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1

Property:BrophyModel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BrophyModel BrophyModel Jump to: navigation, search Property Name BrophyModel Property Type Page Description Application of Brophy's occurrence models to each area based on its tectonic and structural setting. See also Brophy Occurrence Models Allows Values Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource;Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource;Type C: Caldera Resource;Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource;Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource;Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 3 subproperties: L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area V Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "BrophyModel"

2

Brophy Occurrence Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brophy Occurrence Models Brophy Occurrence Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Brophy Occurrence Models Dictionary.png Brophy Occurrence Models: Paul Brophy has classified geothermal areas based on a variety of properties such as tectonic setting, controlling structures, and fluid properties. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Type Examples Topography Climate Depth to Resource (m) Surface Manifestations Permeability Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource The Geysers Rugged to mountainous Variable Usually deep (2500-4000) Restricted Low to moderate fracture permeability Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Philippines, Indonesia, Central and South America Usually mountainous Variable - usually high precipitation Deep to moderate Restricted, depending on depth and shallow ground water Low to moderate fracture permeability - often high

3

Definition: Brophy Occurrence Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Brophy Occurrence Models Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Brophy Occurrence Models Paul Brophy has classified geothermal areas based on a variety of properties such as tectonic setting, controlling structures, and fluid properties.[2] References ↑ Colin F. Williams,Marshall J. Reed,Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. In: Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; 2011/02/02; Stanford, California. Stanford, California: Stanford University; p. ↑ [1] Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Brophy_Occurrence_Models&oldid=699053"

4

Category:Brophy Occurrence Models | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brophy Occurrence Models Brophy Occurrence Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Category:Brophy Occurrence Models Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Brophy Occurrence Models page? For detailed information on Brophy Occurrence Models, click here. Pages in category "Brophy Occurrence Models" The following 6 pages are in this category, out of 6 total. T Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Brophy_Occurrence_Models&oldid=599749" What links here Related changes

5

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Many Geological Survey Organisations (GSOs) are using 3D modelling software technology for a vast variety of applications. Initially many 3D tools were designed for the exploitation of digital seismic mass data existing in hydrocarbon exploration industry. Accordingly, GSOs have to adapt available software and to modify it to their special requirements, defining their own best practice. The Geological Survey of the Bavarian Environment Agency has developed procedures and workflows for a variety of

6

Analytical Performance Models for Geologic Repositories  

SciTech Connect

This report presents analytical solutions of the dissolution and hydrogeologic transport of radionuclides in geologic repositories. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the equations resulting from these analyses. The subjects treated in the present report are: (a) Solubility-limited transport with transverse dispersion (Chapter 2); (b) Transport of a radionuclide chain with nonequilibrium chemical reactions (Chapter 3); (c) Advective transport in a two-dimensional flow field (Chapter 4); (d) Radionuclide.transport in fractured media (Chapter 5); (e) A mathematical model for EPA's analysis of generic repositories (Chapter 6); and (f) Dissolution of radionuclides from solid waste (Chapter 7).

Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Fujita, A.; Kanki, T.; Kobayashi,A.; Lung, H.; Ting, D.; Sato, Y.; Savoshy, S.J.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for FMI Borehole Geology, Geomechanics and 3D Reservoir Modeling Citation...

8

Automatic Building of Structured Geological Models Sylvain Brandel1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological models used for oil and gas exploration. We present a prototype of a "geological pilot" which Modeling for oil and gas exploration Hydrocarbon reservoir models are a major tool currently used involved in oil and gas exploration have acquired a huge amount of seismic data, which are neither

Brandel, Sylvain

9

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Clay and granitic geologic rock units are potential host media for future repositories for used nuclear fuel and high level waste. This report addresses the representation of flow in these two media within numerical process models. Discrete fracture network (DFNs) models are an approach to representing flow in fractured granite that explicitly represents the geometry and flow properties of individual fractures. New DFN generation and computational grid generation methods have been developed and tested. Mesh generation and the generation of flow streamlines within the DFN are also included. Traditional form of Darcy's law is not adequate

10

3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon 3D Geological Modelling In Bavaria - State-Of-The-Art At A State Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

11

3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

13

GSIS: A 3D geological multi-body modeling system from netty cross-sections with topology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True 3D geological models are instrumental in addressing practical geology problems. A 3D geological modeling method is a vital module which converts raw data in lower dimensions into 3D bodies. To be geologically practical, the method must take cross-sections ... Keywords: 3D geological modeling, Data consistency, Fault modeling, Geomodeller

Jing Ming; Mao Pan; Honggang Qu; Zhihong Ge

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geological disposal analysis in salt leaching rock through modeling and simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The improvement in geology and the progress in computer technology have provided geo-science with entirely new possibilities in recent years. Embedding modeling and simulation allow easy handling of structural geological data which is of enormous value. ... Keywords: geological modeling, methodological approach, partitioning, salt leaching

Dietmar P. F. Mller; Rolf Bielecki

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Integration of regional to outcrop digital data: 3D visualisation of multi-scale geological models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-scale geological models contain three-dimensional, spatially referenced data, typically spanning at least six orders of magnitude from outcrop to regional scale. A large number of different geological and geophysical data sources can be combined ... Keywords: Digital geological mapping, Immersive visualisation, Terrestrial laser-scanning, User interaction, Virtual outcrop models

R. R. Jones; K. J. W. McCaffrey; P. Clegg; R. W. Wilson; N. S. Holliman; R. E. Holdsworth; J. Imber; S. Waggott

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mathematical models of thermal and chemical transport in geologic media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semi-analytical and numerical methods are used to investigate thermal and chemical transport processes in geologic media. The work is divided into two parts: (1) development of semi-analytical models for the analysis of uncoupled isothermal and nonisothermal fluid flow in naturally fractured media, and (2) development of a high resolution numerical code to address coupled nonisothermal chemical transport in geologic media. A semi-analytical model is developed for well test data analysis in naturally fractured reservoirs. A simple approximate analytical solution for pressure buildup and drawdown tests is developed. Methods based on the approximate solution are developed for the evaluation of important reservoir properties. Type curves for nonisothermal fluid flow in naturally fractured media are developed to design injection systems for maximum energy in hydrothermal systems. An accurate finite difference method for the solution of a convection-diffusion type equation is developed. The method is incorporated in a two-dimensional code to investigate free convection in a porous slab and kinetic silica-water reactions in geothermal systems. A multicomponent model considering the variations of pressure, temperature and silica concentration is developed to interpret the evolution of geothermal systems during exploitation.

Lai, C.-H.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Hydro-mechanical Model and Analytical Solutions for Geomechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We present a hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow in greater detail. The simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcys law. Two parts were coupled using the standard linear poroelasticity. Analytical solutions for pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario. The model predicts the temporal and spatial variation of pressure field and effects of permeability and elastic modulus of formation on the fluid pressure distribution.

Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain HR

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reservoirs for Carbon Sequestration and Enhanced Gasfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zonethe feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reactive transport modeling for CO2 geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers.geological storage of carbon dioxide. Int. J. Greenhouse GasIPCC special report on carbon dioxide capture and storage.

Xu, T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Modeling wetland loss in coastal Louisiana: Geology, geography ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Habitat change in coastal Louisiana from 1955/6 to 1978 was analyzed to determine the influence of geological and man-made changes on landscape ...

22

COMPUTER MODELING OF NUCLIDE ADSORPTION ON GEOLOGIC MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aqueous transport of radionuclides through geologic media,lead J the exchange of radionuclide mass between the aqueousdistribution of a given radionuclide between the solid and

Silva, R.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coupling geological and numerical models to simulate groundwater flow and contaminant transport in fractured media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new modeling approach is presented to improve numerical simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport in fractured geological media. The approach couples geological and numerical models through an intermediate mesh generation phase. As ... Keywords: Fractures, Geomodel, Influence coefficient technique, Numerical modeling, Tetrahedra

Daniela Blessent; Ren Therrien; Kerry MacQuarrie

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Geologic simulation model for a hypothetical site in the Columbia Plateau. [AEGIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the structure and operation of the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Geologic Simulation Model, a computer simulation model of the geology and hydrology of an area of the Columbia Plateau, Washington. The model is used to study the long-term suitability of the Columbia Plateau Basalts for the storage of nuclear waste in a mined repository. It is also a starting point for analyses of such repositories in other geologic settings. The Geologic Simulation Model will aid in formulating design disruptive sequences (i.e. those to be used for more detailed hydrologic, transport, and dose analyses) from the spectrum of hypothetical geological and hydrological developments that could result in transport of radionuclides out of a repository. Quantitative and auditable execution of this task, however, is impossible without computer simulation. The computer simulation model aids the geoscientist by generating the wide spectrum of possible future evolutionary paths of the areal geology and hydrology, identifying those that may affect the repository integrity. This allows the geoscientist to focus on potentially disruptive processes, or series of events. Eleven separate submodels are used in the simulation portion of the model: Climate, Continental Glaciation, Deformation, Geomorphic Events, Hydrology, Magmatic Events, Meteorite Impact, Sea-Level Fluctuations, Shaft-Seal Failure, Sub-Basalt Basement Faulting, and Undetected Features. Because of the modular construction of the model, each submodel can easily be replaced with an updated or modified version as new information or developments in the state of the art become available. The model simulates the geologic and hydrologic systems of a hypothetical repository site and region for a million years following repository decommissioning. The Geologic Simulation Model operates in both single-run and Monte Carlo modes.

Petrie, G.M.; Zellmer, J.T.; Lindberg, J.W.; Foley, M.G.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Reprint of "3D geological modelling from boreholes, cross-sections and geological maps, application over former natural gas storages in coal mines" [Comput. Geosci. 34 (2008) 278-290  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a wide range of applications involving geological modelling, geological data available at low cost usually consist of documents such as cross-sections or geological maps and punctual data like borehole logs or outcrop descriptions. In order to build ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, Data structuration, GIS, Geomodeler

Olivier Kaufmann; Thierry Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A three-dimensional gravity model of the geologic structure of Long Valley caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several attempts to define and interpret this anomaly have been made in the past using 2-D and 3-D models. None of the previous interpretations have yielded definitive results, but in fairness, the interpretation here has benefited from a larger gravity data base and more subsurface control than available to previous workers. All published 3-D models simplistically assumed constant density of fill. All 2-D models suffered from the inherent three-dimensionality of the complicated density structure of Long Valley caldera. In addition, previous interpreters have lacked access to geological data, such as well lithologies and density logs, seismic refraction interpretations, suface geology, and structural geology interpretations. The purpose of this study is to use all available gravity data and geological information to constrain a multi-unit, 3-D density model based on the geology of Long Valley caldera and its vicinity. Insights on the geologic structure of the caldera fill can help other geophysical interpretations in determining near-surface effects so that deeper structure may be resolved. With adequate control on the structure of the caldera fill, we are able to examine the gravity data for the presence of deeper density anomalies in the crust. 20 refs., 7 figs.

Carle, S.F.; Goldstein, N.E.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6) Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6) Sector Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6) Sector Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A working conceptual model has been developed for the southwestern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal system, the region encompasing CalEnergy Operating Company's imnent 'Unit 6' field expansion (185 megawatts). The model is based on examination and analysis of several thousand borehole rock samples combined with a wealth of subsurface information made available for the first time from the databases of present

28

Conversion of the Bryan Mound geological site characterization reports to a three-dimensional model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bryan Mound salt dome, located near Freeport, Texas, is home to one of four underground crude oil-storage facilities managed by the U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Sandia National Laboratories, as the geotechnical advisor to the SPR, conducts site-characterization investigations and other longer-term geotechnical and engineering studies in support of the program. This report describes the conversion of two-dimensional geologic interpretations of the Bryan Mound site into three-dimensional geologic models. The new models include the geometry of the salt dome, the surrounding sedimentary units, mapped faults, and the 20 oil-storage caverns at the site. This work provides an internally consistent geologic model of the Bryan Mound site that can be used in support of future work.

Stein, Joshua S.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Conceptual geologic model and native state model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual geologic model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs hydrothermal system was developed by a review of the available literature. The hydrothermal system consists of a meteoric recharge area in the Mineral Mountains, fluid circulation paths to depth, a heat source, and an outflow plume. A conceptual model based on the available data can be simulated in the native state using parameters that fall within observed ranges. The model temperatures, recharge rates, and fluid travel times are sensitive to the permeability in the Mineral Mountains. The simulation results suggests the presence of a magma chamber at depth as the likely heat source. A two-dimensional study of the hydrothermal system can be used to establish boundary conditions for further study of the geothermal reservoir. 33 refs., 9 figs.

Faulder, D.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to two geologic carbon sequestration sites, Energy Procedia,for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on Effectivefor geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energy

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

MATHEMATICAL MODELS OF THERMAL AND CHEMICAL TRANSPORT IN GEOLOGIC MEDIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Modeling Fluid and Heat Flow in Fractured Porous Media,Fluid Flow in a Single Fracture Because the topology of fractured media is different from that of porous media,

Lai, C.-H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

Mcdonough, William F.

34

Building simple multiscale visualizations of outcrop geology using virtual reality modeling language (VRML)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological data collected from outcrop are inherently three-dimensional (3D) and span a variety of scales, from the megascopic to the microscopic. This presents challenges in both interpreting and communicating observations. The Virtual Reality Modeling ... Keywords: Carbonates, GIS, Mud-mounds, Photorealistic, VRML

John B. Thurmond; Peter A. Drzewiecki; Xueming Xu

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Implementation of two geologic constitutive models in the HONDO finite-element code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two constitutive models for use with geologic materials have been incorporated into the HONDO finite-element program. Both models have the same behavior in tension, using a stress criterion to form cracks normal to the maximum principal stress. In compression, the two models give upper and lower bound solutions to the unconfined postfailure strength. The first model uses a Coulomb criterion to form explicit shear cracks, while the second model uses an elastic-plastic formulation developed by Krieg. Two sample applications, an indentor test and fracture of a borehole, are presented.

Swenson, D.V.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

GS3: A Knowledge Management Architecture for Collaborative Geologic Sequestration Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern scientific enterprises are inherently knowledge-intensive. In general, scientific studies in domains such as groundwater, climate, and other environmental modeling as well as fundamental research in chemistry, physics, and biology require the acquisition and manipulation of large amounts of experimental and field data in order to create inputs for large-scale computational simulations. The results of these simulations must then be analyzed, leading to refinements of inputs and models and further simulations. In this paper we describe our efforts in creating a knowledge management platform to support collaborative, wide-scale studies in the area of geologic sequestration. The platform, known as GS3 (Geologic Sequestration Software Suite), exploits and integrates off-the-shelf software components including semantic wikis, content management systems and open source middleware to create the core architecture. We then extend the wiki environment to support the capture of provenance, the ability to incorporate various analysis tools, and the ability to launch simulations on supercomputers. The paper describes the key components of GS3 and demonstrates its use through illustrative examples. We conclude by assessing the suitability of our approach for geologic sequestration modeling and generalization to other scientific problem domains

Gorton, Ian; Black, Gary D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Wurstner, Signe K.; Hui, Peter SY

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

Wagoner, J

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

39

An Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Karsten Pruess (K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510/486-6732) Chin-Fu Tsang (CFTsang@lbl.gov; 510/486-5782) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. David H.-S. Law (Law@arc.ab.ca; 780/450-5034) Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1E4, Canada Curtis M. Oldenburg (CMOldenburg@lbl.gov; 510/486-7419) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Mathematical models and numerical simulation tools will play an important role in evaluating the feasibility of CO2 storage in subsurface reservoirs, such as brine aquifers,

40

A workflow for handling heterogeneous 3D models with the TOUGH2 family of codes: Applications to numerical modeling of CO2 geological storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is addressed to the TOUGH2 user community. It presents a new tool for handling simulations run with the TOUGH2 code with specific application to CO"2 geological storage. This tool is composed of separate FORTRAN subroutines (or modules) that ... Keywords: 3D visualization, CO2 geological storage, Multiphase flow, Pre and post processing, Reactive transport modeling, TOUGH2

Pascal Audigane; Christophe Chiaberge; Frdric Mathurin; Julie Lions; Graldine Picot-Colbeaux

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Rapid Calibration of High Resolution Geologic Models to Dynamic Data Using Inverse Modeling: Field Application and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Streamline-based assisted and automatic history matching techniques have shown great potential in reconciling high resolution geologic models to production data. However, a major drawback of these approaches has been incompressibility or slight compressibility assumptions that have limited applications to two-phase water-oil displacements only. We propose an approach to history matching three-phase flow using a novel compressible streamline formulation and streamline-derived analytic sensitivities. First, we utilize a generalized streamline model to account for compressible flow by introducing an 'effective density' of total fluids along streamlines. Second, we analytically compute parameter sensitivities that define the relationship between the reservoir properties and the production response, viz. water-cut and gas/oil ratio (GOR). These sensitivities are an integral part of history matching, and streamline models permit efficient computation of these sensitivities through a single flow simulation. We calibrate geologic models to production data by matching the water-cut and gas/oil ratio using our previously proposed generalized travel time inversion (GTTI) technique. For field applications, however, the highly non-monotonic profile of the gas/oil ratio data often presents a challenge to this technique. In this work we present a transformation of the field production data that makes it more amenable to GTTI. Further, we generalize the approach to incorporate bottom-hole flowing pressure during three-phase history matching. We examine the practical feasibility of the method using a field-scale synthetic example (SPE-9 comparative study) and a field application. Recently Ensemble Kalman Filtering (EnKF) has gained increased attention for history matching and continuous reservoir model updating using data from permanent downhole sensors. It is a sequential Monte-Carlo approach that works with an ensemble of reservoir models. Specifically, the method utilizes cross-covariances between measurements and model parameters estimated from the ensemble. For practical field applications, the ensemble size needs to be kept small for computational efficiency. However, this leads to poor approximations of the cross-covariance matrix, resulting in loss of geologic realism. Specifically, the updated parameter field tends to become scattered with a loss of connectivities of extreme values such as high permeability channels and low permeability barriers, which are of special significance during reservoir characterization. We propose a novel approach to overcome this limitation of the EnKF through a 'covariance localization' method that utilizes sensitivities that quantify the influence of model parameters on the observed data. These sensitivities are used in the EnKF to modify the cross-covariance matrix in order to reduce unwanted influences of distant observation points on model parameter updates. The key to the success of the sensitivity-based covariance-localization is its close link to the underlying physics of flow compared to a simple distance-dependent covariance function as used in the past. This flow-relevant conditioning leads to an efficient and robust approach for history matching and continuous reservoir model updating, avoiding much of the problems in traditional EnKF associated with instabilities, parameter overshoots and loss of geologic continuity. We illustrate the power and utility of our approach using both synthetic and field applications.

Akhil Datta-Gupta

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Numerical modelling of dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures: a parallel approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate a faster and easier way to parallelise seismological codes able to simulate the dynamical interaction between seismic radiation and near-surface geological structures. This is important in assessing strong ground motion, in the mitigation ... Keywords: HPF, numerical modelling, openMP, parallel computing, seismic site effects

A. Caserta; V. Ruggiero; P. Lanucara

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Production Data Integration into High Resolution Geologic Models with Trajectory-based Methods and A Dual Scale Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse problems associated with reservoir characterization are typically underdetermined and often have difficulties associated with stability and convergence of the solution. A common approach to address this issue is through the introduction of prior constraints, regularization or reparameterization to reduce the number of estimated parameters. We propose a dual scale approach to production data integration that relies on a combination of coarse-scale and fine-scale inversions while preserving the essential features of the geologic model. To begin with, we sequentially coarsen the fine-scale geological model by grouping layers in such a way that the heterogeneity measure of an appropriately defined 'static' property is minimized within the layers and maximized between the layers. Our coarsening algorithm results in a non-uniform coarsening of the geologic model with minimal loss of heterogeneity and the ?optimal? number of layers is determined based on a bias-variance trade-off criterion. The coarse-scale model is then updated using production data via a generalized travel time inversion. The coarse-scale inversion proceeds much faster compared to a direct fine-scale inversion because of the significantly reduced parameter space. Furthermore, the iterative minimization is much more effective because at the larger scales there are fewer local minima and those tend to be farther apart. At the end of the coarse-scale inversion, a fine-scale inversion may be carried out, if needed. This constitutes the outer iteration in the overall algorithm. The fine-scale inversion is carried out only if the data misfit is deemed to be unsatisfactory. We propose a fast and robust approach to calibrating geologic models by transient pressure data using a trajectory-based approach that based on a high frequency asymptotic expansion of the diffusivity equation. The trajectory or ray-based methods are routinely used in seismic tomography. In this work, we investigate seismic rays and compare them with streamlines. We then examine the applicability of streamline-based methods for transient pressure data inversion. Specifically, the high frequency asymptotic approach allows us to analytically compute the sensitivity of the pressure responses with respect to reservoir properties such as porosity and permeability. It facilitates a very efficient methodology for the integration of pressure data into geologic models.

Kim, Jong Uk

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks  

SciTech Connect

Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in underground formations, and the evaluation of the risk of potential CO{sub 2} leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers.

Gutierrez, Marte

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

COMPUTER MODELING OF GEOLOGY IN THE SPARTA AND MONTPELIER QUADRANGLES OF CLAY AND CHICKASAW COUNTIES, MISSISSIPPI: A TANTALIZING NEAR MISS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project attempted to combine digital data sets to define and map geologic features in the Sparta and Montpelier quadrangles of Chickasaw and Clay counties (more)

Defibaugh y Chavez, Jason

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Modeling and simulation in analyzing geological repositories for high level nuclear waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is very often used to generate electricity. But first the energy must be released from atoms which can be done in two ways: nuclear fusion and nuclear fission. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to produce electrical energy. Electrical ... Keywords: modeling, nuclear energy, nuclear waste, nuclear waste storage, simulation

Dietmar P. F. Mller

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery with waterflooding'*- Mark E.Johnson,2EllisA. Mona&: and Michael S. Watermad Accepted practice the optimal production strategy. Essentially, this strategy is to refrain from waterflooding until the minimum strategy to be optimal. THE GAS-WATERFLOOD RESERVOIR MODEL The mathematical details of the gas-waterflood

Waterman, Michael S.

55

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR PREDICTING THE FLUID FLOW ATTRIBUTES OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGIC DATA AND MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work carried out during the period of September 29, 2000 to January 15, 2004 under DOE Research Contract No. DE-FC26-00BC15308. High temperatures and reactive fluids in sedimentary basins dictate that interplay and feedback between mechanical and geochemical processes significantly influence evolving rock and fracture properties. Not only does diagenetic mineralization fill in once open fractures either partially or completely, it modifies the rock mechanics properties that can control the mechanical aperture of natural fractures. In this study, we have evolved an integrated methodology of fractured reservoir characterization and we have demonstrated how it can be incorporated into fluid flow simulation. The research encompassed a wide range of work from geological characterization methods to rock mechanics analysis to reservoir simulation. With regard to the characterization of mineral infilling of natural fractures, the strong interplay between diagenetic and mechanical processes is documented and shown to be of vital importance to the behavior of many types of fractured reservoirs. Although most recent literature emphasizes Earth stress orientation, cementation in fractures is likely a critically important control on porosity, fluid flow attributes, and even sensitivity to effective stress changes. The diagenetic processes of dissolution and partial cementation are key controls on the creation and distribution of open natural fractures within hydrocarbon reservoirs. The continuity of fracture-porosity is fundamental to how fractures conduct fluids. In this study, we have made a number of important discoveries regarding fundamental properties of fractures, in particular related to the prevalence of kinematically significant structures (crack-seal texture) within otherwise porous, opening-mode fractures, and the presence of an aperture size threshold below which fractures are completely filled and above which porosity is preserved. These observations can be linked to models of quartz cementation. Significant progress has been made as well in theoretical fracture mechanics and geomechanical modeling, allowing prediction of spatial distributions of fractures that mimic patterns observed in nature. Geomechanical modeling shows the spatial arrangement of opening mode fractures (joints and veins) is controlled by the subcritical fracture index of the material. In particular, we have been able to identify mechanisms that control the clustering of fractures in slightly deformed rocks. Fracture mechanics testing of a wide range of clastic rocks shows that the subcritical index is sensitive to diagenetic factors. We show geomechanical simulations of fracture aperture development can be linked to diagenetic models, modifying fracture porosity as fractures grow, and affect the dynamics of fracture propagation. Fluid flow simulation of representative fracture pattern realizations shows how integrated modeling can give new insight into permeability assessment in the subsurface. Using realistic, geomechanically generated fracture patterns, we propose a methodology for permeability estimation in nonpercolating networks.

Jon E. Olson; Larry W. Lake; Steve E. Laubach

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

RMOTC - Geologic & Resivoir Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic & Reservoir Data Data Sets Online Data Rooms Geologic & Reservoir Data Hills surrounding RMOTC Testing Facility Over the years, the field has become very well...

57

Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States  

SciTech Connect

The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

Joel Sminchak

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. A conceptual simulation model for release scenario analysis of a hypothetical site in Columbia Plateau Basalts  

SciTech Connect

This report is a status report for an evolving methodology for release scenario development for underground nuclear waste repositories. As such, it is intended for use as a reference point and a preliminary description of an evolving geoscience methodology. When completed this methodology will be used as a tool in developing disruptive release scenarios for analyzing the long-term safety of geological nuclear waste repositories. While a basalt environment is used as an example, this report is not intended to reflect an actual site safety assessment for a repository in a media. It is rather intended to present a methodology system framework and to provide discussions of the geological phenomena and parameters that must be addressed in order to develop a methodology for potential release scenarios. It is also important to note that the phenomena, their interrelationships, and their relative importance along with the overall current structure of the model will change as new geological information is gathered through additional peer review, geotechnical input, site specific field work, and related research efforts.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Petrie, G.M.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Christopher U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christopher Magirl U.S. Geological Survey 934 Broadway Suite 300 Tacoma, Washington 98402 Phone; Hydraulic modeling; Computer programming (C/C++, Fortran, Perl), Field survey; Geographic information Research Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. September 2009 ­ present · Analyzing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

62

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to model dense gas dispersion of CO 2 leakage. Themodified to simulate dense gas dispersion appropriate for CO3. Passive vs. dense gas dispersion The behavior of dense

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING IN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRAZIL August/2010 Mônica Mazzini Perrotta Remote Sensing Division Head #12;SUMMARY The Geological Survey of Brazil mission The Remote Sensing Division Main remote, Paleontology, Remote Sensing Director of Hydrology and Land Management But Remote Sensing Division gives

64

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

65

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR PREDICTING THE FLUID FLOW ATTRIBUTES OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGIC DATA AND MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work carried out during the period of September 29, 2000 to September 28, 2001 under DOE Research Contract No. DE-FC26-00BC15308. Our goal is to establish an integrated methodology of fractured reservoir characterization and show how that can be incorporated into fluid flow simulation. We have made progress in the characterization of mineral infilling of natural fractures. The main advancement in this regard was to recognize the strong interplay between diagenetic and mechanical processes. We accomplished several firsts in documenting and quantifying these processes, including documenting the range of emergent threshold in several formations and quantifying the internal structures of crack-seal bridges in fractures. These results will be the basis for an appreciation of fracture opening and filling rates that go well beyond our original goals. Looking at geochemical modeling of fracture infilling, our theoretical analysis addressed the problem of calcite precipitation in a fracture. We have built a model for the deposition of calcite within a fracture. The diagenetic processes of dissolution and partial cementation are key controls on the creation and distribution of natural fractures within hydrocarbon reservoirs. Even with extensive data collection, fracture permeability still creates uncertainty in reservoir description and the prediction of well performance. Data on the timing and stages of diagenetic events can provide explanation as to why, when and where natural fractures will be open and permeable. We have been pursuing the fracture mechanics testing of a wide range of rocks, particularly sandstone using a key rock property test that has hitherto not been widely applied to sedimentary rocks. A major accomplishment in this first year has been to identify sample suites available in the core repository at the University of Texas that represent a wide range of diagenetic alteration and to begin to test these samples. The basis for the fluid flow simulations to be carried out in this part of the project is the adequate spatial characterization of fracture networks. Our initial focus has been on the tendency of fracture sets to cluster into highly fracture zones that are often widely separated. Our preliminary modeling work shows the extent of this clustering to be controlled by the subcritical fracture index of the material. With continued progress, we move toward an integrated fracture characterization methodology that will ultimately be applied through detailed reservoir simulation.

Jon E. Olson; Larry W. Lake; Steve E. Laubach

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Integrated geological-engineering model of Patrick Draw field and examples of similarities and differences among various shoreline barrier systems  

SciTech Connect

The Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program at NIPER employs an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on the high priority reservoir class of shoreline barrier deposits to: (1) determine the problems specific to this class of reservoirs by identifying the reservoir heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of fluids; and (2) develop methods to characterize effectively this class of reservoirs to predict residual oil saturation (ROS) on interwell scales and improve prediction of the flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of critical reservoir parameters (e.g., permeability, porosity, pore geometry, mineralogy, and oil saturation) are essential for designing and implementing processes to improve sweep efficiency and thereby increase oil recovery. The methodologies and models developed in this program will, in the near- to mid-term, assist producers in the implementation of effective reservoir management strategies such as location of infill wells and selection of optimum enhanced oil recovery methods to maximize oil production from their reservoirs.

Schatzinger, R.A.; Szpakiewicz, M.J.; Jackson, S.R.; Chang, M.M.; Sharma, B.; Tham, M.K.; Cheng, A.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geological assessment of the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the sensitivity of the system to greenhouse gas changes cannot yet be constrained by paleoclimate data below its present large range. Geologic records do not support one of the major predictions of greenhouse models-namely, that tropical sea surface temperatures will increase. Geologic data also suggest that winter cooling in high-latitude land areas is less than predicted by models. As the above-mentioned predictions appear to be systemic features of the present generation of climate models, some significant changes in model design may be required to reconcile models and geologic data. However, full acceptance of this conclusion requires more measurements and more systematic compilations of existing geologic data. Since progress in data collection in this area has been quite slow, uncertainties associated with these conclusions may persist for some time. 106 refs., 6 figs.

Crowley, T.J. (Texas A M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Geology of Nevada: The  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology plays a central role in Nevadas human history, economy, and future. Cordilleran tectonics have created the Basin and Range landscape and interior drainage of the Great Basin, provided a rain shadow to make Nevada the nations driest state, and generated frequent earthquakes along normal and strike-slip faults. Geology is key to reducing risks from Nevadas natural and anthropogenic hazards (earthquakes, flash floods, drought, land subsidence, erosion after wildland fires, landslides, swelling and collapsing soils, radon, arsenic, and others). Nevadas geologic fortunes make it the leading state in the production of gold, silver, barite, lithium, and mercury and a major producer of geothermal power and gypsum. The metals are primarily related to igneous activity, with major pulses of magma during the Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary. Barite is mined from Paleozoic

Jonathan G. Price

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geological Sciences College of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

postgraduate studies in Engineering Geology. `From going to mines and quarries, looking at what the job entails to his childhood when he would enjoy visiting mines and caves while on holidays around the UK, learning Geological Evolution of NZ and Antarctica GEOL 483 Coal & Petroleum Geology GEOL488 Special Topics

Hickman, Mark

71

Hydrological/Geological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.\ .8.2 .\ .8.2 Hydrological/Geological Studies Book 1. Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from SelectedT" Streams Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected During Re-Entry Drilling, Project Rulison-7, 197 1 HGS 8 This page intentionally left blank . . . ... . . . . . . . . , : . . . . . . . . . ' . r - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . ..... . - x ..:; . , ' , . . ' . . . . . . !' r:.::. _. . : _ . . : . . . . \ . . ' - \ , : , . . . . . . . . . . . . . il.'; , . . y,.:.: . . . . . . . . ., ' . . ' . , . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . ... . . . . . : . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .,. . . . . . . . .. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . , .- , . : , . , . . . . ......... ... ) . . i - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared. Under . . . ~ ~ r e e m e n t - No. AT(29-2) -474 for the ~ e v a d a - - Operations Office U. S .. Atomic. ,Energy Commi~ssion

72

Geology of magma systems: background and review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A review of basic concepts and current models of igneous geology is presented. Emphasis is centered on studies of magma generation, ascent, emplacement, evolution, and surface or near-surface activity. An indexed reference list is also provided to facilitate future investigations.

Peterfreund, A.R.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/tectonics, hydrogeology, stable isotope geochemistry, environmental geology, sedimentology and stratigraphyAssistant Professor Quantitative Structural Geology or Geomechanics The Department of Geology structural geology with interest in the study of fractured reservoirs and geomechanics. The successful

Mohaghegh, Shahab

74

Global Warming in Geologic Time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The notion is pervasive in the climate science community and in the public at large that the climate impacts of fossil fuel CO2 release will only persist for a few centuries. This conclusion has no basis in theory or models of the atmosphere/ ocean carbon cycle, which we review here. The largest fraction of the CO2 recovery will take place on time scales of centuries, as CO2 invades the ocean, but a significant fraction of the fossil fuel CO2, ranging in published models in the literature from 20-60%, remains airborne for a thousand years or longer. Ultimate recovery takes place on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years, a geologic longevity typically associated in public perceptions with nuclear waste. The glacial/interglacial climate cycles demonstrate that ice sheets and sea level respond dramatically to millennial-timescale changes in climate forcing. There are also potential positive feedbacks in the carbon cycle, including methane hydrates in the ocean, and peat frozen in permafrost, that are most sensitive to the long tail of the fossil fuel CO2 in the atmosphere.

Archer, David (University of Chicago)

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of Science-Based Permitting Guidance for Geological Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Saline Aquifers Based on Modeling and Risk Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Underground carbon storage may become one of the solutions to address global warming. However, to have an impact, carbon storage must be done at a much larger scale than current CO{sub 2} injection operations for enhanced oil recovery. It must also include injection into saline aquifers. An important characteristic of CO{sub 2} is its strong buoyancy--storage must be guaranteed to be sufficiently permanent to satisfy the very reason that CO{sub 2} is injected. This long-term aspect (hundreds to thousands of years) is not currently captured in legislation, even if the U.S. has a relatively well-developed regulatory framework to handle carbon storage, especially in the operational short term. This report proposes a hierarchical approach to permitting in which the State/Federal Government is responsible for developing regional assessments, ranking potential sites (''General Permit'') and lessening the applicant's burden if the general area of the chosen site has been ranked more favorably. The general permit would involve determining in the regional sense structural (closed structures), stratigraphic (heterogeneity), and petrophysical (flow parameters such as residual saturation) controls on the long-term fate of geologically sequestered CO{sub 2}. The state-sponsored regional studies and the subsequent local study performed by the applicant will address the long-term risk of the particular site. It is felt that a performance-based approach rather than a prescriptive approach is the most appropriate framework in which to address public concerns. However, operational issues for each well (equivalent to the current underground injection control-UIC-program) could follow regulations currently in place. Area ranking will include an understanding of trapping modes. Capillary (due to residual saturation) and structural (due to local geological configuration) trappings are two of the four mechanisms (the other two are solubility and mineral trappings), which are the most relevant to the time scale of interest. The most likely pathways for leakage, if any, are wells and faults. We favor a defense-in-depth approach, in which storage permanence does not rely upon a primary seal only but assumes that any leak can be contained by geologic processes before impacting mineral resources, fresh ground water, or ground surface. We examined the Texas Gulf Coast as an example of an attractive target for carbon storage. Stacked sand-shale layers provide large potential storage volumes and defense-in-depth leakage protection. In the Texas Gulf Coast, the best way to achieve this goal is to establish the primary injection level below the total depth of most wells (>2,400 m-8,000 ft). In addition, most faults, particularly growth faults, present at the primary injection level do not reach the surface. A potential methodology, which includes an integrated approach comprising the whole chain of potential events from leakage from the primary site to atmospheric impacts, is also presented. It could be followed by the State/Federal Government, as well as by the operators.

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Renaud Bouroullec; Hugo Castellanos; Susan Hovorka; Srivatsan Lakshminarasimhan; Jeffrey Paine

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

77

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the performance of storage and disposal options. Topics include radionuclide interaction with geomedia, colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Pu colloids), interaction between iodide (accumulate in the interlayer regions of clay minerals) and a suite of clay minerals, adsorption of uranium onto granite and bentonite,

78

Hawaii geologic map data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Hawaii geologic map data Citation Hawaii geologic map data Internet. 2013....

79

NETL: Geological and Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Systems Geological & Environmental Systems Onsite Research Geological and Environmental Sciences Geological and Environmental Sciences (GES) is a focus area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory's Office of Research and Development (ORD). ORD's other focus areas are Energy System Dynamics, Computational and Basic Sciences, and Materials Science and Engineering. Scientists and engineers in ORD conduct research at NETL's advanced research facilities in Morgantown, WV; Pittsburgh, PA; and Albany, OR, and at various offsite locations. GES tackles the challenge of clean energy production from fossil energy sources by focusing on the behavior of natural systems at both the earth's surface and subsurface, including prediction, control, and monitoring of fluid flow in porous and fractured media. Efforts include

80

in Deep Geologic Formations,"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

authors' model (as well as all previous work), which overestimates the rates of feldspar dissolution near equilibrium. Nevertheless, the authors' simulations indicate the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Phase-field simulations of partial melts in geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diffuse interface description based on a multi-phase-field model for geological grain microstructures is introduced, especially useful in the treatment of partially molten structures. Each grain as well as different phases are represented by individual ... Keywords: Grain growth, Microstructure, Numerical modelling, Partial melt, Phase-field model

Frank Wendler; Jens K. Becker; Britta Nestler; Paul D. Bons; Nicolas P. Walte

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The capture and dissemination of integrated 3D geospatial knowledge at the British Geological Survey using GSI3D software and methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Geological Surveying and Investigation in 3 Dimensions (GSI3D) software tool and methodology has been developed over the last 15 years. Since 2001 this has been in cooperation with the British Geological Survey (BGS). To-date over a hundred BGS geologists ... Keywords: 3D geological modelling, 3D visualisation, Geoscience education, Knowledge capture, Systematic geological surveying

Holger Kessler; Steve Mathers; Hans-Georg Sobisch

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geologic Repository at a Geologic Repository Operations Area at Yucca  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted its license application (LA) to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a construction authorization for a geologic repository pursuant to Section 114 of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended

Mountain Nevada; William J. Boyle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEOLOGY, April 2010 315 INTRODUCTION The redox evolution of the oceans through Earth history shaped; Erbacher et al., 2005). In this study we use variations in the isotope composition of U, a trace element and Palmer, 1991). As recently observed, the burial of U into sediments is associated with isotope fraction

Pross, Jörg

86

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas

Oldenburg, C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

workshop on geologic carbon sequestration, 2002. Benson,verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

89

Hanford Borehole Geologic Information System (HBGIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide for viewing and downloading borehold geologic data through a web-based interface.

Last, George V.; Mackley, Rob D.; Saripalli, Ratna R.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

U. S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of NCEP model to historical seismic moment rate 18 CONCLUSIONS 18 APPENDIX A 19 The database: structure Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Mark Petersen California Division of Mines & Geology Carol S. Prentice U length (l) 5 Fault down-dip width (w) 5 Magnitude (Mw) 5 Average coseismic slip (d) 6 Long-term slip rate

92

Developing a geoscience knowledge framework for a national geological survey organisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological survey organisations (GSOs) are established by most nations to provide a geoscience knowledge base for effective decision-making on mitigating the impacts of natural hazards and global change, and on sustainable management of natural resources. ... Keywords: 3D models, Cyber-infrastructure, Geological mapping, Knowledge management, Ontology

Andrew S. Howard; Bill Hatton; Femke Reitsma; Ken I. G. Lawrie

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gable named Geological Society of America Fellow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

member of a large team that received a Laboratory Distinguished Performance Award for the Yucca Mountain Project. About the Geological Society of America Established in 1888, The...

95

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geologic flow characterization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About...

96

NETL: Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

97

Geology of the Tambaredjo oil field, Suriname  

SciTech Connect

After the initial discovery in the sixties of oil below the coastal plain of Suriname (S. America), the State Oil Company of Suriname started production of the unique Tambaredjo field in 1982. The heavy, biodegraded oil (14-16[degrees] API) is produced under compaction drive, from the Paleocene T-sand (average thickness 5 m) at a depth of about 300 m. More than 300 wells have been drilled in an area of about 200 km[sup 2]. High resolution seismics makes it possible to correlate units down to 2 m thick. This dense network of bore holes is very suitable for geological correlations and 3D modeling. The T-sand reservoir consists of angular, medium to coarse grained unconsolidated sands with interfingering clays and lignites. The sands are deposited on a well cemented erosional Cretaceous basement. The reservoir is sealed by locally continuous clays. The oil is trapped in structural highs created by syn-sedimentary rejuvenated basement faults. The depositional environment of the T-sand ranges from fluviatile to deltaic. Frequent avulsion and synsedimentary faulting created a highly compartmented reservoir. Although interconnectedness of the sand bodies is high, clay smears and silting out of the edges confine reservoir compartments. The best genetic sand units such as channel fills or mouth bar deposits hardly correlate over more than a few hundred meters. The Tambaredjo oil field offers an unique opportunity to study the detailed sedimentology and petroleum geology of a fluvio-deltaic transitional realm on the passive margin along the Guiana coast.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Wong, T.E. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Optimizing the use of aeromagnetic data for predictive geological interpretation: an example from the Grenville Province, Quebec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictive geological mapping relies largely on the empirical and statistical analysis of aeromagnetic data. However, in most applications the analysis remains essentially visual and unconstrained. The lithological and structural diversity of rock units ... Keywords: GIS, Geophysical modeling, Magnetic data, Predictive geological mapping, Spatial modeling

Sharon Parsons; Lopold Nadeau; Pierre Keating; Chang-Jo Chung

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

TOUGH+CO2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH+CO"2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO"2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Modeling, Multiphase flow, Parallel computing, Saline aquifer, TOUGH+, TOUGH2

Keni Zhang; George Moridis; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Case studies of current trends in development geology  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, development geologists have been responsible for studying leases, logs, and cores in detail in support of engineering functions. These responsibilities have grown from defining gross reservoir geometries to understanding subtle differences in reservoirs attributed to stratigraphic and structural complexities, depositional environments, and hydrodynamic processes. To handle these increased responsibilities, expertise has become essential in the areas of computer applications, log analysis, modeling, and management of produced water. Examples of the use and application of each area to projects from fields on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley demonstrate current techniques employed by development geologists and the evolution of a development department within Texaco. A study of a property in the South Belridge field on which 330 wells were drilled over a two-year period illustrates how computer resources have become vital in handling the vast amount of data needed to perform detailed geologic studies. Intricate geologic characterization has become essential to optimizing and defining reservoir performance in several fields: (1) Southeast Lost Hills, a complex diagenetic trap; (2) Buena Vista Hills, where log analysis is needed to make reserve estimates and step-out potential meaningful; (3) Midway-Sunset field, for which detailed geology leads to new field-wide models and future prospects. Increasing environmental concern over waste disposal has required an important involvement of development geologists in the geologic and hydrologic aspects of subsurface injection of produced water and other brines in the Santiago Creek field. Instead of providing a training ground for future explorationists, development geology should be viewed as an alternative career with potential for a much greater demand in the future.

Livingston, N.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

FERNANDO GILBES-SANTAELLA DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez Campus Faculty of Arts and Sciences Department of Geology + Spectral Analyses and Sedimentation of the West Coast Beaches of Puerto Rico Undergraduate Research Final, and mineralogy along the west coast of Puerto Rico. These sand sediments were sampled at different geologic

Gilbes, Fernando

102

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring Geological Carbon Sequestration Authors: RongmaoGeological Carbon Sequestration ABSTRACT Injection andmonitoring geological carbon sequestration. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Zhou, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect

Several technological options have been proposed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2}. One proposed remedy is to separate and capture CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel power plants and other stationary industrial sources and to inject the CO{sub 2} into deep subsurface formations for long-term storage and sequestration. Characterization of geologic formations for sequestration of large quantities of CO{sub 2} needs to be carefully considered to ensure that sites are suitable for long-term storage and that there will be no adverse impacts to human health or the environment. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (Final Draft, October 2005) states that ''Site characterization, selection and performance prediction are crucial for successful geological storage. Before selecting a site, the geological setting must be characterized to determine if the overlying cap rock will provide an effective seal, if there is a sufficiently voluminous and permeable storage formation, and whether any abandoned or active wells will compromise the integrity of the seal. Moreover, the availability of good site characterization data is critical for the reliability of models''. This International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO{sub 2} Geological Storage (CO2SC) addresses the particular issue of site characterization and site selection related to the geologic storage of carbon dioxide. Presentations and discussions cover the various aspects associated with characterization and selection of potential CO{sub 2} storage sites, with emphasis on advances in process understanding, development of measurement methods, identification of key site features and parameters, site characterization strategies, and case studies.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program...

105

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Geological Survey - 2011 Monthly Oil and Gas Production Data The Florida Geological Survey is where data related to oil, gas, and geothermal resources for the state of...

107

Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search What links...

108

Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Idaho Geological Survey" Idaho Geological Survey Jump to: navigation, search This is a...

109

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND...

110

Geologic setting and gas reserves of the Venezuelan LNG project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four gas fields, Mejillones, Patao, Dragon, and Rio Caribe, were discovered by Lagoven, a subsidiary of Petroleos de Venezuela S.A., during an exploratory campaign during 1978-1982, offshore northeastern Venezuela. Thirteen wells drilled in the four fields discovered 13.9 tcf of gas, including 1.2 tcf of gas and condensate in the Rio Caribe field. In February 1991, Lagoven entered into an agreement with Shell, Exxon, and Mitsubishi to assess the viability of producing and exporting gas from the four offshore gas fields in the form of liquified natural gas. This is the Venezuelan LNG Project, otherwise called the Cristobal Colon Project. As part of the agreement the participants established a Project Team in Caracas and undertook the acquisition of 1600 km[sup 2] of 3D seismic data over the four fields to evaluate the geological model of the area. In addition, interpretation of the 3D data has led to a preliminary geological model for the gas bearing sands which envisages deposition in a regional setting varying from bathyal turbidites in the Rio Caribe and Mejillones fields in the west to shelf deposits over the Patao and Dragon fields in the east. In addition to the geological setting this paper will discuss preliminary results of the reserves evaluation for the Rio Caribe, Patao, and Dragon fields.

Prieto, R.; Van der Molen, I.; Ramirez de Arellano, R. (Lagoven, Caracas (Venezuela))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Utah Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah Geological Survey Utah Geological Survey Name Utah Geological Survey Address 1594 W. North Temple Place Salt Lake City, Utah Zip 84114-6100 Phone number 801.537.3300 Website http://geology.utah.gov/ Coordinates 40.7713859°, -111.9367973° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7713859,"lon":-111.9367973,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Geology of Kilauea Volcano | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Kilauea Volcano Geology of Kilauea Volcano Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology of Kilauea Volcano Abstract This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, bul the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems lhat develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water, of some of these hydrothermal convection systems are known through studies of surface geology,and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past

113

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

114

United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements, capabilities, and operations in response to a natural or man-made disaster1 United States Geological Survey Geospatial Information Response Information Response Team (GIRT) Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) contains the GIRT

Fleskes, Joe

115

Geological Assessment of the Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic studies provide a valuable perspective on the importance of greenhouse forcing for climate change. On both Pleistocene and tectonic time scales, changes in climate are positively correlated with greenhouse gas variations. However, the ...

Thomas J. Crowley

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A STUDY ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGlNEERING APPROACH COMBINED WITH GEOLOGICAL INFORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the combined approaches of reservoir geology and engineering to a geothermal field where geological characteristics are highly complex and heterogeneous.Especially,the concrete approaches are discussed for the case of geothermal reservoir performance studies with a developed numerical model, by showing example cases accompanied with reinjection of produced disposal hot water into underground in an object geothermal reservoir. This combined approach will be a great help in solving complicated problems encountered during the development of a geothermal field.

Hirakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshinobu, F.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

118

Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3): a collaborative approach to the management of geological GHG storage projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic storage projects associated with large anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) will have lifecycles that may easily span a century, involve several numerical simulation cycles, and have distinct modeling teams. The process used for numerical simulation of the fate of GHG in the subsurface follows a generally consistent sequence of steps that often are replicated by scientists and engineers around the world. Site data is gathered, assembled, interpreted, and assimilated into conceptualizations of a solid-earth model; assumptions are made about the processes to be modeled; a computational domain is specified and spatially discretized; driving forces and initial conditions are defined; the conceptual models, computational domain, and driving forces are translated into input files; simulations are executed; and results are analyzed. Then, during and after the GHG injection, a continuous monitoring of the reservoir is done and models are updated with the newly collected data. Typically the working files generated during all these steps are maintained on workstations with local backups and archived once the project has concluded along with any modeling notes and records. We are proposing a new concept for supporting the management of full-scale GHG storage projects where collaboration, flexibility, accountability and long-term access will be essential features: the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite, GS3.

Bonneville, Alain HR; Black, Gary D.; Gorton, Ian; Hui, Peter SY; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; White, Mark D.; Williams, Mark D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geologic and geotechnical assessment RFETS Building 371, Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the review and evaluation of the geological, geotechnical and geophysical data supporting the design basis analysis for the Rocky Flats Environmental Test Site (RFETS) Building 371. The primary purpose of the geologic and geotechnical reviews and assessments described herein are to assess the adequacy of the crustal and near surface rock and soil model used in the seismic analysis of Building 371. This review was requested by the RFETS Seismic Evaluation Program. The purpose was to determine the adequacy of data to support the design basis for Building 371, with respect to seismic loading. The objectives required to meet this goal were to: (1) review techniques used to gather data (2) review analysis and interpretations of the data; and (3) make recommendations to gather additional data if required. Where there were questions or inadequacies in data or interpretation, recommendations were made for new data that will support the design basis analysis and operation of Building 371. In addition, recommendations are provided for a geologic and geophysical assessment for a new facility at the Rocky Flats Site.

Maryak, M.E.; Wyatt, D.E.; Bartlett, S.F.; Lewis, M.R.; Lee, R.C.

1995-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications: North Sea oil field example  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

122

Bureau of Economic Geology. 1978 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bureau research programs and projects are designed to address many of the State's major concerns in the areas of geologic, energy, mineral, land, and environmental resouces. Research programs incorporate geologic concepts that will build toward an understanding of a specific resource and its impact on human activities. In addition to resource assessments in uranium, lignite, and geopressured geothermal energy, the Bureau continued research into analysis of governmental policy related to energy. Systemic geologic mapping, coastal studies, basin analysis projects, and investigations in other areas of economic geology further indicate the range of research programs carried forward in 1978. Specifically, research on mineral resources and land resources, coastal studies, hydrogeology, basin studies, geologic mapping, and other research (tektites and meteorites, carboniferous of Texas, depositional environments of the Marble Falls Formation, Central Texas) are reported. The establishment of the Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute is followed. Contracts and grant support and contract reports are listed. The publications eminating from the Bureau are listed. Services rendered by the Bureau and personnel information are included. (MCW)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatahan, Northern Mariana Islands- Reconnaissance Geological Observations During And After The Volcanic Crisis Of Spring 1990, And Monitoring Prior To The May 2003 Eruption Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan island is 9.5 km east-west by 3.5 km north-south and truncated by an elongate caldera 5 km east-west by 2.5 km north-south. A steep-walled pit crater ~1 km across and ~200 m deep occupies the eastern part of the caldera. The island is the summit region of a mostly submarine stratovolcano. The oldest subaerial rocks (stage 1) are exposed low on the

124

Brine flow in heated geologic salt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral data fusion products for geological outcrop analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Close-range hyperspectral imaging is an emerging technique for remotely mapping mineral content and distributions in inaccessible geological outcrop surfaces, allowing subtle chemical variations to be identified with high resolution and accuracy. Terrestrial ... Keywords: Ground-based, Integration, Surface modelling, Terrestrial laser scanning, Virtual outcrop models, Visualisation

Simon J. Buckley, Tobias H. Kurz, John A. Howell, Danilo Schneider

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia #12;#12;Effects of Including Surface Depressions in the Application of the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia By Roland J. Viger, Lauren E. Hay-Runoff Modeling System in the Upper Flint River Basin, Georgia: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations

128

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.

Donald Gautier; Timothy Klett

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

GEOLOGY FIELD TRIPS IN THE APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- Exploration for Petroleum and Natural Gas (optional laboratory) 87 -- The Obelisk: Revisited 96 -- References recording past events. Rather than letters and words, rock characteristics such as shape, color, composition of answers to questions about the nature of geological data gathered through the field trips and laboratory

Engelder, Terry

130

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ro s e m ur phy an d m a r k jac c a rd Carbon dioxide capture and storage (ccs) offers the promise that humanity can continue

131

The KU Geologic Record Volume 1, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the articles. KU has one of the strongest research groups in the world working on car- bonate rocks. GeotimesPhil- lips) was cited as the example of resurgent focus on hydro- thermal oil and gas reser- voirs. These are systems in which hot fluids move though rocks and enhance porosity. Such studies integrate hydro- geology

Peterson, Blake R.

132

Monitored Geologic Repository Test Evaluation Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Monitored Geologic Repository test & evaluation program will specify tests, demonstrations, examinations, and analyses, and describe procedures to conduct and document testing necessary to verify meeting Monitored Geologic Repository requirements for a safe and effective geologic repository for radioactive waste. This test program will provide assurance that the repository is performing as designed, and that the barriers perform as expected; it will also develop supporting documentation to support the licensing process and to demonstrate compliance with codes, standards, and regulations. This comprehensive program addresses all aspects of verification from the development of test requirements to the performance of tests and reporting of the test results. The ''Monitored Geologic Repository Test & Evaluation Plan'' provides a detailed description of the test program approach necessary to achieve the above test program objectives. This test plan incorporates a set of test phases focused on ensuring repository safety and operational readiness and implements a project-wide integrated product management team approach to facilitate test program planning, analysis, and implementation. The following sections provide a description of the individual test phases, the methodology for test program planning and analyses, and the management approach for implementing these activities.

M.B. Skorska

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

134

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A geological framework for temporal sedimentary dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical, geochemical and geotechnical methods were used to investigate the spatial and temporal aspects of sediment distribution, accumulation, post-depositional alterations, and seafloor response and recovery to major events in a temperate, paraglacial, turbid outwash fjord. The goals of this study are to generate a complete geological model and compare the results to the global distribution of fjords. The over arching theme of this study is that the ratio of the area of the watershed to the area of the receiving basin can provide a first order indicator of many factors including glacial mass; the timing of glacial retreat; sediment input, accumulation, and preservation; and other factors. Temporal observations reveal the change of this fjord from a glaciated basin to and estuarine environment. These observations become important when viewed in the context of global climate change and the continued loss of ice. Preserved strata provide a 2800 yr record of changing modes of sedimentation as the system evolved from a glaciated basin to a non-glaciated fjord revealing a detailed chronology of change between end-member systems which can be used to infer changes as glaciers retreat from other fjords. Short lived radio isotopes were used to investigate post-depositional alteration of modern sediments. Without an understanding of how biological and physical processes work to modify sedimentary fabric during preservation, changes seen in sediment and rock core data cannot be accurately resolved. Physical processes can cause erosion and lateral transport; winnowing and armoring; and instantaneous sedimentation, all of which may be preserved. Biological processes can modulate the preservation of strata by destroying sedimentary fabric and integrating signals. The final fundamental need is to investigate the seafloor response and recovery to these events. Massive earthquakes are frequent in the study area and cause perturbations to sediment input and preservation. By understanding how lakes and deltas modulate sediment discharge after the event; how shorelines are modified after the event; and where sediment is deposited we can determine the influence these changes have on the environment and on humans.

Noll, Christian John

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Development Effects of Electrification: Evidence from the Geologic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expansions of electricity grids reflect both cost considerations (where is it cheapest to generate electricity?) and demand-side concerns (where are firms and people located, and where is demand for power likely to grow most?). Demand evolves simultaneously with power generation, and complicates efforts to estimate the effects of electrification. This paper attempts to isolate the portion of the variation in grid expansions in Brazil that is attributable to exogenous engineering cost considerations to estimate the development effects of electrification between 1950 and 2000. Brazil relies almost exclusively on hydropower, and hydro-power generation requires intercepting water at high velocity. A portion of the spatial variation in the expansion of the electricity grid in Brazil during this period is therefore driven by river gradients suitable for hydro-power generation. We predict hydropower plant placement based on geologic characteristics (river gradient and water flow) of locations throughout Brazil and then develop a cost-minimizing engineering model to predict the expansions of transmission lines from each of those predicted hypothetical stations every decade. The model generates maps of hypothetical electricity grids for Brazil in each decade which show what the grid would have looked like had infrastructure investments been made based solely on geologic

Molly Lipscomb; A. Mushfiq Mobarak; Tania Barham

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the...

139

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zone2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites: CO 2 migrationGeologic Carbon Sequestration as a Global Strategy to

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of geologic carbon sequestration. Geophys Res Lett 2005;from geologic carbon sequestration sites: Unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration Jennifer L.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Probability Estimation of CO2 Leakage Through Faults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Based on EffectiveFaults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Yingqi Zhang*,faults at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites is a

Zhang, Yingqi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.to two geologic carbon sequestration sites Curtis M.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

144

MICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Geological & Env. Sciences) ­ Stanford University · Stable Isotope Biogeochemistry, Laboratory Methods., Chamberlain, C.P. (In Prep for Geology) Compound- specific stable isotope records of Cenozoic climateMICHAEL T. HREN UNIVERISTY OF MICHIGAN · DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES 2534 C.C. LITTLE

Hren, Michael

145

History of Geochemical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Sources of geochemical modeling software...www.telusplanet.net/public/geogams/index SOLVEQ/CHILLER Mark H. Reed Department of Geological

146

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a scenario analysis.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which would offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply. Geostorage options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and potentially hard rock cavrns. DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an ecocomic analysis methodology to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) a version that is fully arrayed such that all four types of geologic storage options can be assessed at the same time, (2) incorporate specific scenarios illustrating the model's capability, and (3) incorporate more accurate model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules. Drawing from the knowledge gained in the underground large scale geostorage options for natural gas and petroleum in the U.S. and from the potential to store relatively large volumes of CO{sub 2} in geological formations, the hydrogen storage assessment modeling will continue to build on these strengths while maintaining modeling transparency such that other modeling efforts may draw from this project.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

United States Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Survey Jump to: navigation, search Logo: United States Geological Survey Name United States Geological Survey Address USGS National Center 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive Place Reston, VA Zip 20192 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Year founded 1879 Phone number 703-648-5953 Website http://www.usgs.gov/ Coordinates 38.947077°, -77.370315° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.947077,"lon":-77.370315,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

148

North Carolina Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State North Carolina State North Carolina Name North Carolina Geological Survey Address 1612 Mail Service Center City, State Raleigh, North Carolina Zip 27699-1612 Website http://www.geology.enr.state.n Coordinates 35.67°, -78.66° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.67,"lon":-78.66,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

149

Idaho Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Idaho Geological Survey Name Idaho Geological Survey Address 300 North 6th Street Suite 103 City, State Boise, Idaho Zip 83720-0050 Website http://www.idahogeology.org/Dr Coordinates 43.615992°, -116.199217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.615992,"lon":-116.199217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

150

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Horizontal drilling in shallow, geologically complex reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to test the concept that multiple hydraulic fracturing from a directionally-drilled horizontal well, using the medium radius build rate method, can increase gas production sufficiently to justify economic viability over conventional stimulated vertical wells. The test well is located in Yuma County, Colorado, in a favorable area of established production to avoid exploration risks. This report presents: background information; project description which covers location selection/geologic considerations; and preliminary work plan. (AT)

Venable, S.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

The problem of isolating radioactive wastes from the biosphere presents specialists in the fields of earth sciences with some of the most complicated problems they have ever encountered. This is especially true for high level waste (HLW) which must be isolated in the underground and away from the biosphere for thousands of years. Essentially every country that is generating electricity in nuclear power plants is faced with the problem of isolating the radioactive wastes that are produced. The general consensus is that this can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the rock repository. Much new technology is being developed to solve the problems that have been raised and there is a continuing need to publish the results of new developments for the benefit of all concerned. The 28th International Geologic Congress that was held July 9--19, 1989 in Washington, DC provided an opportunity for earth scientists to gather for detailed discussions on these problems. Workshop W3B on the subject, Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation -- A World Wide Review'' was organized by Paul A Witherspoon and Ghislain de Marsily and convened July 15--16, 1989 Reports from 19 countries have been gathered for this publication. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

Witherspoon, P.A. (ed.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Hanford Site Guidelines for Preparation and Presentation of Geologic Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex geology lies beneath the Hanford Site of southeastern Washington State. Within this geology is a challenging large-scale environmental cleanup project. Geologic and contaminant transport information generated by several U.S. Department of Energy contractors must be documented in geologic graphics clearly, consistently, and accurately. These graphics must then be disseminated in formats readily acceptable by general graphics and document producing software applications. The guidelines presented in this document are intended to facilitate consistent, defensible, geologic graphics and digital data/graphics sharing among the various Hanford Site agencies and contractors.

Lanigan, David C.; Last, George V.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Thorne, Paul D.; Webber, William D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book review for Geotechnical and Geological Engineering Dr C.E. Augarde 14/03/01 Modeling­49218­3 This book consists of 26 individually prepared chapters brought together by the editors into a 700­page volume. The aim of the book, expressed in its Preface, is to close the ``gap'' between current research

Augarde, Charles

156

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

157

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007. Geologic Carbon Sequestration Strategies forfor carbon capture and sequestration. Environmental Sciencein Siting Geologic Carbon Sequestration Projects Phillip N.

Price, P.N.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Geology of the Breitenbush River Area, Linn and Marion Counties, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a geologic map and accompanying descriptive text highlighting structural geology, mineralization, and geothermal resources. (ACR)

Priest, G.R.; Woller, N.M.; Ferns, M.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recovery Act: Geologic Sequestration Training and Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work under the project entitled "Geologic Sequestration Training and Research," was performed by the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Southern Company from December 1, 2009, to June 30, 2013. The emphasis was on training of students and faculty through research on topics central to further development, demonstration, and commercialization of carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). The project had the following components: (1) establishment of a laboratory for measurement of rock properties, (2) evaluation of the sealing capacity of caprocks, (3) evaluation of porosity, permeability, and storage capacity of reservoirs, (4) simulation of CO2 migration and trapping in storage reservoirs and seepage through seal layers, (5) education and training of students through independent research on rock properties and reservoir simulation, and (6) development of an advanced undergraduate/graduate level course on coal combustion and gasification, climate change, and carbon sequestration. Four graduate students and one undergraduate student participated in the project. Two were awarded Ph.D. degrees for their work, the first in December 2010 and the second in August 2013. A third graduate student has proposed research on an advanced technique for measurement of porosity and permeability, and has been admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. The fourth graduate student is preparing his proposal for research on CCUS and solid waste management. The undergraduate student performed experimental measurements on caprock and reservoir rock samples and received his B.S.M.E. degree in May 2012. The "Caprock Integrity Laboratory," established with support from the present project, is fully functional and equipped for measurement of porosity, permeability, minimum capillary displacement pressure, and effective permeability to gas in the presence of wetting phases. Measurements are made at ambient temperature and under reservoir conditions, including supercritical CO2. During the course of the project, properties of 19 samples provided by partners on companion projects supported by NETL were measured, covering a range of permeabilities from 0.28 ndarcy to 81 mdarcy. Reservoir simulations were performed for injection of 530,000 tonnes of CO2 through a single well into the Middle Donovan formation in Citronelle Dome, in southwest Alabama, over 40 years, followed by migration and trapping for 10,000 years, using the TOUGH2 and TOUGHREACT software packages from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. It was estimated that 50 kg CO2/m3 of formation would be converted to mineral phases within the CO2 plume during that time. None of the sand units considered for CO2 storage in Citronelle Dome have thickness exceeding the estimated critical CO2 column height (Berg, 1975) at which seepage might begin, through their confining shale layers. A model for leakage through caprock, based on work by Hildenbrand et al. (2004), including a functional relationship between capillary pressure and the effective permeability to gas in the presence of a wetting phase, demonstrated the sensitivity of long-term storage to caprock permeability and thickness. A traditional course on coal combustion was augmented with material on climate change, coal gasification, and carbon sequestration. A total of 49 students completed the course during two offerings, in Fall 2010 and Fall 2012. It has become a popular advanced elective course in the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

Walsh, Peter; Esposito, Richard; Theodorou, Konstantinos; Hannon, Michael; Lamplugh, Aaron; Ellison, Kirk

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).

Staub, W.P.; Reed, R.M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy's law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Green's function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain HR

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

Ababou, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Precise rare earth analysis of geological materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rare earth element (REE) concentrations are very informative in revealing chemical fractionation processs in geological systems. The REE's (La-Lu) behavior is characteristic of various primary and secondary minerals which comprise a rock. The REE's contents and their patterns provide a strong fingerprint in distinguishing among various rock types and in understanding the partial melting and/or fractional crystallization of the source region. The REE contents in geological materials are usually at trace levels. To measure all the REE at such levels, radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) has been used with a REE group separation scheme. To maximize detection sensitivites for individual REE, selective ..gamma..-ray/x-ray measurements have been made using normal Ge(Li) and low-energy photon detectors (LEPD), and Ge(Li)-NaI(Tl) coincidence-noncoincidence spectrometer systems. Using these detection methods an individual REE can be measured at or below the ppB levels; chemical yields of the REE are determined by reactivation.

Laul, J.C.; Wogman, N.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

167

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geo- logic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: An Analysis of86 MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP,MONITORING OF GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION B. R. Strazisar,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

April 7, 2008 Dr. Mark Myers, Director US Geological Survey ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... US Geological Survey 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Mail ... The Central and Eastern United States hazard ... coastal California and the Basin and Range ...

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geological occurrence of gas...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Geological occurrence of gas hydrates at the Blake Outer Ridge, western North Atlantic Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

170

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

c. contamination from Chernobyl m. Technologic complexity a.and Complications from the Chernobyl Disaster . . . .5by radionuclides from Chernobyl Geological division of

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern...

172

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,...

173

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOEEIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...

174

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the...

175

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -...

176

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

177

Liquid Metal Heat Exchanger for Geologic Deposits - Energy ...  

Researchers at ORNL developed a down-well heating apparatus that efficiently heats subterranean geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract ...

178

Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO2 Storage Infrastructure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Development Office of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority; Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky Geological Surveys; Western Michigan University; and Battelle's Pacific Northwest...

179

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Geologic Distribution of U.S. Proved Reserves, 2009 Although proved reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, and natural gas have historically been

180

Current Status of Deep Geological Repository Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This talk provided an overview of the current status of deep-geological-repository development worldwide. Its principal observation is that a broad consensus exists internationally that deep-geological disposal is the only long-term solution for disposition of highly radioactive nuclear waste. Also, it is now clear that the institutional and political aspects are as important as the technical aspects in achieving overall progress. Different nations have taken different approaches to overall management of their highly radioactive wastes. Some have begun active programs to develop a deep repository for permanent disposal: the most active such programs are in the United States, Sweden, and Finland. Other countries (including France and Russia) are still deciding on whether to proceed quickly to develop such a repository, while still others (including the UK, China, Japan) have affirmatively decided to delay repository development for a long time, typically for a generation of two. In recent years, a major conclusion has been reached around the world that there is very high confidence that deep repositories can be built, operated, and closed safely and can meet whatever safety requirements are imposed by the regulatory agencies. This confidence, which has emerged in the last few years, is based on extensive work around the world in understanding how repositories behave, including both the engineering aspects and the natural-setting aspects, and how they interact together. The construction of repositories is now understood to be technically feasible, and no major barriers have been identified that would stand in the way of a successful project. Another major conclusion around the world is that the overall cost of a deep repository is not as high as some had predicted or feared. While the actual cost will not be known in detail until the costs are incurred, the general consensus is that the total life-cycle cost will not exceed a few percent of the value of the electricity generated by the power reactors that have produced the waste. Of course, the current international situation is that no nation is currently willing to take any radioactive waste from another nation for deep disposal. This means that every nation will ultimately need to develop its own deep repository. This makes no sense, however--many nations have only a modest amount of waste, or do not have appropriate geological settings for a repository, or both. Ultimately, the need for one or more multi-national or international repositories will emerge, although so far this has not happened.

Budnitz, R J

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Reaction Mechanisms in Petroleum: From Experimentation to Upgrading and Geological Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among the numerous questions that arise concerning the exploitation of petroleum from unconventional reservoirs, lie the questions of the composition of hydrocarbons present in deep seated HP-HT reservoirs or produced during in-situ upgrading steps of heavy oils and oil shales. Our research shows that experimental hydrocarbon cracking results obtained in the laboratory cannot be extrapolated to geological reservoir conditions in a simple manner. Our demonstration is based on two examples: 1) the role of the hydrocarbon mixture composition on reaction kinetics (the "mixing effect") and the effects of pressure (both in relationship to temperature and time). The extrapolation of experimental data to geological conditions requires investigation of the free-radical reaction mechanisms through a computed kinetic model. We propose a model that takes into account 52 reactants as of today, and which can be continuously improved by addition of new reactants as research proceeds. This model is complete and detailed enou...

Lannuzel, Frdric; Bounaceur, Roda; Marquaire, Paul-Marie; Michels, Raymond

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Florida Geological Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Florida Name Florida Geological Survey Address 3900 Commonwealth Boulevard M.S. 49 City, State Tallahassee, Florida Zip 32399 Website http://www.dep.state.fl.us/geo Coordinates 30.47491°, -84.357967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.47491,"lon":-84.357967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

183

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document (PDD) is to allocate the functions, requirements, and assumptions to the systems at Level 5 of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) architecture identified in Section 4. It provides traceability of the requirements to those contained in Section 3 of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Requirements Document (YMP RD) (YMP 2001a) and other higher-level requirements documents. In addition, the PDD allocates design related assumptions to work products of non-design organizations. The document provides Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) technical requirements in support of design and performance assessment in preparing for the Site Recommendation (SR) and License Application (LA) milestones. The technical requirements documented in the PDD are to be captured in the System Description Documents (SDDs) which address each of the systems at Level 5 of the CRWMS architecture. The design engineers obtain the technical requirements from the SDDs and by reference from the SDDs to the PDD. The design organizations and other organizations will obtain design related assumptions directly from the PDD. These organizations may establish additional assumptions for their individual activities, but such assumptions are not to conflict with the assumptions in the PDD. The PDD will serve as the primary link between the technical requirements captured in the SDDs and the design requirements captured in US Department of Energy (DOE) documents. The approved PDD is placed under Level 3 baseline control by the CRWMS Management and Operating Contractor (M&O) and the following portions of the PDD constitute the Technical Design Baseline for the MGR: the design characteristics listed in Table 1-1, the MGR Architecture (Section 4.1), the Technical Requirements (Section 5), and the Controlled Project Assumptions (Section 6).

P. Curry

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geological investigation of the Socorro geothermal area. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a comprehensive geological and geochemical study of the Socorro geothermal area are presented. The following are discussed: geologic setting, structural controls, stratigraphic controls, an ancient geothermal system, modern magma bodies, geothermal potential of the Socorro area, and the Socorro transverse shear zone. (MHR)

Chapin, C.E.; Sanford, A.R.; White, D.W.; Chamberlin, R.M.; Osburn, G.R.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Geologic Sequestration Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an update of the United States regulations and project experiences associated with permitting injection wells used for geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This report is an update of a previous Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) study on this subject published in December 2008 when the draft regulations governing geologic sequestration were first published.BackgroundSeparating ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

A Catalog of Geologic Data for the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This revision of the geologic data catalog incorporates new boreholes drilled after September 2002 as well as other older wells, particularly from the 600 Area, omitted from the earlier catalogs. Additionally, borehole geophysical log data have been added to the catalog. This version of the geologic data catalog now contains 3,519 boreholes and is current with boreholes drilled as of November 2004.

Horton, Duane G.; Last, George V.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Mackley, Rob D.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Discrete-event simulation of nuclear-waste transport in geologic sites subject to disruptive events. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines a methodology to study the effects of disruptive events on nuclear waste material in stable geologic sites. The methodology is based upon developing a discrete events model that can be simulated on the computer. This methodology allows a natural development of simulation models that use computer resources in an efficient manner. Accurate modeling in this area depends in large part upon accurate modeling of ion transport behavior in the storage media. Unfortunately, developments in this area are not at a stage where there is any consensus on proper models for such transport. Consequently, our work is directed primarily towards showing how disruptive events can be properly incorporated in such a model, rather than as a predictive tool at this stage. When and if proper geologic parameters can be determined, then it would be possible to use this as a predictive model. Assumptions and their bases are discussed, and the mathematical and computer model are described.

Aggarwal, S.; Ryland, S.; Peck, R.

1980-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

190

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process GRR/Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 16 - Geological Resources Assessment Process 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Bureau of Land Management Regulations & Policies Paleontological Resources Preservation Act 43 CFR 8365.1-5: Public Property and Resources 43 CFR 3620: Petrified Wood 16 USC 4301: Federal Cave Resources Protection Act 43 CFR 1610.7-2: Areas of Critical Environmental Concern Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 16GeologicalResourceAssessmentProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

191

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

192

Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Israel C. Russell Organization U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1885 Report Number Monograph M11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada Citation Israel C. Russell (U.S. Geological Survey). 1885. Geological History of Lake Lahontan, a Quaternary Lake of Northwestern Nevada. Washington, District of Columbia: U.S. Government Printing Office. Report No.:

193

State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title State Geological Survey Contributions to NGDS Data Development, Collection and Maintenance Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Data Development, Collection, and Maintenance Project Description The project is expected to make large quantities of geothermal-relevant geoscience data held by the State Geological Surveys available via the NGDS. State Arizona Objectives Expand and enhance the National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) by creating a national, sustainable, distributed, interoperable network of state geological survey-based data providers that will develop, collect, serve, and maintain geothermalrelevant data that operates as an integral compliant component of NGDS.

194

doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geology doi: 10.1130/G30308A.1 2009;37;1015-1018Geology Kendra J. Williams Gregory D. Hoke, Carmala isotope altimeter: Do Quaternary pedogenic carbonates predict Email alerting services articles cite Geological Society of America on December 18, 2009geology.gsapubs.orgDownloaded from #12;GEOLOGY, November

Garzione, Carmala N.

195

Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interconnected, mineralized fractures (veinlets). This stockwork probably formed by hydraulic rock rupture induced by explosion of isolated, fluid-filled pores heated and...

196

Reactive transport modeling of geologic CO2 sequestration in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sleipner facility, where properties of the waste stream, target saline aquifer, and shale cap rock are relatively well constrained. The principle goal has been to discover and...

197

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4 ) reservoir, a natural gas power plant that burns CH 4 ,2 produced from the natural gas power plant, there are twoflue gas of the natural gas power plant in the system. When

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Geological model for oil gravity variations in Oriente Basin, Ecuador  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oriente basin is one of the major productive Subandean basins. Most of the fields produce 29/sup 0/-33/sup 0/ API paraffinic oils, but oils have been discovered with gravities ranging from 10/sup 0/to 35/sup 0/ API. All the oils have been recovered from multiple middle to Late Cretaceous sandstone reservoirs (Hollin and Napo Formations). Wells display a variety of oil gravities by reservoir. The origin of the Oriente oils is problematical and controversial, but structural, geochemical, and well evidence suggest a vast oil kitchen west of the present Andean foothills that was mature for oil generation by at least early Tertiary. Oil analyses indicate a single family of oils is present. Oil gravity variations can be explained systematically in terms of the various alteration processes suffered by the oil in each reservoir. Intermittent early Andean uplift (latest Cretaceous to Mid-Eocene) resulted in biodegradation and water-washing of oils, particularly in the uppermost Napo reservoirs. The main Andean orogeny (Pliocene) uplifted the Hollin reservoir to outcrop in the west, and tilted the basin down to the south. This movement resulted in water washing or flushing of the Hollin aquifer and a phase of northward remigration of oil. Late Andean structures postdated primary oil migration. Almost all structures displaying growth during the Late Cretaceous to early Eocene have been oil bearing, but some, particularly those located on the present-day basin flanks, were later severely biodegraded or breached.

Dashwood, M.F.; Abbotts, I.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preliminary Geologic Modeling and Flow Simulation Study of CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recovery of oil and gas from the reservoir. Even with the technological advances and long history of CO 2 injection in enhanced oil recovery operations, a number of unknowns still...

200

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Time-windows-based filtering method for near-surface detection of leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Lehua Pan,of CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites from within

Pan, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A life cycle cost analysis framework for geologic storage of hydrogen : a user's tool.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an interest in large scale hydrogen geostorage, which could offer substantial buffer capacity to meet possible disruptions in supply or changing seasonal demands. The geostorage site options being considered are salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers and hard rock caverns. The DOE has an interest in assessing the geological, geomechanical and economic viability for these types of geologic hydrogen storage options. This study has developed an economic analysis methodology and subsequent spreadsheet analysis to address costs entailed in developing and operating an underground geologic storage facility. This year the tool was updated specifically to (1) incorporate more site-specific model input assumptions for the wells and storage site modules, (2) develop a version that matches the general format of the HDSAM model developed and maintained by Argonne National Laboratory, and (3) incorporate specific demand scenarios illustrating the model's capability. Four general types of underground storage were analyzed: salt caverns, depleted oil/gas reservoirs, aquifers, and hard rock caverns/other custom sites. Due to the substantial lessons learned from the geological storage of natural gas already employed, these options present a potentially sizable storage option. Understanding and including these various geologic storage types in the analysis physical and economic framework will help identify what geologic option would be best suited for the storage of hydrogen. It is important to note, however, that existing natural gas options may not translate to a hydrogen system where substantial engineering obstacles may be encountered. There are only three locations worldwide that currently store hydrogen underground and they are all in salt caverns. Two locations are in the U.S. (Texas), and are managed by ConocoPhillips and Praxair (Leighty, 2007). The third is in Teeside, U.K., managed by Sabic Petrochemicals (Crotogino et al., 2008; Panfilov et al., 2006). These existing H{sub 2} facilities are quite small by natural gas storage standards. The second stage of the analysis involved providing ANL with estimated geostorage costs of hydrogen within salt caverns for various market penetrations for four representative cities (Houston, Detroit, Pittsburgh and Los Angeles). Using these demand levels, the scale and cost of hydrogen storage necessary to meet 10%, 25% and 100% of vehicle summer demands was calculated.

Kobos, Peter Holmes; Lord, Anna Snider; Borns, David James; Klise, Geoffrey T.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Status report on the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an introduction to the present state of knowledge of the geology of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and a cursory introduction to the hydrogeology. An important element of this work is the construction of a modern detailed geologic map of the ORR (Plate 1), which remains in progress. An understanding of the geologic framework of the ORR is essential to many current and proposed activities related to land-use planning, waste management, environmental restoration, and waste remediation. Therefore, this report is also intended to convey the present state of knowledge of the geologic and geohydrologic framework of the ORR and vicinity and to present some of the available data that provide the basic framework for additional geologic mapping, subsurface geologic, and geohydrologic studies. In addition, some recently completed, detailed work on soils and other surficial materials is included because of the close relationships to bedrock geology and the need to recognize the weathered products of bedrock units. Weathering processes also have some influence on hydrologic systems and processes at depth.

Hatcher, R.D. Jr.; Lemiszki, P.J.; Foreman, J.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Dreier, R.B.; Ketelle, R.H.; Lee, R.R.; Lee, Suk Young (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lietzke, D.A. (Lietzke (David A.), Rutledge, TN (United States)); McMaster, W.M. (McMaster (William M.), Heiskell, TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geologic mapping of tunnels using photogrammetry: Camera and target positioning  

SciTech Connect

A photogrammetric method has been developed by the US Geological Survey and the US Bureau of Reclamation for the use in geologic mapping of tunnels (drifts). The method requires photographing the tunnel walls and roof with a calibrated small-format camera to obtain stereo pairs of photos which are then oriented in an analytical stereo plotter for measurement of geologic features. The method was tested in G-tunnel at Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site. Calculations necessary to determine camera and target positions and problems encountered during testing were used to develop a set of generic formulas that can be applied to any tunnel. 7 figs.

Coe, J.A. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Dueholm, K.S. [Danmarks Tekniske Hoejskole, Lyngby (Denmark). Inst. of Surveying and Photogrammetry

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study of geologic carbon sequestration Catherine A. Petersleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites. Env EarthDOE) Conference on Carbon Sequestration, 2005. Alexandria,

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology of Injection Well 46A-19RD in the Coso Enhanced Geothermal Systems Experiment Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology...

209

Geological characterization report, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site, Southeastern New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Geotechnical information is presented relevant to the WIPP site in the Delaware Basin in SE New Mexico. This volume covers regional geology, site geology, and seismology. (DLC)

Powers, D.W.; Lambert, S.J.; Shaffer, S.E.; Hill, L.R.; Weart, W.D. (eds.)

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Prototype Geologic Database and Users Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described here is aimed at assembling a prototype database of raw geologic data typically used to identify and differentiate hydrologically significant lithostratigraphic units. The domain of the prototype database was focused on the T, TX, TY Tank farm area and the 216-Z-9 Trench area in 200 West Area and focused on ''orphan'' data that was not already captured in existing databases, as well as new data coming from core projects. A total of 86 boreholed-wells (78 in the T, TX, TY Tank Farm Area, and 8 in the immediate vicinity of 216-Z-9) are included in the initial prototype database. The prototype database currently consists as a series of Excel workbooks, one for each borehole/well, with multiple worksheets representing the different data tables. The number and complexity of the worksheets is dependent on the type and complexity of the data available for a given borehole. By far the most available data sets for these boreholes were as built drawings (pdf files), geophysical log data (internet links and/or depth specific numerical array), and/or ROCSAN data (particle-size, calcium-carbonate, and Folk/Wentworth Classification). Note that secondary data tables that required manual entry of data were completed only for the eight 216-Z-9 Trench boreholes. Note also, that data tables dealing with the sample, laboratory, and/or analytical information needed to qualify the data also have also not yet been completed, as this requires a greater level of effort than originally planned for this initial exercise.

FOGWELL, T.W.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Novel Concepts Research in Geologic Storage of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs of the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the January-March 2007 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the main accomplishment was an announcement by AEP to move forward with a {approx}100,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year capture and sequestration project at the Mountaineer site. This decision was the outcome of last several years of research under the current DOE funded project involving the technology, site-specific characterization, modeling, risk assessment, etc. This news marks a significant accomplishment for DOE's research program to translate the theoretical potential for carbon sequestration into tangible measures and approaches for the region. The program includes a 30-megawatt thermal product validation at the Mountaineer Plant where up to 100,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year will be captured and sequestered in deep rock formations identified in this work. Plans include further steps at Mountaineer with capture and storage at a very expedited pace. Work continued on the design and feasibility support tasks such as development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site. Overall, the current design feasibility phase of the project has reached a major milestone. Plans to facilitate the next steps of the project will be the main work remaining in this portion of the project as the program moves toward the proposed capture and sequestration system.

Neeraj Gupta

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

KINKFOLD: an AutoLISP program for construction of geological cross-sections using borehole image data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

KINKFOLD is an AutoLISP program designed to construct geological cross-sections from borehole image or dip meter logs. The program uses the kink-fold method for cross-section construction. Beds are folded around hinge lines as angle bisectors so that ... Keywords: borehole image logs, cross-section, dip meter logs, kink-fold method, structural model

Sait Ismail zkaya

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation Geological and Anthropogenic Factors Influencing Mercury Speciation in Mine Wastes Christopher S. Kim,1 James J. Rytuba,2 Gordon E. Brown, Jr.3 1Department of Physical Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA 92866 2U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Introduction Figure 1. Dr. Christopher Kim collects a mine waste sample from the Oat Hill mercury mine in Northern California. The majority of mercury mine wastes at these sites are present as loose, unconsolidated piles, facilitating the transport of mercury-bearing material downstream into local watersheds. Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that poses considerable health risks to humans, primarily through the consumption of fish which

214

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

215

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

216

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

217

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGIC FRAMEWORK OF THE EAST FLANK, COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR EGS DEVELOPMENT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field is a large, high temperature system located in eastern California on the western edge of the Basin and Range province. The East Flank of this field is currently under study as a DOE-funded Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) project. This paper summarizes petrologic and geologic investigations on two East Flank wells, 34A-9 and 34-9RD2 conducted as part of a continuing effort to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydraulic and thermal stimulation. Well 34A-9

218

STATE OF OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OREGON OREGON DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL INDUSTRIES Portland, Oregon 97201 910 State Office Building r DOE/ID/12526--T2 OPEN-FILE REPORT 0-86-3 DE87 013077 INVESTIGATION OF THE TEIERMAL REGIME AND GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF THE DRILLING IN THE CASCADE RANGE CASCADE VOLCANIC ARC: FIRST PHASE OF A PROGRAM FOR SCIENTIFIC Prepared by George R . Priest Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Preparation and publication of this document were supported b the Ore on Department of Geology and Mineral Industries and Grant No. DE-%G07-841&.2526 from the U . S . Department of Energy DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees,

219

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

220

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Geology and Temperature Gradient Surveys Blue Mountain Geothermal Discovery, Humboldt County, Nevada Abstract Triassic argillite and sandstone of the Grass Valley Formation and phyllitic mudstone of the overlying Raspberry Formation, also of Triassic age, host a blind geothermal system under exploration by Blue Mountain Power Company Inc. with assistance from the Energy & Geoscience Institute. Geologically young, steeply dipping, open fault sets, striking N50-60°E,N50-60°W, and N-S intersect in the geothermal zone providing deep permeability over a wide area. Extensive silicification andhydro

222

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

223

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Pre-Investigation Geological Appraisal Of Geothermal Fields Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In recent years there has been interest in the possibility of generating electricity from geothermal steam in many countries. The initial stage is the preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources and, apart from economic considerations, the problem is essentially geological. This paper deals with the factors involved in the selection of areas that warrant expenditure on investigation and development. Preferred requirements in geothermal fields for power generation are temperatures above 200°C and permeable aquifers or zones within 2000 m from the surface. The existence

224

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River geothermal system is located in southern Idaho, near the Utah-Idaho state boarder in the Raft River Valley. The field, which is owned and operated by U.S. Geothermal, has been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes ongoing geologic and petrologic investigations being conducted in support of this project. The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase

225

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation CorridorDOE/EIS-0250F-S2andFinal Envir This part of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor (DOE/EIS-0250F-S2) (Nevada Rail Corridor SEIS)

226

Geothermal energy: Geology, exploration, and developments. Part I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geology, exploration, and initial developments of significant geothermal areas of the world are summarized in this report which is divided into two parts. Part 1 is a review of the geological and explorational aspects of geothermal energy development; areas of potential development in the Western United States are also discussed. The most favorable geological environment for exploration and development of geothermal steam is characterized by recent normal faulting, volcanism, and high heat flow. Successful exploration for steam consists of coordinated multidisciplinary application of geological, geophysical, and geochemical knowledge and techniques. These are reviewed. California leads in known geothermal reserves and is followed by Nevada, Oregon, and New Mexico. Specific prospective areas in these 11 Western States are described.

Grose, Dr. L.T.

1971-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Geologic interpretation of space shuttle radar images of Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space shuttle mission in November 1981 acquired images of parts of the earth with a synthetic aperture radar system at a wavelength of 23.5 cm (9.3 in.) and spatial resolution of 38 m (125 ft). This report describes the geologic interpretation of 1:250,000-scale images of Irian Jaya and eastern Kalimantan, Indonesia, where the all-weather capability of radar penetrates the persistent cloud cover. The inclined look direction of radar enhances subtle topographic features that may be the expression of geologic structures. On the Indonesian images, the following terrain categories are recognizable for geologic mapping: carbonate, clastic, volcanic, alluvial and coastal, melange, and metamorphic, as well as undifferentiated bedrock. Regional and local geologic structures are well expressed on the images.

Sabing, F.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Multiblock grid generation for simulations in geological formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating fluid flow in geological formations requires mesh generation, lithology mapping to the cells, and computing geometric properties such as normal vectors and volume of cells. The purpose of this research work is to compute and process the geometrical ...

Sanjay Kumar Khattri

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Minor actinide waste disposal in deep geological boreholes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate a waste canister design suitable for the disposal of vitrified minor actinide waste in deep geological boreholes using conventional oil/gas/geothermal drilling technology. ...

Sizer, Calvin Gregory

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

12.001 Introduction to Geology, Spring 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This undergraduate level course presents a basic study in geology. It introduces major minerals and rock types, rock-forming processes, and time scales; temperatures, pressures, compositions, structure of the Earth, and ...

Elkins-Tanton, Lindy

231

Statistical approaches to leak detection for geological sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological sequestration has been proposed as a way to remove CO? from the atmosphere by injecting it into deep saline aquifers. Detecting leaks to the atmosphere will be important for ensuring safety and effectiveness of ...

Haidari, Arman S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

NETL: News Release - DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test CO2 Injection Begins in Existing Production Well to Evaluate CO2 Storage Potential, Oil Recovery Washington, D.C. - A U.S. Department...

233

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 3. Generator routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for utilization by the hydraulic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System, a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display is described. This is the third of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.; Argo, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall Faulting At Dixie Valley, Nevada Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 'nested graben' structural model, in which multiple faults successively displace rocks downward to the deepest part of the basin, is supported by recent field geologic analysis and correlation of results to geophysical data for Dixie Valley. Aerial photographic analysis and detailed field mapping provide strong evidence for a deep graben separated from the ranges to the east and west by multiple normal faults that affect the Tertiary/Quaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic

235

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Optimal Reservoir Management and Well Placement Under Geologic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir management, sometimes referred to as asset management in the context of petroleum reservoirs, has become recognized as an important facet of petroleum reservoir development and production operations. In the first stage of planning field development, the simulation model is calibrated to dynamic data (history matching). One of the aims of the research is to extend the streamline based generalized travel time inversion method for full field models with multimillion cells through the use of grid coarsening. This makes the streamline based inversion suitable for high resolution simulation models with decades long production history and numerous wells by significantly reducing the computational effort. In addition, a novel workflow is proposed to integrate well bottom-hole pressure data during model calibration and the approach is illustrated via application to the CO2 sequestration. In the second stage, field development strategies are optimized. The strategies are primarily focused on rate optimization followed by infill well drilling. A method is proposed to modify the streamline-based rate optimization approach which previously focused on maximizing sweep efficiency by equalizing arrival time of the waterfront to producers, to account for accelerated production for improving the net present value (NPV). Optimum compromise between maximizing sweep efficiency and maximizing NPV can be selected based on a 'trade-off curve.' The proposed method is demonstrated on field scale application considering geological uncertainty. Finally, a novel method for well placement optimization is proposed that relies on streamlines and time of flight to first locate the potential regions of poorly swept and drained oil. Specifically, the proposed approach utilizes a dynamic measure based on the total streamline time of flight combined with static and dynamic parameters to identify "Sweet-Spots" for infill drilling. The "Sweet-Spots" can be either used directly as potential well-placement locations or as starting points during application of a formal optimization technique. The main advantage of the proposed method is its computational efficiency in calculating dynamic measure map. The complete workflow was also demonstrated on a multimillion cell reservoir model of a mature carbonate field with notable success. The infill locations based on dynamic measure map have been verified by subsequent drilling.

Taware, Satyajit Vijay

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Modeling shallow marine carbonate depositional systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological Process Models (GPMs) have been used in the past to simulate the distinctive stratigraphies formed in carbonate sediments, and to explore the interaction of controls that produce heterogeneity. Previous GPMs have only indirectly included the ... Keywords: Carbonate, Geological process model, Numerical modeling, Reef, Supersaturation

Jon Hill; Daniel Tetzlaff; Andrew Curtis; Rachel Wood

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Current Status of The Romanian National Deep Geological Repository Program  

SciTech Connect

Construction of a deep geological repository is a very demanding and costly task. By now, countries that have Candu reactors, have not processed the spent fuel passing to the interim storage as a preliminary step of final disposal within the nuclear fuel cycle back-end. Romania, in comparison to other nations, represents a rather small territory, with high population density, wherein the geological formation areas with radioactive waste storage potential are limited and restricted not only from the point of view of the selection criteria due to the rocks natural characteristics, but also from the point of view of their involvement in social and economical activities. In the framework of the national R and D Programs, series of 'Map investigations' have been made regarding the selection and preliminary characterization of the host geological formation for the nation's spent fuel deep geological repository. The fact that Romania has many deposits of natural gas, oil, ore and geothermal water, and intensively utilizes soil and also is very forested, cause some of the apparent acceptable sites to be rejected in the subsequent analysis. Currently, according to the Law on the spent fuel and radioactive waste management, including disposal, The National Agency of Radioactive Waste is responsible and coordinates the national strategy in the field and, subsequently, further actions will be decided. The Romanian National Strategy, approved in 2004, projects the operation of a deep geological repository to begin in 2055. (authors)

Radu, M.; Nicolae, R.; Nicolae, D. [Center of Technology and Engineering for Nuclear Objectives (CITON), ILFOV County (Romania)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Remedial action and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings sites at Slick Rock, Colorado. Attachment 2, Geology report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents geologic considerations that are pertinent to the Remedial Action Plan for Slick Rock mill tailings. Topics covered include regional geology, site geology, geologic stability, and geologic suitability.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Kansas Field Conference Kansas Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network FDD Frequency Division Duplexing FEP Front End Processor FER Frame Error Rate FERC Federal Energy Regulatory Commission - www.ferc.gov 6 International Electrotechnical Commission ­ www.iec.ch #12;- 6 - IHD without any personally identifiable information (PII) identifiers Aggregator SEE FERC OPERATION MODEL

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Nevada Rail - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Env The Summary of the Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada -- Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Rail Alignment for the Construction and Operation of a Railroad in Nevada to a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County,

242

Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Details Activities (5) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Studies of the geology, geochemistry of thermal waters, and of one exploratory geothermal well show that two related hot spring systems discharge in Canon de San Diego at Soda Dam (48°C) and Jemez Springs (72°C). The hot springs discharge from separate strands of the Jemez fault zone which trends northeastward towards the center of Valles Caldera. Exploration drilling to Precambrian basement beneath Jemez Springs

243

Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mines and Geology Mines and Geology Jump to: navigation, search State Nevada Name Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Address University of Nevada/178 City, State Reno, Nevada Zip 89557 Website http://www.nbmg.unr.edu/Oil&Ga Coordinates 39.5440601°, -119.8136573° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.5440601,"lon":-119.8136573,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

245

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

246

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lake Lahontan: Geology of Southern Carson Desert, Nevada Abstract This report presents a stratigraphic study of an area of about 860 square miles in the southern part of the Carson Desert, near Fallen, Churchill County, Nev. The exposed rocks and surficial sediments range in age from early Tertiary (?) to Recent. The late Quaternary sediments and soils were especially studied: they furnish a detailed history of the fluctuations of Lake Lahontan (a huge but intermittent late Pleistocene lake) and of younger lakes, as well as a history of late Quaternary sedimentation, erosion, soil development, and climatic change that probably is

247

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

248

Impact of geologic parameters on enhanced oil recovery - workshop proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this workshop is to identify and develop objectives for future geologic research needed to increase light oil production with the enhanced oil recovery processes and to identify quantitative studies with potential to predict the impact reservoir heterogeneities on the light oil recovery processes. With these goals in mind, four workshop groups were organized to discuss and develop a conceptual R and D program to minimize the geologic constraints to E.O.R. These workshop groups will provide guidance and input into DOE's light oil research program and will help decide where time and resources are most effectively utilized. Working groups studied: (1) rock-fluid interactions; (2) reservoir heterogeneity; (3) reservoir description; and (4) geologic imput into EOR simulation studies. The question addressed is whether the present technology is adequate to quantitatively define each of these areas for predictive uses. If it is not, what techniques and instrumentation is necessary to define these for each EOR process.

Peterson, M.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Digital Geologic Field Mapping Using Arcpad, In: Digital Mapping Techniques '02- Workshop Proceedings Abstract Research into the practicality of digital mapping by Placer Dome Exploration identified hardware and software solutions to enhance the efficiency and accuracy of field work. The goal of the research was to find a lightweight hardware-software system that allows the user to build a digital map from field observations in much the same way as pen and paper methods. The focus of the research was to minimize the size and weight of computer systems. Systems identified consist of a wearable PC or handheld

250

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 1. Geochemistry and geologic setting of selected thermal waters Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. One hundred twenty-four of these were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of rock types-igneous, metamorphic, and both consolidated and unconsolidated sediments. Twenty-eight of the sites visited occur on or near fault zones while a

251

Do Periodicities in Extinction -- with Possible Astronomical Connections -- Survive a Revision of the Geological Timescale?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A major revision of the geological timescale was published in 2012. We re-examine our past finding of a 27 Myr periodicity in marine extinction rates by re-assigning dates to the extinction data used previously. We find that the spectral power at this period is somewhat increased, and persists at a narrow bandwidth, which supports our previous contention that the Nemesis hypothesis is untenable as an explanation for the periodicity that was first noted by Raup and Sepkoski in the 1980s. We enumerate a number of problems in a recent study comparing extinction rates with time series models.

Melott, Adrian L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Name Oregon State Department of Geology and Mineral Industries Address Ste. 965 Northeast Oregon Street Place Portland, OR Zip 97232 Website http://www.oregongeology.org/s Coordinates 45.5286301°, -122.656652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5286301,"lon":-122.656652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

PNNL's Community Science & Technology Seminar Series Geology and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. | Admission is FREE Hanford may be home to the world's first industrial scale nuclear reactor, but did you, the nuclear industry faces unique hurdles to expansion and waste management. Geology plays a critical role the fate of contaminants in the environment, inspiring ideas for ceramic waste forms, and storing used

254

Geologic map of the Hood River Quadrangle, Washington and Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - second worldwide review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first world wide review of the geological problems in radioactive waste isolation was published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991. This review was a compilation of reports that had been submitted to a workshop held in conjunction with the 28th International Geological Congress that took place July 9-19, 1989 in Washington, D.C. Reports from 15 countries were presented at the workshop and four countries provided reports after the workshop, so that material from 19 different countries was included in the first review. It was apparent from the widespread interest in this first review that the problem of providing a permanent and reliable method of isolating radioactive waste from the biosphere is a topic of great concern among the more advanced, as well as the developing, nations of the world. This is especially the case in connection with high-level waste (HLW) after its removal from nuclear power plants. The general concensus is that an adequate isolation can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the underground system with its engineered barriers. This document contains the Second Worldwide Review of Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation, dated September 1996.

Witherspoon, P.A. [ed.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Location and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Quebec, is organic-rich black shale and hosting oil and gas. It is equivalent to the Ithaca shaleLocation and Geology Fig 1. The Macasty black shale in the Anticosti Island in the Gulf of St. d13C for calcite disseminated in the black shale range from 2.6o to 2.8 / The values are lower

257

Z .Chemical Geology 182 2002 139178 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 182 2002 139­178 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo The cretaceous Ladakh arc and trace elements and Sr, Nd, Pb isotopes of the Mid-Cretaceous lavas of the Ladakh side of the arc.80 . Isotope and trace element data of western Ladakh lavas are compatible with high-degree melting Z . wZ . Z

Demouchy, Sylvie

258

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 6771 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 67­71 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo Hydrogen-isotope analysis Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogen; Isotopes; Organic; Toxic materials; Water 1. Introduction Hydrogen-isotope analysis of potentially haz- ardous organic materials is problematic. Conti

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

259

Brigham Young University Geology Studies Volume 27, Part 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geological deposits, such as oil shale, to extract hydrocarbons for energy needs. The apparatus provides more. The apparatus allows the liquid metal to distribute heat evenly throughout the oil shale. This reduces by providing more even heat distribution ·· Reduces costs associated with in situ heat extraction of oil shale

Seamons, Kent E.

260

Geologic map of the Mount Adams Quadrangle, Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is comprised of a 1:100,000 scale geologic map and accompanying text. The text consists of unit descriptions, a table of age dates, a table of major element geochemistry, correlation diagram, and a source of mapping diagram. (ACR)

Korosec, M.A. (comp.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geological and geophysical studies of a geothermal area in the southern Raft river valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: areal geology; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; clastic rocks; clasts; composition; conglomerate; economic geology; electrical methods; evolution; exploration; faults; folds; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravity methods; Idaho; igneous rocks; lithostratigraphy; magnetic methods; pyroclastics; Raft River Valley; resources; sedimentary rocks; seismic methods; stratigraphy; structural geology; structure; surveys; tectonics; United States; volcanic rocks

262

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) could become an instrumental part of a future carbon trading system in the US. If the US starts operating an emissions trading scheme (ETS) similar to that of the European Union's then limits on CO{sub 2} emissions will be conservative in the beginning stages. The government will most likely start by distributing most credits for free; these free credits are called allowances. The US may follow the model of the EU ETS, which during the first five-year phase distributed 95% of the credits for free, bringing that level down to 90% for the second five-year phase. As the number of free allowances declines, companies will be forced to purchase an increasing number of credits at government auction, or else obtain them from companies selling surplus credits. In addition to reducing the number of credits allocated for free, with each subsequent trading period the number of overall credits released into the market will decline in an effort to gradually reduce overall emissions. Companies may face financial difficulty as the value of credits continues to rise due to the reduction of the number of credits available in the market each trading period. Governments operating emissions trading systems face the challenge of achieving CO{sub 2} emissions targets without placing such a financial burden on their companies that the country's economy is markedly affected.

Hoversten, Shanna

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Storage of CO2 in Geologic Formations in the Ohio River Valley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OH 43201 614-424-3820 gupta@battelle.org Storage of Co 2 in geologiC formationS in the ohio river valley region Background The storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in a dense,...

264

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factor, Presented at the Oil Reserves Conference, Paris,water, coal, oil & gas, mineral reserves or other geological

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geologic map of the Oasis Valley basin and vicinity, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This map and accompanying cross sections present an updated synthesis of the geologic framework of the Oasis Valley area, a major groundwater discharge site located about 15 km west of the Nevada Test Site. Most of the data presented in this compilation is new geologic map data, as discussed below. In addition, the cross sections incorporate new geophysical data that have become available in the last three years (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999). Geophysical data are used to estimate the thickness of the Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary rocks on the cross sections, and to identify major concealed structures. Large contiguous parts of the map area are covered either by alluvium or by volcanic units deposited after development of the major structures present at the depth of the water table and below. Hence, geophysical data provide critical constraints on our geologic interpretations. A companion paper by Fridrich and others (1999) and the above-cited reports by Hildenbrand and others (1999) and Mankinen and others (1999) provide explanations of the interpretations that are presented graphically on this map. This map covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles in Nye County, Nevada, centered on the Thirsty Canyon SW quadrangle, and is a compilation of one published quadrangle map (O'Connor and others, 1966) and eight new quadrangle maps, two of which have been previously released (Minor and others, 1997; 1998). The cross sections that accompany this map were drawn to a depth of about 5 km below land surface at the request of hydrologists who are modeling the Death Valley groundwater system.

Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; Ryder, P.L.; Slate, J.L.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical model.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

CGDK: An extensible CorelDRAW VBA program for geological drafting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corel Geological Drafting Kit (CGDK), a program written in VBA, has been designed to assist geologists and geochemists with their drafting work. It obtains geological data from a running Excel application directly, and uses the data to plot geochemical ... Keywords: CGDK, CorelDRAW, Excel, Geological drafting, Software, VBA

Jun-Ting Qiu; Wan-Jiao Song; Cheng-Xin Jiang; Han Wu; Raymond M. Dong

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Professor in Geology and Geophysics Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

270

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry and Carbonate1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

271

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotope GeoloGy1 Unlike physics or chemistry, teaching isotope geochemistry is difficult because. Writing an effective book on geochemistry is thus even more difficult. Claude Allègre's Isotope Geology geochemistry book, given how effective the texts by Faure and Dickin are. However, Allègre's Isotope Geology

Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

272

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry & Stable isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2012- Charles L. Jones Professor in Geology, 2013, Oxygen isotope composition of meltwater from a Neoproterozoic glaciation in South China. Geology1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

273

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

isotopes Postdoc 1998-2001 APPOINTMENTS 2007- Associate professor in Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana Physical Geology and Earth System History for undergraduate students; Stable Isotope Geochemistry1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex

Bao, Huiming

274

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2008 in Hydraulic Conductivity to Represent Bedrock Structure #12;Cover. Photograph showing aerial view looking by David L. Nelms, U.S. Geological Survey. #12;Ground-Water Resources Program National Cooperative Geologic

275

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

276

Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No.  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geological and geophysical analysis of Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole No. 1 (CGEH-1), Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Exploration Hole number one (CGEH-1) was drilled in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, California, from September 2 to December 2, 1977. Chip samples were collected at ten foot intervals and extensive geophysical logging surveys were conducted to document the geologic character of the geothermal system as penetrated by CGEH-1. The major rock units encountered include a mafic metamorphic sequence and a

277

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

278

I I Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' Hydrological/Geological Studies Radiochemical Analyses of Water Samples from Selected Streams, Wells, Springs and Precipitation Collected Prior to Re-Entry . , Drilling, Project Rulison-6, 197 1 HGS 7 ' DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Prepared Under Agreement No. AT(29-2)-474 f o r the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission PROPERTY OF U. S. GOVERNMENT -UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY - F e d e r a l . C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS, WELLS, SPRINGS, AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED PRIOR TO REENTRY DRILLING, PROJECT RULISON I , BY Paul T. - V o e g e l i

279

Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Methodology for the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage Program September 2010 Summary of the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide 2 Authors: U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D John Litynski U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D/Sequestration Division Dawn Deel Traci Rodosta U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Office of Research and Development George Guthrie U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/

280

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

282

Performance Assessment Strategy Plan for the Geologic Repository Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance assessment is a major constituent of the program being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a geologic repository. Performance assessment is the set of activities needed for quantitative evaluations to assess compliance with the performance requirements in the regulations for a geologic repository and to support the development of the repository. The strategy for these evaluations has been documented in the Performance Assessment Strategy Plan (DOE, 1989). The implementation of the performance assessment strategy is defined in this document. This paper discusses the scope and objectives of the implementation plan, the relationship of the plan to other program plans, summarizes the performance assessment areas and the integrated strategy of the performance assessment program. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

NONE

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geologic and thermochronologic constraints on the initial orientation of the Raft River detachment and footwall shear zone Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Mountains of northwestern Utah expose a detachment fault that separates a hanging wall of Paleozoic rocks from Proterozoic and Archean rocks of the footwall. Beneath the detachment lies a 100 to 300m-thick top-to-the-east extensional shear zone. Geologic mapping, strain and kinematic analysis, and 40Ar/39 Ar thermochronology suggest that the shear zone and detachment fault had an initial low-angle regional

284

Regulation and Permitting of Carbon Dioxide Transport and Geologic Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a comprehensive review and analysis of United States (U.S.) regulations that will have a direct impact on permitting and commercial-scale deployment of carbon dioxide (CO2) transport and sequestration projects. The report focuses on specific regulations associated with CO2 transport and sequestration, including pipeline regulations and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) proposed rules for characterizing, operating, monitoring, and closing CO2 geologic sequestration we...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

285

Transuranic Burning Issues Related to a Second Geologic Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines issues that need to be addressed by a development program recently initiated to establish the viability of a transuranic burning concept application that would achieve a substantial delay to the need date for a second geologic repository. The visualized transuranic burning concept application is one in which spent fuel created after a date in the 2010 time frame or later would be processed and the separated plutonium used to start up liquid metal reactors (LMRs).

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

GEOLOGICAL SURVEY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , Colorado 80225 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE SECOND PRODUCTION-TEST FLARING, PROJECT RULISON ( R u l i s o n - 1 0 ) a 1 9 7 1 P r e p a r e d U n d e r A g r e e m e n t No. A T ( 2 9 - 2 ) -474 '. f o r the N e v a d a Operations Office . . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . USGS -474 - 1 2 2 R u l i sdn- 10 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PY GEOLOGICAL SURVEY F e d e r a l C e n t e r , D e n v e r , C o l o r a d o 8 0 2 2 5 RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES OF WATER FROM SELECTED STREAMS AND PRECIPITATION COLLECTED IMMEDIATELY BEFORE AND AFTER THE S EC OND PRODUCTION- TES T FLARING,

287

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Geological structures from televiewer logs of GT-2, Fenton Hill, New Mexico: Part 1, Feature extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Patterns in reflected sonic intensity recognized during examination of televiewer logs of basement gneiss at the Hot Dry Rock Site, Fenton Hill, New Mexico, are due to geological fractures and foliations and to incipient breakouts. These features are obscured by artifacts caused by wellbore ellipticity, tool off-centering, and tool oscillations. An interactive method, developed for extraction of the structural features (fractures and foliations), uses human perception as a pattern detector and a chi-square test of harmonic form as a pattern discriminator. From imagery of GT-2, 733 structures were recovered. The acceptance rate of the discriminator was 54%. Despite these positive results, the general conclusion of this study is that intensity-mode imagery from Fenton Hill is not directly invertible for geological information because of the complexity of the televiewer imaging process. Developing a forward model of the intensity-imaging process, or converting to caliper-mode imagery, or doing both, will be necessary for high-fidelity feature extraction from televiewer data.

Burns, K.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library : Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, HawaiiInfo Graphic/Map/Chart Authors Frank A. Trusdell and Richard B. Moore Published U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY, 2006 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Citation Frank A. Trusdell,Richard B. Moore. Geologic Map of the Middle East Rift Geothermal Subzone, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. []. Place of publication not provided. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY. 2006. Available from: http://pubs.usgs.gov/imap/2614/downloads/pdf/2614map_508.pdf.

291

Microsoft Word - CCS Geologic Storage-Intro_2011l.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Geologic carbon sequestration involves the storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in deep underground geologic formations. The majority of geologic formations considered for CO 2 storage, deep saline or depleted oil and gas reservoirs, are layers of subsurface porous rock that are overlain by a layer or multiple layers of low-permeability rock. Under high pressures, CO 2 is a supercritical fluid, with the high- density characteristics of a liquid but behaves like a gas by filling all available volume. Coal seams are also a viable option for geologic storage. When CO 2 is injected into a coal formation it is adsorbed onto the coal surfaces and methane gas is released and produced in adjacent wells. NETL's Core R&D research is focused on developing the ability to characterize a geologic formation

292

A new analytic-adaptive model for EGS assessment, development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

center in Nevada with REA250. State Nevada Objectives Develop and apply: (1) a Geologic Heat Exchanger (GHE) model, (2) a life-cycle model, and (3) a total system model. The GHE...

293

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Although models that simulate the fracturing process exist, they can be significantly improved by extending the models to account for nonsymmetric, nonplanar fractures, coupling the models to more realistic reservoir simulators, and implementing advanced multiphase flow models for the transport of proppant. Third, it may be possible to deviate from current hydraulic fracturing technology by using different proppants (possibly waste materials that need to be disposed of, e.g., asbestos) combined with different hydraulic fracturing carrier fluids (possibly supercritical CO2 itself). Because current technology is mainly aimed at enhanced oil recovery, it may not be ideally suited for the injection and storage of CO2. Finally, advanced concepts such as increasing the injectivity of the fractured geologic formations through acidization with carbonated water will be investigated. Saline formations are located through most of the continental United States. Generally, where saline formations are scarce, oil and gas reservoirs and coal beds abound. By developing the technology outlined here, it will be possible to remove CO2 at the source (power plants, industry) and inject it directly into nearby geological formations, without releasing it into the atmosphere. The goal of the proposed research is to develop a technology capable of sequestering CO2 in geologic formations at a cost of US $10 per ton.

L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

294

Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing data available from the Kentucky Geonet (KYGeonet.ky.gov) the fossil fuel mining locations created by the Kentucky Geological Survey geo-locating oil and gas wells are mapped using ESRI ArcGIS in Kentucky single plain 1602 ft projection. This data was then exported into a spreadsheet showing latitude and longitude for each point to be used for modeling at different scales to determine the fractal dimension of the set. Following the porosity and diffusivity studies of Tarafdar and Roy1 we extract fractal dimensions of the fossil fuel mining locations and search for evidence of scaling laws for the set of deposits. The Levy index is used to determine a match to a statistical mechanically motivated generalized probability function for the wells. This probability distribution corresponds to a solution of a dynamical anomalous diffusion equation of fractional order that describes the Levy paths which can be solved in the diffusion limit by the Fox H function ansatz.

Andrew, Keith; Andrew, Kevin A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Estimating Plume Volume for Geologic Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, when a new subsurface flow and transport problem is first being considered, very simple models with a minimal number of parameters are used to get a rough idea of how the system will evolve. For a hydrogeologist considering the spreading of a contaminant plume in an aquifer, the aquifer thickness, porosity, and permeability might be enough to get started. If the plume is buoyant, aquifer dip comes into play. If regional groundwater flow is significant or there are nearby wells pumping, these features need to be included. Generally, the required parameters tend to be known from pre-existing studies, are parameters that people working in the field are familiar with, and represent features that are easy to explain to potential funding agencies, regulators, stakeholders, and the public. The situation for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline aquifers is quite different. It is certainly desirable to do preliminary modeling in advance of any field work since geologic storage of CO{sub 2} is a novel concept that few people have much experience with or intuition about. But the parameters that control CO{sub 2} plume behavior are a little more daunting to assemble and explain than those for a groundwater flow problem. Even the most basic question of how much volume a given mass of injected CO{sub 2} will occupy in the subsurface is non-trivial. However, with a number of simplifying assumptions, some preliminary estimates can be made, as described below. To make efficient use of the subsurface storage volume available, CO{sub 2} density should be large, which means choosing a storage formation at depths below about 800 m, where pressure and temperature conditions are above the critical point of CO{sub 2} (P = 73.8 bars, T = 31 C). Then CO{sub 2} will exist primarily as a free-phase supercritical fluid, while some CO{sub 2} will dissolve into the aqueous phase.

Doughty, Christine

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

296

STOMP-ECKEChem: An Engineering Perspective on Reactive Transport in Geologic Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECKEChem (Equilibrium, Conservation, Kinetic Equation Chemistry) is a reactive transport module for the STOMP suite of multifluid subsurface flow and transport simulators that was developed from an engineering perspective. STOMP comprises a suite of operational modes that are distinguished by the solved coupled conservation equations with capabilities for a variety of subsurface applications (e.g., environmental remediation and stewardship, geologic sequestration of greenhouse gases, gas hydrate production, and oil shale production). The ECKEChem module was designed to provide integrated reactive transport capabilities across the suite of STOMP simulator operational modes. The initial application for the ECKEChem module was in the simulation of the mineralization reactions that occurred with the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into deep Columbia River basalt formations, where it was implemented in the STOMP-CO2 simulator. The STOMP-ECKEChem solution approach to modeling reactive transport in multifluid geologic media is founded on an engineering perspective: (1) sequential non-iterative coupling between the flow and reactive transport is sufficient, (2) reactive transport can be modeled by operator splitting with local geochemistry and global transport, (3) geochemistry can be expressed as a system of coupled nonlinear equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, (4) a limited number of kinetic equation forms are used in geochemical practice. This chapter describes the conceptual approach to converting a geochemical reaction network into a series of equilibrium, conservation and kinetic equations, the implementation of ECKEChem in STOMP, the numerical solution approach, and a demonstration of the simulator on a complex application involving desorption of uranium from contaminated field-textured sediments.

White, Mark D.; Fang, Yilin

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geologic evaluation of the Oasis Valley basin, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a geologic study of the area between the underground-nuclear-explosion testing areas on Pahute Mesa, in the northwesternmost part of the Nevada Test Site, and the springs in Oasis Valley, to the west of the Test Site. The new field data described in this report are also presented in a geologic map that is a companion product(Fridrich and others, 1999) and that covers nine 7.5-minute quadrangles centered on Thirsty Canyon SW, the quadrangle in which most of the Oasis Valley springs are located. At the beginning of this study, published detailed maps were available for 3 of the 9 quadrangles of the study area: namely Thirsty Canyon (O'Connor and others, 1966); Beatty (Maldonado and Hausback, 1990); and Thirsty Canyon SE (Lipman and others, 1966). Maps of the last two of these quadrangles, however, required extensive updating owing to recent advances in understanding of the regional structure and stratigraphy. The new map data are integrated in this re port with new geophysical data for the Oasis Valley area, include gravity, aeromagnetic, and paleomagnetic data (Grauch and others, 1997; written comm., 1999; Mankinen and others, 1999; Hildenbrand and others, 1999; Hudson and others, 1994; Hudson, unpub. data).

Fridrich, C.J.; Minor, S.A.; and Mankinen, E.A.

2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

Geologic evidence for a magma chamber beneath Newberry Volcano, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

At Newberry Volcano, central Oregon, more than 0.5 m.y. of magmatic activity, including caldera collapse and renewed caldera-filling volcanism, has created a structural and thermal chimney that channels magma ascent. Holocene rhyolitic eruptions (1) have been confined mainly within the caldera in an area 5 km in diameter, (2) have been very similar in chemical composition, phenocryst mineralogy, and eruptive style, and (3) have occurred as recently as 1300 years ago, with repose periods of 2000--3000 years between eruptions. Holocene basaltic andesite eruptions are widespread on the flanks but are excluded from the area of rhyolitic volcanism. Basaltic andesite in fissures at the edge of the rhyolite area has silicic inclusions and shows mixed basalt-rhyolite magma relations. These geologic relations and the high geothermal gradient that characterizes the lower part of a drill hole in the caldera (U.S. Geological Survey Newberry 2) indicate that a rhyolitic magma chamber has existed beneath the caldera throughout the Holocene. Its longevity probably is a result of intermittent underplating by basaltic magma.

Macleod, N.S.; Sherrod, D.R.

1988-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geology of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Beaver County, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is located on the western margin on the Mineral Mountains in Beaver County, Utah. The bedrock geology of the area is presented. It is dominated by metamorphic and plutonic rocks of Precambrian age as well as felsic plutonic phases of the Tertiary Mineral Mountains Pluton. Rhyolite flows, domes, and pyroclastics reflect igneous activity between 0.8 and 0.5 million years ago. All lithologies present in the map area are described in detail with an emphasis on characteristics which will allow them to be distinguished in drill cuttings. The geothermal system at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA is structurally controlled with reservoir rocks demonstrating little primary permeability. North to north-northeast trending faults are the youngest structures in the area, and they control present fumarolic activity and recent hot spring activity which has deposited opaline and chalcedonic sinters. It is proposed here that the geothermal reservoirs are controlled primarily by intersections of the principal zones of faulting. Logs from Thermal Power Utah State 72-16, Getty Oil Utah State 52-21, and six shallow thermal gradient holes drilled by the University of Utah are presented in this report and have been utilized in the construction of geologic cross sections of the geothermal field.

Nielson, D.L.; Sibbett, B.S.; McKinney, D.B.; Hulen, J.B.; Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations October 5, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact onCCS Opportunities in the United States [click on imageto link to the publication]Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed the manual to better understand the characteristics of geologic formations

302

Summary of geology at the ERDA--MAGMA--SDG and E geothermal test site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is given of the geologic structure of the test facility in Imperial County. The analysis is based on well records, especially electrical logs. (LBS)

Towse, D.F.; Palmer, T.D.

1976-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Geologic map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This map of the Priest Rapids 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of those quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports (listed below). The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey (Tabor and others, 1982), and the Moses Lake (Gulick, 1990a), Ritzville (Gulick, 1990b), and Rosalia (Waggoner, 1990) quadrangles have already been released. The geology of the Priest Rapids quadrangle has not previously been compiled at 1:100,000 scale. Furthermore, this is the first 1:100,000 or smaller scale geologic map of the area to incorporate both bedrock and surficial geology. This map was compiled in 1992, using published and unpublished geologic maps as sources of data.

Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature...

305

A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and capillaritythe heat pipe effect, Int. J. Heatgeothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porousProcesses in Geologic Heat Pipes Jens T. Birkholzer Ernest

Birkholzer, Jens T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Clayshale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level...

307

SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND SELECTION GUIDELINES FOR GEOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is a key technology pathway to substantial reduction of greenhouse gas emissions for the state of California and the western region. Current estimates suggest that the sequestration resource of the state is large, and could safely and effectively accept all of the emissions from large CO2 point sources for many decades and store them indefinitely. This process requires suitable sites to sequester large volumes of CO2 for long periods of time. Site characterization is the first step in this process, and the state will ultimately face regulatory, legal, and technical questions as commercial CCS projects develop and commence operations. The most important aspects of site characterizations are injectivity, capacity, and effectiveness. A site can accept at a high rate a large volume of CO2 and store it for a long time is likely to serve as a good site for geological carbon sequestration. At present, there are many conventional technologies and approaches that can be used to estimate, quantify, calculate, and assess the viability of a sequestration site. Any regulatory framework would need to rely on conventional, easily executed, repeatable methods to inform the site selection and permitting process. The most important targets for long-term storage are deep saline formations and depleted oil and gas fields. The primary CO2 storage mechanisms for these targets are well understood enough to plan operations and simulate injection and long-term fate of CO2. There is also a strong understanding of potential geological and engineering hazards for CCS. These hazards are potential pathway to CO2 leakage, which could conceivably result in negative consequences to health and the environmental. The risks of these effects are difficult to quantify; however, the hazards themselves are sufficiently well understood to identify, delineate, and manage those risks effectively. The primary hazard elements are wells and faults, but may include other concerns as well. There is less clarity regarding the legal and regulatory issues around site characterization for large CCS injection volumes. In particular, it is not clear what would constitute due diligence for a potential selection and operation of a commercial site. This is complicated by a lack of clarity around permitting issues and subsurface ownership. However, there are many natural, industrial, regulatory, and legal analogs for these questions. However, solutions will need to evolve within the set of laws and practices current to the State. The chief conclusion of this chapter is that there is enough knowledge today to characterize a site for geological carbon sequestration safely and effective permitting and operation. From this conclusion and others flow a set of recommendations that represent potential actions for decision makers.

Friedmann, S J

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Analysis of anions in geological brines using ion chromatography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ion chromatographic procedures for the determination of the anions bromide, sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and iodide in brine samples have been developed and are described. The techniques have been applied to the analysis of natural brines, and geologic evaporites. Sample matrices varied over a range from 15,000 mg/L to 200,000 mg/L total halogens, nearly all of which is chloride. The analyzed anion concentrations ranged from less than 5 mg/L in the cases of nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate, to 20,000 mg/L in the case of sulfate. A technique for suppressing chloride and sulfate ions to facilitate the analysis of lower concentration anions is presented. Analysis times are typically less than 20 minutes for each procedure and the ion chromatographic results compare well with those obtained using more time consuming classical chemical analyses. 10 references, 14 figures.

Merrill, R.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada Rail Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada - Nevada Rail Transportation Corridor DOE/EIS-0250F-S2 and Final En Proposed Action: To determine a rail alignment within a rail corridor in which to construct and operate a railroad to transport spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, and other materials from an existing railroad in Nevada to a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada. The Proposed Action includes the construction of railroad construction and operations support facilities. This Rail Alignment EIS analyzes two alternatives that would implement the Proposed Action: the Caliente rail

310

United States Geological Survey, LSC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LSC LSC Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, LSC Address Leetown Science Center, Conte Anadromous Fish Laboratory, 1 Migratory Way Place Turners Falls, Massachusetts Zip 01376 Sector Hydro Phone number (413) 863-9475 Website http://www.lsc.usgs.gov/CAFLin Coordinates 42.5998509°, -72.5679159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5998509,"lon":-72.5679159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

311

United States Geological Survey, HIF | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIF HIF Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name United States Geological Survey, HIF Address Building 2101 Stennis Space Center Place Mississippi Zip 39529 Sector Hydro Phone number (228) 688-1508 Website http://wwwhif.er.usgs.gov/publ Coordinates 30.3695°, -89.6147° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3695,"lon":-89.6147,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Geology and geothermics of the Island of Milos (Greece)  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal research which has been conducted on the island of Milos is reviewed and the island's geology is discussed in terms of the geodynamics of the eastern Mediterranean. The rock formations which outcrop at Milos are described in detail, including the crystalline basement, Neogene transgressive conglomerates and limestones, and the Quaternary volcanics and volcano-sedimentary series. The recent disjunctive tectonics and volcano-tectonics affecting Milos and the neighboring islands are reviewed. Thermal manifestations and their attendant mineralizations and hydrothermal alterations are described. The geophysical methods utilized in exploration and for the siting of production wells are described. Exploration work involved the drilling of 55 wells for thermometric determinations and a full scale electrical survey. Preliminary data from two production wells with bottom-hole temperatures in excess of 300/sup 0/C are reported. Fifty-four references are provided.

Fytikas, M.; Marinelli, G.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources in Berkeley, June 12, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPAs mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Perspectives on the geological and hydrological aspects of long-term release scenario analyses  

SciTech Connect

Information that may be relevant to individuals involved with analyzing long-term release scenarios of specific repositories for nuclear waste is presented. The bulk of the information is derived from recent studies in West Germany and the United States. Emphasis is on the specific geological and hydrological phenomena that, alone or in concert, could potentially perturb the area around specific repository sites. Research is continuing on most of the topics discussed within this report. Because research is ongoing, statements and conclusions described in this document are subject to change. The main topics of this report are: (1) fracturing, (2) geohydrology, (3) magmatic activity, and (4) geomorphology. Therefore, the site-specific nature of the problem cannot be overemphasized. As an example of how one might combine the many synergistic and time-dependent parameters into a concise format the reader is referred to A Conceputal Simulation Model for Release Scenario Analysis of a Hypothetical Site in Columbia Plateau Basalts, PNL-2892. For additional details on the topics in this report, the reader is referred to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) consultant report listed in the bibliography.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Wallace, R.W.; Benson, G.L.; Zellmer, J.T.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. CIRMIS data system. Volume 4. Driller's logs, stratigraphic cross section and utility routines  

SciTech Connect

The Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program is developing and applying the methodology for assessing the far-field, long-term post-closure safety of deep geologic nuclear waste repositories. AEGIS is being performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract with the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) for the Department of Energy (DOE). One task within AEGIS is the development of methodology for analysis of the consequences (water pathway) from loss of repository containment as defined by various release scenarios. Analysis of the long-term, far-field consequences of release scenarios requires the application of numerical codes which simulate the hydrologic systems, model the transport of released radionuclides through the hydrologic systems to the biosphere, and, where applicable, assess the radiological dose to humans. The various input parameters required in the analysis are compiled in data systems. The data are organized and prepared by various input subroutines for use by the hydrologic and transport codes. The hydrologic models simulate the groundwater flow systems and provide water flow directions, rates, and velocities as inputs to the transport models. Outputs from the transport models are basically graphs of radionuclide concentration in the groundwater plotted against time. After dilution in the receiving surface-water body (e.g., lake, river, bay), these data are the input source terms for the dose models, if dose assessments are required. The dose models calculate radiation dose to individuals and populations. CIRMIS (Comprehensive Information Retrieval and Model Input Sequence) Data System is a storage and retrieval system for model input and output data, including graphical interpretation and display. This is the fourth of four volumes of the description of the CIRMIS Data System.

Friedrichs, D.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2010­1229 Unintended rates of nitrogen increase the nitrogen exported from the Yazoo River Basin to the Mississippi River by Michael A. Manning, U.S. Geological Survey. Why has the Production of Biofuels Become Important? Biofuels

318

DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PD DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

319

The geological disasters defense expert system of the massive pipeline network SCADA system based on FNN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SCADA system plays an important role in monitoring the long distance operation of mass pipeline network, which may experience huge damage due to landslides geological hazards. It is critical to detect the deformation and displacement of rock to forecast ... Keywords: FNN, SCADA system, TDR, expert system, geologic hazard

Xiedong Cao; Cundang Wei; Jie Li; Li Yang; Dan Zhang; Gang Tang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Method for increasing the pressure in oil-bearing geological structures  

SciTech Connect

A method for increasing pressure in geological oil-bearing structures by gas production due to microbial activity comprising adding to a geological oil-bearing structure, an aneorobic microorganism (Methanobacterium termoautotroficum), a culture medium and formic acid. The formic acid is converted to carbon dioxide and methane gases resulting in increased pressure in the structures.

Hellman, B.G.; Ronnow, P.H.; Tengblad, P.F.; Wiberger, L.I.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stability, slope design, engineering geology, fault, open pit mines, SOMAIR uranium mine, OCP phosphate mine of procedures for abandonment of mine sites where the problems of long-term slope stability may arise1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

Construction of accurate geological cross-sections along trenches, cliffs and mountain slopes using photogrammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of close range photogrammetry for the construction of geological cross-sections from outcrops located on trenches, cliffs and mountain slopes. Our methodology is based on stereoscopic pairs of photographs of the outcrops ... Keywords: Geological cross-section, Photogeological interpretation, Photogrammetry, Stereoscopic pair, Structure from motion (SFM)

Santiago MartN; Hodei Uzkeda; Josep Poblet; Mayte Bulnes; RamN Rubio

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CV-Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 CV- Huiming Bao Department of Geology & Geophysics, E235 Howe-Russell Geoscience Complex Palaeontology & Stratigraphy B. Sc. 1982-1986 Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology, Academia Sinica Calcareous Algae & carbonate sedimentology M.Sc. 1986-1989 Princeton University Stable isotope geochemistry

Bao, Huiming

324

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Department of Geology at Wayne State University is located in a urban environmental set- ting-time faculty and four part-time instructors. Faculty include: Drs. Mark Baskaran (Isotope Geo- chemistry), Jeff Howard (Sedimentology), Larry Lemke (Hydrogeology), Ed van Hees (Economic Geology), and Sarah Brownlee

Cinabro, David

325

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1240 Legacy Mercury--Data Collection at Alviso Slough. Photo by M. Marvin-DiPasquale. Bottom Left--Aerial Photo with Alviso Slough of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;iii U.S. Department of the Interior DIRK KEMPTHORNE, Secretary U

326

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

Sminchak, Joel

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors D.E. White, M.E. Hinkle and I. Barnes Published U.S. Government Printing Office, 1970 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713 Citation D.E. White,M.E. Hinkle,I. Barnes. 1970. Mercury Contents of Natural Thermal and Mineral Fluids, In- U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 713.

329

DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration March 17, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations. The report, titled Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations, should prove to be an invaluable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere through geologic sequestration. The report was prepared by NETL with input from the seven Regional Carbon

330

Geologic map of the Richland 1:100,000 quadrangle, Washington  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This map of the Richland 1:100,000-scale quadrangle, Washington, shows the geology of one of fifteen complete or partial 1:100,000-scale quadrangles that cover the southeast quadrant of Washington. Geologic maps of these quadrangles have been compiled by geologists with the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources (DGER) and Washington State University and are the principal data sources for a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the southeast quadrant of Washington, which is in preparation. Eleven of these quadrangles are being released as DGER open-file reports. The map of the Wenatchee quadrangle has been published by the US Geological Survey, and the Moses Lake, Ritzville quadrangles have already been released.

Reidel, S.P.; Fecht, K.R. [comps.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Big Hill Salt Dome  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological and geophysical analyses of the Big Hill Salt Dome were performed to determine the suitability of this site for use in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Development of 140 million barrels (MMB) of storage capacity in the Big Hill Salt Dome is planned as part of the SPR expansion to achieve 750 MMB of storage capacity. Objectives of the study were to: (1) Acquire, evaluate, and interpret existing data pertinent to geological characterization of the Big Hill Dome; (2) Characterize the surface and near-surface geology and hydrology; (3) Characterize the geology and hydrology of the overlying cap rock; (4) Define the geometry and geology of the dome; (5) Determine the feasibility of locating and constructing 14 10-MMB storage caverns in the south portion of the dome; and (6) Assess the effects of natural hazards on the SPR site. Recommendations are included. (DMC)

Hart, R.J.; Ortiz, T.S.; Magorian, T.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 140 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Survey Data Series 140 Geological Survey Data Series 140 Jump to: navigation, search Name U.S. Geological Society Data Series 140 Data Format Excel Spreadsheets Geographic Scope United States TODO: Import actual dataset contents into OpenEI "The US Minerals Databrowser (USGS DS140) is a collection of Excel spreadsheets which contain United States' historical consumption, production, imports and exports of various minerals. [1] It is produced by the United States Geological Survey. Many of the minerals it covers are important to the energy industry. Data from DS140 is used in various tools, including the US Minerals Databrowser.[2]" References ↑ "USGS DS140 Homepage" ↑ "US Minerals Databrowser" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=U.S._Geological_Survey_Data_Series_140&oldid=381562"

333

Hypercube performance for 2-D seismic finite-difference modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave-equation seismic modeling in two space dimensions is computationally intensive, often requiring hours of supercomputer CPU time to run typical geological models with 500 500 grids and 100 sources. This paper analyzes the performance of ACOUS2D, ...

L. J. Baker

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Dictionary.png Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

335

Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Dictionary.png Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Sedimentary-hosted volcanic-related resources are special in that the

336

Type C: Caldera Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

C: Caldera Resource C: Caldera Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type C: Caldera Resource Dictionary.png Type C: Caldera Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Caldera resources may be found in many tectonic settings but are defined by their caldera structures which control the flow of the fluids in the system.

337

Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Dictionary.png Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Extensional-tectonic, fault-controlled resources typically result from a

338

Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Dictionary.png Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

339

Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Dictionary.png Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

340

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct shear wave velocity (Vs) measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) geologic studies to confirm the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the core hole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member, and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt also was penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed, and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 ft of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5-million-year-old Elephant Mountain Member, was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. Brent; Fecht, Karl R.; Reidel, Stephen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Novel Concepts Research in Geologic Storage of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative on developing new technologies for the storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in geologic reservoirs, Battelle has been investigating the feasibility of CO{sub 2} sequestration in the deep saline reservoirs of the Ohio River Valley region. In addition to the DOE, the project is being sponsored by American Electric Power (AEP), BP, Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) of the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority, Schlumberger, and Battelle. The main objective of the project is to demonstrate that CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep formations is feasible from engineering and economic perspectives, as well as being an inherently safe practice and one that will be acceptable to the public. In addition, the project is designed to evaluate the geology of deep formations in the Ohio River Valley region in general and in the vicinity of AEP's Mountaineer Power Plant, in order to determine their potential use for conducting a long-term test of CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline formations. The current technical progress report summarizes activities completed for the April-June 2007 period of the project. As discussed in the report, the main accomplishments related to preparation to move forward with a 100,000-300,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year capture and sequestration project at the Mountaineer site. The program includes a 10 to 30-megawatt thermal product validation at the Mountaineer Plant where up to 300,000 metric tons CO{sub 2}/year will be captured and sequestered in deep rock formations identified in this work. Design and feasibility support tasks such as development of injection well design options, engineering assessment of CO{sub 2} capture systems, permitting, reservoir storage simulations, and assessment of monitoring technologies as they apply to the project site were developed for the project. Plans to facilitate the next steps of the project will be the main work remaining in this portion of the project as the program moves toward the proposed capture and sequestration system.

Neeraj Gupta

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A very typical statistical/econometric model assumes something like yt ? i.i.d. f (y, x, ?) (1) where f () is a parametric family known up to parameters ?. Parameter estimation: maximum likelihood ?n = arg max ? ln f (Yt, Xt, ?) (2) t What if the basic model assumptions of (1) are violated? The parametric family may not contain the true model f0(x, y) that generated the data; or the data may not be i.i.d.; etc. Misspecified

Stas Kolenikov; U Of Missouri; U Of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Aadland, R.K., and E.H. Bennett. 1979. Geologic Map of the Sandpoint Quadrangle, Idaho and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

503 Aadland, R.K., and E.H. Bennett. 1979. Geologic Map of the Sandpoint Quadrangle, Idaho and Washington: Idaho Geological Survey, 1:250,000 Scale, 1 Plate. Abbot, A. H. and Duvenack. 1939. 1934. Roadside Geology of Idaho: Mountain Press Publishing, Missoula, MT, 393 pp. Anders, P. and D. Richards

346

Geological map of Bare Mountain, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Bare Mountain comprises the isolated complex of mountain peaks southeast of the town of Beatty in southern Nye County, Nevada. This small mountain range lies between the alluvial basins of Crater Flat to the east and the northern Amargosa Desert to the southwest. The northern boundary of the range is less well defined, but for this report, the terrane of faulted Miocene volcanic rocks underlying Beatty Mountain and the unnamed hills to the east are considered to be the northernmost part of Bare Mountain. The southern tip of the mountain range is at Black Marble, the isolated hill at the southeast corner of the map. The main body of the range, between Fluorspar Canyon and Black Marble, is a folded and complexly faulted, but generally northward-dipping (or southward-dipping and northward-overturned), sequence of weakly to moderately metamorphosed upper Proterozoic and Paleozoic marine strata, mostly miogeoclinal (continental shelf) rocks. The geology of Bare Mountain is mapped at a scale of 1:24,000.

Monsen, S.A.; Carr, M.D.; Reheis, M.C.; Orkild, P.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

UNITED STATES UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR i ..- - - - . WA-5 PROJECT REPORT West A f r i c a n S t a t e s (ECOWAS) Region I n v e s t i g a t i o n (1R)WA-5 USGS-OFR--82-714 DE84 900493 ASSESSMENT OF THE PETROLEUM, COAL,, AND GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES OF THE ECONOMIC COMMUNITY OF WEST AFRICAN STATES (ECOWAS) REGION Compiled by Robert E. M a t t i c k U.S. G e o l o g i c a l Survey Open-File Report 92 - 7/4! DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process

348

Geology of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA) is located on the northwestern margin of the Marysvale volcanic field in southwestern Utah. The geology of the KGRA is dominated by lava flows and ash-flow tuffs of late Oligocene to mid-Miocene age that were deposited on faulted sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic to Mesozoic age. The geothermal system of the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale KGRA is structurally controlled by normal faults. High-angle faults control fluid flow within the geothermal reservoir, while the gravitational glide blocks provide an impermeable cap for the geothermal system in the central part of the field. Surficial activity occurring to the north and south of the glide blocks is characterized by the evolution of hydrogen sulfide and deposition of native sulphur. Intense acid alteration of the aluvium, resulting from downward migration of sulphuric acid, has left porous siliceous residues that retain many of the original sedimentary structures. Detailed logs of Union Oil Company drill holes Forminco No. 1, Utah State 42-7, and Utah State 31-33 are included.

Moore, J.N.; Samberg, S.M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A compact neutron detector for a geology application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors recently designed and built a compact neutron detector for a geology experiment. The detector had to fit inside a 1.5-in.-diam borehole in a large block of concrete. They attached a gas-filled, 1-in.-diam {sup 3}He tube to a 1-in.-diam electronics preamplifier package of their design. The electronics package consists of a cylindrically shaped, high-voltage section and a single-channel analyzer with a buffered output. The low-voltage components are mounted on a printed-circuit board. The circuit board and the high-voltage section are attached to a semicylindrical base. The outputs consist of a light-emitting diode for visual observations and a fixed-width, TTL-compatible pulse for a counter. This internal assembly is equipped with coaxial connectors and slips into a thin-walled tube that serves as the preamplifier housing. Power for a detector is supplied by an external, high-voltage supply and a 5-Vdc supply.

Biddle, R.S.; Collinsworth, P.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Geological isotope anomalies as signatures of nearby supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearby supernova explosions may cause geological isotope anomalies via the direct deposition of debris or by cosmic-ray spallation in the earth's atmosphere. We estimate the mass of material deposited terrestrially by these two mechanisms, showing the dependence on the supernova distance. A number of radioactive isotopes are identified as possible diagnostic tools, such as Be-10, Al-26, Cl-36, Mn-53, Fe-60, and Ni-59, as well as the longer-lived I-129, Sm-146, and Pu-244. We discuss whether the 35 and 60 kyr-old Be-10 anomalies observed in the Vostok antarctic ice cores could be due to supernova explosions. Combining our estimates for matter deposition with results of recent nucleosynthesis yields, we calculate the expected signal from nearby supernovae using ice cores back to \\sim 300 kyr ago, and we discuss using deep ocean sediments back to several hundred Myr. In particular, we examine the prospects for identifying isotope anomalies due to the Geminga supernova explosion, and signatures of the possibility...

Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Schramm, David N; Ellis, John; Fields, Brian D; Schramm, David N

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Petroleum geology of the Gulf of California, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of California basin proper is a very young (late Miocene) feature in northwestern Mexico, produced by the tectonic interaction of the Pacific and American plates. Sediments are mostly siliciclastic with thicknesses that may exceed 8,000 m (26,248 ft). Exploratory drilling started in 1979 and since then, ten offshore and seven onshore wells have been spudded. Foremost among the former the Extremeno 1 well tested from a thin deltaic sand 4,115 m deep (13,501 ft) a daily flow of 6.2 million ft{sup 3} of gas and 130 bbl of gas condensate through a 0.25 in. choke with a pressure of 280 kg/cm{sup 2} (3,981 psi). In the southern part of the basin, the offshore Huichol 1 well was also a gas and condensate producer, albeit noncommercial. Geologically, the basin's favorable generation and trapping conditions make up a very attractive scenario for a future petroleum producing province, once exploration priorities are considered timely.

Guzman, A.E. (Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX), San Luis Potosi, Mexico)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Geological, Geophysical, And Thermal Characteristics Of The Salton Sea Geothermal Field, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is the largest water-dominated geothermal field in the Salton Trough in Southern California. Within the trough, local zones of extension among active right-stepping right-lateral strike-slip faults allow mantle-derived magmas to intrude the sedimentary sequence. The intrusions serves as heat sources to drive hydrothermal systems. We can characterize the field in detail because we have an extensive geological and geophysical data base. The sediments are relatively undeformed and can be divided into three categories as a function of depth: (1) low-permeability cap rock, (2) upper reservoir rocks consisting of sandstones, siltstones, and shales that were subject to minor alterations, and (3) lower reservoir rocks that were extensively altered. Because of the alteration, intergranular porosity and permeability are reduced with depth. permeability is enhanced by renewable fractures, i.e., fractures that can be reactivated by faulting or natural hydraulic fracturing subsequent to being sealed by mineral deposition. In the central portion of the field, temperature gradients are high near the surface and lower below 700 m. Surface gradients in this elliptically shaped region are fairly constant and define a thermal cap, which does not necessarily correspond to the lithologic cap. At the margin of the field, a narrow transition region, with a low near-surface gradient and an increasing gradient at greater depths, separates the high temperature resource from areas of normal regional gradient. Geophysical and geochemical evidence suggest that vertical convective motion in the reservoir beneath the thermal cap is confined to small units, and small-scale convection is superimposed on large-scale lateral flow of pore fluid. Interpretation of magnetic, resistivity, and gravity anomalies help to establish the relationship between the inferred heat source, the hydrothermal system, and the observed alteration patterns. A simple hydrothermal model is supported by interpreting the combined geological, geophysical, and thermal data. In the model, heat is transferred from an area of intrusion by lateral spreading of hot water in a reservoir beneath an impermeable cap rock.

Younker, L.W.; Kasameyer, P. W.; Tewhey, J. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Short note: A FORTRAN program to introduce field-measured sedimentary logs into reservoir modelling packages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building reservoir-scale facies models of outcrops is a practice that improves the three-dimensional geological modelling of subsurface analogues. Facies modelling of outcrops can be achieved either with geostatistical or object-based methods, which ...

O. Falivene; P. Arbus; J. Howell; O. Fernndez; P. Cabello; J. A. Muoz; L. Cabrera

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

GEOLOGY, January 2007 85Geology, January 2007; v. 35; no. 1; p. 8588; doi: 10.1130/G23101A.1; 5 figures; Data Repository item 2007026. 2007 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.o  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Hydrocarbon Source Rocks, Tight gas sand reservoirs Heaman, Larry Isotope geology, geochronology, geochemistry of petroleum; conventional and unconventional source rocks; principles of migration; reservoir rocks; traps and environmental concerns Gleeson, Sarah Economic geology, hydrothermal geochemistry, water/rock interactions Haas

Svensen, Henrik

356

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern Indiana, and an immiscible CO{sub 2} flood pilot was conducted in the Jackson sandstone (Mississippian System Big Clifty Sandstone Member) at the Sugar Creek Field in Hopkins County, western Kentucky. Up to 12% incremental oil recovery was estimated based on these pilots. A CO{sub 2} huff ??n?? puff (HNP) pilot project was conducted in the Cypress Sandstone in the Loudon Field. This pilot was designed to measure and record data that could be used to calibrate a reservoir simulation model. A pilot project at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois, tested the potential storage of CO{sub 2} in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} storage and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot results from all four sites showed that CO{sub 2} could be injected into the subsurface without adversely affecting groundwater. Additionally, hydrocarbon production was enhanced, giving further evidence that CO{sub 2} storage in oil reservoirs and coal beds offers an economic advantage. Results from the MVA program at each site indicated that injected CO{sub 2} did not leave the injection zone. Topical reports were completed on the Middle and Late Devonian New Albany Shale and Basin CO{sub 2} emissions. The efficacy of the New Albany Shale as a storage sink could be substantial if low injectivity concerns can be alleviated. CO{sub 2} emissions in the Illinois Basin were projected to be dominated by coal-fired power plants.

Robert Finley

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containment, then the natural gas storage model would haveApplication of the natural gas storage model for geo-VSP data recorded at a natural gas storage field in Indiana,

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Geology of the Waste Treatment Plant Seismic Boreholes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, DOE-ORP initiated the Seismic Boreholes Project (SBP) to emplace boreholes at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) site in order to obtain direct Vs measurements and other physical property measurements in Columbia River basalt and interbedded sediments of the Ellensburg Formation. The goal was to reduce the uncertainty in the response spectra and seismic design basis, and potentially recover design margin for the WTP. The characterization effort within the deep boreholes included 1) downhole measurements of the velocity properties of the suprabasalt, basalt, and sedimentary interbed sequences, 2) downhole measurements of the density of the subsurface basalt and sediments, and 3) confirmation of the geometry of the contact between the various basalt and interbedded sediments through examination of retrieved core from the corehole and data collected through geophysical logging of each borehole. This report describes the results of the geologic studies from three mud-rotary boreholes and one cored borehole at the WTP. All four boreholes penetrated the entire Saddle Mountains Basalt and the upper part of the Wanapum Basalt where thick sedimentary interbeds occur between the lava flows. The basalt flows penetrated in Saddle Mountains Basalt included the Umatilla Member, Esquatzel Member, Pomona Member and the Elephant Mountain Member. The underlying Priest Rapids Member of the Wanapum Basalt was also penetrated. The Ellensburg Formation sediments consist of the Mabton Interbed, the Cold Creek Interbed, the Selah Interbed and the Rattlesnake Ridge Interbed; the Byron Interbed occurs between two flows of the Priest Rapids Member. The Mabton Interbed marks the contact between the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts. The thicknesses of the basalts and interbedded sediments were within expected limits. However, a small reverse fault was found in the Pomona Member flow top. This fault has three periods of movement and less than 15 feet of repeated section. Most of the movement on the fault appears to have occurred before the youngest lava flow, the 10.5 million year old Elephant Mountain Member was emplaced above the Pomona Member.

Barnett, D. BRENT; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Fecht, Karl R.; Lanigan, David C.; Reidel, Steve; Rust, Colleen F.

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The U.S. Geological Survey World Energy Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Geological Survey has conducted four assessments of world oil and gas resources over the past 15 years. Recently, a new five year plan for the World Energy Program was completed. Eight regional coordinators were appointed and planning activities for a new world assessment which will include oil, natural gas and coal resources is planned within four years. Currently the program is undertaking U.S. AID sponsored collaborative work with research organizations in Russia including VINIGNI and VNIGRI. Some of the products planned for this collaborative effort include a petroleum basin map of the former Soviet Union and eventually a basin map of the world at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and databases characterizing past exploration activities in Russia. Centers are being established in Moscow and Tyumen to where state of the art seismic processing, organic geochemistry and geographic information systems will be operational. Additionally, collaborative research particularly organic geochemical studies and unconventional natural gas studies in the Timon-Pechora basin are underway. Training of Russian scientists both at the USGS and in Russia on equipment purchased for the Russian institutes has been underway for the past year. An analogous program, but at a smaller scale, focusing primarily on seismic processing and compilation of databases is underway with Ukranian geologists. Similar collaborative activities in coal research are underway in Armenian and Kyrgyzstan, and recently completed in India and Pakistan. Collaborative organic geochemical research, natural gas research with particular emphasis on basin centered gas accumulations or unconventional natural gas accumulations such as coal bed methane have been undertaken or are anticipated in several countries including Hungary, Poland, China, several Middle East countries, South America and Indonesia.

Ahlbrandt, T.S. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

EPRI Review of Geologic Disposal for Used Fuel and High Level Radioactive Waste: Volume II--U.S. Regulations for Geologic Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to site and construct a deep geologic repository for used fuel and high level radioactive waste (HLW) proceeded sporadically over a three-decade period from the late 1950s until 1982, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) codifying a national approach for developing a deep geologic repository. Amendment of the NWPA in 1987 resulted in a number of dramatic changes in direction for the U.S. program, most notably the selection of Yucca Mountain as the only site of t...

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ozkocak, 1985) Ozkocak, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations (Ozkocak, 1985) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes CONTRIBUTION OF THE LATEST ADVANCES IN GEOLOGY, GEOCHEMISTRY AND GEOPHYSICS TO GEOTHERMAL PROSPECTING. Twenty-five papers were received on this topic, 14 of them concerning geology, four geochemistry and seven geophysics. The papers dealing with geology describe attempts to build models of underground geothermal activity and study the factors that control the formation of reservoir and cap rocks (regional plate tectonics, local tectonics, stratigraphy, geochemistry and volcanism) and the relations

363

Preliminary subsurface hydrologic considerations: Columbia River Plateau Physiographic Province. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a discussion of the hydrologic conditions of the Columbia River Plateau physiographic province. The Columbia River Plateau is underlain by a thick basalt sequence. The Columbia River basalt sequence contains both basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds. These sedimentary interbeds, which are layers of sedimentary rock between lava flows, are the main aquifer zones in the basalt sequence. Permeable interflow zones, involving the permeable top and/or rubble bottom of a flow, are also water-transmitting zones. A number of stratigraphic units are present in the Pasco Basin, which is in the central part of the Columbia River Plateau. At a conceptual level, the stratigraphic sequence from the surface downward can be separated into four hydrostratigraphic systems. These are: (1) the unsaturated zone, (2) the unconfined aquifer, (3) the uppermost confined aquifers, and (4) the lower Yakima basalt hydrologic sequence. A conceptual layered earth model (LEM) has been developed. The LEM represents the major types of porous media (LEM units) that may be encountered at a number of places on the Columbia Plateau, and specifically in the Pasco Basin. The conceptual LEM is not representative of the actual three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic sequence and hydrologic conditions existing at any specific site within the Columbia Plateau physiographic province. However, the LEM may be useful for gaining a better understanding of how the hydrologic regime may change as a result of disruptive events that may interact with a waste repository in geologic media.

Veatch, M.D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

365

The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect

Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior suggestive of CO{sub 2} seepage without need for detailed understanding of natural system processes. Because of the local extrema in CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in natural systems, simple steepest-descent algorithms are not effective and evolutionary computation algorithms are proposed as a paradigm for dynamic monitoring networks to pinpoint CO{sub 2} seepage areas.

Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Geologic investigation of Playa Lakes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada : data report.  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface geological investigations have been conducted at two large playa lakes at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada. These characterization activities were intended to provide basic stratigraphic-framework information regarding the lateral distribution of ''hard'' and ''soft'' sedimentary materials for use in defining suitable target regions for penetration testing. Both downhole geophysical measurements and macroscopic lithilogic descriptions were used as a surrogate for quantitative mechanical-strength properties, although some quantitative laboratory strength measurements were obtained as well. Both rotary (71) and core (19) holes on a systematic grid were drilled in the southern half of the Main Lake; drill hole spacings are 300 ft north-south and 500-ft east-west. The drilled region overlaps a previous cone-penetrometer survey that also addressed the distribution of hard and soft material. Holes were drilled to a depth of 40 ft and logged using both geologic examination and down-hole geophysical surveying. The data identify a large complex of very coarse-grained sediment (clasts up to 8 mm) with interbedded finer-grained sands, silts and clays, underlying a fairly uniform layer of silty clay 6 to 12 ft thick. Geophysical densities of the course-grained materials exceed 2.0 g/cm{sup 2}, and this petrophysical value appears to be a valid discriminator of hard vs. soft sediments in the subsurface. Thirty-four holes, including both core and rotary drilling, were drilled on a portion of the much larger Antelope Lake. A set of pre-drilling geophysical surveys, including time-domain electromagnetic methods, galvanic resistivity soundings, and terrain-conductivity surveying, was used to identify the gross distribution of conductive and resistive facies with respect to the present lake outline. Conductive areas were postulated to represent softer, clay-rich sediments with larger amounts of contained conductive ground water. Initial drilling, consisting of cored drill holes to 100-ft (33-m) depth, confirmed both the specific surface geophysical measurements and the more general geophysical model of the subsurface lake facies. Good agreement of conductive regions with drill holes containing little to no coarse-grained sediments was observed, and vice-versa. A second phase of grid drilling on approximately 300-ft (100-m) centers was targeted a delineating a region of sufficient size containing essentially no coarse-grained ''hard'' material. Such a region was identified in the southwestern portion of Antelope Lake.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test DOE Targets Rural Indiana Geologic Formation for CO2 Storage Field Test November 12, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) team of regional partners has begun injecting 8,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate the carbon storage potential and test the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of the Mississippian-aged Clore Formation in Posey County, Ind. Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is seen as a key technology for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and helping to mitigate climate change. The injection, which is expected to last 6-8 months, is an integral step in DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is conducting the field test to

369

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage September 16, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2). View Project Details Funding for the projects includes $49.75 million from the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and will result in substantial employment opportunities for local and regional organizations over the next three years while providing hands-on scientific experience for individuals looking to be employed in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry.

370

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

371

NETL: News Release - DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 5, 2010 DOE Manual Studies 11 Major CO2 Geologic Storage Formations Information in Comprehensive Report Important to Carbon Capture and Storage Research Washington, D.C. - A comprehensive study of 11 geologic formations suitable for permanent underground carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is contained in a new manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States Geologic Storage Formation Classifications: Understanding Its Importance and Impact on CCS Opportunities in the United States [click on image to link to the publication] Using data from DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) and other sponsored research activities, the Office of Fossil Energy's

372

Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leveraging regionaL expLoration Leveraging regionaL expLoration to DeveLop geoLogic Framework For co 2 Storage in Deep FormationS Background The Midwestern region encompasses numerous coal-fired power plants that could be adversely impacted by carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emission control restrictions. Geologic sequestration could be a viable option to mitigate the CO 2 emissions within this region. Unfortunately, the understanding of rock properties within deep forma- tions in the region is poorly understood due to lack of deep well data. Under this project, regional geologic characterization is being refined with new rock property data being collected in collaboration with regional oil and gas drilling companies. Description The project is designed to develop an improved understanding of the geologic frame-

373

DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage DOE Selects Projects to Monitor and Evaluate Geologic CO2 Storage August 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the selection of 19 projects to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. The projects' total value is approximately $35.8 million over four years, with $27.6 million of DOE funding and $8.2 million of non-Federal cost sharing. The work will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Coal is the Nation's most abundant energy resource, supplying nearly 50 percent of domestic electricity. In order for low-cost electricity from

374

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada EIS-0250: Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada Summary This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed action to construct, operate, monitor, and eventually close a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The EIS evaluates not only impacts from constructing, operating, monitoring, and closing a repository, but also from transporting the materials from 72 commercial and 4 DOE sites to the Yucca Mountain repository site in Nye County, Nevada. Public Comment Opportunities

375

Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 97. Total U.S. tight oil production by geologic formation, 2011-2040 (million barrels per day) Permian Basin Bakken Eagle Ford

376

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits. A selected, annotated bibliography  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 479 references encompassing the fields of uranium and thorium geochemistry and mineralogy, geology of uranium deposits, uranium mining, and uranium exploration techniques has been compiled by the Ecological Sciences Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The bibliography was produced for the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program, which is funded by the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy. The references contained in the bibliography have been divided into the following eight subject categories: (1) geology of deposits, (2) geochemistry, (3) genesis O deposits, (4) exploration, (5) mineralogy, (6) uranium industry, (7) reserves and resources, and (8) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas. All categories specifically refer to uranium and thorium; the last category contains basic geologic information concerning areas which the Grand Junction Office feels are particularly favorable for uranium deposition. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, taxonomic name, and keyword.

Garland, P.A.; Thomas, J.M.; Brock, M.L.; Daniel, E.W. (comps.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Underground mining and deep geologic disposal - Two compatible and complementary activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active and mature underground mining districts offer conditions favorable to deep geologic disposal because their geology is known in more detail, the feasibility of underground excavations has already been demonstrated, mining leaves distinctive footprints and records that alert subsequent generations to the anthropogenic alterations of the underground environment, and subsequent exploration and production proceeds with great care and accuracy to locate and generally to avoid old mine workings. Compatibility of mining with deep geologic waste disposal has been proven by decades of experience with safe storage and disposal in former mines and in the mined-out areas of still active mining operations. Mineral extraction around an intended repository reduces the incentive for future disturbance. Incidental features of mineral exploration and extraction such as lost circulation zones, allochthonous backfill, and permanent surface markers can deter future intrusion into a repository. Thus exploration and production of mineral resources should be compatible with, and complementary to, deep geologic waste disposal.

Rempe, N.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Assessment of the geothermal resources of Indiana based on existing geologic data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The general geology of Indiana is presented including the following: physiography, stratigraphy, and structural features. The following indicators of geothermal energy are discussed: heat flow and thermal gradient, geothermal occurrences, seismic activity, geochemistry, and deep sedimentary basins. (MHR)

Vaught, T.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and testing the wells. Capay Shale Gas Reservoir Pilot Thewithin the Middle Capay shale Figure 3. Typical geologic2 is in the Middle Capay Shale. at a depth of 928 m (3044

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). U.S. Natural Gas Storage. http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_OF UNDERGROUND NATURAL GAS STORAGE TO GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATIONof underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Holocene valley fill sequence in south Louisiana: A geological and geotechnical interpretation based on results of two deep cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Louisiana Geological Survey--US Geological Survey cooperative research program concerning wetland subsidence in Terrebonne and Lafourche Parishes, Louisiana, funded two deep research borings, each of which recovered core of the entire Holocene valley fill. These boreholes, 22 km apart in dip direction, were logged by porosity and resistivity tools and calibrated to cone penetrometer and seismic profiles immediately offsetting them. Major deltaic cycles and ravinement surfaces were recognized in each core by ROCKEVAL pyrolysis, [sup 13]C isotope signatures, shifts of increasing radiocarbon age with depth, shifts of increasing resistivity and density with depth, microfossil analysis, and the presence and type of shell material. Data collected in this project suggest the top of the Pleistocene in this onshore, fluvially-dominated section may not be the top of Substratum sands, but significantly higher in the section, as determined by the strongest positive reflection coefficient below the 10,000 year radiocarbon datum. This satisfies the criterion that this operational boundary be mappable and chronostratigraphic. Additionally, the presence of two growth faults in the northern part of the study area may have acted as sites for preferential thickening of the Holocene. Both reasons stated above profoundly influence the modeling of Holocene thickness and consolidation settlement potential, critical for understanding subsurface controls on wetland loss.

Kuecher, G.J.; Roberts, H.H.; Suhayda, J.H. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)); McGinnis, L.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALE-AMR ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu, John Bernard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder June 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid equations is an additional term in the stress tensor. We show results of applying the model to an expanding Al droplet surrounded by an Al vapor, where additional droplets are created. 1 Introduction The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment II (NDCX II) is an induction accelerator planned for initial commissioning in 2012. The final design calls for a 3 MeV, Li+ ion beam, delivered in a bunch with characteristic pulse duration of 1 ns, and transverse dimension of order 1 mm. The

385

Preliminary digital geologic maps of the Mariposa, Kingman, Trona, and Death Valley Sheets, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parts of four 1:250,000-scale geologic maps by the California Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mines and Geology have been digitized for use in hydrogeologic characterization. These maps include the area of California between lat. 35{degree}N; Long. 115{degree}W and lat. 38{degree}N, long. 118{degree}W of the Kingman Sheet (Jennings, 1961), Trona Sheet (Jennings and others, 1962), Mariposa Sheet (Strand, 1967), and Death Valley Sheet (Streitz and Stinson, 1974). These digital maps are being released by the US Geological Survey in the ARC/INFO Version 6.1 Export format. The digitized data include geologic unit boundaries, fault traces, and identity of geologic units. The procedure outlined in US Geological Survey Circular 1054 (Soller and others, 1990) was sued during the map construction. The procedure involves transferring hard-copy data into digital format by scanning manuscript maps, manipulating the digital map data, and outputting the data. Most of the work was done using Environmental Systems Research Institute`s ARC/INFO software. The digital maps are available in ARC/INFO Rev. 6.1 Export format, from the USGS, Yucca Mountain Project, in Denver, Colorado.

D`Agnese, F.A.; Faunt, C.C.; Turner, A.K. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation: Second Worldwide Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Site Scale Model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. LawrenceHazard Analysis for Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Draft Report,and A4. D. Voegele 1. Yucca Mountain Site Characterization

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review  

SciTech Connect

The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When the scCO2 was released from the reactor, less than 60% of the injected lighter compounds (benzene, toluene) were transported through dry sand column by the CO2, while more than 90% of the heavier organics were trapped in the sand column. For wet sand columns, most (80% to 100%) of the organic compounds injected into the sand column passed through, except for naphthalene which was substantial removed from the CO2 within the column. A spectrophotometric method was developed to measure pH in brines in contact with scCO2. This method provides an alternative to fragile glass pH electrodes and thermodynamic modeling approaches for estimating pH. The method was tested in simulated reservoir fluids (CO2NaClH2O) at different temperatures, pressures, and ionic strength, and the results were compared with other experimental studies and geochemical models. Measured pH values were generally in agreement with the models, but inconsistencies were present between some of the models.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

390

Recovery Act: Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this project is to provide training opportunities for two graduate students in order to improve the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. The graduate student effort will be geared towards the formulation and implementation of an integrated simulation-optimization framework to provide a rigorous scientific support to the design CCS systems that, for any given site: (a) maximize the amount of carbon storage; (b) minimize the total cost associated with the CCS project; (c) minimize the risk of CO2 upward leakage from injected formations. The framework will stem from a combination of data obtained from geophysical investigations, a multiphase flow model, and a stochastic multi-objective optimization algorithm. The methodology will rely on a geostatistical approach to generate ensembles of scenarios of the parameters that are expected to have large sensitivities and uncertainties on the model response and thus on the risk assessment, in particular the permeability properties of the injected formation and its cap rock. The safety theme will be addressed quantitatively by including the risk of CO2 upward leakage from the injected formations as one the objectives that should be minimized in the optimization problem. The research performed under this grant is significant to academic researchers and professionals weighing the benefits, costs, and risks of CO2 sequestration. Project managers in initial planning stages of CCS projects will be able to generate optimal tradeoff surfaces and with corresponding injection plans for potential sequestration sites leading to cost efficient preliminary project planning. In addition, uncertainties concerning CCS have been researched. Uncertainty topics included Uncertainty Analysis of Continuity of Geological Confining Units using Categorical Indicator Kriging (CIK) and the Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to Overlying Formations. Reductions in uncertainty will lead to safer CCS projects.

Bau, Domenico

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Pore-scale study of capillary trapping mechanism during CO2 injection in geological formations  

SciTech Connect

Geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} gas emerged as a promising solution for reducing amount of green house gases in atmosphere. A number of continuum scale models are available to describe the transport phenomena of CO{sub 2} sequestration. These models rely heavily on a phenomenological description of subsurface transport phenomena and the predictions can be highly uncertain. Pore-scale models provide a better understanding of fluid displacement processes, nonetheless such models are rare. In this work we use a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study pore-scale displacement and capillary trapping mechanisms of super-critical CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Simulations are carried out to investigate the effects of gravitational, viscous, and capillary forces in terms of Gravity, Capillary, and Bond numbers. Contrary to the other published continuum scale investigations, we found that not only Gravity number but also Capillary number plays an important role on the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. For large Gravity numbers (on the order of 10), most of the injected CO{sub 2} reaches the cap-rock due to gravity segregation. A significant portion of CO{sub 2} gets trapped by capillary forces when Gravity number is small (on the order of 0.1). When Gravity number is moderately high (on the order of 1), trapping patterns are heavily dependent on Capillary number. If Capillary number is very small (less than 0.001), then capillary forces dominate the buoyancy forces and a significant fraction of injected CO{sub 2} is trapped by the capillary forces. Conversely, if Capillary number is high (higher than 0.001), capillary trapping is relatively small since buoyancy dominates the capillary forces. In addition, our simulations reveal different types of capillary trapping and flow displacement mechanisms during and after injection. In gravity dominated cases leave behind was the widespread trapping mechanism. Division was the primary trapping mechanism in viscous dominated cases. In capillary dominated cases, snap-off of the CO{sub 2} plume is the most commonly observed displacement mechanism. Large CO{sub 2} blobs are created due to coalescence mechanism.

Bandara, Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Palmer, Bruce J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transporter-Model II (TRUPACT-II), and NRC has issuedand trailer with up to three TRUPACT-II containers (Figuresubstitute for one or more TRUPACT-IIs. As generator-site

Witherspoon editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson editor, G.S.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Estimation of channelized features in geological media using sparsity constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a new approach is studied for inverse modeling of ill-posed problems with spatially continuous parameters that exhibit sparseness in an incoherent basis (e.g. a Fourier basis). The solution is constrained ...

Jafarpour, Behnam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Comparison of resource assessment methods and geologic controls--deep natural gas plays and zones, United States and Russia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep (greater than 4.5 km--15,000 ft) conventional natural gas resources will play an important role in the future energy needs of the United States and Russia. Deep sedimentary basins are widespread in these countries and have formed in a variety of depositional and tectonic settings. Significant volumes of undiscovered deep natural gas are in the Gulf Coast, Anadarko, Permian, and Rocky Mountain basins of the U.S., and in the Timan-Pechora, West Siberia, East Siberia, and North and South Caspian basins of the former Soviet Union. Deep natural gas resources are regularly assessed by the All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Institute (VNIGRI) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of their normal research activities. Both VNIGRI and the USGS employ similar assessment methods involving play (or zone) analysis using geological data and based on an analysis of confirmed and hypothetical plays using field-size distributions, discovery-process models, and statistical estimation procedures that yield probabilistic estimates of undiscovered accumulations. Resource estimates for the deep structural and statigraphic plays of the Anadarko basin and deep Paleozoic zones in the Timan-Pechora basin are compared and contrasted using both methods. Differences in results of assessments between VNIGRI and USGS arise due to (1) the way in which plays/zones are defined, (2) different geochemical models for hydrocarbon generation as applied to hypothetical plays, (3) variations in the ways in which statistical estimation procedures are applied to plays and regions, and (4) differences in economic and technologic assumptions, reserve growth calculations, and accumulation size limits and ranges.

Dyman, T.S. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Belonin, M.D. (All-Russia Petroleum Research Exploration Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Austin, Austin, Texas, U.S.A. ABSTRACT R ock-physics models are presented describing gas-hydrate systems. Knapp, and R. Boswell, eds., Natural gas hydrates--Energy resource potential and associated geologic

Texas at Austin, University of

396

Operations modeling and analysis of an underground coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In general, it is quite difficult to describe and model operations and conveyance systems precisely in underground coal mines because of geological components, poor visibility, unreliable installed facilities, and difficult work conditions. In this study, ...

Kanna Miwa; Soemon Takakuwa

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Parametric Explosion Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

Ford, S R; Walter, W R

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.

Normark, W.R.; Herring, H.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Visualization of Geologic Stress Perturbations Using Mohr Diagrams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Huge salt formations, trapping large untapped oil and gas reservoirs, lie in the deepwater region of the Gulf of Mexico. Drilling in this region is high-risk and drilling failures have led to well abandonments, with each costing tens of millions of dollars. ... Keywords: Index Terms- Geomechanical modeling, Mohr diagrams, multiple coordinated views, tensor field visualization, tensor glyph.

Patricia Crossno; David H. Rogers; Rebecca M. Brannon; David Coblentz; Joanne T. Fredrich

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Entropic component analysis and its application in geological data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an entropic component analysis for identifying key parameters or variables and the joint effects of various parameters that characterize complex systems. This approach identifies key parameters through solving the variable selection problem. ... Keywords: Logistic likelihood function, Maximum entropy, Model selection, Oil-field brines, Sample classification

Chih-Yuan Tseng; Chien-Chih Chen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 26, Part 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to )/( nmn + & . This result is in agreement with experimental data of oil shale (Grady et al., 1980, 1972, p. 129-140. Grady D.E., Kipp M.E., « Continuum Modeling of Explosive Fracture in Oil Shale », Int

Seamons, Kent E.

403

Imaging Reservoir Quality: Seismic Signatures of Geologic Processes  

SciTech Connect

Lithofacies successions from diverse depositional environments show distinctive patterns in various rock-physics planes (velocity-porosity, velocity-density and porosity-clay). Four clear examples of decameter-scale lithofacies sequences are documented in this study: (1) Micocene fluvial deposits show an inverted-V pattern indicative of dispersed fabric, (2) a fining-upward sequence of mud-rich deep deposits shows a linear trend associated with laminated sand-clay mixtures, (3) sand-rich deposits show a pattern resulting from the scarcity of mixed lithofacies, and (4) a coarsening-upward sequence shows evidence of both dispersed and horizontally laminated mixed lithofacies, with predominating dispersed mixtures generated by bioturbation. It was observed that carbonate-cemented sandstones are extremely heterogeneous in the project deep-water study area. Those from the base of incisions are usually associated with lower shaliness, lower porosity and higher P-impedance, while from the top of flooding surfaces exhibit higher shaliness, higher porosity and lower P-impedance. One rock physics model that captures the observed impedance-porosity trend is the 'stiff-sand model'. For this model, the high-porosity end-member is unconsolidated sand whose initial porosity is a function of sorting and shaliness, while the low-porosity end-member is solid mineral. These two end points are joined with a Hashin-Shtrikman equation. A systematic variation of quartz:clay ratio from proximal to distal locations was observed in the study area even within a single facies. The quartz:clay ratio changes from [0.5:0.5] to [1:0] along the direction of flow, based on the trends of P-impedance vs. porosity as predicted by the rock model for uncemented sands. The results are in agreement with spill-and-fill sequence stratigraphic model in mini-basin setting. In addition, porosity at the distal location ({approx}25 % to 35%) is higher than the porosity at the proximal location ({approx}20 % to 23%). This trend is explained by a sequence stratigraphic model which predicts progressive increase in sorting by turbidity current along the flow, as well as, quantified by a rock model that heuristically accounts for sorting. The results can be applied to improve quantitative predication of sediment parameters from seismic impedance, away from well locations.

Department of Geophysics

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

405

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (10) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic

406

Anatomy Of A Middle Miocene Valles-Type Caldera Cluster- Geology Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anatomy Of A Middle Miocene Valles-Type Caldera Cluster- Geology Of The Anatomy Of A Middle Miocene Valles-Type Caldera Cluster- Geology Of The Okueyama Volcano-Plutonic Complex, Southwest Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Anatomy Of A Middle Miocene Valles-Type Caldera Cluster- Geology Of The Okueyama Volcano-Plutonic Complex, Southwest Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A deeply eroded root of a Miocene Valles-type caldera cluster is exposed in the Okueyama volcano-plutonic complex in Kyushu, southwest Japan. The complex shows the relationship between an ash-flow caldera and a vertically zoned granitic batholith. The igneous activity of this complex began with the eruption of the Sobosan dacitic tuff and collapse of the Sobosan cauldron (18 _ 13 km). After an erosion interval, the Katamukiyama

407

Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geology and alteration of the Coso Geothermal Area, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geology and alteration of the Coso geothermal area were mapped in conjunction with geophysical surveys and a deep drill test (CGEH-1) to facilitate selection of a follow-up drill site. The oldest rocks exposed at Coso are intermediate to mafic metamorphic rocks of uncertain age intruded by dikes and pods of quartz latite porphyry and felsite, and by a small

408

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geological Aspects Of The 2003-2004 Eruption Of Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Anatahan Volcano, Northern Mariana Islands, began erupting in May-June 2003. A series of subplinian explosive eruptions of andesite magma began at the Eastern Crater in the eastern part of the summit caldera on the evening of 10 May. Brown tephra was sent mainly westward by strong winds. Small-scale pyroclastic surges were discharged eastward outside the caldera in late May. An andesite lava dome that had once filled the inner crater was fragmented by phreatomagmatic explosions in the middle of June.

409

An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature geothermal system in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: An overview of the geology and secondary mineralogy of the high temperature geothermal system in Dixie Valley, Nevada Abstract Lithologic units encountered in the Dixie Valleygeothermalfield range from Triassic marine sediments toRecent basin-filling sediments. Structural features affectingthe location of the geothermal activity include Mesozoicthrusting. late Tertiary normal faulting andQuaternary to Recent normal faulting. The hydrothermalmineral suite is variable, due in part to rock-gasreactions. Author A. F. Waibel Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council Transactions, 1987

410

Environmental geology workshop for the Geysers--Calistoga known geothermal resources area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) is studying ways in which the environmental quality of The Geysers-Calistoga known geothermal resources area may be protected from any significant harmful consequences of future geothermal development. The LLL study includes the effects of development on air and water quality, geology, the ecosystem, socioeconomics, and noise. The Geothermal Resource Impact Projection Study (GRIPS) has grants to undertake similar work. On 28 and 29 November 1977, LLL and GRIPS jointly sponsored a workshop at Sonoma State College at which knowledgeable earth scientists presented their views on the potential geological hazards of geothermal development. The workshop produced recommendations for studies in geological mapping, slope stability, subsidence, seismicity, and groundwater hydrology. These recommendations will be evaluated along with other considerations and in conjunction with the other subjects of the LLL study. The results of the study will be contained in a preplanning report of final recommendations to the Department of Energy.

Ledbetter, G.; Crow, N.B.

1978-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

412

in three types of geological formations found in the United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in three types of geological formations found in the United States in three types of geological formations found in the United States and Canada: saline formations, unmineable coal seams, and oil and gas reservoirs. The methodologies are based on widely accepted assumptions associated with fluid distribution and displacement processes commonly applied in petroleum and groundwater science. Leadership for this document was provided by the Capacity and Fairways Subgroup, a subcommittee convened in 2006 by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Geological Working Group to develop the first carbon sequestration atlas. The document will be presented as an appendix in Atlas II, which DOE expects to release later this year. The Atlas recently won an APEX Grand Award for publication

413

Mathematical Geology, Vol. 33, No. 1, 2001 Modeling Uranium Transport in Koongarra,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the given paper consists in obtaining such data for depleted uranium and for four uranium alloys at strain comparison e.g. with depleted uranium. I f we use these materials for design of s t r u c t u r a l p a r Z o Fig. 3 : The effect of the strain rate on the Hugoniot stress -0- ,k A Depleted Uranium A/ o

Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

414

Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features of dense gas dispersion and to create a tool toonly. Passive vs. Dense Gas Dispersion The behavior of denseand atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The Newcastle geothermal system, Iron County, Utah: Geology, hydrology, and conceptual model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This appendix contains raw data used in the fault slip analysis. Data was collected from four sites, sites A through D. Minor fault slip measurements are listed for each site, and each row of data is one measurement. The index number is an arbitrary sequential number. Strike is the strike of the fault plane, measured in the northern hemisphere. Dip is the dip of the fault plane, which has two letters attached to the end showing the quadrant of the dip direction. Rake is the rake of the slickenside in the plane of the fault, which has two letters attached to the end showing the quadrant of the plunge direction of the rake. Sense is the sense of slip of the fault: N = normal (rake > 45{degree}), R = reverse (rake > 45{degree}), D = dextral (rake < 45{degree}), S = sinistral (rake < 45{degree}). 37 figs., 19 tabs.

Blackett, R.E.; Shubat, M.A.; Bishop, C.E. (Utah Geological and Mineral Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Chapman, D.S.; Forster, C.B.; Schlinger, C.M. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Engineering Geology 52 (1999) 231250 Mathematical modelling of groundwater flow at Sellafield, UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state, the of the quadrilaterals) are then calculated for each conservation of thermal energy can be expressed node Eq. (6). as/outflux sites and their driving energies effect of varying the hydraulic conductivity of theare separate Hotel, London. hydraulic conductivity of low permeability Black, J.H., Brightman, M.A., 1996. Conceptual

Haszeldine, Stuart

417

A Comparative Review of Hydrologic Issues Involved in Geologic Storage of CO2 and Injection Disposal of Liquid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pp. 112, 2005. DOE, Carbon sequestration research andNational Conference on Carbon Sequestration, National Energyverification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.

Tsang, C.-F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geology of the Yucca Mountain Region, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain has been proposed as the site for the Nation's first geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste. This chapter provides the geologic framework for the Yucca Mountain region. The regional geologic units range in age from late Precambrian through Holocene, and these are described briefly. Yucca Mountain is composed dominantly of pyroclastic units that range in age from 11.4 to 15.2 Ma. The proposed repository would be constructed within the Topopah Spring Tuff, which is the lower of two major zoned and welded ash-flow tuffs within the Paintbrush Group. The two welded tuffs are separated by the partly to nonwelded Pah Canyon Tuff and Yucca Mountain Tuff, which together figure prominently in the hydrology of the unsaturated zone. The Quaternary deposits are primarily alluvial sediments with minor basaltic cinder cones and flows. Both have been studied extensively because of their importance in predicting the long-term performance of the proposed repository. Basaltic volcanism began about 10 Ma and continued as recently as about 80 ka with the eruption of cones and flows at Lathrop Wells, approximately 10 km south-southwest of Yucca Mountain. Geologic structure in the Yucca Mountain region is complex. During the latest Paleozoic and Mesozoic, strong compressional forces caused tight folding and thrust faulting. The present regional setting is one of extension, and normal faulting has been active from the Miocene through to the present. There are three major local tectonic domains: (1) Basin and Range, (2) Walker Lane, and (3) Inyo-Mono. Each domain has an effect on the stability of Yucca Mountain.

J.S. Stuckless; D. O'Leary

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental study of potential wellbore cement carbonation by various phases of carbon dioxide during geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Hydrated Portland cement was reacted with carbon dioxide (CO2) in supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases to understand the potential cement alteration processes along the length of a wellbore, extending from deep CO2 storage reservoir to the shallow subsurface during geologic carbon sequestration. The 3-D X-ray microtomography (XMT) images displayed that the cement alteration was significantly more extensive by CO2-saturated synthetic groundwater than dry or wet supercritical CO2 at high P (10 MPa)-T (50C) conditions. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) analysis also exhibited a systematic Ca depletion and C enrichment in cement matrix exposed to CO2-saturated groundwater. Integrated XMT, XRD, and SEM-EDS analyses identified the formation of extensive carbonated zone filled with CaCO3(s), as well as the porous degradation front and the outermost silica-rich zone in cement after exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater. The cement alteration by CO2-saturated groundwater for 2-8 months overall decreased the porosity from 31% to 22% and the permeability by an order of magnitude. Cement alteration by dry or wet supercritical CO2 was slow and minor compared to CO2-saturated groundwater. A thin single carbonation zone was formed in cement after exposure to wet supercritical CO2 for 8 months or dry supercritical CO2 for 15 months. Extensive calcite coating was formed on the outside surface of a cement sample after exposure to wet gaseous CO2 for 1-3 months. The chemical-physical characterization of hydrated Portland cement after exposure to various phases of carbon dioxide indicates that the extent of cement carbonation can be significantly heterogeneous depending on CO2 phase present in the wellbore environment. Both experimental and geochemical modeling results suggest that wellbore cement exposure to supercritical, gaseous, and aqueous phases of CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration is unlikely to damage the wellbore integrity because cement alteration by all phases of CO2 is dominated by carbonation reaction. This is consistent with previous field studies of wellbore cement with extensive carbonation after exposure to CO2 for 3 decades. However, XMT imaging indicates that preferential cement alteration by supercritical CO2 or CO2-saturated groundwater can occur along the cement-steel or cement-rock interfaces. This highlights the importance of further investigation of cement degradation along the interfaces of wellbore materials to ensure permanent geologic carbon storage.

Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

3D modeling using geognostic data: The case of the low valley of Foglia river (Italy)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In specific geological contexts, such as alluvial environments, the lithology is highly heterogeneous and laterally variable. As a result, a large number of lithological data are collected (generally random and under sampled) for stratigraphic reconstruction. ... Keywords: 3D geological modeling, Data management workflow, GIS, Geostatistics, Multi-source data validation

G. Gallerini; M. De Donatis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "brophy model geologic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

422

Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1) Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nevada represents the proposed solution to what has been a lengthy national effort to dispose of high-level radioactive waste, waste which must be isolated from the biosphere for tens of thousands of years. This chapter reviews the background of that national effort and includes some discussion of international work in order to provide a more complete framework for the problem of waste disposal. Other chapters provide the regional geologic setting, the geology of the Yucca Mountain site, the tectonics, and climate (past, present, and future). These last two chapters are integral to prediction of long-term waste isolation.

R.A. Levich; J.S. Stuckless

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Preliminary Feasibility Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential for TVA's John Sevier and Kingston Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a preliminary assessment of the potential for geologic carbon sequestration for the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) John Sevier and Kingston power plants. The purpose of this assessment is to make a 'first cut' determination of whether there is sufficient potential for geologic carbon sequestration within 200 miles of the plants for TVA and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to proceed with a joint proposal for a larger project with a strong carbon management element. This assessment does not consider alternative technologies for carbon capture, but assumes the existence of a segregated CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration.

Smith, Ellen D [ORNL; Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

"Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage,"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide (CO of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). DE-FOA-0000652, titled, "Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage," addresses key geologic storage challenges and uncertainties that include improving and validating containment, improving injection operations, increasing reservoir storage efficiency, and mitigating potential releases of CO 2 from the engineered containment system. The following four technical areas of interest are addressed: Area of Interest 1 - Studies of Existing Wellbores Exposed to CO 2 ; Area of Interest 2 - Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies; Area of Interest 3 - Field Methods to Optimize Capacity and Ensure Storage Containment; and Area of Interest 4 - Enhanced Simulation Tools to Improve Predictions and

426

Method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological structures from a vertical bore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drilling horizontal holes in geological strata from a vertical position. The geological structures intended to be penetrated in this fashion are coal seams, as for in situ gasification or methane drainage, or in oil-bearing strata for increasing the flow rate from a pre-existing well. Other possible uses for this device might be for use in the leaching of uranium ore from underground deposits or for introducing horizontal channels for water and steam injections.

Summers, David A. (Rolla, MO); Barker, Clark R. (Rolla, MO); Keith, H. Dean (Rolla, MO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Geology and recognition criteria for uranium deposits of the quartz-pebble conglomerate type. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is concerned with Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates. This class of deposit has been estimated to contain between approximately 16 and 35 percent of the global uranium reserve in two rather small areas, one in Canada, the other in South Africa. Similar conglomerates, which are often gold-bearing, are, however, rather widespread, being found in parts of most Precambrian shield areas. Data have been synthesized on the geologic habitat and character of this deposit type. The primary objective has been to provide the most relevant geologic observations in a structural fashion to allow resource studies and exploration to focus on the most prospective targets in the shortest possible time.

Button, A.; Adams, S.S.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Regional topography, physiography, and geology of the Northern Great Plains. Open file report  

SciTech Connect

The report analyzes the topography, physiography and geology of a 63 county area in North Dakota, Montana, Wyoming, and South Dakota. Geologic maps are included. In addition 7 1/2 minute quadrangle slope maps are included for 5 selected sites that are representative of the areas that are likely to be impacted with accelerated coal development in the Northern Great Plains. These maps are provided as tools for planning transportation facilities, utility corridors, siting of mines and related facilities, controlling erosion, determining reclamation potential, and preparation of mining plans.

Keefer, W.R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The natural system is an integral part of a geologic nuclear waste repository; it extends from the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around a disposal room, created by mechanical, thermal and chemical perturbations due to underground excavation or waste emplacement, to the surrounding geologic media, and out to a specified repository boundary. The natural system evaluation and tool development work supports anticipated future site screening, site selection, site characterization, and site suitability. This work is conducted to reduce uncertainty in natural system performance

430

Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

2002 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; December 2002; v. 30; no. 12; p. 11031106; 5 figures. 1103  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002 Geological Society of America. For permission to copy, contact Copyright Permissions, GSA, or editing@geosociety.org. Geology; December 2002; v. 30; no. 12; p. 1103­1106; 5 figures. 1103 Hydrogen isotope ratios of palmitic acid in lacustrine sediments record late Quaternary climate variations Yongsong

Shuman, Bryan N.

432

Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of volcanism and are contemporaneous with resurgence of the caldera floor. If they are extensive sills rather than dikes, a possibility being investigated through relogging of core from neighboring wells, they were responsible for resurgence. A {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 769 {+-} 14 ka from Bishop Tuff at 820 m depth conforms with tuff ages from outside the caldera and indicates an absence of shallow hydrothermal activity (>300 C) persisting after emplacement. Work is proceeding on investigating hydrothermal alteration deeper in the well. This alteration includes sulfide+quartz fracture fillings, calcite+quartz replacement of feldspars, and disseminated pyrite in both the tuff and basement. Electron microprobe analysis of phases are being conducted to determine initial magmatic and subsequent hydrothermal conditions.

McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Geologic and hydrologic investigations of a potential nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain, southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain in southern Nye County, Nevada, has been selected by the United States Department of Energy as one of three potential sites for the nation`s first high-level nuclear waste repository. Its deep water table, closed-basin ground-water flow, potentially favorable host rock, and sparse population have made the Yucca Mountain area a viable candidate during the search for a nuclear waste disposal site. Yucca Mountain, however, lies within the southern Great Basin, a region of known contemporary tectonism and young volcanic activity, and the characterization of tectonism and volcanism remains as a fundamental problem for the Yucca Mountain site. The United States Geological Survey has been conducting extensive studies to evaluate the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain, as well as the timing and rates of tectonic and volcanic activity in the region. A workshop was convened by the Geologic Survey in Denver, Colorado, on August 19, 20, and 21, 1985, to review the scientific progress and direction of these studies. Considerable debate resulted. This collection of papers represents the results of some of the studies presented at the workshop, but by no means covers all of the scientific results and viewpoints presented. Rather, the volume is meant to serve as a progress report on some of the studies within the Geological Survey`s continuing research program toward characterizing the tectonic framework of Yucca Mountain. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Carr, M.D.; Yount, J.C. (eds.)

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

434

The WIPP is the nation's first geologic facility designed for permanent disposal of transuranic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WIPP is the nation's first geologic facility designed for permanent disposal of transuranic, New Mexico to dispose of this waste. The TRU waste being disposed at the WIPP is packaged into drums-level waste and spent nuclear fuel. The WIPP has a total capacity of 6.2 million cubic feet of TRU waste

435

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

436

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Strategic Metal for Green Technology: The Geologic Occurrence and Global Life Cycle of Lithium. Mainly due to the growing demand for lightweight and powerful batteries, lithium has become such a metal. While supplies of lithium have historically been mined from pegmatites, brine extraction from salars

437

ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PA ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

438

SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

439

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal laboratory characterisation for CO2 geological storage E.C. Gaucher1 *, P.D.C. Défossez1 storage of CO2 in unmineable coal seams could be a very interesting option in the sustainable management of coal basins. However, the various chemical and physical parameters that determine the success

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

440

Influence of the geological history of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-eight populations (210 individuals) were sequenced for one nuclear (rpb2) and two chloroplast (trnL­F and psb time, geology, Mexico, nuclear marker, phylogeography, plant spe- ciation, psbA­trnH, rpb2, Trans-Miocene around the mod- ern-day cities of Morelia and Queretaro in central Mexico, ª 2013 Blackwell Publishing

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon capture and storage in geologic formations has been proposed as a global warming mitigation strategy that can contribute to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide to maintain adsorbed methane in the coalbed formation. But now carbon dioxide will replace the methane

Mohaghegh, Shahab

442

Contrasting the Indian and East Asian monsoons: implications on geologic timescales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrasting the Indian and East Asian monsoons: implications on geologic timescales Bin Wang a for the strength of the Indian monsoon and East Asian monsoon, respectively. Paleo-monsoon variability has been studied through analysis of sediment records from these two monsoon regions. To facilitate interpretation

Wang, Bin

443

U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Natural Hazards Response is to ensure that the disaster response community has production as required for use in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery operations. USGS Natural Hazards Response Products and Services When disaster strikes there is often an urgent need and high demand

Fleskes, Joe

444

Marine Geology, 42 (1981) 133-153 Elsevier Scientific Publishing Company, Amsterdam -Printed in The Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the program, the investigators benefited from cooperative arrangements with other agencies and interests. A feature of special importance to seep geology is the subcircular mud mound. The side-scan sonar mosaics or no backscatter ("dead eye", Figure 4). Some of the uniformly high backscatter patches were mud mounds, although

Jumars, Pete

445

APPLICATION OF REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION AND GROUNDWATER POTENTIAL ZONE IDENTIFICATION,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPLICATION OF REMOTE SENSING AND GIS FOR GEOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION AND GROUNDWATER POTENTIAL ZONE FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER OF SCIENCE IN GIS AND REMOTE SENSING BY TEWODROS RANGO GODEBO JULY 2005 #12;INTRODUCTION been done with the absence of the application of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS

Mege, Daniel

446

GEOLOGICAL CONTROLS IN THE FORMATIONS AND EXPANSIONS OF GULLIES OVER HILLSLOPE HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES IN THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Northern Blue Nile River source region shallow depth highly weathered and fractured flood basalt watershed. Geologic features of the watershed include shallow depth, highly weathered and fractured basalt of the watershed. The basalt is exposed in the upper slope area and underlies most of the watershed, forming

447

Geologic assessment of the fossil energy and geothermal potential of the Sudan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This preliminary report provides geological input to the consideration of appropriate activities that can enhance the exploration and development of fossil-fuel and possible geothermal energy resources of the Sudan, and is based on study of available literature in early 1982. 59 references, 16 figures, 7 tables.

Setlow, L.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Preliminary geologic map of the geysers steam field and vicinity, Sonoma County, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The map symbols include: contact; axis of syncline; axis of anticline; fault; thrust fault; scarp line; landslide deposit; sag pond; hot spring; spring; and zone of hydrothermally altered rock. The attitude of planar surfaces is also indicated. Stratigraphic units are indicated. A generalized geologic map showing major faults and structural units of the Geysers area is included. (JGB)

McLaughlin, R.J.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of Five Sedimentary Rocks Other Than Salt for Geologic Repository Siting Purposes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE), in order to increase the diversity of rock types under consideration by the geologic disposal program, initiated the Sedimary ROck Program (SERP), whose immediate objectiv eis to evaluate five types of secimdnary rock - sandstone, chalk, carbonate rocks (limestone and dolostone), anhydrock, and shale - to determine the potential for siting a geologic repository. The evaluation of these five rock types, together with the ongoing salt studies, effectively results in the consideration of all types of relatively impermeable sedimentary rock for repository purposes. The results of this evaluation are expressed in terms of a ranking of the five rock types with respect to their potential to serve as a geologic repository host rock. This comparative evaluation was conducted on a non-site-specific basis, by use of generic information together with rock evaluation criteria (RECs) derived from the DOE siting guidelines for geologic repositories (CFR 1984). An information base relevant to rock evaluation using these RECs was developed in hydrology, geochemistry, rock characteristics (rock occurrences, thermal response, rock mechanics), natural resources, and rock dissolution. Evaluation against postclosure and preclosure RECs yielded a ranking of the five subject rocks with respect to their potential as repository host rocks. Shale was determined to be the most preferred of the five rock types, with sandstone a distant second, the carbonate rocks and anhydrock a more distant third, and chalk a relatively close fourth.

Croff, A.G.; Lomenick, T.F.; Lowrie, R.S.; Stow, S.H.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

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