantic Interaction for Visual Analytics: Toward Coupling Cognition and Computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endert, Alexander

    2014-07-01

    The dissertation discussed in this article [1] was written in the midst of an era of digitization. The world is becoming increasingly instrumented with sensors, monitoring, and other methods for generating data describing social, physical, and natural phenomena. Thus, data exist with the potential of being analyzed to uncover, or discover, the phenomena from which it was created. However, as the analytic models leveraged to analyze these data continue to increase in complexity and computational capability, how can visualizations and user interaction methodologies adapt and evolve to continue to foster discovery and sensemaking?

  15. Molecular Interaction between Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Its Protein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Receptor Revealed Molecular Interaction between Botulinum Neurotoxin B and Its Protein Receptor Revealed Figure 1 Structure of the HcB-Syt-II complex. a, sA-weighted FO - FC electron density map (contoured at 1.5 s) around Syt-II, overlaid with the final refined model (Syt-II: red and green; HcB: grey). Please note that this map is model-bias free since it is calculated from the phases of the atomic model prior to the inclusion of the Syt-II peptide (using a lower resolution diffraction data

  16. Weak interaction processes in nuclei involving neutrinos and CDM candidates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosmas, T. S.; Tsakstara, V. [Theoretical Physics Section, University of Ioannina, GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Divari, P. C. [Department of Physical Sciences, Hellenic Army Academy, Vari 16673, Attica (Greece); Sinatkas, J. [Department of Informatics and Computer Technology, TEI of Western Macedonia, GR-52100 Kastoria (Greece)

    2009-11-09

    In this work, we concentrate on the nuclear physics aspects of low-energy neutrinos and in particular on problems related to neutrino detection by terrestrial experiments, neutrino astrophysics and neutrino-nucleus interactions. The detection of low-flux neutrinos, feasible by measuring the energy recoil of the recoiling nucleus with gaseous-detectors having very-low threshold-energy, is carried out in conjunction with direct-detection of cold dark matter events and nonstandard physics searches like the neutrinoless double beta decay.

  17. A fusion power plant without plasma-material interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S.A.

    1997-04-01

    A steady-state fusion power plant is described which avoids the deleterious plasma-material interactions found in D-T fueled tokamaks. It is based on driven p-{sup 11}B fusion in a high-beta closed-field device, the field-reversed configuration (FRC), anchored in a gas-dynamic trap (GDT). The plasma outflow on the open magnetic-field lines is cooled by radiation in the GDT, then channeled through a magnetic nozzle, promoting 3-body recombination in the expansion region. The resulting supersonic neutral exhaust stream flows through a turbine, generating electricity.

  18. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N.; Gabdullin, M. T.

    2014-01-15

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  19. Effective Interaction Potentials and Physical Properties of Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A.

    2009-11-10

    Microscopic, thermodynamic and transport properties of complex plasmas are investigated on the basis of effective potentials of interparticle interaction. These potentials take into account correlation effects and quantum-mechanical diffraction. Plasma composition, thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and helium plasmas are obtained for a wide region of coupling parameter. Collision processes in partially ionized plasma are considered; some kinetic characteristics such as phase shift, scattering cross section, bremsstrahlung cross section and absorption coefficient are investigated. Dynamic and transport properties of dusty plasma are studied by computer simulation method of the Langevin dynamics.

  20. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Nonlinear Interaction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    19 14 ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Nonlinear Interaction of Plane Elastic Waves A06 2 7 1998 Valeri A. Korneev, Kurt T. Nihei, and Larry R. Myer Earth Sciences Division June 1998 OF T4IS ~~~~~~~~~ 1 s DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by t h e United States Government, While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor a n y agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of

  1. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center (LMI-EFRC) UIUC Workshop Acknowledgements To be included as an LMI-EFRC publication, paper acknowledgements must be carefully worded. Please use the following as a guideline in preparing the "Acknowledgements" section in your manuscripts that include the LMI-EFRC as a source of support. For work solely funded by the LMI-EFRC At minimum, please use this wording: "This work was supported by the DOE 'Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion' Energy Frontier

  2. Method and apparatus to image biological interactions in plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew; Bonito, Gregory M.; Reid, Chantal D.; Smith, Mark Frederick

    2015-12-22

    A method to dynamically image the actual translocation of molecular compounds of interest in a plant root, root system, and rhizosphere without disturbing the root or the soil. The technique makes use of radioactive isotopes as tracers to label molecules of interest and to image their distribution in the plant and/or soil. The method allows for the study and imaging of various biological and biochemical interactions in the rhizosphere of a plant, including, but not limited to, mycorrhizal associations in such regions.

  3. Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O. A. Marina; L. R. Pederson; R. Gemmen; K. Gerdes; H. Finklea; I. B. Celik

    2010-03-01

    An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

  4. Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Finklea, Harry; Celik, Ismail B.

    2010-05-01

    An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

  5. Ni/YSZ Anode Interactions with Impurities in Coal Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coffey, Greg W.

    2009-10-16

    Performance of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with nickel/zirconia anodes on synthetic coal gas in the presence of low levels of phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, hydrogen chloride, and antimony impurities were evaluated. The presence of phosphorus and arsenic led to the slow and irreversible SOFC degradation due to the formation of secondary phases with nickel, particularly close to the gas inlet. Phosphorus and antimony surface adsorption layers were identified as well. Hydrogen chloride and sulfur interactions with the nickel were limited to the surface adsorption only, whereas selenium exposure also led to the formation of nickel selenide for highly polarized cells.

  6. Interactive visualization of particle beams for accelerator design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Brett; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Qiang, Ji; Ryne, Robert

    2002-01-15

    We describe a hybrid data-representation and rendering technique for visualizing large-scale particle data generated from numerical modeling of beam dynamics. The basis of the technique is mixing volume rendering and point rendering according to particle density distribution, visibility, and the user's instruction. A hierarchical representation of the data is created on a parallel computer, allowing real-time partitioning into high-density areas for volume rendering, and low-density areas for point rendering. This allows the beam to be interactively visualized while preserving the fine structure usually visible only with slow point based rendering techniques.

  7. Top 5 Maps and Interactive Graphics of 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Top 5 Maps and Interactive Graphics of 2014 Top 5 Maps and Interactive Graphics of 2014 December 22, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis Daniel Wood Daniel Wood Data Visualization and...

  8. DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    , Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with Non-Government Standards Bodies - July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with...

  9. Structure and Interactions of the CS Domain of Human H/ACA RNP...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure and Interactions of the CS Domain of Human HACA RNP Assembly Protein Shq1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Interactions of the CS Domain of Human...

  10. Interactions of multiquark states in the chromodielectric model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Gunnar; Greiner, Carsten; Leupold, Stefan; Mosel, Ulrich

    2006-05-01

    We investigate 4-quark (qqqq) systems as well as multiquark states with a large number of quarks and antiquarks using the chromodielectric model. In the former type of systems the flux distribution and the corresponding energy of such systems for planar and nonplanar geometries are studied. From the comparison to the case of two independent qq-strings we deduce the interaction potential between two strings. We find an attraction between strings and a characteristic string flip if there are two degenerate string combinations between the four particles. The interaction shows no strong Van-der-Waals forces and the long range behavior of the potential is well described by a Yukawa potential, which might be confirmed in future lattice calculations. The multiquark states develop an inhomogeneous porous structure even for particle densities large compared to nuclear matter constituent quark densities. We present first results of the dependence of the system on the particle density pointing towards a percolation type of transition from a hadronic matter phase to a quark matter phase. The critical energy density is found at {epsilon}{sub c}=1.2 GeV/fm{sup 3}.

  11. SSI (soil-structure interactions) and structural benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.; Graves, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the latest results of the ongoing program entitled, ''Standard Problems for Structural Computer Codes'', currently being worked on at BNL for the USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. During FY 1986, efforts were focussed on three tasks, namely, (1) an investigation of ground water effects on the response of Category I structures, (2) the Soil-Structure Interaction Workshop and (3) studies on structural benchmarks associated with Category I structures. The objective of the studies on ground water effects is to verify the applicability and the limitations of the SSI methods currently used by the industry in performing seismic evaluations of nuclear plants which are located at sites with high water tables. In a previous study by BNL (NUREG/CR-4588), it has been concluded that the pore water can influence significantly the soil-structure interaction process. This result, however, is based on the assumption of fully saturated soil profiles. Consequently, the work was further extended to include cases associated with variable water table depths. In this paper, results related to ''cut-off'' depths beyond which the pore water effects can be ignored in seismic calculations, are addressed. Comprehensive numerical data are given for soil configurations typical to those encountered in nuclear plant sites. These data were generated by using a modified version of the SLAM code which is capable of handling problems related to the dynamic response of saturated soils.

  12. The coincidence problem and interacting holographic dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwan, Khamphee

    2008-05-15

    We study the dynamical behaviour of the interacting holographic dark energy model whose interaction term is Q = 3H({lambda}{sub d}{rho}{sub d}+{lambda}{sub c}{rho}{sub c}), where {rho}{sub d} and {rho}{sub c} are the energy densities of dark energy and cold dark matter respectively. To satisfy the observational constraints from type Ia supernovae, the cosmic microwave background shift parameter and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements, if {lambda}{sub c} = {lambda}{sub d} or {lambda}{sub d},{lambda}{sub c}>0, the cosmic evolution will only reach the attractor in the future and the ratio {rho}{sub c}/{rho}{sub d} cannot be slowly varying at present. Since the cosmic attractor can be reached in the future even when the present values of the cosmological parameters do not satisfy the observational constraints, the coincidence problem is not really alleviated in this case. However, if {lambda}{sub c}{ne}{lambda}{sub d} and they are allowed to be negative, the ratio {rho}{sub c}/{rho}{sub d} can be slowly varying at present and the cosmic attractor can be reached near the present epoch. Hence, the alleviation of the coincidence problem is attainable in this case. The alleviation of the coincidence problem in this case is still attainable when confronting this model with Sloan Digital Sky Survey data.

  13. Protein interaction reporter agents and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruce, James E.; Tang, Xiaoting; Munske,Gerhard

    2009-04-28

    Particular aspects provide novel protein interaction reporter (PIR) compounds (e.g., formulas I and II), comprising at least two protein reactive moieties (e.g., N-hydroxysuccinamide), each linked to a reporter moiety (e.g., mass reporter) by a covalent labile bond that is differentially cleavable with respect to peptide bonds (e.g., by a method such as collisional activation in a mass spectrometer, activation by electron capture dissociation (ECD), photoactivation, etc.), wherein the reporter moiety is operatively releasable from the PIR agent upon cleavage of the labile bonds, the released reporter moiety having a characteristic identifying property or label (e.g., m/z value). Particular PIRs comprise a mass reporter moiety, and further comprise an affinity group, (e.g., biotin), linked to the PIR (e.g., to the mass reporter moiety) by a selectively cleavable bone (e.g. photo-labile bond)). Additional aspects provide methods for characterizing intermolecular or intramolecular protein interactions using one or more inventive PIR compounds.

  14. Wave-wave interactions in solar type III radio bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2014-02-11

    The high time resolution observations from the STEREO/WAVES experiment show that in type III radio bursts, the Langmuir waves often occur as localized magnetic field aligned coherent wave packets with durations of a few ms and with peak intensities well exceeding the strong turbulence thresholds. Some of these wave packets show spectral signatures of beam-resonant Langmuir waves, down- and up-shifted sidebands, and ion sound waves, with frequencies, wave numbers, and tricoherences satisfying the resonance conditions of the oscillating two stream instability (four wave interaction). The spectra of a few of these wave packets also contain peaks at f{sub pe}, 2f{sub pe} and 3 f{sub pe} (f{sub pe} is the electron plasma frequency), with frequencies, wave numbers and bicoherences (computed using the wavelet based bispectral analysis techniques) satisfying the resonance conditions of three wave interactions: (1) excitation of second harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of two oppositely propagating Langmuir waves, and (2) excitation of third harmonic electromagnetic waves as a result of coalescence of Langmuir waves with second harmonic electromagnetic waves. The implication of these findings is that the strong turbulence processes play major roles in beam stabilization as well as conversion of Langmuir waves into escaping radiation in type III radio bursts.

  15. Interaction between Cassiopeia A and nearby molecular clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilpatrick, C. D.; Bieging, J. H.; Rieke, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    We present spectroscopy of the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (Cas A) observed at infrared wavelengths from 10 to 40 ?m with the Spitzer Space Telescope and at millimeter wavelengths in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J =2-1 (230 and 220 GHz) with the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope. The IR spectra demonstrate high-velocity features toward a molecular cloud coincident with a region of bright radio continuum emission along the northern shock front of Cas A. The millimeter observations indicate that CO emission is broadened by a factor of two in some clouds toward Cas A, particularly to the south and west. We believe that these features trace interactions between the Cas A shock front and nearby molecular clouds. In addition, some of the molecular clouds that exhibit broadening in CO lie 1'-2' away from the furthest extent of the supernova remnant shock front. We propose that this material may be accelerated by ejecta with velocity significantly larger than the observed free-expansion velocity of the Cas A shock front. These observations may trace cloud interactions with fast-moving outflows such as the bipolar outflow along the southwest to northeast axis of the Cas A supernova remnant, as well as fast-moving knots seen emerging in other directions.

  16. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Mattson, Earl Douglas; Podgorney, Robert Karl

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  17. Determining Interactions in PSA models: Application to a Space PSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Smith; E. Borgonovo

    2010-06-01

    This paper addresses use of an importance measure interaction study of a probabilistic risk analysis (PSA) performed for a hypothetical aerospace lunar mission. The PSA methods used in this study follow the general guidance provided in the NASA Probabilistic Risk Assessment Procedures Guide for NASA Managers and Practitioners. For the PSA portion, we used phased-based event tree and fault tree logic structures are used to model a lunar mission, including multiple phases (from launch to return to the Earth surface) and multiple critical systems. Details of the analysis results are not provided in this paper instead specific basic events are denoted by number (e.g., the first event is 1, the second is 2, and so on). However, in the model, we used approximately 150 fault trees and over 800 basic events. Following analysis and truncation of cut sets, we were left with about 400 basic events to evaluate. We used this model to explore interactions between different basic events and systems. These sensitivity studies provide high-level insights into features of the PSA for the hypothetical lunar mission.

  18. DISRUPTION OF STAR CLUSTERS IN THE INTERACTING ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karl, Simon J.; Naab, Thorsten; Fall, S. Michael E-mail: naab@mpa-garching.mpg.de

    2011-06-10

    We re-examine the age distribution of star clusters in the Antennae in the context of N-body+hydrodynamical simulations of these interacting galaxies. All of the simulations that account for the observed morphology and other properties of the Antennae have star formation rates that vary relatively slowly with time, by factors of only 1.3-2.5 in the past 10{sup 8} yr. In contrast, the observed age distribution of the clusters declines approximately as a power law, dN/d{tau}{proportional_to}{tau}{sup {gamma}} with {gamma} = -1.0, for ages 10{sup 6} yr {approx}< {tau} {approx}< 10{sup 9} yr. These two facts can only be reconciled if the clusters are disrupted progressively for at least {approx}10{sup 8} yr and possibly {approx}10{sup 9} yr. When we combine the simulated formation rates with a power-law model, f{sub surv}{proportional_to}{tau}{sup {delta}}, for the fraction of clusters that survive to each age {tau}, we match the observed age distribution with exponents in the range -0.9 {approx}< {delta} {approx}< -0.6 (with a slightly different {delta} for each simulation). The similarity between {delta} and {gamma} indicates that dN/d{tau} is shaped mainly by the disruption of clusters rather than variations in their formation rate. Thus, the situation in the interacting Antennae resembles that in relatively quiescent galaxies such as the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds.

  19. Control of entity interactions in a hierarchical variable resolution simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.R.

    1997-08-01

    There has long been interest in variable resolution modeling to support military analysis for a broad range of interest areas. Despite the ever-present desire for models of greater fidelity at the expense of analysis and computation resources, models of moderate to low fidelity are still required at many levels of decision-making. Problems can arise due to the issue of consistency among the family of models used for analysis. To address this and other problems, models of variable resolution have been suggested. However, such variable resolution architectures inherently carry their own set of issues which must be resolved in order to be useful. First, what are the structural requirements for a variable resolution model; and second, how are interactions between entities governed, especially when the entities have different resolutions? This paper addresses these issues and discusses key mechanisms needed to develop a variable resolution combat simulation that meets several core requirements for such models: seamless aggregation/disaggregation, appropriate interactions between entities of differing resolution, and control of the aggregation/disaggregation process.

  20. Control of entity interactions in a hierarchical variable resolution simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, D.R.

    1997-10-01

    There has long been interest in variable resolution modeling to support military analysis for a broad range of interest areas. Despite the ever-present desire for models of greater fidelity at the expense of analysis and computation resources, models of moderate to low fidelity are still required at many levels of decision-making. Problems can arise due to the issue of consistency among the family of models used for analysis. To address this and other problems, models of variable resolution have been suggested. However, such variable resolution architectures inherently carry their own set of issues which must be resolved in order to be useful. First, what are the structural requirements for a variable resolution model; and second, how are interactions between entities governed, especially when the entities have different resolutions? This paper addresses these issues and discusses key mechanisms needed to develop a variable resolution combat simulation that meets several core requirements for such models: seamless aggregation/disaggregation, appropriate interactions between entities of differing resolution, and control of the aggregation/disaggregation process.

  1. AN INTERACTING GALAXY SYSTEM ALONG A FILAMENT IN A VOID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beygu, B.; Van de Weygaert, R.; Van der Hulst, J. M.; Kreckel, K.; Van Gorkom, J. H.

    2013-05-15

    Cosmological voids provide a unique environment for the study of galaxy formation and evolution. The galaxy population in their interiors has properties significantly different from average field galaxies. As part of our Void Galaxy Survey (VGS), we have found a system of three interacting galaxies (VGS{sub 3}1) inside a large void. VGS{sub 3}1 is a small elongated group whose members are embedded in a common H I envelope. The H I picture suggests a filamentary structure with accretion of intergalactic cold gas from the filament onto the galaxies. We present deep optical and narrowband H{alpha} data, optical spectroscopy, near-UV, and far-UV Galaxy Evolution Explorer and CO(1-0) data. We find that one of the galaxies, a Markarian object, has a ring-like structure and a tail evident both in optical and H I. While all three galaxies form stars in their central parts, the tail and the ring of the Markarian object are devoid of star formation. We discuss these findings in terms of a gravitational interaction and ongoing growth of galaxies out of a filament. VGS{sub 3}1 is one of the first observed examples of a filamentary structure in a void. It is an important prototype for understanding the formation of substructure in a void. This system also shows that the galaxy evolution in voids can be as dynamic as in high-density environments.

  2. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. On the representation of many-body interactions in water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medders, Gregory R.; Gotz, Andreas W.; Morales, Miguel A.; Bajaj, Pushp; Paesani, Francesco

    2015-09-09

    Our recent work has shown that the many-body expansion of the interactionenergy can be used to develop analytical representations of global potential energy surfaces (PESs) for water. In this study, the role of short- and long-range interactions at different orders is investigated by analyzing water potentials that treat the leading terms of the many-body expansion through implicit (i.e., TTM3-F and TTM4-F PESs) and explicit (i.e., WHBB and MB-pol PESs) representations. Moreover, it is found that explicit short-range representations of 2-body and 3-body interactions along with a physically correct incorporation of short- and long-range contributions are necessary for an accurate representationmore » of the waterinteractions from the gas to the condensed phase. Likewise, a complete many-body representation of the dipole moment surface is found to be crucial to reproducing the correct intensities of the infrared spectrum of liquid water.« less

  4. Global fits of the dark matter-nucleon effective interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catena, Riccardo; Gondolo, Paolo E-mail: paolo.gondolo@utah.edu

    2014-09-01

    The effective theory of isoscalar dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by heavy spin-one or spin-zero particles depends on 10 coupling constants besides the dark matter particle mass. Here we compare this 11-dimensional effective theory to current observations in a comprehensive statistical analysis of several direct detection experiments, including the recent LUX, SuperCDMS and CDMSlite results. From a multidimensional scan with about 3 million likelihood evaluations, we extract the marginalized posterior probability density functions (a Bayesian approach) and the profile likelihoods (a frequentist approach), as well as the associated credible regions and confidence levels, for each coupling constant vs dark matter mass and for each pair of coupling constants. We compare the Bayesian and frequentist approach in the light of the currently limited amount of data. We find that current direct detection data contain sufficient information to simultaneously constrain not only the familiar spin-independent and spin-dependent interactions, but also the remaining velocity and momentum dependent couplings predicted by the dark matter-nucleon effective theory. For current experiments associated with a null result, we find strong correlations between some pairs of coupling constants. For experiments that claim a signal (i.e., CoGeNT and DAMA), we find that pairs of coupling constants produce degenerate results.

  5. STUDY OF ELECTRON -PROTON BEAM-BEAM INTERACTION IN ERHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAO,Y.; LITVINENKO, V.N.; MONTAG, C.; POZDEYEV, E.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    Beam-beam effects present one of major factors limiting the luminosity of colliders. In the linac-ring option of eRHIC design, an electron beam accelerated in a superconducting energy recovery linac collides with a proton beam circulating in the RHIC ring. There are some features of beam-beam effects, which require careful examination in linac-ring configuration. First, the beam-beam interaction can induce specific head-tail type instability of the proton beam referred to as a ''kink'' instability. Thus, beam stability conditions should be established to avoid proton beam loss. Also, the electron beam transverse disruption by collisions has to be evaluated to ensure beam quality is good enough for the energy recovery pass. In addition, fluctuations of electron beam current and/or electron beam size, as well as transverse offset, can cause proton beam emittance growth. The tolerances for those factors should be determined and possible countermeasures should be developed to mitigate the emittance growth. In this paper, a soft Gaussian strong-strong simulation is used to study all of mentioned beam-beam interaction features and possible techniques to reduce the emittance growth.

  6. Interactive graphical model building using telepresence and virtual reality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, C.; Stansfield, S.

    1993-10-01

    This paper presents a prototype system developed at Sandia National Laboratories to create and verify computer-generated graphical models of remote physical environments. The goal of the system is to create an interface between an operator and a computer vision system so that graphical models can be created interactively. Virtual reality and telepresence are used to allow interaction between the operator, computer, and remote environment. A stereo view of the remote environment is produced by two CCD cameras. The cameras are mounted on a three degree-of-freedom platform which is slaved to a mechanically-tracked, stereoscopic viewing device. This gives the operator a sense of immersion in the physical environment. The stereo video is enhanced by overlaying the graphical model onto it. Overlay of the graphical model onto the stereo video allows visual verification of graphical models. Creation of a graphical model is accomplished by allowing the operator to assist the computer in modeling. The operator controls a 3-D cursor to mark objects to be modeled. The computer then automatically extracts positional and geometric information about the object and creates the graphical model.

  7. Multiple Syntrophic Interactions in a Terephthalate-Degrading Methanogenic Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lykidis, Athanasios; Chen, Chia-Lung; Tringe, Susannah G.; McHardy, Alice C.; Copeland, Alex 5; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hugenholtz, Philip; Liu, Wen-Tso

    2010-08-05

    Terephthalate (TA) is one of the top 50 chemicals produced worldwide. Its production results in a TA-containing wastewater that is treated by anaerobic processes through a poorly understood methanogenic syntrophy. Using metagenomics, we characterized the methanogenic consortium tinside a hyper-mesophilic (i.e., between mesophilic and thermophilic), TA-degrading bioreactor. We identified genes belonging to dominant Pelotomaculum species presumably involved in TA degradation through decarboxylation, dearomatization, and modified ?-oxidation to H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} and acetate. These intermediates are converted to CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} by three novel hyper-mesophilic methanogens. Additional secondary syntrophic interactions were predicted in Thermotogae, Syntrophus and candidate phyla OP5 and WWE1 populations. The OP5 encodes genes capable of anaerobic autotrophic butyrate production and Thermotogae, Syntrophus and WWE1 have the genetic potential to oxidize butyrate to COsub 2}/H{sub 2} and acetate. These observations suggest that the TA-degrading consortium consists of additional syntrophic interactions beyond the standard H{sub 2}-producing syntroph ? methanogen partnership that may serve to improve community stability.

  8. Fermionic dark matter with pseudo-scalar Yukawa interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghorbani, Karim

    2015-01-01

    We consider a renormalizable extension of the standard model whose fermionic dark matter (DM) candidate interacts with a real singlet pseudo-scalar via a pseudo-scalar Yukawa term while we assume that the full Lagrangian is CP-conserved in the classical level. When the pseudo-scalar boson develops a non-zero vacuum expectation value, spontaneous CP-violation occurs and this provides a CP-violated interaction of the dark sector with the SM particles through mixing between the Higgs-like boson and the SM-like Higgs boson. This scenario suggests a minimal number of free parameters. Focusing mainly on the indirect detection observables, we calculate the dark matter annihilation cross section and then compute the DM relic density in the range up to m{sub DM}=300 GeV.We then find viable regions in the parameter space constrained by the observed DM relic abundance as well as invisible Higgs decay width in the light of 125 GeV Higgs discovery at the LHC. We find that within the constrained region of the parameter space, there exists a model with dark matter mass m{sub DM}?38 GeV annihilating predominantly into b quarks, which can explain the Fermi-LAT galactic gamma-ray excess.

  9. Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase () | Data Explorer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase Title: Regulatory Interactions in ProKaryotes from RegTransBase RegTransBase, a manually curated database of regulatory interactions in prokaryotes, captures the knowledge in published scientific literature using a controlled vocabulary. RegTransBase describes a large number of regulatory interactions reported in many organisms and contains various types of experimental data, in particular: the activation or repression of transcription by

  10. 2012 ELECTRON DONOR-ACCEPTOR INTERACTIONS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, AUGUST 5-10, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCusker, James

    2012-08-10

    The upcoming incarnation of the Gordon Research Conference on Electron Donor Acceptor Interactions will feature sessions on classic topics including proton-coupled electron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells, and biological electron transfer, as well as emerging areas such as quantum coherence effects in donor-acceptor interactions, spintronics, and the application of donor-acceptor interactions in chemical synthesis.

  11. Advanced Interactive Facades - Critical Elements for Future GreenBuildings?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, Stephen; Aschehoug, Oyvind; Lee, Eleanor S.

    2003-11-01

    Building designers and owners have always been fascinated with the extensive use of glass in building envelopes. Today the highly glazed facade has almost become an iconic element for a 'green building' that provides daylighting and a visual connection with the natural environment. Even before the current interest in green buildings there was no shortage of highly glazed building designs. But many of these buildings either rejected sunlight, and some associated daylight and view with highly reflective glazings or used highly transmissive glass and encountered serious internal comfort problems that could only be overcome with large HVAC systems, resulting in significant energy, cost and environmental penalties. From the 1960's to the 1990's innovation in glazing made heat absorbing glass, reflective glass and double glazing commonplace, with an associated set of aesthetic features. In the last decade there has been a subtle shift from trying to optimize an ideal, static design solution using these glazings to making the facade responsive, interactive and even intelligent. More sophisticated design approaches and technologies have emerged using new high-performance glazing, improved shading and solar control systems, greater use of automated controls, and integration with other building systems. One relatively new architectural development is the double glass facade that offers a cavity that can provide improved acoustics, better solar control and enhanced ventilation. Taken to its ultimate development, an interactive facade should respond intelligently and reliably to the changing outdoor conditions and internal performance needs. It should exploit available natural energies for lighting, heating and ventilation, should be able to provide large energy savings compared to conventional technologies, and at the same time maintain optimal indoor visual and thermal comfort conditions. As photovoltaic costs decrease in the future, these onsite power systems will be integrated within the glass skin and these facades will become local, non-polluting energy suppliers to the building. The potential for facilitating sustainable building operations in the future by exploiting these concepts is therefore great. There is growing interest in highly glazed building facades, driven by a variety of architectural, aesthetic, business and environmental rationales. The environmental rationale appears plausible only if conventional glazing systems are replaced by a new generation of high performance, interactive, intelligent facade systems, that meet the comfort and performance needs of occupants while satisfying owner economic needs and broader societal environmental concerns. The challenge is that new technology, better systems integration using more capable design tools, and smarter building operation are all necessary to meet these goals. The opportunity is to create a new class of buildings that are both environmentally responsible at a regional or global level while providing the amenities and working environments that owners and occupants seek.

  12. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M J

    2008-09-24

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}DBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0{nu}DBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0{nu}DBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0{nu}DBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0{nu}DBD of {sup 130}Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO{sub 2} bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0{nu}DBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10{sup -6}. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0{nu}DBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by ({alpha},n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE data to set an upper limit for the production of a 2529 keV gamma-ray from the {sup 126}Te(n,n{prime}{gamma}) reaction. This gamma-ray is a potential source of interference for the 0{nu}DBD peak. Based on this measurement, the contribution of this line to the background is expected to be negligible.

  13. CO2 EFFECTS ON MOJAVE DESERT PLANT INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. A. DEFALCO; G. C. FERNANDEZ; S. D. SMITH; R. S. NOWAK

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal and interannual droughts characteristic of deserts have the potential to modify plant interactions as atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations continue to rise. At the Nevada Desert FACE (free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment) facility in the northern Mojave Desert, the effects of elevated atmospheric C02 (550 vs. ambient {approx}360 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) on plant interactions were examined during two years of high and low rainfall. Results suggest that CO{sub 2} effects on the interaction between native species and their understory herbs are dependent on the strength of competition when rainfall is plentiful, but are unimportant during annual drought. Seasonal rainfall for 1999 was 23% the long-term average for the area, and neither elevated CO{sub 2} nor the low production of herbaceous neighbors had an effect on relative growth rate (RGR, d{sup -1}) and reproductive effort (RE, number of flowers g{sup -1}) for Achnatherum hymenoides (early season perennial C{sub 3} grass), Pleuraphis rigida (late season perennial C{sub 4} grass), and Larrea tridentata (evergreen C{sub 3} shrub). In contrast, 1998 received 213% the average rainfall. Consequently, the decrease in RGR and increase in RE for Achnatherum, whose period of growth overlaps directly with that of its neighbors, was exaggerated at elevated CO{sub 2}. However, competitive effects of neighbors on Eriogonum trichopes (a winter annual growing in shrub interspaces), Pleuraphis and Larrea were not affected by elevated CO{sub 2}, and possible explanations are discussed. Contrary to expectations, the invasive annual neighbor Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens had little influence on target plant responses because densities in 1998 and 1999 at this site were well below those found in other studies where it has negatively affected perennial plant growth. The extent that elevated CO{sub 2} reduces the performance of Achnatherum in successive years to cause its loss from the plant community depends more on future pressure from herbaceous neighbors and less on the extent that CO{sub 2} enhances Achnatherum growth during periods of severe drought.

  14. Interaction of graphene quantum dots with bulk semiconductor surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohapatra, P. K.; Singh, B. P.; Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, J.

    2015-05-15

    Highly luminescent graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are synthesized through thermolysis of glucose. The average lateral size of the synthesized GQDs is found to be ?5 nm. The occurrence of D and G band at 1345 and 1580 cm{sup ?1} in Raman spectrum confirms the presence of graphene layers. GQDs are mostly consisting of 3 to 4 graphene layers as confirmed from the AFM measurements. Photoluminescence (PL) measurement shows a distinct broadening of the spectrum when GQDs are on the semiconducting bulk surface compared to GQDs in water. The time resolved PL measurement shows a significant shortening in PL lifetime due to the substrate interaction on GQDs compared to the GQDs in solution phase.

  15. Determining protein function and interaction from genome analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eisenberg, David; Marcotte, Edward M.; Thompson, Michael J.; Pellegrini, Matteo; Yeates, Todd O.

    2004-08-03

    A computational method system, and computer program are provided for inferring functional links from genome sequences. One method is based on the observation that some pairs of proteins A' and B' have homologs in another organism fused into a single protein chain AB. A trans-genome comparison of sequences can reveal these AB sequences, which are Rosetta Stone sequences because they decipher an interaction between A' and B. Another method compares the genomic sequence of two or more organisms to create a phylogenetic profile for each protein indicating its presence or absence across all the genomes. The profile provides information regarding functional links between different families of proteins. In yet another method a combination of the above two methods is used to predict functional links.

  16. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  17. Resonant wave-particle interactions modified by intrinsic Alfvenic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C. S.; Lee, K. H.; Wang, C. B.; Wu, D. J.

    2012-08-15

    The concept of wave-particle interactions via resonance is well discussed in plasma physics. This paper shows that intrinsic Alfven waves can qualitatively modify the physics discussed in conventional linear plasma kinetic theories. It turns out that preexisting Alfven waves can affect particle motion along the ambient magnetic field and, moreover, the ensuing force field is periodic in time. As a result, the meaning of the usual Landau and cyclotron resonance conditions becomes questionable. It turns out that this effect leads us to find a new electromagnetic instability. In such a process intrinsic Alfven waves not only modify the unperturbed distribution function but also result in a different type of cyclotron resonance which is affected by the level of turbulence. This instability might enable us to better our understanding of the observed radio emission processes in the solar atmosphere.

  18. Neutral Current Elastic Interactions at MiniBooNE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Elastic Interactions at MiniBooNE -Ranjan Dharmapalan for the MiniBooNE collaboration NuInt '11 Dehradun, India. 2 Outline: 1. The MiniBooNE Experiment 2. Neutral current Elastic scattering (theory) 3. Neutral current Elastic scattering in MiniBooNE (expt) 4. mode results 5. First look at data 6. Future plans and conclusion 3 B o o s t e r t a r g e t a n d h o r n d e t e c t o r d i r t d e c a y r e g i o n a b s o r b e r p r i m a r y b e a m t e r t i a r y b e a m s e c o n d a r

  19. Interactive display system having a digital micromirror imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard; Kaull, Lisa; Brewster, Calvin

    2006-04-11

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. A projector cooperates with a digital imaging device, e.g. a digital micromirror imaging device, for projecting an image through the panel for display on the outlet face. The imaging device includes an array of mirrors tiltable between opposite display and divert positions. The display positions reflect an image light beam from the projector through the panel for display on the outlet face. The divert positions divert the image light beam away from the panel, and are additionally used for reflecting a probe light beam through the panel toward the outlet face. Covering a spot on the panel, e.g. with a finger, reflects the probe light beam back through the panel toward the inlet face for detection thereat and providing interactive capability.

  20. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A; Potok, Thomas E; Patton, Robert M; Goodall, John R; Maness, Christopher S; Senter, James K

    2012-01-01

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  1. Graphical User Interface Color Display Animation Interaction Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-10-05

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a highly flexible graphical user interface for displaying the results of a calculation, typically generated by RELAP5 or other code. This display consists of one or more picture, called masks, that mimic the host code input. This mask can be animated to display user-specified code output information mapped as colors, dials, moving arrows, etc., on the mask. The user can also interact with the control systems of the hostmore » input file as the execution progresses, thereby controlling aspects of the calculation. The Computer Visual System (CVS) creates, edits, and animates the the masks for use in the NPA.« less

  2. Power Saving Optimization for Linear Collider Interaction Region Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Optimization of Interaction Region parameters of a TeV energy scale linear collider has to take into account constraints defined by phenomena such as beam-beam focusing forces, beamstrahlung radiation, and hour-glass effect. With those constraints, achieving a desired luminosity of about 2E34 would require use of e{sup +}e{sup -} beams with about 10 MW average power. Application of the 'travelling focus' regime may allow the required beam power to be reduced by at least a factor of two, helping reduce the cost of the collider, while keeping the beamstrahlung energy loss reasonably low. The technique is illustrated for the 500 GeV CM parameters of the International Linear Collider. This technique may also in principle allow recycling the e{sup +}e{sup -} beams and/or recuperation of their energy.

  3. Microwave modeling of laser plasma interactions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    For a large laser fusion targets and nanosecond pulse lengths, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and self-focusing are expected to be significant problems. The goal of the contractual effort was to examine certain aspects of these physical phenomena in a wavelength regime (lambda approx.5 cm) more amenable to detailed diagnostics than that characteristic of laser fusion (lambda approx.1 micron). The effort was to include the design, fabrication and operation of a suitable experimental apparatus. In addition, collaboration with Dr. Neville Luhmann and his associates at UCLA and with Dr. Curt Randall of LLNL, on analysis and modelling of the UCLA experiments was continued. Design and fabrication of the TRW experiment is described under ''Experiment Design'' and ''Experimental Apparatus''. The design goals for the key elements of the experimental apparatus were met, but final integration and operation of the experiment was not accomplished. Some theoretical considerations on the interaction between Stimulated Brillouin Scattering and Self-Focusing are also presented.

  4. TRACE3D. Interactive Beam-Dynamics Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, L.; Yao, C.Y.

    1993-12-01

    TRACE3D is an interactive program that calculates the envelopes of a bunched beam, including linear space-charge forces, through a user-defined system. The transport system may consist of the following elements: drift, thin lens, quadrupole, permanent magnet quadrupole, solenoid, doublet, triplet, bending magnet, edge angle (for bend), RF gap, radio-frequency-quadrupole cell, RF cavity, coupled-cavity tank, user-desired element, coordinate rotation, and identical element. The beam is represented by a 6X6 matrix defining a hyper-ellipsoid in six-dimensional phase space. The projection of this hyperellipsoid on any two-dimensional plane is an ellipse that defines the boundary of the beam in that plane.

  5. Interaction between silicon dioxide and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rahman, Irman Abdul

    2014-09-03

    Many of the cellular process depend on the ability of the membrane to separate areas while allowing exchange and tightly regulated transport of material within and across the membrane to occur, which is the driving principle behind cell communication. The complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development of a wide variety of simpler model systems whose size, geometry and composition can be tailored with precision. This study was conducted to investigate the interactions between silica nanoparticles and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. The size range of DPPC vesicles formed was from 50 to 150 nm. Concentration of silica added to the vesicles was varied from 0.25 to 1.5 mg/ml. The change in vesicle size distribution, localization and positioning of silica nanoparticles in vesicles was studied via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

  6. Advanced reactor safety program. Stakeholder interaction and feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H.; Smith, Curtis L.

    2014-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, we began discussions with our industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require substantial participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

  7. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, ?-butyrolactone and ?-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packingin the solid-stateto be scrutinized in detail.

  8. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  9. APPLICATION OF THE THEORY OF INTERACTING CONTINUA TO BLOOD FLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Kim, Jeongho; Hund, Samuel J.; Antaki, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Micro-scale investigations of the flow and deformation of blood and its formed elements have been studied for many years. Early in vitro investigations in the rotational viscometers or small glass tubes revealed important rheological properties such as the reduced blood apparent viscosity, Fahraeus effect and Fahraeus-Lindqvist effect [1], exhibiting the nonhomogeneous property of blood in microcirculation. We have applied Mixture Theory, also known as Theory of Interacting Continua, to study and model this property of blood [2, 3]. This approach holds great promise for predicting the trafficking of RBCs in micro-scale flows (such as the depletion layer near the wall), and other unique hemorheological phenomena relevant to blood trauma. The blood is assumed to be composed of an RBC component modeled as a nonlinear fluid, suspended in plasma, modeled as a linearly viscous fluid.

  10. Parametric reflection upon cascade interaction of focused optical beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobanov, V E; Sukhorukov, A P; Sukhorukova, A K

    2008-10-31

    The parametric reflection of a signal beam in the waist of the reference pump beam upon mismatched three-frequency interaction in a quadratically nonlinear medium is discussed. The critical angle of total internal reflection from the induced defocusing channel is found as a function of the beam waist parameters. It is shown that when the reference beam is focused, this angle increases and some distortions are introduced into the reflected wave due to a finite length of the waist. The modification of the cross section of a wave reflected from a convex parametric mirror is analysed. The optimal beam focusing geometry is found at which the distortions of the shape and divergence of the reflected wave are minimal. Under certain conditions, the signal wave also flows around a cylindrical inhomogeneity produced by the axially symmetric pump beam. The results of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation are in good agreement. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds (LASIC) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuidema, P; Chiu, C; Fairall, CW; Ghan, SJ; Kollias, P; McFarguhar, GM; Mechem, DB; Romps, DM; Wong, H; Yuter, SE; Alvarado, MJ; DeSzoeke, SP; Feingold, G; Haywood, JM; Lewis, ER; McComiskey, A; Redemann, J; Turner, DD; Wood, R; Zhu, P

    2015-12-01

    Southern Africa is the world’s largest emitter of biomass-burning (BB) aerosols. Their westward transport over the remote southeast Atlantic Ocean colocates some of the largest atmospheric loadings of absorbing aerosol with the least examined of the Earth’s major subtropical stratocumulus decks. Global aerosol model results highlight that the largest positive top-of-atmosphere forcing in the world occurs in the southeast Atlantic, but this region exhibits large differences in magnitude and sign between reputable models, in part because of high variability in the underlying model cloud distributions. Many uncertainties contribute to the highly variable model radiation fields: the aging of shortwave-absorbing aerosol during transport, how much of the aerosol mixes into the cloudy boundary layer, and how the low clouds adjust to smoke-radiation and smoke-cloud interactions. In addition, the ability of the BB aerosol to absorb shortwave radiation is known to vary seasonally as the fuel type on land changes.

  12. The interactional foundations of MaxEnt: Open questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harr, Michael S.

    2014-12-05

    One of the simplest and potentially most useful techniques to be developed in the 20{sup th} century, a century noted for an ever more mathematically sophisticated formulation of the sciences, is that of maximising the entropy of a system in order to generate a descriptive, stochastic model of that system in closed form, often abbreviated to MaxEnt. The extension of MaxEnt to systems beyond the physics from which it originated is hampered by the fact that the microscopic physical interactions that are not justified or justifiable within the MaxEnt framework need to be falsifiably evaluated in each new field of application. It is not obvious that such justification exists for many systems in which the interactions are not directly based on physics. For example what is the justification for the use of MaxEnt in biology, climate modelling or economics? Is it simply a useful heuristic or is there some deeper connection with the foundations of some systems? Without further critical examination of the microscopic foundations that give rise to the success of the MaxEnt principle it is difficult to motivate the use of such techniques in other fields except through theoretically an practically unsatisfying analogical arguments. This article briefly presents the basis of MaxEnt principles as originally introduced in statistical mechanics in the Jaynes form, the Tsallis form and the Rnyi form. Several different applications are introduced including that of ecological diversity where maximising the different diversity measures is equivalent to maximising different entropic functionals.

  13. Chemical interaction matrix between reagents in a Purex based process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brahman, R.K.; Hennessy, W.P.; Paviet-Hartmann, P.

    2008-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is the responsible entity for the disposal of the United States excess weapons grade plutonium. DOE selected a PUREX-based process to convert plutonium to low-enriched mixed oxide fuel for use in commercial nuclear power plants. To initiate this process in the United States, a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is under construction and will be operated by Shaw AREVA MOX Services at the Savannah River Site. This facility will be licensed and regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A PUREX process, similar to the one used at La Hague, France, will purify plutonium feedstock through solvent extraction. MFFF employs two major process operations to manufacture MOX fuel assemblies: (1) the Aqueous Polishing (AP) process to remove gallium and other impurities from plutonium feedstock and (2) the MOX fuel fabrication process (MP), which processes the oxides into pellets and manufactures the MOX fuel assemblies. The AP process consists of three major steps, dissolution, purification, and conversion, and is the center of the primary chemical processing. A study of process hazards controls has been initiated that will provide knowledge and protection against the chemical risks associated from mixing of reagents over the life time of the process. This paper presents a comprehensive chemical interaction matrix evaluation for the reagents used in the PUREX-based process. Chemical interaction matrix supplements the process conditions by providing a checklist of any potential inadvertent chemical reactions that may take place. It also identifies the chemical compatibility/incompatibility of the reagents if mixed by failure of operations or equipment within the process itself or mixed inadvertently by a technician in the laboratories. (aut0010ho.

  14. Semiclassical wave-packets emerging from interaction with an environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recchia, Carla; Teta, Alessandro

    2014-01-15

    We study the quantum evolution in dimension three of a system composed by a test particle interacting with an environment made of N harmonic oscillators. At time zero the test particle is described by a spherical wave, i.e., a highly correlated continuous superposition of states with well localized position and momentum, and the oscillators are in the ground state. Furthermore, we assume that the positions of the oscillators are not collinear with the center of the spherical wave. Under suitable assumptions on the physical parameters characterizing the model, we give an asymptotic expression of the solution of the Schrdinger equation of the system with an explicit control of the error. The result shows that the approximate expression of the wave function is the sum of two terms, orthogonal in L{sup 2}(R{sup 3(N+1)}) and describing rather different situations. In the first one, all the oscillators remain in their ground state and the test particle is described by the free evolution of a slightly deformed spherical wave. The second one consists of a sum of N terms where in each term there is only one excited oscillator and the test particle is correspondingly described by the free evolution of a wave packet, well concentrated in position and momentum. Moreover, the wave packet emerges from the excited oscillator with an average momentum parallel to the line joining the oscillator with the center of the initial spherical wave. Such wave packet represents a semiclassical state for the test particle, propagating along the corresponding classical trajectory. The main result of our analysis is to show how such a semiclassical state can be produced, starting from the original spherical wave, as a result of the interaction with the environment.

  15. EFFECT OF INTERACTING RAREFACTION WAVES ON RELATIVISTICALLY HOT JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Jin; Shibata, Kazunari; Masada, Youhei

    2012-06-01

    The effect of rarefaction acceleration on the propagation dynamics and structure of relativistically hot jets is studied through relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We emphasize the nonlinear interaction of rarefaction waves excited at the interface between a cylindrical jet and the surrounding medium. From simplified one-dimensional (1D) models with radial jet structure, we find that a decrease in the relativistic pressure due to the interacting rarefaction waves in the central zone of the jet transiently yields a more powerful boost of the bulk jet than that expected from single rarefaction acceleration. This leads to a cyclic in situ energy conversion between thermal and bulk kinetic energies, which induces radial oscillating motion of the jet. The oscillation timescale is characterized by the initial pressure ratio of the jet to the ambient medium and follows a simple scaling relation, {tau}{sub oscillation}{proportional_to}(P{sub jet,0}/P{sub amb,0}){sup 1/2}. Extended two-dimensional simulations confirm that this radial oscillating motion in the 1D system manifests as modulation of the structure of the jet in a more realistic situation where a relativistically hot jet propagates through an ambient medium. We find that when the ambient medium has a power-law pressure distribution, the size of the reconfinement region along the propagation direction of the jet in the modulation structure {lambda} evolves according to a self-similar relation {lambda}{proportional_to}t{sup {alpha}/2}, where {alpha} is the power-law index of the pressure distribution.

  16. On the interaction between turbulence and a planar rarefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bryan M.

    2014-04-01

    The modeling of turbulence, whether it be numerical or analytical, is a difficult challenge. Turbulence is amenable to analysis with linear theory if it is subject to rapid distortions, i.e., motions occurring on a timescale that is short compared to the timescale for nonlinear interactions. Such an approach (referred to as rapid distortion theory) could prove useful for understanding aspects of astrophysical turbulence, which is often subject to rapid distortions, such as supernova explosions or the free-fall associated with gravitational instability. As a proof of principle, a particularly simple problem is considered here: the evolution of vorticity due to a planar rarefaction in an ideal gas. Analytical solutions are obtained for incompressive modes having a wave vector perpendicular to the distortion; as in the case of gradient-driven instabilities, these are the modes that couple most strongly to the mean flow. Vorticity can either grow or decay in the wake of a rarefaction front, and there are two competing effects that determine which outcome occurs: entropy fluctuations couple to the mean pressure gradient to produce vorticity via baroclinic effects, whereas vorticity is damped due to the conservation of angular momentum as the fluid expands. Whether vorticity grows or decays depends upon the ratio of entropic to vortical fluctuations at the location of the front; growth occurs if this ratio is of order unity or larger. In the limit of purely entropic fluctuations in the ambient fluid, a strong rarefaction generates vorticity with a turbulent Mach number on the order of the rms of the ambient entropy fluctuations. The analytical results are shown to compare well with results from two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations. Analytical solutions are also derived in the linear regime of Reynolds-averaged turbulence models. This highlights an inconsistency in standard turbulence models that prevents them from accurately capturing the physics of rarefaction-turbulence interaction. In addition to providing physical insight, the solutions derived here can be used to verify algorithms of both the Reynolds-averaged and direct numerical simulation variety. Finally, dimensional analysis of the equations indicates that rapid distortion of turbulence can give rise to two distinct regimes in the turbulent spectrum: a distortion range at large scales where linear distortion effects dominate, and an inertial range at small scales where nonlinear effects dominate.

  17. Radio Frequency Station - Beam Dynamics Interaction in Circular Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-03-01

    The longitudinal beam dynamics in circular accelerators is mainly defined by the interaction of the beam current with the accelerating Radio Frequency (RF) stations. For stable operation, Low Level RF (LLRF) feedback systems are employed to reduce coherent instabilities and regulate the accelerating voltage. The LLRF system design has implications for the dynamics and stability of the closed-loop RF systems as well as for the particle beam, and is very sensitive to the operating range of accelerator currents and energies. Stability of the RF loop and the beam are necessary conditions for reliable machine operation. This dissertation describes theoretical formalisms and models that determine the longitudinal beam dynamics based on the LLRF implementation, time domain simulations that capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction, and measurements from the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that validate the models and simulations. These models and simulations are structured to capture the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They also provide the opportunity to study diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Coupled-bunch instabilities and RF station power were the performance limiting effects for PEP-II. The sensitivity of the instabilities to individual LLRF parameters, the effectiveness of alternative operational algorithms, and the possible tradeoffs between RF loop and beam stability were studied. New algorithms were implemented, with significant performance improvement leading to a world record current during the last PEP-II run of 3212 mA for the Low Energy Ring. Longitudinal beam emittance growth due to RF noise is a major concern for LHC. Simulations studies and measurements were conducted that clearly show the correlation between RF noise and longitudinal bunch emittance, identify the major LLRF noise contributions, and determine the RF component dominating this effect. With these results, LHC upgrades and alternative algorithms are evaluated to reduce longitudinal emittance growth during operations. The applications of this work are described with regard to future machines and analysis of new technical implementations, as well as to possible future work which would continue the directions of this dissertation.

  18. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  19. Probing many-body interactions in an optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, A.M., E-mail: arey@jilau1.colorado.edu [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Gorshkov, A.V. [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Joint Quantum Institute, NIST and University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Kraus, C.V. [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria) [Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Martin, M.J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States) [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bishof, M.; Swallows, M.D.; Zhang, X.; Benko, C.; Ye, J. [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)] [JILA, NIST and University of Colorado, Department of Physics, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Lemke, N.D.; Ludlow, A.D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    We present a unifying theoretical framework that describes recently observed many-body effects during the interrogation of an optical lattice clock operated with thousands of fermionic alkaline earth atoms. The framework is based on a many-body master equation that accounts for the interplay between elastic and inelastic p-wave and s-wave interactions, finite temperature effects and excitation inhomogeneity during the quantum dynamics of the interrogated atoms. Solutions of the master equation in different parameter regimes are presented and compared. It is shown that a general solution can be obtained by using the so called Truncated Wigner Approximation which is applied in our case in the context of an open quantum system. We use the developed framework to model the density shift and decay of the fringes observed during Ramsey spectroscopy in the JILA {sup 87}Sr and NIST {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clocks. The developed framework opens a suitable path for dealing with a variety of strongly-correlated and driven open-quantum spin systems. -- Highlights: Derived a theoretical framework that describes many-body effects in a lattice clock. Validated the analysis with recent experimental measurements. Demonstrated the importance of beyond mean field corrections in the dynamics.

  20. Low energy charged particles interacting with amorphous solid water layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horowitz, Yonatan; Asscher, Micha

    2012-04-07

    The interaction of charged particles with condensed water films has been studied extensively in recent years due to its importance in biological systems, ecology as well as interstellar processes. We have studied low energy electrons (3-25 eV) and positive argon ions (55 eV) charging effects on amorphous solid water (ASW) and ice films, 120-1080 ML thick, deposited on ruthenium single crystal under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Charging the ASW films by both electrons and positive argon ions has been measured using a Kelvin probe for contact potential difference (CPD) detection and found to obey plate capacitor physics. The incoming electrons kinetic energy has defined the maximum measurable CPD values by retarding further impinging electrons. L-defects (shallow traps) are suggested to be populated by the penetrating electrons and stabilize them. Low energy electron transmission measurements (currents of 0.4-1.5 {mu}A) have shown that the maximal and stable CPD values were obtained only after a relatively slow change has been completed within the ASW structure. Once the film has been stabilized, the spontaneous discharge was measured over a period of several hours at 103 {+-} 2 K. Finally, UV laser photo-emission study of the charged films has suggested that the negative charges tend to reside primarily at the ASW-vacuum interface, in good agreement with the known behavior of charged water clusters.