Sample records for brookhaven graphite research

  1. Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II. Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

  2. BGRR-048, Rev. C Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BGRR-048, Rev. C Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project DRAFT CANAL AND WATER ....................................................................................... 1 2.2 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

  3. BGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................................................................ 17 4.0 Waste Management 17 5.0 Lessons Learned 18 6.0 REFERENCES 19 Appendix A Action MemorandumBGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project FINAL COMPLETION

  4. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National Nuclear Data Center - 1952* High Flux Beam Reactor - 1964 Technical Support for NRC - 1974

  5. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  6. Lessons Learned from the Application of Bulk Characterization to Individual Containers on the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory - 12056

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneitel, Terri [US DOE, Brookhaven Site Office (United States); Rocco, Diane [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When conducting environmental cleanup or decommissioning projects, characterization of the material to be removed is often performed when the material is in-situ. The actual demolition or excavation and removal of the material can result in individual containers that vary significantly from the original bulk characterization profile. This variance, if not detected, can result in individual containers exceeding Department of Transportation regulations or waste disposal site acceptance criteria. Bulk waste characterization processes were performed to initially characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) graphite pile and this information was utilized to characterize all of the containers of graphite. When the last waste container was generated containing graphite dust from the bottom of the pile, but no solid graphite blocks, the material contents were significantly different in composition from the bulk waste characterization. This error resulted in exceedance of the disposal site waste acceptance criteria. Brookhaven Science Associates initiated an in-depth investigation to identify the root causes of this failure and to develop appropriate corrective actions. The lessons learned at BNL have applicability to other cleanup and demolition projects which characterize their wastes in bulk or in-situ and then extend that characterization to individual containers. (authors)

  7. Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  8. Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  9. Summer Research Internship Program (FY94) Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toler, L.T.; Indusi, J.P.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Summer Research Internship Program is a new program that allows high school teachers to participate and assist scientific staff at national laboratories in specific research assignments. This participation allows the high school teachers to become familiar with new technology and have ``hands-on`` experience with experiments and equipment which utilize both mathematics and science skills. Teachers also have the opportunity to advance their new and well-developed software. This enlightenment and experience is brought back into their schools and classrooms in the hopes that their peers and students will realize the excitement that knowledge and education in the areas of mathematics and science can bring. The Safeguards, Safety and Nonproliferation Division of the Department of Advanced Technology at Brookhaven National Laboratory utilized five high school teachers during FY94 in various projects. The project assignments and internship activities are outlined in this paper.

  10. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  11. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  12. Brookhaven highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  13. Photo of the Week: The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  14. Photo of the Week: The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  15. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  16. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the second one following the Berkeley Summer Program taken place in June of 2009. This program at BNL focused on theory and had many presentations on a wide range of theoretical aspects on nucleon spin, from perturbative-QCD calculations to models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. It also had a good number of summary talks from all major experimental collaborations on spin physics. The program facilitated many discussions between theorists as well as experimentalists. With five transparencies from each presentation at the Summer Program, this proceedings provides a valuable summary on the status and progress, as well as the future prospects of spin physics.

  17. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  18. 428th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Brookhaven Lab, a team of researchers has overcome a major x-ray focusing obstacle to allow the study of molecules, atoms, and advanced materials at the nanoscale, which is on the order of billionths of a meter. Their innovative method uses a type of refractive lens called a kinoform lens --similar to the kind found in lighthouses -- in order to focus the x-rays down to the extremely small spots needed for a sharp image at small dimensions.

  19. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  20. 452nd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nikolaos Simos

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nikolaos Simos of Brookhaven?s Energy Sciences and Technology Department and the National Synchrotron Light Source II Project presents ?Extreme Environments of Next-Generation Energy Systems and Materials: Can They Peacefully Co-Exist??

  1. 427th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gene-Jack Wang

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans.

  2. Brookhaven Highlights, October 1, 1987--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Seubert, L.; Horner Kuper, J.B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's research activities for fiscal year 1988. Research programs range from physics and chemistry to medical and biology. (JF)

  3. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  4. Some Long Range Impacts of Research at the BGRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Associates U.S. Department of Energy #12;Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor · The first reactor basic nuclear research that was key #12;Measurement of Cross sections · A major activity the whimsical name "barn" as in as "big as a barn door" BNL produced the "barn book" ­ compilation of neutron

  5. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  6. 429th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robert P. Crease

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robert P. Crease, historian for Brookhaven National Laboratory and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University, presents "How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Lab," covering the founding of the Laboratory, the key figures involved in starting BNL, and the many problems that had to be overcome in creating and designing its first big machines.

  7. Preliminary Notice of Violation, Brookhaven Science Associates...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC - WEA-2013-01 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC - WEA-2013-01 August 29, 2013 Issued to Brookhaven Science...

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Site OverviewThe Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) (predecessor to U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). Formerly Camp Upton, a U.S....

  9. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  10. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the formation of quarkonium in nuclear medium as well as the strong interacting quark-gluon matter produced in heavy ion collisions; and heavy quarkonium properties from the first principle lattice calculations. The heavy quarkonium production at a future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) was also discussed at the meeting. The highlight of the meeting was the apparent success of the NRQCD approach at next-to-leading order in the description of the quarkonium production in proton-proton, electron-proton and electron positron collisions. Still many questions remain open in lattice calculations of in-medium quarkonium properties and in the area of cold nuclear matter effects.

  11. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  12. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Vanier

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  13. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL Sealed Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY Sealed Source Contamination Incident October 13, 2011 #12;2 Cesium (Cs-137) Source Failure On September 28th @ ~1600 contamination event discovered Two Radiological Contamination was from a Cs-137 (265 micro-curie) "sealed source" used to test area radiation monitors. Source

  14. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Robert Crease

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  15. 423rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mei Bai

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

  16. 418th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Timur Shaftan

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NSLS-II project will establish a third-generation light source at Brookhaven Lab, increasing beam-line brightness by 10,000. Achieving and maintaining this will involve tightly focusing the electron beam, providing the most efficient insertion devices, and achieving and maintaining a high electron current. In this talk, the various sub-systems of NSLS-II will be reviewed, and the requirements and key elements of their design will be discussed. In addition, the a small prototype of a light source of a different kind that was developed by the NSLS will also be discussed.

  17. Brookhaven Symposium Biology 32

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Monash researchers led by Dr. Dan Li have developed a novel method for converting natural graphite into highly porous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, David

    natural graphite into highly porous graphene film for advanced applications. Figure 1: illustrates the conversion of inexpensive & abundant graphite into highly porous, mechanically robust conductive films (eg capacitors, batteries and fuel cells) n LCD displays and photovoltaic devices n Composites

  19. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  20. Brookhaven Women in Science Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johanna Levelt Sengers

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sponsored by Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS), Johanna Levelt Sengers, Scientist Emeritus at the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), presents a talk titled "The World's Science Academies Address the Under-Representation of Women in Science and Technology."

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory Solar Energy and Smarter Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Solar Energy and Smarter Grid Research Update Presented to BNL CAC on Market Barriers #12;5 BNL's research agenda for solar energy and smarter electric grid focuses on two key areas Advancement of Solar Energy Generation in Northeast · Characterization of renewable generation

  2. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  3. Environmental, Safety, Security, and Health Policy Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Environmental, Safety, Security, and Health Policy Brookhaven National Laboratory This document is a statement of BNL's ESSH policy. BNL is a world leader in scientific research and strives to demonstrate's progress on ESSH goals and adherence to this policy, I invite all interested parties to provide me

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    /2010) BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY LASER CONTROLLED AREA STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE (SOP) This document defines) Beam Diameter (mm) DPSS 532 3B 23 mW CW NA OPERATIONS Operation Maintenance the safety management program for the laser system(s) listed below. All American National Standard Institute

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0057 01 Effective: Page 1 of 9 06 Chris Weilandics Signature on file Department ES&H Approval printed name Signature Date Lori Stiegler Signature on file #12;Number: PS-ESH-0057 Revision: 01 Effective: 06/08/12 Page 2 of 9 The only official

  6. EIS-0003: Proton-Proton Storage Accelerator Facility (Isabelle), Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the significant environmental effects associated with construction and operation of the ISABELLE research facility to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  7. 403rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Saskia Mioduszewski

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Probing the Matter Created at RHIC." Mioduszewski discusses the results from RHIC's experimental collaborations and how researchers hope to create a form of matter in which the basic building blocks of matter -- quarks and gluons -- interact freely in what is called quark gluon plasma.

  8. 456th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Allen Orville

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orville presents ?Getting More From Less: Correlated Single-Crystal Spectroscopy and X-ray Crystallography at the NSLS? in which he discusses how researchers can use many different tools and techniques to study atomic structure and electronic structure to provide insights into chemistry.

  9. 401st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Marcelo Vasquez

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Hazards of the Deep: Killing the Dragons -- Neurobiological Consequences of Space Radiation Exposures." Vazquez discusses his research projects and how scientists from NASA, national laboratories, and other institutions worldwide have expanded the understanding of the link between ionizing radiation and neurodegeneration.

  10. 440th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rita Goldstein

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goldstein describes drug-addiction research, in which she tested a theoretical model postulating that drug-addicted individuals disproportionately attribute value to their drug of choice -- at the expense of other potentially but no-longer-rewarding stimuli and at the same time, experience decreased ability to inhibit their drug use.

  11. 415th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ivan Bozovic

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Atomic-Layer Engineering of Cuprate Superconductors." Copper-oxide compounds, called cuprates, show superconducting properties at 163 degrees Kelvin, the highest temperature of any known superconducting material. Cuprates are therefore among the "high-temperature superconductors" of extreme interest both to scientists and to industry. Research to learn their secrets is one of the hottest topics in the field of materials science.

  12. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  13. 417th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Huilin Li

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proteins that cleave other proteins using a molecule of water, protease complexes are exquisite macromolecular machines involved in a multitude of physiological and cellular reactions. Our structural studies shed light into the inner workings of multi-protein assemblies, and they reveal a surprisingly common strategy for controlled proteolysis employed by the two drastically different machines. Further research will facilitate rational design of drugs for treating Tb infection and Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Preparation of graphitic articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan; Nemer, Martin; Weigle, John C.

    2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphitic structures have been prepared by exposing templates (metal, metal-coated ceramic, graphite, for example) to a gaseous mixture that includes hydrocarbons and oxygen. When the template is metal, subsequent acid treatment removes the metal to yield monoliths, hollow graphitic structures, and other products. The shapes of the coated and hollow graphitic structures mimic the shapes of the templates.

  15. Department of Energy Cites Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC for Worker Safety and Health Violations...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Brookhaven National Laboratory...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory Buildings 353 354 467 and 468 - NY 14 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Brookhaven National Laboratory Buildings 353 354 467 and 468 (NY.14 ) Designated...

  17. Energy Department Awards New Contract to Manage and Operate Brookhaven...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract to Manage and Operate Brookhaven National Laboratory Energy Department Awards New Contract to Manage and Operate Brookhaven National Laboratory November 12, 2014 -...

  18. Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 Type B Accident Investigation of the Arc Flash at Brookhaven National Laboratory, April 14, 2006 February 10, 2006 An...

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0027 06 copy of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: PS-ESH-0025 01 of this file is the one on-line in the NSLS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the NSLS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Brookhaven National Laboratory National Synchrotron Light Source Number: Revision: LS-ESH-0026 4 of this file is the one on-line in the PS ESH website. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the document issue date on the PS ESH website. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  2. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2001 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE HELD AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, N.Y., APRIL 30 - MAY 1, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCDONALD, R.J.

    2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL is proud to acknowledge all of our 2001 sponsors, with their help and support this has correctly become an oilheat industry conference. It is quite gratifying to see an industry come together to help support an activity like the technology conference, for the benefit of the industry as a whole and to celebrate the beginning of the National Oilheat Research Alliance. This meeting is the fourteenth oil heat industry technology conference to be held since 1984 and the first under a new name, NORA, the National Oilheat research Alliance, and the very first in the new century. The conference is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Program. The Oilheat Research Program at BNL is under the newly assigned program management at the Office of Power Technology within the US DOE. The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation. Seventeen technical presentations will be made during the two-day program, all related to oil-heat technology and equipment, these will cover a range of research, developmental, and demonstration activities being conducted within the United States and Europe, including: (1) High-flow Fan Atomization Burner (HFAB) Development and Field Trials; (2) Field Test of the Flame Quality Monitor; (3) NORA/DOE/ BNL Oilheat Five-Year Research Plan; (4) US Department of Energy's Building Cooling Heating and Power for Buildings Program; (5) NORA Education Committee Report; (6) Marketing Oil Heat in Europe: A study in contrasts; (7) Diagnosing Burner Problems with Recorded Data ''The solution to any problem is obvious.. . once it is found''; (8) Variable Firing Rate Oil Burner Using Pulse Fuel Flow Control; (9) Oil-Fired Hydronic Heating Appliances with Reduced Electric Power Consumption and Battery Backup; (10) Peep Into The Nozzle Using Computational Fluid Dynamics; (11) Results of a Parametric Investigation of Spray Characteristics Using a HFAB Type Atomizer; (12) Progression and Improvements in the Design of Blue-flame Oil Burners; (13) Biodiesel as a Heating Oil Blend Stock; (14) Lab Tests of Biodiesel Blends in Residential Heating Equipment; (15) Alternative Fuel Oils and the Effect of Selected Properties in Combustion; (16) New York State Premium Low-Sulfur Heating Fuel Marketplace Demonstration; and (17)The Need for a New Fuel Oil Stability Specification.

  4. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    200 MeV Drift Tube Linac BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeHarold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-Power Target Experiment INTC Meeting CERN

  5. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    200 MeV Drift Tube Linac BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeHarold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-Power Target Experiment NUFACT'04 Osaka

  6. Site Environmental Report BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    companies as the industry standard of measurement for "green" buildings. The LEED green building rating Governor David Paterson announced that a new solar power station would be sited at Brookhaven. The project, which will be the largest solar photovoltaic

  7. Pyrolytic graphite production : automation of material placement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olle, Chase R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examines the process and challenges associated with the addition of an autonomous transfer robot to a manufacturing line for AvCarb Material Solutions for use in production of pyrolytic graphite. Development ...

  8. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  9. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  11. Laboratory for Characterization of Irradiated Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center (IRC). The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research is in support of the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment a major material irradiation experiment within the NGNP Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials.

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement, February 28, 1992 Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic InstituteEnergy -Brookhaven

  14. Removal of {sup 14}C from Irradiated Graphite for Graphite Recycle and Waste Volume Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunzik-Gougar, Mary Lou; Windes, Will; Marsden, Barry

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the research presented here was to identify the checmical from of {sup 14}C inirradiated graphite. A greater understanding of the chemical form of this longest-lived isotope in irradiated graphite will inform not only management of legacy waste, but also development of next generation gas-cooled reactors. Approimately 250,000 metric tons of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide, with the largest single quantity originating in the Magnox and AGR reactors of UK. The waste quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation I gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 ({sup 14}C), with a half-life of 5730 years.

  15. Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY --October 19-21, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of the LUX Dark Matter Experiment" I. Lewis: "Majorana Neutrino and W' Chiral Couplings at Brookhaven Forum 2011 "A First Glimpse of the Tera Scale" Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY

  16. Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP:Brookhaven Teaching Fellows Program Brookhaven

  17. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR Compiled by S. M. Shapiro I. PICTORIAL with fiberglass insulation and a protective aluminum skin. The reactor vessel is shaped somewhat like a very large at the spherical end. It is located at the center of the reactor building and is surrounded by a lead and steel

  18. 2006 Site Environmental Report brookhaven national laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is distributed to various U.S. Department of Energy sites, local libraries, and local regulators and stakeholders of the summary and CD, please write or call: Brookhaven National Laboratory Environmental and Waste Management constructed Center for Functional Nanomaterials, the planned National Synchrotron Light Source II project

  19. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experimentsa major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  20. Brookhaven Lab: Science Happens Here

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a World War I U.S. Army base to a world-renowned center of high-tech research: See how our site and our science has evolved to meet the challenges of the 21st Century.

  1. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY METEOROLOGICAL SERVICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    John Heiser February 16, 2013 Environmental Sciences Department/Energy Research and Technology Division with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges.......................................................................................................................1 3.1 Instrument Towers

  2. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory Targetry Concept for a Neutrino Factory EMCOG Meeting.2 MW 2.0 MW BNL 0.14 MW 1.0 MW 4.0 MW AGS Upgrade to 1 MW200 MeV Drift Tube Linac BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeV 800 MeV 1.2 GeV To Target Station AGS 1

  3. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-power Target Experiment at CERN (2.5 Hz) 116 MeV Drift Tube Linac (first sections of 200 MeV Linac) BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeV 800 MeV 1.2 GeV 0.15 s 0.1 s 0.15 s To Target Station

  4. Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Harold G. Kirk Brookhaven National Laboratory The High-Power Target Experiment at CERN Report GeV 0.4 s cycle time (2.5 Hz) 116 MeV Drift Tube Linac (first sections of 200 MeV Linac) BOOSTER High Intensity Source plus RFQ Superconducting Linacs To RHIC 400 MeV 800 MeV 1.2 GeV 0.15 s 0.1 s 0

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory presentation 2007 Peer Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    and milestones FY2007 activities and progress (total $300K): CRADA with AMSC: thick (>2 µµµµm) MOD films ($100K = 2 MA/cm2) CRADA Goal: >600 A/cm #12;Brookhaven National Laboratory presentation 2007 Peer Review layers: performance statistics Milestone 1 (CRADA), completed: 2 MA/cm2 level achieved for 2 µµµµm triple

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  7. Role of Nuclear Grade Graphite in Oxidation in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willaim Windes; G. Strydom; J. Kane; R. Smith

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The passively safe High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design is one of the primary concepts considered for Generation IV and Small Modular Reactor (SMR) programs. The helium cooled, nuclear grade graphite moderated core achieves extremely high operating temperatures allowing either industrial process heat or electricity generation at high efficiencies. In addition to their neutron moderating properties, nuclear grade graphite core components provide excellent high temperature stability, thermal conductivity, and chemical compatibility with the high temperature nuclear fuel form. Graphite has been continuously used in nuclear reactors since the 1940s and has performed remarkably well over a wide range of core environments and operating conditions. Graphite moderated, gas-cooled reactor designs have been safely used for research and power production purposes in multiple countries since the inception of nuclear energy development. However, graphite is a carbonaceous material, and this has generated a persistent concern that the graphite components could actually burn during either normal or accident conditions [ , ]. The common assumption is that graphite, since it is ostensibly similar to charcoal and coal, will burn in a similar manner. While charcoal and coal may have the appearance of graphite, the internal microstructure and impurities within these carbonaceous materials are very different. Volatile species and trapped moisture provide a source of oxygen within coal and charcoal allowing them to burn. The fabrication process used to produce nuclear grade graphite eliminates these oxidation enhancing impurities, creating a dense, highly ordered form of carbon possessing high thermal diffusivity and strongly (covalently) bonded atoms.

  8. Brookhaven-Built Magnet Will Catch Subatomic Debris

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Wanderer

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Peter Wanderer, head of Brookhaven's Superconducting Magnet Division, describes the magnet that's being built for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory Consent Order, November 30, 2009

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Science Associate's (BSA) investigation and response to the October 13, 2008, propane gas explosion that destroyed building 637, well house number 12, at the Brookhaven...

  10. Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Brookhaven...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratory Employee Injury at Building 1005H on October 9, 2009 Type B Accident Investigation Board Report of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Employee Injury at...

  11. Recompressed exfoliated graphite articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides an electrically conductive, less anisotropic, recompressed exfoliated graphite article comprising a mixture of (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite flakes; and (b) particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon, wherein the non-expandable graphite or carbon particles are in the amount of between about 3% and about 70% by weight based on the total weight of the particles and the expanded graphite flakes combined; wherein the mixture is compressed to form the article having an apparent bulk density of from about 0.1 g/cm.sup.3 to about 2.0 g/cm.sup.3. The article exhibits a thickness-direction conductivity typically greater than 50 S/cm, more typically greater than 100 S/cm, and most typically greater than 200 S/cm. The article, when used in a thin foil or sheet form, can be a useful component in a sheet molding compound plate used as a fuel cell separator or flow field plate. The article may also be used as a current collector for a battery, supercapacitor, or any other electrochemical cell.

  12. Improved graphite furnace atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siemer, D.D.

    1983-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphite furnace atomizer for use in graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy is described wherein the heating elements are affixed near the optical path and away from the point of sample deposition, so that when the sample is volatilized the spectroscopic temperature at the optical path is at least that of the volatilization temperature, whereby analyteconcomitant complex formation is advantageously reduced. The atomizer may be elongated along its axis to increase the distance between the optical path and the sample deposition point. Also, the atomizer may be elongated along the axis of the optical path, whereby its analytical sensitivity is greatly increased.

  13. Diamond-graphite field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode of diamond and a conductive carbon, e.g., graphite, is provided.

  14. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagally, Max (Madison, WI); Liu, Feng (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL): Advanced Electrocatalysts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP: ChallengesEnergyEnergyBroinBrookhaven

  16. Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and Innovative EnergyHeights,Illinois: Energy ResourcesBrookhaven

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridger Valley ElecBroadbandBrookhaven

  18. Memorandum Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  19. Graphite Oxidation Simulation in HTR Accident Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive air and water ingress, following a pipe break or leak in steam-generator tubes, is a design-basis accident for high-temperature reactors (HTRs). Analysis of these accidents in both prismatic and pebble bed HTRs requires state-of-the-art capability for predictions of: 1) oxidation kinetics, 2) air ?helium gas mixture stratification and diffusion into the core following the depressurization, 3) transport of multi-species gas mixture, and 4) graphite corrosion. This project will develop a multi-dimensional, comprehensive oxidation kinetics model of graphite in HTRs, with diverse capabilities for handling different flow regimes. The chemical kinetics/multi-species transport model for graphite burning and oxidation will account for temperature-related changes in the properties of graphite, oxidants (O2, H2O, CO), reaction products (CO, CO2, H2, CH4) and other gases in the mixture (He and N2). The model will treat the oxidation and corrosion of graphite in geometries representative of HTR core component at temperatures of 900C or higher. The developed chemical reaction kinetics model will be user-friendly for coupling to full core analysis codes such as MELCOR and RELAP, as well as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes such as CD-adapco. The research team will solve governing equations for the multi-dimensional flow and the chemical reactions and kinetics using Simulink, an extension of the MATLAB solver, and will validate and benchmark the model's predictions using reported experimental data. Researchers will develop an interface to couple the validated model to a commercially available CFD fluid flow and thermal-hydraulic model of the reactor , and will perform a simulation of a pipe break in a prismatic core HTR, with the potential for future application to a pebble-bed type HTR.

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  1. High intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, J.M.; Roser, T.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience and results from recent high intensity proton running periods of the Brookhaven AGS, during which a record intensity for a proton synchrotron of 6.3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse was reached, is presented. This high beam intensity allowed for the simultaneous operation of three high precision rare kaon decay experiments. The record beam intensities were achieved after the 1.5 GeV Booster was commissioned and a transition jump system, a powerful transverse damper, and an rf upgrade in the AGS were completed. Recently even higher intensity proton synchrotrons are studied for neutron spallation sources or proton driver for a muon collider. Implications of the experiences from the AGS to these proposals and also possible future upgrades for the AGS are discussed.

  2. Heat exchanger using graphite foam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

  3. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Office of Technology Commercialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    diagnostics and homeland security; and catalysts for producing methanol-powered fuel cells. Sponsored Research Brookhaven Lab for DOE. A few of the licensed products include red-blood- cell labeling kits that are used

  4. Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Audit by Dominion Energy of QAP (8/4 ­8/03) - Testing at 3 Dominion stations and Pilgrim Nuclear 6Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy Determination of Unfiltered In

  5. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable support of Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction. Noncovalently functionalized graphitic mesoporous carbon as a stable...

  6. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and implementing prescribed burns and fuel reduction projects in the Upton Reserve. Prescribed fire and fuel reduction in locations outside the Upton Reserve will be coordinated through the Natural Resource Management Program at BNL, and done in consultation with FWS. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by FWS, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel.

  7. Argonne is a partner in the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center led by Northwestern University. Argonne is a partner in the Center for Emergent Superconductivity led by Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Argonne is a partner in the Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center led by Northwestern Conductivity (CES) W. Kwok (MSD) Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) M. Pellin (MSD) #12; Administrative Support J. Hogan and G. Cutinello Chemical Sciences & Engineering (CSE) E.E. Bunel High Energy

  8. Depolarizing 'beat' resonances in the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M.; Courant, E.D.; Krisch, A.D.; Ratner, L.D.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While accelerating polarized protons in the Brookhaven AGS we found a variant of the standard imperfection and intrinsic depolarizing resonances which has some of the properties of both types. Imperfection resonances occur at G..gamma.. = k, when the number of spin precessions per revolution, G gamma, equals a harmonic of the depolarizing field, k. Intrinsic resonances occur at G..gamma.. = nP + or - ..nu.. /SUB Z/ , when the AGS gradient periodicities, nP, modulate free vertical betatron oscillations to create the sum and difference frequencies. The variant resonance is a beat between nP and an imperfection driven betatron oscillation of periodicity k'. These occur at G..gamma.. = nP + or - k', and are strongest when the driven betatron oscillation is largest. The effect was most dramatic at the strong G..gamma.. = 27 resonance. Since ..nu.. /SUB Z/ = 8.8 for the AGS, and there is a major nP = 36 AGS periodicity, a strong beat resonance should exist at G gamma = 36-9 = 27. Applying a 27 /SUP th/ harmonic correction directly was unsuccessful, but a 9 /SUP th/ harmonic correction removed the depolarization.

  9. Spent graphite fuel element processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holder, N.D.; Olsen, C.W.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy currently sponsors two programs to demonstrate the processing of spent graphite fuel elements. General Atomic in San Diego operates a cold pilot plant to demonstrate the processing of both US and German high-temperature reactor fuel. Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company is demonstrating the processing of spent graphite fuel elements from Rover reactors operated for the Nuclear Rocket Propulsion Program. This work is done at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, where a hot facility is being constructed to complete processing of the Rover fuel. This paper focuses on the graphite combustion process common to both programs.

  10. As Director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), I expect nothing less than excellence from our em-ployees and visiting researchers, in terms of the science carried out here, our support operations, and in our role as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    . In 2003, the Laboratory continued to demonstrate environmental leadership across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex by having our Environmental Management System (EMS) recertified to the ISO 14001 standard-based Natural Resource Management Plan and approved funding for several research projects. It is important

  11. Adapting non-library facilities for periodical collections at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, K.; Galli, M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to cope with space limitations and rapidly growing periodical collections, Brookhaven National Laboratory Research Library undertook to investigate the use of various recycled non-library facilities to be used as a library annex. Several interim solutions are discussed and details of a low-cost use of industrial shelving in a former chapel/theatre are given. Advisory support from plant engineers and architects, as well as from a library user advisory committee, was shown to be essential in arriving at a viable and cost-effective solution to a serious space problem.

  12. Independent Verification Survey Report for the Long Island Solar Farm, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5119-SR-01-0 INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR THE LONG ISLAND SOLAR FARM, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  13. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Daum

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  14. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion and storage devices. A View of Brookhaven Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Brookhaven. Some uses envisioned by scientists at Brookhaven's CFN include: nanostructured catalysts to improve-conversion devices. The CFN program emphasizes the preparation of nanomaterials and understanding

  15. Brookhaven National Laboratory Community Advisory Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Government-Owned Contractor-Operated (GOCO) Federal program

  16. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  18. Meeting National Needs, Creating Opportunities for Growth Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 2006 to 2009 $74.7 Millioninvested in new facilities and renovations 314jobs directly supported.S. looks for new sources of growth while facing major challenges in areas as diverse as health, energy in Upton, New York, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of just six

  19. Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of the sound speed on the density (void fraction). Enough input parameters (thermodynamic/acoustic parameters of both saturated points) to fit the sound speed to experimental data. Experimental image (left for liquid #12;Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 5 Homogeneous two phase EOS model

  20. Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ) of the mercury jet. Correct dependence of the sound speed on the density (void fraction). The EOS is applicable the sound speed in all phases to experimental data. Absence of drag, surface tension, and viscous forces) Stiffened Polytropic EOS for liquid #12;Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 4

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory LIPA Solar RFP and Proposed BP Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    a total of 50MW of power produced by solar photovoltaics..." · LIPA to purchase the energy output for upBrookhaven National Laboratory LIPA Solar RFP and Proposed BP Project Presentation to Community · Siting the Nation's largest photovoltaic solar array at a DOE site underscores our commitment

  3. Memorandum, Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 102 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanenet Variance Regarding Static Magnetic Fields at Brookhaven National Laboratory (Variance 1021)

  4. NGNP Graphite Testing and Qualification Specimen Selection Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bratton

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The available grades of graphite for the NGNP are reviewed. A selection matrix is presented outlining the available grades for the NGNP graphite irradiation program based upon input from potential NGNP vendors, graphite manufactures, and graphite experts.

  5. Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velamati, Manasa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due to directional properties...

  6. Systems and methods for forming defects on graphitic materials and curing radiation-damaged graphitic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryu, Sunmin; Brus, Louis E.; Steigerwald, Michael L.; Liu, Haitao

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are disclosed herein for forming defects on graphitic materials. The methods for forming defects include applying a radiation reactive material on a graphitic material, irradiating the applied radiation reactive material to produce a reactive species, and permitting the reactive species to react with the graphitic material to form defects. Additionally, disclosed are methods for removing defects on graphitic materials.

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory - a passion for discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Melissa Sims, Stony Brook University Our Mission We advance fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics to gain a deeper understanding of matter, energy, space, and...

  8. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Albert J. (Ten Mile, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a brazing material for joining graphite structures that can be used at temperatures up to about 2800.degree. C. The brazing material formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600.degree. C. with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800.degree. C. so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. This brazing temperature for hafnium carbide is considerably less than the eutectic temperature of hafnium carbide of about 3150.degree. C. The brazing composition also incorporates the thermosetting resin so that during the brazing operation the graphite structures may be temporarily bonded together by thermosetting the resin so that machining of the structures to final dimensions may be completed prior to the completion of the brazing operation. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures joined thereby and also provides a joint of sufficient integrity so as to at least correspond with the strength and other properties of the graphite.

  9. RESEARCH FOR OUR ENERGY FUTURE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    to fossil fuels and improving energy efficiency to meet our exponentially growing energy needs over the next ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF #12;8 Biofuels Harnessing The Power of Plants to fuel our future 2 iNTRoDuCTioN The energy Challenge 12 CaTalysis Driving Toward alternative fuels 24 aDvaNCeD sToRage sysTems Tapping

  10. Completed Projects Table 2015-02-09.xlsx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remediation Soil and Water Remediation BRNL-0030 a 196 202 2005 2005 Yes Yes Yes Nuclear Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning-Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor...

  11. Preliminary analysis of graphite dust releasing behavior in accident for HTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, W.; Yang, X. Y.; Yu, S. Y.; Wang, J. [Inst. of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua Univ., Beijing100084 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of the graphite dust is important to the safety of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors. This study investigated the flow of graphite dust in helium mainstream. The analysis of the stresses acting on the graphite dust indicated that gas drag played the absolute leading role. Based on the understanding of the importance of gas drag, an experimental system is set up for the research of dust releasing behavior in accident. Air driven by centrifugal fan is used as the working fluid instead of helium because helium is expensive, easy to leak which make it difficult to seal. The graphite particles, with the size distribution same as in HTR, are added to the experiment loop. The graphite dust releasing behavior at the loss-of-coolant accident will be investigated by a sonic nozzle. (authors)

  12. Brookhaven Essay Contest Science and Society

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Science and Society Essay Contest aims to challenge high school students to question and deliberate the purposes and social implications of scientific research. All high school students (9th...

  13. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

  14. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhmurikov, E I; Pokrovsky, A S; Harkov, D V; Dremov, V V; Samarin, S I

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

  15. Graphite in Science and Nuclear Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Zhmurikov; I. A. Bubnenkov; A. S. Pokrovsky; D. V. Harkov; V. V. Dremov; S. I. Samarin

    2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The monograph is devoted to the application of graphite and graphite composites in science and technology. The structure and electrical properties, the technological aspects of production of high-strength synthetic graphites, the dynamics of the graphite destruction, traditionally used in the nuclear industry are discussed. It is focuses on the characteristics of graphitization and properties of graphite composites based on carbon isotope 13C. The book is based, generally, on the original results, and concentrated on the actual problems of application and testing of graphite materials in modern nuclear physics, in scientific and technical applications. For scientists and engineers specializing in nuclear physics and engineering, physics of nuclear reactors, condensed matter, for undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate students of universities physical specialties.

  16. Composition and method for brazing graphite to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, A.J.; Dykes, N.L.

    1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A brazing material is described for joining graphite structures that can be used up to 2800/sup 0/C. The brazing material is formed of a paste-like composition of hafnium carbide and uranium oxide with a thermosetting resin. The uranium oxide is converted to uranium dicarbide during the brazing operation and then the hafnium carbide and uranium dicarbide form a liquid phase at a temperature about 2600/sup 0/C with the uranium diffusing and vaporizing from the joint area as the temperature is increased to about 2800/sup 0/C so as to provide a brazed joint consisting essentially of hafnium carbide. The resulting brazed joint is chemically and thermally compatible with the graphite structures.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory Smarter Grid Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    1. Sustainable Chemical Conversion 2. Electric Grid Infrastructure De-carbonized Generation Distribution Infrastructure - How does Smarter Electric Grid Research, Innovation, Development, Demonstration SGRID3 SGRID3 Goals Lower the cost of electric power by 5-10% Improve the quality and reliability

  18. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  19. REVISED INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF A AND B RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINES TRENCH BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    REVISED INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE A AND B RADIOACTIVE WASTE TRANSFER LINES TRENCH, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY 5062-SR-01-1

  20. Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research Sustainability of Large Deployment of Photovoltaics: Environmental & Grid Integration Research www Photovoltaics Environmental Research Center Brookhaven National Laboratory #12;2 Source: PV Market Outlook

  1. AGC-3 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the third Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-3) irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule is third in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The general design of AGC-3 test capsule is similar to the AGC-2 test capsule, material property tests were conducted on graphite specimens prior to loading into the AGC-3 irradiation assembly. However the 6 major nuclear graphite grades in AGC-2 were modified; two previous graphite grades (IG-430 and H-451) were eliminated and one was added (Mersens 2114 was added). Specimen testing from three graphite grades (PCEA, 2114, and NBG-17) was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and specimen testing for two grades (IG-110 and NBG-18) were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from May 2011 to July 2013. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-3 irradiation capsule. The AGC-3 capsule design requires "matched pair" creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-3 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce "matched pairs" of graphite samples above and below the AGC-3 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  2. Environmentally benign graphite intercalation compound composition for exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A carboxylic-intercalated graphite compound composition for the production of exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, or nano-scaled graphene platelets. The composition comprises a layered graphite with interlayer spaces or interstices and a carboxylic acid residing in at least one of the interstices, wherein the composition is prepared by a chemical oxidation reaction which uses a combination of a carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide as an intercalate source. Alternatively, the composition may be prepared by an electrochemical reaction, which uses a carboxylic acid as both an electrolyte and an intercalate source. Exfoliation of the invented composition does not release undesirable chemical contaminants into air or drainage.

  3. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative electron microscopy techniques in strongly correlated electron systems and nanostructured materials. As a first step, with the support of Materials Science Division, Office of Basic Energy Science, US Department of Energy, and the New York State Office of Science, Technology, and Academic Research, recently we acquired three aberration-corrected electron microscopes from the three major microscope manufacturers, i.e., JEOL, Hitachi, and FEI. The Hitachi HD2700C is equipped with a probe corrector, the FEI Titan 80-300 has an imaging corrector, while the JEOL2200MCO has both. All the correctors are of the dual-hexapole type, designed and manufactured by CEOS GmbH based on the design due to Rose and Haider [3, 18]. All these three are one-of-a-kind in the US, designed for specialized capabilities in characterizing nanoscale structure. In this chapter, we review the performance of these state-of-the art instruments and the new challenges associated with the improved spatial resolution, including the environment requirements of the laboratory that hosts these instruments. Although each instrument we describe here has its own strengths and drawbacks, it is not our intention to rank them in terms of their performance, especially their spatial resolution in imaging.

  4. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactors lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  5. Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stable aqueous dispersions of graphitic nanoplatelets via the reduction of exfoliated graphite be prepared via an exfoliation/in-situ reduction of graphite oxide in the presence of poly(sodium 4 prepare graphite nanoplatelets via the chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide nanoplatelets

  6. A SCENARIO FOR A BROOKHAVEN NEUTRINO SUPER BEAM EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DIWAN,M.V.; KAHN,S.A.; PALMER,R.B.; STUMER,I.; PARSA,Z.; MCDONALD,K.T.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the feasibility of a long baseline neutrino beam facility based on a proposed upgrade to the AGS accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It assumes that the AGS is upgraded initially to a 1 MW proton driver and eventually to a 4 MW proton machine. This upgrade would provide a strong incentive for a long baseline low energy neutrino beam to study neutrino oscillations. In this paper we look at a possible long baseline experiment with a detector at Cornell, which is 350 km away from BNL.

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  9. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  10. Brookhaven, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and Innovative EnergyHeights,Illinois: EnergyBrookhaven, West

  11. Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

  12. Nuclear Graphite -Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nuclear Graphite - Fission Reactor Brief Outline of Experience and Understanding Professor Barry J Physical Changes to Polycrystalline Graphite due to Fast Neutron Damage and Radiolytic Oxidation Provided channels for control rods and coolant gas Neutron Shield Boronated graphite Thermal columns

  13. Graphite Reactor | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the early, desperate

  14. PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site PIA - 10th International Nuclear Graphite Specialists Meeting registration web site More Documents &...

  15. Exfoliation of Graphite Oxide in Propylene Carbonate and Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exfoliation of Graphite Oxide in Propylene Carbonate and Thermal Reduction of the Resulting Chemical Society ABSTRACT Graphite oxide was exfoliated and dispersed in propylene carbonate (PC) by bath

  16. Polyelectrolyte-Induced Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide: A Facile Route to Synthesis of Soluble Graphene Nanosheets. Polyelectrolyte-Induced Reduction of Exfoliated Graphite Oxide: A Facile...

  17. Investigations of Graphite Current Collectors and Metallic Lithium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Graphite Current Collectors and Metallic Lithium Anodes Investigations of Graphite Current Collectors and Metallic Lithium Anodes Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  18. Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium-ion Batteries Establish and Expand Commercial Production of Graphite Anode Materials...

  19. A-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Graphite Research Reactor BLIP Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer BMRR Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor Bq/L becquerel per liter BSA Brookhaven Science Associates Btu British thermal units CAA Clean Air Cs cesium CSF Central Steam Facility CT carbon tetrachloride CWA Clean Water Act CY calendar year DCA

  20. Inhibition of Oxidation in Nuclear Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil Winston; James W. Sterbentz; William E. Windes

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite is a fundamental material of high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactors, providing both structure and neutron moderation. Its high thermal conductivity, chemical inertness, thermal heat capacity, and high thermal structural stability under normal and off normal conditions contribute to the inherent safety of these reactor designs. One of the primary safety issues for a high temperature graphite reactor core is the possibility of rapid oxidation of the carbon structure during an off normal design basis event where an oxidizing atmosphere (air ingress) can be introduced to the hot core. Although the current Generation IV high temperature reactor designs attempt to mitigate any damage caused by a postualed air ingress event, the use of graphite components that inhibit oxidation is a logical step to increase the safety of these reactors. Recent experimental studies of graphite containing between 5.5 and 7 wt% boron carbide (B4C) indicate that oxidation is dramatically reduced even at prolonged exposures at temperatures up to 900C. The proposed addition of B4C to graphite components in the nuclear core would necessarily be enriched in B-11 isotope in order to minimize B-10 neutron absorption and graphite swelling. The enriched boron can be added to the graphite during billet fabrication. Experimental oxidation rate results and potential applications for borated graphite in nuclear reactor components will be discussed.

  1. Thermal and electrical conduction in the compaction direction of exfoliated graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Thermal and electrical conduction in the compaction direction of exfoliated graphite in the compaction direction of graphite-flake-based exfoliated graphite have been decoupled. The compact Exfoliated graphite is elongated graphite particles obtained by the exfoliation (typically involving rapid

  2. Modeling Fission Product Sorption in Graphite Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Allen, Todd [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to determine changes in adsorption and desorption of fission products to/from nuclear-grade graphite in response to a changing chemical environment. First, the project team will employ principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis to predict stability of fission products on graphite in the presence of structural defects commonly observed in very high- temperature reactor (VHTR) graphites. Desorption rates will be determined as a function of partial pressure of oxygen and iodine, relative humidity, and temperature. They will then carry out experimental characterization to determine the statistical distribution of structural features. This structural information will yield distributions of binding sites to be used as an input for a sorption model. Sorption isotherms calculated under this project will contribute to understanding of the physical bases of the source terms that are used in higher-level codes that model fission product transport and retention in graphite. The project will include the following tasks: Perform structural characterization of the VHTR graphite to determine crystallographic phases, defect structures and their distribution, volume fraction of coke, and amount of sp2 versus sp3 bonding. This information will be used as guidance for ab initio modeling and as input for sorptivity models; Perform ab initio calculations of binding energies to determine stability of fission products on the different sorption sites present in nuclear graphite microstructures. The project will use density functional theory (DFT) methods to calculate binding energies in vacuum and in oxidizing environments. The team will also calculate stability of iodine complexes with fission products on graphite sorption sites; Model graphite sorption isotherms to quantify concentration of fission products in graphite. The binding energies will be combined with a Langmuir isotherm statistical model to predict the sorbed concentration of fission products on each type of graphite site. The model will include multiple simultaneous adsorbing species, which will allow for competitive adsorption effects between different fission product species and O and OH (for modeling accident conditions).

  3. AGC-2 Graphite Preirradiation Data Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes; W. David Swank; David Rohrbaugh; Joseph Lord

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report described the specimen loading order and documents all pre-irradiation examination material property measurement data for the graphite specimens contained within the second Advanced Graphite Capsule (AGC-2) irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule is the second in six planned irradiation capsules comprising the Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) test series. The AGC test series is used to irradiate graphite specimens allowing quantitative data necessary for predicting the irradiation behavior and operating performance of new nuclear graphite grades to be generated which will ascertain the in-service behavior of the graphite for pebble bed and prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. Similar to the AGC-1 specimen pre-irradiation examination report, material property tests were conducted on specimens from 18 nuclear graphite types but on an increased number of specimens (512) prior to loading into the AGC-2 irradiation assembly. All AGC-2 specimen testing was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) from October 2009 to August 2010. This report also details the specimen loading methodology for the graphite specimens inside the AGC-2 irradiation capsule. The AGC-2 capsule design requires matched pair creep specimens that have similar dose levels above and below the neutron flux profile mid-plane to provide similar specimens with and without an applied load. This document utilized the neutron flux profile calculated for the AGC-2 capsule design, the capsule dimensions, and the size (length) of the selected graphite and silicon carbide samples to create a stacking order that can produce matched pairs of graphite samples above and below the AGC-2 capsule elevation mid-point to provide specimens with similar neutron dose levels.

  4. Application of a Barrier Filter at a High Purity Synthetic Graphite Plant, CRADA 99-F035, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Superior Graphite Company and the US Department of Energy have entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to study the application of ceramic barrier filters at its Hopkinsville, Kentucky graphite plant. Superior Graphite Company is a worldwide leader in the application of advanced thermal processing technology to produce high purity graphite and carbons. The objective of the CRADA is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of incorporating the use of high-temperature filters to improve the performance of the offgas treatment system. A conceptual design was developed incorporating the ceramic filters into the offgas treatment system to be used for the development of a capital cost estimate and economic feasibility assessment of this technology for improving particulate removal. This CRADA is a joint effort of Superior Graphite Company, Parsons Infrastructure and Technology Group, and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »Awake AnimalScienceOctoberBrookhavenBrookhaven

  6. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  7. Acceleration of polarized protons in the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M.; Crabb, D.G.; Krisch, A.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-laboratory-university collaborative project involving Argonne, Brookhaven, Michigan, Rice and Yale is underway to accelerate polarized protons at the AGS. The success of the now turned off 12 GeV/c ZGS polarized beam and the design studies for the AGS made us confident of the feasibility of achieving a polarization of about 60% at 26 GeV/c with an intensity 10/sup 11/ to 10/sup 12/ protons/pulse. Such a beam would be a potential source of polarized protons for ISABELLE. This report gives a brief discussion of the overall project and describes the tests of a prototype of the fast pulsed ferrite quadrupole magnets which will jump the intrinsic depolarizing resonances.

  8. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  9. Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

  10. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Dean, Mark P. M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Weller, Thomas E. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Howard, Christopher A. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Rahnejat, Kaveh C. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom); Saxena, Siddharth S. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ellerby, Mark [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes are most important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.

  11. Superconductivity in graphite intercalation compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Robert P.; Dean, Mark P. M.; Weller, Thomas E.; Howard, Christopher A.; Rahnejat, Kaveh C.; Saxena, Siddharth S.; Ellerby, Mark

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of superconductivity in the class of materials known as graphite intercalation compounds has a history dating back to the 1960s This paper recontextualizes the field in light of the discovery of superconductivity in CaC? and YbC? in 2005. In what follows, we outline the crystal structure and electronic structure of these and related compounds. We go on to experiments addressing the superconducting energy gap, lattice dynamics, pressure dependence, and how this relates to theoretical studies. The bulk of the evidence strongly supports a BCS superconducting state. However, important questions remain regarding which electronic states and phonon modes aremoremost important for superconductivity and whether current theoretical techniques can fully describe the dependence of the superconducting transition temperature on pressure and chemical composition.less

  12. Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Polymer graphite composite anodes for Li-ion batteries Basker Veeraraghavan, Bala Haran, Ralph for the graphite particles by in-situ polymerization #12;Experimental Preparation of PPy/Graphite composites Dropwise addition of pyrrole into aqueous slurry of graphite at 0 C with nitric acid acting as an oxidizer

  13. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, W.W.; Spencer, C.

    1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphite panel with a hole having a damaged thread is repaired by drilling the hole to remove all of the thread and making a new hole of larger diameter. A bolt with a lubricated thread is placed in the new hole and the hole is packed with graphite cement to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread in the cement which is at least as strong as that of the original thread. 8 figures.

  14. Method for molding threads in graphite panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Short, William W. (Livermore, CA); Spencer, Cecil (Silverton, OR)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphite panel (10) with a hole (11) having a damaged thread (12) is repaired by drilling the hole (11) to remove all of the thread and make a new hole (13) of larger diameter. A bolt (14) with a lubricated thread (17) is placed in the new hole (13) and the hole (13) is packed with graphite cement (16) to fill the hole and the thread on the bolt. The graphite cement (16) is cured, and the bolt is unscrewed therefrom to leave a thread (20) in the cement (16) which is at least as strong as that of the original thread (12).

  15. I. INTRODUCTION The purpose of this Proposed Reme-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was removed,and the fuel was shipped to the Savannah River Site of the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) shortly as the Superfund law). In 1980, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), which is owned by DOE, was placed on the list Remedial Action Plan for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor At Brookhaven National Laboratory PLEASE

  16. Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids by electrochemical exfoliation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China); Chen, Shih-Ming; Lai, Wei-Hao [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China)] [Materials and Chemical Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Chutung, Hsinchu, 31040 Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 106 Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)] [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli, 320 Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Superhydrophilic graphite surfaces and water-dispersible graphite colloids are obtained by electrochemical exfoliation with hydrophobic graphite electrodes. Such counterintuitive characteristics are caused by partial oxidation and investigated by examining both graphite electrodes and exfoliated particles after electrolysis. The extent of surface oxidation can be explored through contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscope, electrical sheet resistance, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, zeta-potential analyzer, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-visible, and Raman spectroscopy. The degree of wettability of the graphite anode can be altered by the electrolytic current and time. The water contact angle declines generally with increasing the electrolytic current or time. After a sufficient time, the graphite anode becomes superhydrophilic and its hydrophobicity can be recovered by peeling with adhesive tape. This consequence reveals that the anodic graphite is oxidized by oxygen bubbles but the oxidation just occurs at the outer layers of the graphite sheet. Moreover, the characteristics of oxidation revealed by UV peak shift, peak ratio between D and G bands, and negative zeta-potential indicate the presence of graphite oxide on the outer shell of the exfoliated colloids. However, thermogravimetric analysis for the extent of decomposition of oxygen functional groups verifies that the amount of oxygen groups is significantly less than that of graphite oxide prepared via Hummer method. The structure of this partially oxidized graphite may consist of a graphite core covered with an oxidized shell. The properties of the exfoliated colloids are also influenced by pH of the electrolytic solution. As pH is increased, the extent of oxidation descends and the thickness of oxidized shell decreases. Those results reveal that the degree of oxidation of exfoliated nanoparticles can be manipulated simply by controlling pH.

  17. Managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates Bill Dorsch, Manager (typically monitoring and extraction wells) Petition Regulators for system Original Operations Updated Operations Monitoring Only #12;77 Groundwater Cleanup Completion System

  18. Brookhaven Lab Captures E. colis Sticky Fingers on Film

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Scientists at Brookhaven use the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to take a look at how the urinary-tract-infection causing strain of E. coli extends its sticky fingers.

  19. Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleaning Up Groundwater in Areas South and Southeast of Brookhaven National Laboratory This pamphlet summarizes the questions you or your neighbors raised about groundwater treatment systems National Laboratory have been listening to the concerns of the community about groundwater

  20. Immobilization of Rocky Flats Graphite Fines Residue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.S.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of the immobilization process for graphite fines has proceeded through a series of experimental programs. The experimental procedures and results from each series of experiments are discussed in this report.

  1. Method of producing exfoliated graphite, flexible graphite, and nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna (Centerville, OH); Shi, Jinjun (Columbus, OH); Guo, Jiusheng (Centerville, OH); Jang, Bor Z. (Centerville, OH)

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of graphite, graphite oxide, or a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  2. Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

  3. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  5. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  6. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn H.; Calaga, R.; Jain, P.; Johnson, E.C.; Xu, W.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several past measurements of the Brookhaven ERL at superconducting temperature produced a long list of higher order modes (HOMs). The Niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to tolerable levels. However, a number of undamped resonances with Q {ge} 10{sup 6} were found at 4 K and their mode identification remained as a goal for this paper. The approach taken here consists in taking different S{sub 21} measurements on a copper cavity replica of the ERL which can be compared with the actual data and also with Microwave Studio computer simulations. Several different S{sub 21} transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, between probes in a single cell, and between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes. Mode identification is supported by bead pulling with a metallic needle or a dielectric sphere that are calibrated in the fundamental mode. This paper presents results for HOMs in the first two dipole bands with the prototypical 958 MHz trapped mode, the lowest beam tube resonances, and high-Q modes in the first quadrupole band and beyond.

  7. The production of methanol by the Brookhaven National Laboratory process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.B.; Williams, J.J.; Johnson, A.R.

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to develop a capital cost estimate and methanol production costs for a new methanol process under development at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The cost of fuel delivered to the US Gulf Coast is compared with fuel produced by a conventional methanol process and a liquefied natural gas (LNG) process. The new methanol process is made possible by the development of a new liquid phase catalyst. The new liquid catalyst system can convert synthesis gas almost completely to methanol in a SINGLE pass through the methanol synthesis reactor. This catalyst system reduces synthesis reaction temperatures from about 260{degree}C to about 100{degree}C, permitting isothermal synthesis conditions, in contrast to the temperature gradients in currently available pelleted, solid catalysts. Natural gas feedstock can be processed at pressures under 250 psia. Since nitrogen in the synthesis gas can be tolerated, the autothermal reforming step (combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming over a nickel catalyst) uses preheated air rather than oxygen. However, even with nitrogen present, the volume of gas fed to the reactor can still be smaller than the volume of gas that must be circulated in a conventional reactor, which operates with low conversions and requires high recycle volumes. The characteristics of the BNL system permits a major improvement in methanol plant design and economics. 11 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  9. Method for producing thin graphite flakes with large aspect ratios

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunnell, L. Roy (Kennewick, WA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making graphite flakes of high aspect ratio by the steps of providing a strong concentrated acid and heating the graphite in the presence of the acid for a time and at a temperature effective to intercalate the acid in the graphite; heating the intercalated graphite at a rate and to a temperature effective to exfoliate the graphite in discrete layers; subjecting the graphite layers to ultrasonic energy, mechanical shear forces, or freezing in an amount effective to separate the layes into discrete flakes.

  10. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  11. EIS-0291: High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Transition Project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The EIS evaluates the range of reasonable alternatives and their impacts regarding the future management of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL).

  12. Nondestructive evaluation of nuclear-grade graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunerth, D. C.; McJunkin, T. R. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, MS 2209, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2209 (United States)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The material of choice for the core of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant Program is graphite. Graphite is a composite material whose properties are highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. In addition to the material variations intrinsic to the manufacturing process, graphite will also undergo changes in material properties resulting from radiation damage and possible oxidation within the reactor. Idaho National Laboratory is presently evaluating the viability of conventional nondestructive evaluation techniques to characterize the material variations inherent to manufacturing and in-service degradation. Approaches of interest include x-ray radiography, eddy currents, and ultrasonics.

  13. Graphite oxidation modeling for application in MELCOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelbard, Fred

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arrhenius parameters for graphite oxidation in air are reviewed and compared. One-dimensional models of graphite oxidation coupled with mass transfer of oxidant are presented in dimensionless form for rectangular and spherical geometries. A single dimensionless group is shown to encapsulate the coupled phenomena, and is used to determine the effective reaction rate when mass transfer can impede the oxidation process. For integer reaction order kinetics, analytical expressions are presented for the effective reaction rate. For noninteger reaction orders, a numerical solution is developed and compared to data for oxidation of a graphite sphere in air. Very good agreement is obtained with the data without any adjustable parameters. An analytical model for surface burn-off is also presented, and results from the model are within an order of magnitude of the measurements of burn-off in air and in steam.

  14. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Graphite Print The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been...

  15. Piezoreslstive graphite/polyimide thin films for micromachining applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piezoreslstive graphite/polyimide thin films for micromachining applications A. Bruno Frazier) In this work, graphite/polyimide composite thin films are introduced and characterized for micromachining tetracarboxylic dianhydride+xydianiline/metaphenylene diamine polyimide matrix. The resultant material represents

  16. NOVEL SALTS OF GRAPHITE AND A BORON NITRIDE SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlett, Neil

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ i\\f'{y AND DOCUMENTS SECTION NOVEL SALTS OF GRAPHITE ANDA BORON NITRIDE SALT Neil Bartlett, R. N. Biagioni, B. W.privately owned rights. Novel Salts of Graphite and a Boron

  17. Imparting Electrical Conductivity into Asphalt Composites Using Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranikumar, Aishwarya

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    publications showed the potential of graphite in mitigating the sudden transition. The study presented herein investigates possibility of precisely controlling the electrical conductivity of asphalt concrete only by adding filler size graphite powder. Nine...

  18. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  20. Chemically modified graphite for electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to chemically modified graphite particles: (a) that are useful in alkali metal-containing electrode of a electrochemical cell comprising: (1) the electrode, (2) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent which solvent tends to decompose when the electrochemical cell is in use, and an electrically conductive salt of an alkali metal, and (3) a counter electrode; and (b) that are chemically modified with fluorine, chlorine, iodine or phosphorus to reduce such decomposition. This invention also relates to electrodes comprising such chemically modified graphite and a binder and to electrochemical cells containing such electrodes. 3 figs.

  1. Characteristics of Graphitic Films for Carbon Based Magnetism and Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jeongmin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the nineteenth century to exfoliate graphene, is now used tolayers of graphite to exfoliate the graphene sheets. This

  2. Effect of Vinylene Carbonate on Graphite Anode Cycling Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridgway, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphite formulations in particular, are the current standard for battery anodes in electric vehicle lithium-ion batteries (

  3. Method of making segmented pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKernan, M.A.; Alford, C.S.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Chen, C.W.

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite wafers are oriented and bonded together such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are maximized along the back surface of the segmented pyrolytic graphite target to allow for optimum heat conduction away from the sputter target's sputtering surface and to allow for maximum energy transmission from the target's sputtering surface. 2 figures.

  4. Nanometal-Decorated Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Based Glucose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    Nanometal-Decorated Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet Based Glucose Biosensors with High Sensitivity demonstrated for the first time that exfoli- ated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs), which are 1 10 nm, and affordable amperometric glucose biosensor using exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnPs) decorated with Pt

  5. Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koledintseva, Marina Y.

    Engineering of Ferrite-Graphite Composite Media for Microwave Shields Marina Koledintseva, PoornaAA@mpei.ru Abstract-- An electromagnetic shielding of objects using ferrite-graphite composites is considered- shielding; dielectric base material; ferrite- graphite composite, Maxwell Garnett formulation I

  6. US graphite reactor D&D experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, S.M.K.; Williams, N.C.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the U.S. Graphite Reactor Experience Task for the Decommissioning Strategy Plan for the Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Unit 1 Study. The work described in this report was performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE).

  7. Graphite formation in the Hiroshima fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Crenshaw, M.; Yalcintas, M.G.; Strehlow, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Cole, L.L. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate what might be the composition and optical properties of particles that could lead to a nuclear winter, a search has been made for particles that had been generated in urban fire storms. Deposits containing small amounts of graphite have been found on an artifact from the Hiroshima fire storm. The fire storm was initiated on August 6, 1945, by the atomic bomb detonation. The particles were rained out of the atmosphere in the black rain that commenced following the urban fire storm. Initial studies using electron microscopy have revealed that the particles consist of a mixture of clay and amorphous sooty carbon. Scanning electron photomicrographs have suggested the presence of graphite. Its presence has been confirmed using laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), surface ionization mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and electron scattering for chemical analysis (ESCA). Significant amounts of the sooty material consist of clay, and the graphite is probably present as short-range ordered structure in sooty microspheres. The results of this study are presented with a discussion of conditions that may lead to graphite formation.

  8. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »Awake AnimalScienceOctoberBrookhaven National

  9. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »Awake AnimalScienceOctoberBrookhaven

  10. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »AwakeBrookhaven National Laboratory Laboratory

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »AwakeBrookhaven National Laboratory

  12. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the entire BNL site including the Upton Reserve and has been reviewed by, The Nature Conservancy, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Forest Rangers, and DOE, as well as appropriate BNL emergency services personnel. The BNL Fire Department is the lead on wildfire suppression. However, the BNL Natural Resource Manager will be assigned to all wildland fires as technical resource advisor.

  13. Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

  14. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of silver 110-m in a nuclear grade graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Thad Calhoun

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in HTGRs. . . II. B Cesium Research. II. C Silver Research. 5 6 8 II. C. 1 Recognition of Importance of 110 m Ag II. C. 2 Current Work on 110 m Ag Diffusion in Structural Graphites. . . . . . . . . . . II. D Diffusion Theory. 10 10 II. D. 1... contaminating various reactor components can make their main- tainance costly and difficult. Additionally from the radiological safety viewpoint, in the event of a severe reactor transient it is essential to understand how fast fission products will leave...

  15. NSLS-II Achieves First Stored Electron Beam Brookhaven scientists and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from a lithium-ion battery to power devices such as laptops and cell phones. When an external current Batteries Brookhaven scientists have made the first 3D observations of how the structure of a lithi- um-ion battery anode evolves at the nanoscale in a real bat- tery cell as it discharges and recharges

  16. Preparations for a high gradient inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven national laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duris, J.; Li, R. K.; Musumeci, P.; Sakai, Y.; Threlkeld, E.; Williams, O.; Fedurin, M.; Kusche, K.; Pogorelsky, I.; Polyanskiy, M.; Yakimenko, V. [UCLA Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparations for an inverse free electron laser experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Accelerator Test Facilty are presented. Details of the experimental setup including beam and laser transport optics are first discussed. Next, the driving laser pulse structure is investigated and initial diagnostics are explored and compared to simulations. Finally, planned improvements to the experimental setup are discussed.

  17. EA-1928: White-Tailed Deer Management at Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, New York

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to lower, then maintain the deer herd on the 5,265 acre Brookhaven National Laboratory to levels protective of the ecosystem (estimated to be between 80 and 250 animals) using one or more methods for population growth.

  18. Laboratory Plan FY 2010-2019 June 2, 2010 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    - CT Markets: Growing the Future Global PET / SPECT market PET accounts for ~ 75% of the overall PET of ~ 9.4% from ~ $6.5 billion in 2010 PET-CT segment Accounts for ~ 97% of overall PET market Semiconductor PET Detector US Provisional Patent Application 61/508,113 July 16, 2012 #12;BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL

  19. The core structure of presolar graphite onions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Fraundorf; Martin Wackenhut

    2001-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the ``presolar particles'' extracted from carbonaceous chondrite dissolution residues, i.e. of those particles which show isotopic evidence of solidification in the neighborhood of other stars prior to the origin of our solar system, one subset has an interesting concentric graphite-rim/graphene-core structure. We show here that single graphene sheet defects in the onion cores (e.g. cyclopentane loops) may be observable edge-on by HREM. This could allow a closer look at models for their formation, and in particular strengthen the possibility that growth of these assemblages proceeds atom-by-atom with the aid of such in-plane defects, under conditions of growth (e.g. radiation fluxes or grain temperature) which discourage the graphite layering that dominates subsequent formation of the rim.

  20. Atomic resolution images of graphite in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Shedd, G.M.; Griffis, D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One sample used for proof of operation for atomic resolution in STM is highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). This sample has been imaged with many different STM`s obtaining similar results. Atomic resolution images of HOPG have now been obtained using an STM designed and built at the Precision Engineering Center. This paper discusses the theoretical predictions and experimental results obtained in imaging of HOPG.

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear-Grade Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Timothy R. McJunkin

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive Evaluation of Nuclear Grade Graphite Dennis C. Kunerth and Timothy R. McJunkin Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 This paper discusses the nondestructive evaluation of nuclear grade graphite performed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Graphite is a composite material highly dependent on the base material and manufacturing methods. As a result, material variations are expected within individual billets as well billet to billet and lot to lot. Several methods of evaluating the material have been explored. Particular technologies each provide a subset of information about the material. This paper focuses on techniques that are applicable to in-service inspection of nuclear energy plant components. Eddy current examination of the available surfaces provides information on potential near surface structural defects and although limited, ultrasonics can be utilized in conventional volumetric inspection. Material condition (e.g. micro-cracking and porosity induced by radiation and stress) can be derived from backscatter or acousto-ultrasound (AU) methods. Novel approaches utilizing phased array ultrasonics have been attempted to expand the abilities of AU techniques. By combining variable placement of apertures, angle and depth of focus, the techniques provide the potential to obtain parameters at various depths in the material. Initial results of the study and possible procedures for application of the techniques are discussed.

  2. Flexible graphite modified by carbon black paste for use as a thermal interface material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    graphite is a material that is made by the com- pression of exfoliated graphite, which is in turn made by the exfoliation of intercalated graphite flake [3]. Due to the accordion-like microstructure of exfoliated graphite, mechan- ical interlocking between pieces of exfoliated graphite (each piece obtained from a flake

  3. austempered spheroidal graphite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Environmental Management U.S. Department of Energy BNL): - Remove the graphite pile - Construct an engineered cap - Remove the bioshield Environmental...

  4. Forming gas treatment of lithium ion battery anode graphite powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Contescu, Cristian Ion; Gallego, Nidia C; Howe, Jane Y; Meyer, III, Harry M; Payzant, Edward Andrew; Wood, III, David L; Yoon, Sang Young

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of making a battery anode in which a quantity of graphite powder is provided. The temperature of the graphite powder is raised from a starting temperature to a first temperature between 1000 and 2000.degree. C. during a first heating period. The graphite powder is then cooled to a final temperature during a cool down period. The graphite powder is contacted with a forming gas during at least one of the first heating period and the cool down period. The forming gas includes H.sub.2 and an inert gas.

  5. Putting the Spin on Graphite: Observing the Spins of Impurity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Spins of Impurity Atoms Align Friday, February 28, 2014 The existence of magnetism in graphite is a very intriguing subject. The possibility to exploit the magnetic...

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory The National Synchrotron Light Source II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    and neutron facilities, the power of the world's finest experts and facilities for fabricating and government institutions.Their myriad research programs pro- duce about 900 publications per year, with more by researchers to explain how a class of proteins helps to generate nerve impulses ­ the electrical activity

  7. Recapturing Graphite-Based Fuel Element Technology for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trammell, Michael P [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL is currently recapturing graphite based fuel forms for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). This effort involves research and development on materials selection, extrusion, and coating processes to produce fuel elements representative of historical ROVER and NERVA fuel. Initially, lab scale specimens were fabricated using surrogate oxides to develop processing parameters that could be applied to full length NTP fuel elements. Progress toward understanding the effect of these processing parameters on surrogate fuel microstructure is presented.

  8. Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letter to the Editor Microwave assisted exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide yet versatile method to simultaneously achieve the exfoliation and reduction of graphite oxide of crumpled, few-layer thick and electronically conductive graphitic sheets. Using the microwave exfoliated

  9. Macroscopic Properties of Restacked, Redox-Liquid Exfoliated Graphite and Graphite Mimics Produced in Bulk Quantities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Vikram K [ORNL; Quinlan, Ronald [ORNL; Agapov, Alexander L [ORNL; Dunlap, John R [ORNL; Nelson, Kimberly M [ORNL; Duranty, Edward R [ORNL; Sokolov, Alexei P [ORNL; Bhat, Gajanan [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The excellent properties exhibited by monolayer graphene have spurred the development of exfoliation techniques using bulk graphite to produce large quantities of pristine monolayer sheets. Development of simple chemistry to exfoliate and intercalate graphite and graphite mimics in large quantities is required for numerous applications. To determine the macroscopic behavior of restacked, exfoliated bulk materials, a systematic approach is presented using a simple, redox-liquid sonication process along to obtain large quantities of 2D and 3D hexagonally layered graphite, molybdenum disulfi de, and boron nitride, which are subsequently characterized to observe chemical and structural changes. For MoS 2 sonicated with the antioxidant sodium bisulfi te, results from Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and electron microscopy indicate the presence of distorted phases from different polymorphs, and apparent nanotube structures in the bulk, restacked powder. Furthermore, using thermograviemtric analysis, the antioxidant enhances the resistance to oxidative degradation of MoS 2 , upon thermal treatment up to 900 C. The addition of the ionic antioxidant decreased dispersion stability in non-polar solvent, suggesting decreased compatibility with non-polar systems. Using simple chemical methods, the ability to generate tailored multidimensional layered materials with unique macroscopic properties is critical for numerous applications, including electrical devices, reinforced polymer composites, lithium ion capacitors, and chemical sensing.

  10. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  11. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals »Awake

  13. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

  14. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORYS CAPABILITIES FOR ADVANCED ANALYSES OF CYBER THREATS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePhillips M. P.

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL has several ongoing, mature, and successful programs and areas of core scientific expertise that readily could be modified to address problems facing national security and efforts by the IC related to securing our nations computer networks. In supporting these programs, BNL houses an expansive, scalable infrastructure built exclusively for transporting, storing, and analyzing large disparate data-sets. Our ongoing research projects on various infrastructural issues in computer science undoubtedly would be relevant to national security. Furthermore, BNL frequently partners with researchers in academia and industry worldwide to foster unique and innovative ideas for expanding research opportunities and extending our insights. Because the basic science conducted at BNL is unique, such projects have led to advanced techniques, unlike any others, to support our mission of discovery. Many of them are modular techniques, thus making them ideal for abstraction and retrofitting to other uses including those facing national security, specifically the safety of the nations cyber space.

  15. Multiscale modeling of polyisoprene on graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Yogendra Narayan; Brayton, Alexander; Doxastakis, Manolis, E-mail: edoxastakis@uh.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Burkhart, Craig; Papakonstantopoulos, George J. [Global Materials Science Division, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 44305 (United States)] [Global Materials Science Division, The Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio 44305 (United States)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The local dynamics and the conformational properties of polyisoprene next to a smooth graphite surface constructed by graphene layers are studied by a multiscale methodology. First, fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of oligomers next to the surface are performed. Subsequently, Monte Carlo simulations of a systematically derived coarse-grained model generate numerous uncorrelated structures for polymer systems. A new reverse backmapping strategy is presented that reintroduces atomistic detail. Finally, multiple extensive fully atomistic simulations with large systems of long macromolecules are employed to examine local dynamics in proximity to graphite. Polyisoprene repeat units arrange close to a parallel configuration with chains exhibiting a distribution of contact lengths. Efficient Monte Carlo algorithms with the coarse-grain model are capable of sampling these distributions for any molecular weight in quantitative agreement with predictions from atomistic models. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations with well-equilibrated systems at all length-scales support an increased dynamic heterogeneity that is emerging from both intermolecular interactions with the flat surface and intramolecular cooperativity. This study provides a detailed comprehensive picture of polyisoprene on a flat surface and consists of an effort to characterize such systems in atomistic detail.

  16. Electroless plating of graphite with copper and nickel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caturla, F.; Molina, F.; Molina-Sabio, M.; Rodriguez-Reinoso, F. [Univ. de Alicante (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Inorganica; Esteban, A. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning in the European Union of gas-cooled nuclear reactors using graphite as the moderator will generate a large amount of irradiated graphite as waste. Graphite is a radioactive waste of relatively low activity and consequently the options considered for the management of the waste may include: (i) incineration, (ii) ocean bed disposal, (iii) deep geological disposal, and (iv) shallow land burial. In case the last is the selected mode, an appropriate conditioning procedure is necessary before final disposal, by covering the graphite with a material avoiding or reducing the emission of radionuclides to its surrounding. This work analyses the possibility of conditioning graphite pieces (with a large proportion of pores of different sizes up to 100 {micro}m) with a metal coating of copper or nickel produced by electroless plating, with the aim of completely isolating the graphite from its surrounding. Electroless plating with copper results in a very large proportion of pores filled or covered, but a fraction of the pores remain in the graphite, which decreases with increasing thickness of metal deposit. Furthermore, the copper plating is permeable to liquids and consequently the graphite does not become completely isolated from the surrounding. The percentage of porosity filled or covered by nickel deposits is similar to copper, but they are not permeable to liquids, at least when the thickness is relatively high, and consequently the access of the liquids to the graphite is rather limited. However, when electroless plating with copper is followed by nickel deposition the graphite becomes isolated from the exterior.

  17. EPAC02_graphite.doc STUDY OF GRAPHITE TARGETS INTERACTING WITH THE 24 GeV PROTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    materials selected for the experiment are ATJ graphite and the anisotropic carbon-carbon composite. Each, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS to evaluate candidate target materials for the future muon collider/neutrino factory carbon-based solid

  18. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  19. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.C. Weaver

    2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  20. Brookhaven National Laboratory - HFBR Tritium | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBR Tritium

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBR

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU III VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IV

  3. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU V VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IVV

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU VI VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IVVVI

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory - Sr90 - Chemical Holes | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic InstituteEnergy - Chemical

  6. Brookhaven National Laboratory - Sr90-Former HWMF | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic InstituteEnergy -

  7. Brookhaven National Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement, February 28, 1992

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic InstituteEnergy -

  8. I-1 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2002 Discover Award, 1-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -9 auto batteries recycling (table), 2-15 basin sediment sampling, 6-25 Battelle Memorial Institute, 1 radiation, 8-14 Breuer, Marcel, 6-29 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, 1-3, 1-5, 8-10 Brookhaven Linac

  9. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    DOI: 10.1002/adma.200702672 Intact Pattern Transfer of Conductive Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelet as biosensors[8,9] or in drug deliv- ery.[10,11] Exfoliated graphite has been incorporated into PEM and other incorporated into PEM.[1518] Oxidized graphite is created by the acid treatment of graphite, which exfoliates

  10. Elastomeric behavior of exfoliated graphite, as shown by instrumented indentation testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Elastomeric behavior of exfoliated graphite, as shown by instrumented indentation testing Po for the first time the elastomeric behavior of a non-polymeric material, as observed in exfoliated graphite sliding of the graphite layers within the cell wall of exfoliated graphite. The reversibility is probably

  11. Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTedRegion | Department of Energy4th

  12. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  13. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  14. 2014 Annual Planning Summary for the Brookhaven Site Office | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment ofCBFO-13-3322(EE) |2DepartmentNatural GasEnergy Brookhaven

  15. Brookhaven Site Office CX Determinations | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials FindAdvancedBrookhaven Site Office CX Determinations

  16. Brookhaven Site Office EA / EIS | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials FindAdvancedBrookhaven Site Office CX

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC)PrincipalStaffTheofanisApplication1BiogeochemicalBiosBrookhaven

  18. Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National Laboratory Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory

  19. Brookhaven Lab's broad mission is to produce excellent science. Our scientists conduct research in the physical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    of the nation's energy needs are met by the combustion of fossil fuels such as oil, natural gas, and coal that will keep you informed about happenings at the Laboratory, help you understand some of the science behind alternative energy sources into electrical energy that is then transformed into chemical fuels, or by directly

  20. First Direct Evidence of Dirac Fermions in Graphite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27 June 2007 00:00 The recent surge of interest in the electronic properties of graphene-that is, isolated layers of graphite just one atomic layer thick-has largely been...

  1. Mechanics of fatigue damage in titanium-graphite hybrid laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burianek, Dennis Arthur

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titanium-graphite hybrid laminates are being developed for high-temperature aerospace applications. Experimental observations have indicated that cracks in the titanium facesheets initiate at free edges as well as in areas ...

  2. TRACES Centre Thermo GFS35 Graphite Furnace Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    TRACES Centre Thermo GFS35 Graphite Furnace Spectrometer Standard Operating Procedure 1. Turn. Click on the lamp icon a. ID the lamp of choice and click the `Off' button to `On' b. Non-Thermo lamps

  3. Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Direct exfoliation of natural graphite into micrometer size few layers graphene sheets using ionic liquids Re-direct Destination: Stable high-concentration suspensions (up to 0.95...

  4. Dry synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite powders and carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we describe the direct synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite by heating under vacuum or ball milling under pressurized Ar(g). Both methods allow for stoichometric control of Li-C ratio in batter-grade graphites and carbon fibers prior formation of a solid electrolyte interphase. The products' surface chemistries, as probed by XPS, suggest that LiC6 are extremely reactive with trace amounts of moisture or oxygen. The open circuit potential and SEM data show that the reactivity of the lithiated battery-grade graphite and the carbon fiber can be related to the density of edge/defect sites on the surfaces. Preliminary results of spontaneous SEI formation on Li-graphite in electrolyte are also given.

  5. The dependence of natural graphite anode performance on electrode density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of electrode density for lithium intercalation and irreversible capacity loss on the natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries was studied by electrochemical methods. Both the first-cycle reversible and irreversible capacities of the natural graphite anode decreased with an increase in the anode density though compression. The reduction in reversible capacity was attributed to a reduction in the chemical diffusion coefficient for lithium though partially agglomerated particles with a larger stress. For the natural graphite in this study the potentials for Li (de)insertion shifted between the first and second formation cycles and the extent of this shift was dependent on electrode density. The relation between this peak shift and the irreversible capacity loss are probably both due to the decrease in graphite surface area with compression.

  6. ams graphite target: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

  7. arak iran graphite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

  8. astm graphite oxidation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF THE BNL, in the first phase of the E951 experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS materials selected for the experiment are ATJ...

  9. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  10. The preliminary feasibility of intercalated graphite railgun armatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaier, J.R. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center); Gooden, C.E. (Air Force Armament Lab., Eglin AFB, FL (United States)); Yashan, D. (Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States)); Naud, S. (Naval Coastal Systems Lab., Panama City, FL (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on graphite intercalation compounds which may provide an excellent material for the fabrication of electro-magnetic railgun armatures. As a pulse of power is fed into the armature the intercalate could be excited into the plasma state around the edges of the armature, while the bulk of the current would be carried through the graphite block. Such an armature would have desirable characteristics of both diffuse plasma armatures and bulk conduction armatures. In addition, the highly anisotropic nature of these materials could enable the electrical and thermal conductivity to be tailored to meet the specific requirements of electromagnetic railgun armatures. Preliminary investigations have been performed in an attempt to determine the feasibility of using graphite intercalation compounds as railgun armatures. Issues of fabrication, resistivity, stability, and electrical current spreading have been addressed for the case of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite.

  11. Experimental thermal conductivity and contact conductance of graphite composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marian Christine

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite fiber organic matrix composites were reviewed ics. for potential heat sink applications in the electronics packaging determined the effective transverse and longitudinal thermal industry. This experimental investigation conductivity...

  12. Graphite electrode arc melter demonstration Phase 2 test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, N.R.; Chambers, A.G.; Anderson, G.L.; O`Connor, W.K.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several U.S. Department of Energy organizations and the U.S. Bureau of Mines have been collaboratively conducting mixed waste treatment process demonstration testing on the near full-scale graphite electrode submerged arc melter system at the Bureau`s Albany (Oregon) Research Center. An initial test series successfully demonstrated arc melter capability for treating surrogate incinerator ash of buried mixed wastes with soil. The conceptual treatment process for that test series assumed that buried waste would be retrieved and incinerated, and that the incinerator ash would be vitrified in an arc melter. This report presents results from a recently completed second series of tests, undertaken to determine the ability of the arc melter system to stably process a wide range of {open_quotes}as-received{close_quotes} heterogeneous solid mixed wastes containing high levels of organics, representative of the wastes buried and stored at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Phase 2 demonstration test results indicate that an arc melter system is capable of directly processing these wastes and could enable elimination of an up-front incineration step in the conceptual treatment process.

  13. Compression induced delamination in a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Earley, John W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    December 1981 Major Subject: Civil Engineering COMPRESSION INDUCED DELAMINATION IN A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by JOHN W. EARLEY Approved as to style and content by: (K. L. Jerina, Chairman) (R, A. Schape y', MemP ) W. L.... Bradley, Me er Il. 8 0 1d, O. pa t~tH d December 1981 ABSTRACT Compression Induced Delamination in a Unidirectional Graphite/Epoxy Composite (December 1981) John William Earley, B. S. Aeronautical Engineering California Polytechnic State University...

  14. Slow, stable delamination in graphite/epoxy composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razi, Hamid

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SLOB, STABLE DELAFIINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RA2I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SLOW, STABLE DELAMINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RAZI Approved as to style and content by: (R. A. Schapery, hair (J. R. Wa ton, Member) (W. L. Bradley, Membe . R. Hopkins, ead of Department...

  15. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  16. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov a passion for discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Hybridyne Imaging Technologies, Inc., ProxiScanTM won a 2009 R&D 100 AwardImaging Technologies,Inc. Patents Inventorshold16patentson thetechnology BrookhavenScience AssociatesThe U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973

  17. Electrical and thermal properties of graphite/polyaniline composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourdo, Shawn E., E-mail: sxbourdo@ualr.edu [Center for Integrative Nanotechnology Sciences, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Warford, Brock A.; Viswanathan, Tito [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite of a carbon allotrope (graphite) and an inherently conducting polymer, polyaniline (PANI), has been prepared that exhibits an electrical conductivity greater than either of the two components. An almost 2-fold increase in the bulk conductivity occurs when only a small mass fraction of polyaniline exists in the composite (91% graphite/ 9% polyaniline, by mass). This increase in dc electrical conductivity is curious since in most cases a composite material will exhibit a conductivity somewhere between the two individual components, unless a modification to the electronic nature of the material occurs. In order to elucidate the fundamental electrical properties of the composite we have performed variable temperature conductivity measurements to better understand the nature of conduction in these materials. The results from these studies suggest a change in the mechanism of conduction as the amount of polyaniline is increased in the composite. Along with superior electrical properties, the composites exhibit an increase in thermal stability as compared to the graphite. - Graphical abstract: (Left) Room temperature electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at different mass ratios. (Right) Electrical conductivity of G-PANI composites at temperatures from 5 K to 300 K. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composites of graphite and polyaniline have been synthesized with unique electrical and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Certain G-PANI composites are more conductive and more thermally stable than graphite alone. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer G-PANI composites exhibit a larger conductivity ratio with respect to temperature than graphite alone.

  18. Physics and Neuroscience: Common Ground Between Disparate Fields (420th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaska, Paul

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    At Brookhaven, methods of experimental physics are being applied to enhance the understanding of the human brain, with the ultimate goal of improving treatments for a variety of disorders ranging from addiction to obesity. The Medical Department's Paul Vaska and colleagues designed and built a fully functional brain scanner so small that it can image the brain of an awake, moving animal. We have developed unique strategies to image the brain non-invasively, in human beings and animal models of human brain function. However, anesthesia, which is used in the study of animal models, has significant unintended consequences on brain function. To avoid anesthesia-induced changes in brain function, the speaker and colleages have designed and built the smallest, fully functional brain scanner of its type in the world. It is so small that it can be used to image the brain of a rat while the animal is awake and moving. The significance of this device as well as other related instruments under development at Brookhaven will be discussed.

  19. Manipulating Light to Understand and Improve Solar Cells (494th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisaman, Matthew [BNL, Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy consumption around the world is projected to approximately triple by the end of the century, according to the 2005 Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization. Much will change in those next 86 years, but for all the power the world needsfor everything from manufacturing and transportation to air conditioning and charging cell phone batteriesimproved solar cells will be crucial to meet this future energy demand with renewable energy sources. At Brookhaven Lab, scientists are probing solar cells and exploring variations within the cellsvariations that are so small they are measured in billionths of a meterin order to make increasingly efficient solar cells and ultimately help reduce the overall costs of deploying solar power plants. Dr. Eisaman will discuss DOE's Sunshot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar cell-generated electricity by 2020. He will also discuss how he and collaborators at Brookhaven Lab are probing different material compositions within solar cells, measuring how efficiently they collect electrical charge, helping to develop a new class of solar cells, and improving solar-cell manufacturing processes.

  20. Approaches to Deal with Irradiated Graphite in Russia - Proposal for New IAEA CRP on Graphite Waste Management - 12364

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Poluektov, Pavel; Ustinov, Oleg [JSC 'VNIINM', Center of SNF and RW Management, 5A Rogova st., Moscow 123060 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problems of spent reactor graphite are being shown, the options of its disposal is considered. Burning method is selected as the most efficient and waste-free. It is made a comparison of amounts of {sup 14}C that entering the environment in a natural way during the operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and as a result of the proposed burning of spent reactor graphite. It is shown the possibility of burning graphite with the arrival of {sup 14}C into the atmosphere within the maximum allowable emissions. This paper analyzes the different ways of spent reactor graphite treatment. It is shown the possibility of its reprocessing by burning method in the air flow. It is estimated the effect of this technology to the overall radiation environment and compared its contribution to the general background radiation due to cosmic radiation and NPPs emission. It is estimated the maximum permissible speeds of burning reactor graphite (for example, RBMK graphite) for areas with different conditions of agricultural activities. (authors)

  1. A Fast, Versatile Nanoprobe for Complex Materials: The Sub-micron Resolution X-ray Spectroscopy Beamline at NSLS-II (491st Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieme, Juergen [BNL Photon Sciences Directorate

    2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Time is money and for scientists who need to collect data at research facilities like Brookhaven Labs National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), beamtime can be a precious commodity. While scanning a complex material with a specific technique and standard equipment today would take days to complete, researchers preparing to use brighter x-rays and the new sub-micron-resolution x-ray spectroscopy (SRX) beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) could scan the same sample in greater detail with just a few hours of beamtime. Talk about savings and new opportunities for researchers! Users will rely on these tools for locating trace elements in contaminated soils, developing processes for nanoparticles to deliver medical treatments, and much more. Dr. Thieme explains benefits for next-generation research with spectroscopy and more intense x-rays at NSLS-II. He discusses the instrumentation, features, and uses for the new SRX beamline, highlighting its speed, adjustability, and versatility for probing samples ranging in size from millimeters down to the nanoscale. He will talk about complementary beamlines being developed for additional capabilities at NSLS-II as well.

  2. Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States); Poncet, Bernard [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)] [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36 is released during roasting tests. (authors)

  3. Method for wetting a boron alloy to graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Storms, E.K.

    1987-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for wetting a graphite substrate and spreading a a boron alloy over the substrate. The wetted substrate may be in the form of a needle for an effective ion emission source. The method may also be used to wet a graphite substrate for subsequent joining with another graphite substrate or other metal, or to form a protective coating over a graphite substrate. A noneutectic alloy of boron is formed with a metal selected from the group consisting of nickel (Ni), palladium (Pd), and platinum (Pt) with excess boron, i.e., and atomic percentage of boron effective to precipitate boron at a wetting temperature of less than the liquid-phase boundary temperature of the alloy. The alloy is applied to the substrate and the graphite substrate is then heated to the wetting temperature and maintained at the wetting temperature for a time effective for the alloy to wet and spread over the substrate. The excess boron is evenly dispersed in the alloy and is readily available to promote the wetting and spreading action of the alloy. 1 fig.

  4. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  5. THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Lucien Wielopolski and colleagues from Brookhaven National Laboratory continued the characterization

  6. Effect of Graphitic Content on Carbon Supported Catalyst Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; David Harvey; M. Dutta; V. Colbow; S. Wessel

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of graphitic content on carbon supported platinum catalysts was investigated in order to investigate its influence on catalyst performance. Four catalysts of varying surface areas and graphitic content were analyzed using XPS, HREELS, and tested using RDE experiments. The catalysts were also heat treated at 150 C and 100%RH as means to uniformly age them. The heat treated samples were analyzed using the same methods to determine what changes had occurred due to this aging process. When compared to the BOL catalysts, heat treated catalysts displayed increased graphitic carbon and platinum metallic content, however they also showed depressed catalytic activity. The primary cause is still under investigation, though it is believed to be related to loss of amorphous carbon content.

  7. Effect of Vinylene Carbonate on Graphite Anode Cycling Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Paul; Zheng, Honghe; Liu, Gao; Song, Xiangun; Ross, Philip; Battaglia, Vincent

    2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Vinylene Carbonate (VC) was added to the electrolyte in graphite-lithium half-cells. We report its effect on the coulombic efficiency (as capacity shift) of graphite electrodes under various formation cycling conditions. Cyclic voltammetry on glassy carbon showed that VC passivates the electrode against electrolyte reduction. The dQ/dV plots of the first lithiation of the graphite suggest that VC alters the SEI layer, and that by varying the cell formation rate, the initial ratio of ethylene carbonate to VC in the SEI layer can be controlled. VC was found to decrease first cycle efficiency and reversible capacity (in ongoing cycling) when used to excess. However, experiments with VC additive used with various formation rates did not show any decrease in capacity shift.

  8. Graphite Foams for Lithium-Ion Battery Current Collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Tiegs, Terry N [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Jang, Young-Il [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite open-cell foams, with their very high electronic and thermal conductivities, may serve as high surface area and corrosion resistant current collectors for lithium-ion batteries. As a proof of principle, cathodes were prepared by sintering carbon-coated LiFePO4 particles into the porous graphite foams. Cycling these cathodes in a liquid electrolyte cell showed promising performance even for materials and coatings that have not been optimized. The specific capacity is not limited by the foam structure, but by the cycling performance of the coated LiFePO4 particles. Upon extended cycling for more than 100 deep cycles, no loss of capacity is observed for rates of C/2 or less. The uncoated graphite foams will slowly intercalate lithium reversibly at potentials less than 0.2 volts versus lithium.

  9. Graphit-ceramic RF Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, David L. (Princeton Junction, NJ); Hosea, Joel C. (Princeton, NJ)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process of brazing a ceramic mater to graphite. In particular, the brazing procedure is directed to the production of a novel brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield.

  10. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries....

  11. Chemical and Physical Modification of Graphitic Materials by Oxidative Processes and Solvent Intercalation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werke, Carrie Beth

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene and graphite are materials of high interest for many applications. In order to increase the possible uses of these materials, more must be understood about how their properties can be modified. One way to modify graphitic properties...

  12. Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  13. Microfabrication of freestanding metal structures released from graphite substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarova, O. V.; Tang, C.-M.; Mancini, D. C.; Moldovan, N.; Divan, R.; Ryding, D. G.; Lee, R. H.

    2002-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sacrificial layer is usually used to release electroformed microstructures. Because of the chemistry applied to the sacrificial layer, only a limited number of metals can be used for electroforming. A novel method to fabricate freestanding electroformed copper structures is presented. A graphite substrate allows the release of the metal part, by abrasive removal of the graphite after electroforming. Results on fabrication of high-aspect-ratio freestanding copper grids are presented; these can be used as x-ray collimator in medical imaging to reduce scattered radiation. This process has potential application to the fabrication of injection molds and microparts on pick-and-place carriers for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  14. Equation of State of Graphite-like BC,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solozhenko,V.; Kurakevych, O.; Solozhenko, E.; Chen, J.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compressibility of turbostratic boron-substituted graphite (t-BC) was measured up to 12 GPa at room temperature using energy-dispersive X-ray powder diffraction with synchrotron radiation. A fit to the experimental p-V data using Birch-Murnaghan equation of state gives values of the t-BC bulk modulus 23(2) GPa and its pressure derivative 8.0(6). These values point to a higher compressibility of t-BC as compared to turbostratic graphite.

  15. Delamination fracture toughness of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, Roy Charles

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOS ITE A Thesis by ROY CHARLES HULSEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DELAMINA. ION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by ROY CHARLES HULSEY Approved as to sty1e and content by: +alter L. Brad1ey, C airman TR. A. S p...

  16. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  17. Gelcasting polymeric precursors for producing net-shaped graphites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W.; Janney, Mark A.

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a method for molding complex and intricately shaped high density monolithic carbon, carbon-carbon, graphite, and thermoplastic composites using gelcasting technology. The method comprising a polymeric carbon precursor, a solvent, a dispersant, an anti-foaming agent, a monomer system, and an initiator system. The components are combined to form a suspension which is poured into a mold and heat-treated to form a thermoplastic part. The thermoplastic part can then be further densified and heat-treated to produce a high density carbon or graphite composite. The present invention also discloses the products derived from this method.

  18. Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Under Various Cycling Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridgway, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphite formulations in particular, are the current standard for lithium-ion anodes for electric vehicle batteries(

  19. Status of ASME Section III Task Group on Graphite Support Core Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Bratton; Tim D. Burchell

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the roadmap that the ASME Project Team on Graphite Core Supports is pursuing to establish design codes for unirradiated and irradiated graphite core components during its first year of operation. It discusses the deficiencies in the proposed Section III, Division 2, Subsection CE graphite design code and the different approaches the Project Team has taken to address those deficiencies.

  20. Non-oxidative intercalation and exfoliation of graphite by Brnsted acids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-oxidative intercalation and exfoliation of graphite by Brnsted acids Nina I. Kovtyukhova1 and the polarizable graphene sheets. The intercalated graphites readily exfoliate in dimethylformamide to give, with loss of conductivity9,10. These highly oxidized graphite compounds can be exfoliated to form

  1. Krypton adsorption on (0001) graphite pre-plated with cyclohexane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    91 Krypton adsorption on (0001) graphite pre-plated with cyclohexane A. Razafitianamaharavo (1), N tudie par volumtrie entre 71 et 83 K. L'adsorption de krypton, fortement inhibe par la prsence du physisorbed has been studied between 71 and 83 K by means of classical volumetric methods. Krypton adsorption

  2. A neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and regions containing oxidized chain-like structures. The neutron scattering pair distribution function is heterogeneous, the total neutron scattering data presented in this paper gives a statistically averagedA neutron diffraction study of nano-crystalline graphite oxide J.A. Johnsona,b,*, C.J. Benmoreb , S

  3. Author's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    on the surface [18]. Hence the effect of lithium on plasmawall interactions is expected to dependAuthor's personal copy Reactivity of lithium exposed graphite surface S.S. Harilal a, *, J in fusion devices [15]. For example, wall conditioning with thin lithium layers gives rise to low hydrogen

  4. Progress in Developing Finite Element Models Replicating Flexural Graphite Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Bratton

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the status of flexural strength evaluations from current ASTM procedures and of developing finite element models predicting the probability of failure. This work is covered under QLD REC-00030. Flexural testing procedures of the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) assume a linear elastic material that has the same moduli for tension and compression. Contrary to this assumption, graphite is known to have different moduli for tension and compression. A finite element model was developed and demonstrated that accounts for the difference in moduli tension and compression. Brittle materials such as graphite exhibit significant scatter in tensile strength, so probabilistic design approaches must be used when designing components fabricated from brittle materials. ASTM procedures predicting probability of failure in ceramics were compared to methods from the current version of the ASME graphite core components rules predicting probability of failure. Using the ASTM procedures yields failure curves at lower applied forces than the ASME rules. A journal paper was published in the Journal of Nuclear Engineering and Design exploring the statistical models of fracture in graphite.

  5. THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR VERSUS A FAST SPECTRUM SOLID FUEL is to compare two main options dedicated to long-term energy production with Thorium: solid fuel with fast its be- haviour until it reaches the 232Th/233U equilibrium from two di erent starting fuels: 232Th

  6. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J. (comp.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  7. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  8. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  9. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramano, A.J. (comp.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  11. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, 1 October-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, LMFBR Safety Experiments, SSC Code Development, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  12. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  13. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Advanced Code Evaluation, Simulator Improvement Program, and LWR Assessment and Application.

  14. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  15. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  16. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gang, Oleg (Center for Functional Nanomaterials) [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNAs natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard University from 1999 to 2002. After joining BNL as a Goldhaber Fellow in 2002, he became an assistant scientist at the CFN in 2004. He became the CFNs leader for Soft and Biological Nanomaterials Theme Group in 2006, and earned the title of scientist in 2009. Gang has received numerous honors and recognitions, including the 2010 Gordon Battelle Prize for Scientific Discovery.

  17. ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A GRAPHITE BASED COMPOSITE AS AFFECTED BY THE DEGREE OF MIXEDNESS OF GRAPHITE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    filled polymers and the mechanisms involved in the formation of conductive composites of polymerELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY OF A GRAPHITE BASED COMPOSITE AS AFFECTED BY THE DEGREE OF MIXEDNESS of the volume conductivity of the composite. Background Electrically conductive nonmetallic materials are used

  18. Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

  19. An Investigation of the Effect of Graphite Degradation on the Irreversible Capacity in Lithium-ion Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardwick, Laurence

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphite anodes suffer severe surface structural damage upon prolonged cycling in rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

  20. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The sun cant do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sunso hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held togetherfrom atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest starshow all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  1. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds updrafts and downdraftswhich resemble airflow in a convection ovenand many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earths climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earths climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  2. Quantum modelling of hydrogen chemisorption on graphene and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlick, Frantiek, E-mail: frantisek.karlicky@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palack University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic)] [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palack University, T?. 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Lepetit, Bruno, E-mail: bruno.lepetit@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr; Lemoine, Didier, E-mail: didier.lemoine@irsamc.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire Collisions Agrgats Ractivit, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Collisions Agrgats Ractivit, IRSAMC and UMR5589 du CNRS, Universit de Toulouse, UPS, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse cedex (France)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemisorption of hydrogen on graphene or graphite is studied within a quantum formalism involving a subsystem coupled to a phonon bath. The subsystem includes the hydrogen atom approaching the surface perpendicularly right on top of a carbon atom which puckers out of the surface. The bath includes the acoustic and optical phonon modes vibrating perpendicularly to the surface. Couplings between subsystem and bath are obtained with a periodic density functional theory calculation. Trapping probabilities are obtained as a function of the hydrogen atom kinetic energy. These results are discussed in the light of the experimental hydrogenation studies performed on graphite by Zecho et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 8486 (2002)] and on graphene by Haberer et al. [Adv. Mater. 23, 4497 (2011)].

  3. Local diamagnetic susceptibility of quasi-two-dimensional graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, E. G., E-mail: nikolaev@kapitza.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Kotosonov, A. S. [OAO NIIgrafit (Russian Federation)] [OAO NIIgrafit (Russian Federation); Shalashugina, E. A.; Troyanovskii, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Tsebro, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of quasi-two-dimensional graphite (QTDG) whose magnetic properties are described within the Dirac fermion model is investigated by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) techniques. The broad spectrum of the sample points to a large dispersion of crystallite sizes in this system, which is also confirmed by STM data. It is established that the local diamagnetic susceptibility may substantially exceed the average value over the sample and reaches an abnormally high value of -1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} emu/g at T = 4.2 K, which is greater than the corresponding value of highly oriented graphite by a factor of four.

  4. Catalytic graphitization of carbon aerogels by transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado-Hodar, F.J.; Moreno-Castilla, C.; Rivera-Utrilla, J.; Hanzawa, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels and Cr-, Fe-, Co-, and Ni-containing carbon aerogels were obtained by pyrolysis, at temperatures between 500 and 1,800 C, of the corresponding aerogels prepared by the sol-gel method from polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde. All samples were characterized by mercury porosimetry, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Results obtained show that carbon aerogels are, essentially, macroporous materials that maintain large pore volumes even after pyrolysis at 1,800 C. For pyrolysis at temperatures higher than 1,000 C, the presence of the transition metals produced graphitized areas with three-dimensional stacking order, as shown by HRTEM, XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. HRTEM also showed that the metal-carbon containing aerogels were formed by polyhedral structures. Cr and Fe seem to be the best catalysts for graphitization of carbon aerogels.

  5. Testing of Small Graphite Samples for Nuclear Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Chapman

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately determining the mechanical properties of small irradiated samples is crucial to predicting the behavior of the overal irradiated graphite components within a Very High Temperature Reactor. The sample size allowed in a material test reactor, however, is limited, and this poses some difficulties with respect to mechanical testing. In the case of graphite with a larger grain size, a small sample may exhibit characteristics not representative of the bulk material, leading to inaccuracies in the data. A study to determine a potential size effect on the tensile strength was pursued under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant program. It focuses first on optimizing the tensile testing procedure identified in the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard C 781-08. Once the testing procedure was verified, a size effect was assessed by gradually reducing the diameter of the specimens. By monitoring the material response, a size effect was successfully identified.

  6. Graphite having improved thermal stress resistance and method of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Charles R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for fabricating a graphite article comprises the steps of impregnating a coke article by first heating the coke article in contact with a thermoplastic pitch at a temperature within the range of 250.degree.-300.degree. C. at a pressure within the range of 200-2000 psig for at least 4-10 hours and then heating said article at a temperature within the range of 450.degree.-485.degree. C. at a pressure of 200-2000 psig for about 16-24 hours to provide an impregnated article; heating the impregnated article for sufficient time to carbonize the impregnant to provide a second coke article, and graphitizing the second coke article. A graphite having improved thermal stress resistance results when the coke to be impregnated contains 1-3 wt.% sulfur and no added puffing inhibitors. An additional improvement in thermal stress resistance is achieved when the second coke article is heated above about 1400.degree. C. at a rate of at least 10.degree. C./minute to a temperature above the puffing temperature.

  7. Proceedings of the conference on electrochemistry of carbon allotropes: Graphite, fullerenes and diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, K. [ed.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Scherson, D. [ed.] [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference provided an opportunity for electrochemists, physicists, materials scientists and engineers to meet and exchange information on different carbon allotropes. The presentations and discussion among the participants provided a forum to develop recommendations on research and development which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes. The following topics which are relevant to the electrochemistry of carbon allotropes were addressed: Graphitized and disordered carbons, as Li-ion intercalation anodes for high-energy-density, high-power-density Li-based secondary batteries; Carbons as substrate materials for catalysis and electrocatalysis; Boron-doped diamond film electrodes; and Electrochemical characterization and electrosynthesis of fullerenes and fullerene-type materials. Abstracts of the presentations are presented.

  8. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  9. Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Ho Oh; Eung Soo Kim; Hee Cheon No; Nam Zin Cho

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is performing research and development (R&D) that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program / GEN-IV Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Phenomena identification and ranking studies (PIRT) to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important (Schultz et al., 2006). Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation (V&V) are very high priority for the NGNP program. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization, air will enter the core through the break. Air ingress leads to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will cause the release of fission products eventually. The potential collapse of the bottom reflector because of burn-off and the release of CO lead to serious safety problems. For estimation of the proper safety margin we need experimental data and tools, including accurate multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. We also need to develop effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods R&D project. This project is focused on (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the bottom reflector, (d) structural tests of the burnt-off bottom reflector, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  10. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence of atoms produced in a graphite furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goforth, D.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace gives detection limits for Pb, Cu, Mn, Sn, Al, In, Li, and Pt, in the picogram to sub-picogram range. The linear dynamic range for these elements varies from 3 to 7 orders of magnitude. A graphite rod, a plain graphite cup, and a slotted graphite cup are compared as the cuvette in the fluorescence system. Detection limits for a pyrolytic coating, a tantalum foil liner, and a tantalum carbide coating of the graphite cuvette are compared. A hydrogen-argon atmosphere, a low-pressure atmosphere, and an argon atmosphere are compared as the atmosphere surrounding the graphite cuvette. Lastly, Cu and Mn are determined in several standard reference materials.

  11. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  12. Development of lead-free copper alloy graphite castings. Annual report, January--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, P.K.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of graphite particles in graphite containing copper alloy was further improved very significantly using several procedures and technological modifications. The developed techniques attacked the graphite distribution problem in two ways. Realizing that clustering of very fine (5um) graphite particles is one of the two major problems, a pretreatment process has been developed using aluminum powders to deagglomerate graphite particles. Along with this, a two-stage stirring technique was used to first incorporate and then to distribute uniformly the deagglomerated particles in the melt. During this year, based on these developments, several components were cast to evaluate the castability of Cu alloy-graphite melts. In addition, machinability tests were done to clearly established that addition of graphite particles improve the machinability of copper MMC alloys over and above that of monolithic copper alloys. The results show that the machining chip sizes and cutting forces of Cu alloys containing graphite particles are smaller than these of the corresponding monolithic Cu alloys. This clearly establishes that the presence of graphite particles in copper alloy improves the machinability in a fashion similar to lead additions to copper alloys. Centrifugal casting of shapes of different sizes appear to be a very attractive method for casting graphite containing copper alloys, since all the graphite particles (regardless of their distribution in the melt) are forced to segregate to the inner periphery of the castings where they impart a very desirable solid lubrication property for bushing and bearing use. A very large number of cylindrical elements of lead bearing copper alloys are now used for similar bearing bushing applications and the manufacturers of these type of bearings are under safety and health hazard pressure to remove lead. This year several parameters for centrifugal casting of copper graphite alloys have been established.

  13. Understanding Creep Mechanisms in Graphite with Experiments, Multiscale Simulations, and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Jacob; Murty, Korukonda; Burchell, Timothy

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Disordering mechanisms in graphite have a long history with conflicting viewpoints. Using Raman and x-ray photon spectroscopy, electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction experiments and atomistic modeling and simulations, the current project has developed a fundamental understanding of early-to-late state radiation damage mechanisms in nuclear reactor grade graphite (NBG-18 and PCEA). We show that the topological defects in graphite play an important role under neutron and ion irradiation.

  14. Laser-induced dehydration of graphite oxide coatings on polymer substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longo, Angela, E-mail: angela.longo@cnr.it; Palomba, Mariano; Carotenuto, Gianfranco; Nicolais, Luigi [Institute for Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Viale Kennedy, 54, Mostra d'Oltremare Padiglione 20, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Orabona, Emanuele; Maddalena, Pasqualino [Department of Physics, University of Naples, Federico II, via cintia, 80126, Naples, Italy and SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy); Ambrosio, Antonio [SPIN Institute, National Research Council, UOS Naples, via cintia, 80126, Naples (Italy)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosized graphite has been oxidized by the Hummers method to give high quality graphite oxide. This reaction is characterized by a very fast kinetic behavior and a high yield. The produced graphite oxide has been conveniently used to pattern graphene by using a standard photolithographic method, and the resulting systems have been characterized by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Visible-Near Infrared spectroscopy (Vis-NIR)

  15. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipal Investigators PostdoctoralResearch

  16. advanced gas cooled graphite moderated reactor: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperatures during normal (more) Moore, Eugene James Thomas 2006-01-01 2 THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR Physics Websites Summary: ,...

  17. air-cooled graphite reactors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an estimated 1,282 cubic yards of contaminated steel and filter elements from 4 THORIUM FUEL CYCLES: A GRAPHITE-MODERATED MOLTEN SALT REACTOR Physics Websites Summary: ,...

  18. Environmental and health effects review for obscurant graphite flakes. Final report, 1991 July--1993 May

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driver, C.J.; Ligotke, M.W.; Landis, W.G.; Downs, J.L.; Tiller, B.L.; Moore, E.B. Jr.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The health and environmental effects of obscurant graphite flakes were reviewed and compared to predicted levels of graphite flake material in the field during typical testing and training scenarios. Graphite flake dispersion and deposition for simulated mechanical and pyrotechnic releases were determined using a modified Gaussian atmospheric plume-dispersion model. The potential for wind resuspension of graphite flakes is controlled by weathering processes and incorporation rates in soil. Chemically, graphite flakes pose little risk to aquatic or terrestrial systems. Mechanical damage to plants and invertebrate and vertebrate organisms from the flakes is also minimal. In humans, the pathological and physiological response to inhaled graphite flake is similar to that induced by nuisance dusts and cause only transient pulmonary changes. Repeated exposure to very high concentrations (such as those near the source generator) may overwhelm the clearance mechanisms of the lung and result in pulmonary damage from the retained particles in unprotected individuals. However, these lesions either resolve with time or are of limited severity. Health effects of mixed aerosols of mixed aerosols of graphite and fog oil are similar to those produced by graphite flakes alone. Environmental impacts of fog oil-coated graphite flakes are not well known.

  19. Surface treated natural graphite as anode material for high-power Li-ion battery applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.; Vissers, D. R.; Amine, K.; Barsukov, I. V.; Henry, F.; Doniger, J.; Chemical Engineering; Superior Graphite Co.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power application of Li-ion battery in hybrid electrical vehicles requires low cost and safe cell materials. Among the various carbon anode materials used in lithium ion batteries, natural graphite shows the most promise with advantages in performance and cost. However, natural graphite is not compatible with propylene carbonate (PC)-based electrolytes, which have a lower melting point and improved safety characteristics. The problem with it is that the molecules of propylene carbonate intercalate with Li+ into graphite, and that frequently leads to the exfoliation of the graphite matrix.

  20. Safety research programs sponsored by Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research: Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. (comp.)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the Division of Regulatory Applications, Division of Engineering, Division of Safety Issue Resolution, and Division of Systems Research of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research following the reorganization in July 1988. The previous reports have covered the period October 1, 1976 through December 31, 1988.

  1. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov In Partnership with Stony Brook University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 systems, including proteins and genomic information, to understand the structure and function of enzymes U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory Funding $26 million from New York State

  2. PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. (in press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRESS IN PHOTOVOLTAICS: RESEARCH AND APPLICATIONS Prog. Photovolt: Res. Appl. (in press and Separation of Cd and Te from Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaic Manufacturing Scrap V. M. Fthenakis*,y and W. Wang Brookhaven National Laboratory, Department of Environmental Sciences, Photovoltaic Environmental

  3. Enhanced performance of graphite anode materials by AlF3 coating for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaolin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chen, Xilin; Yang, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to form the stable surface film and to further enhance the long-term cycling stability of the graphite anodes of lithium-ion batteries, the surface of graphite powders has been modified by AlF3 coating through chemical precipitation method. The AlF3-coated graphite shows no evident changes in the bulk structure and a thin AlF3-coating layer of about 2 nm thick is found to uniformly cover the graphite particles with 2 wt% AlF3 content. However, it delivers a higher initial discharge capacity and largely improved rate performances compared to the pristine graphite. Remarkably, AlF3 coated graphite demonstrated a much better cycle life. After 300 cycles, AlF3 coated graphite and uncoated graphite show capacity retention of 92% and 81%, respectively. XPS measurement shows that a more conductive solid electrode interface (SEI) layer was formed on AlF3 coated graphite as compared to uncoated graphite. SEM monograph also reveals that the AlF3-coated graphite particles have a much more stable surface morphology after long-term cycling. Therefore, the improved electrochemical performance of AlF3 coated graphite can be attributed to a more stable and conductive SEI formed on coated graphite anode during cycling process.

  4. Status of Initial Assessment of Physical and Mechanical Properties of Graphite Grades for NGNP Appkications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strizak, Joe P [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current candidate graphite grades for the core structures of NGNP include grades NBG-17, NBG-18, PCEA and IG-430. Both NBG-17 and NBG-18 are manufactured using pitch coke, and are vibrationally molded. These medium grain products are produced by SGL Carbon SAS (France). Tayo Tanso (Japan) produces IG-430 which is a petroleum coke, isostatically molded, nuclear grade graphite. And PCEA is a medium grain, extruded graphite produced by UCAR Carbon Co. (USA) from petroleum coke. An experimental program has been initiated to develop physical and mechanical properties data for these current candidate graphites. The results will be judged against the requirements for nuclear grade graphites set forth in ASTM standard D 7219-05 "Standard Specification for Isotropic and Near-isotropic Nuclear Graphites". Physical properties data including thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion, and mechanical properties data including tensile, compressive and flexural strengths will be obtained using the established test methods covered in D-7219 and ASTM C 781-02 "Standard Practice for Testing Graphite and Boronated Graphite Components for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactors". Various factors known to effect the properties of graphites will be investigated. These include specimen size, spatial location within a graphite billet, specimen orientation (ag and wg) within a billet, and billet-to-billet variations. The current status of the materials characterization program is reported herein. To date billets of the four graphite grades have been procured, and detailed cut up plans for obtaining the various specimens have been prepared. Particular attention has been given to the traceability of each specimen to its spatial location and orientation within a billet.

  5. Beam-induced graphitic carbon cage transformation from sumanene aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Jun-ichi, E-mail: fujita@bk.tsukuba.ac.jp; Tachi, Masashi; Murakami, Katsuhisa [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science (TIMS), Tsukuba 305-8573 (Japan); Sakurai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yuki; Higashibayashi, Shuhei [Research Center of Integrative Molecular Systems, Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8787 (Japan); Takeguchi, Masaki [Transmission Electron Microscopy Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We found that electron-beam irradiation of sumanene aggregates strongly enhanced their transformation into a graphitic carbon cage, having a diameter of about 20?nm. The threshold electron dose was about 32 mC/cm{sup 2} at 200?keV, but the transformation is still induced at 20?keV. The transformation sequence suggested that the cage was constructed accompanied by the dynamical movement of the transiently linked sumanene molecules in order to pile up inside the shell. Thus, bond excitation in the sumanene molecules rather than a knock-on of carbon atoms seems to be the main cause of the cage transformation.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Collisions between Hydrogen and Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ito; H. Nakamura

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen adsorption by graphite is examined by classical molecular dynamics simulation using a modified Brenner REBO potential. Such interactions are typical in chemical sputtering experiments, and knowledge of the fundamental behavior of hydrogen and graphene in collisional conditions is essential for modeling the sputtering mechanism. The hydrogen adsorption rate is found to be dependent on the incident hydrogen energy and not on graphene temperature. Rather than destroying the graphene, hydrogen incidence at energies of less than 100 eV can be classified into three regimes of adsorption, reflection and penetration through one or more graphene layers. Incidence at the lowest energies is shown to distort the graphene structure.

  7. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Specimen A-4, [0/90?] , 98$ Ft s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen 8-5, [0/90, ] , 94$ s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen C-S, [0/90, ] , 91$ Ft . . ~ Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen E-9, tO /90... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  8. Dynamic scanning probe microscopy of adsorbed molecules on graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Berdunov; A. J. Pollard; P. H. Beton

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a combined dynamic scanning tunneling and atomic force microscope to study the organisation of weakly bound adsorbed molecules on a graphite substrate. Specifically we have acquired images of islands of the perylene derivative molecules. These weakly bound molecules may be imaged in dynamic STM, in which the probe is oscillated above the surface. We show that molecular resolution may be readily attained and that a similar mode of imaging may be realised using conventional STM arrangement. We also show, using tunnelling spectroscopy, the presence of an energy gap for the adsorbed molecules confirming a weak molecule-substrate interaction.

  9. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, Jr., Dominic J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herman, Herbert (Port Jefferson, NY); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1600.degree.C. which transforms the coating to silicon carbide.

  10. Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional graphitic silicon carbide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiao; Lin, Shisheng; Hakro, Ayaz Ali; Cao, Te; Chen, Hongsheng; Zhang, Baile

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical and electronic properties of two dimensional few layers graphitic silicon carbide (GSiC), in particular monolayer and bilayer, are investigated by density functional theory and found different from that of graphene and silicene. Monolayer GSiC has direct bandgap while few layers exhibit indirect bandgap. The bandgap of monolayer GSiC can be tuned by an in-plane strain. Properties of bilayer GSiC are extremely sensitive to the interlayer distance. These predictions promise that monolayer GSiC could be a remarkable candidate for novel type of light-emitting diodes utilizing its unique optical properties distinct from graphene, silicene and few layers GSiC.

  11. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  12. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the early,

  13. Graphite and its Hidden Superconductivity | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the

  14. Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

  15. Synthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the preparation of graphene sheets from graphite. After numerous failed attempts to create graphene-based sheetsSynthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide Sasha of a colloidal suspension of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets in water with hydrazine hydrate results

  16. Adsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional theory study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Adsorption of supramolecular building blocks on graphite: A force field and density functional-mail: axel.gross@uni-ulm.de The adsorption of the oligopyridine isomers 2,4'-BTP and 3,3'- BTP on graphite with an C6R-6-type dispersion correction, and the calculated adsorption energies are compared to the results

  17. Adsorption of the first layer of argon on graphite (*) Laboratoire des Composs non St0153chiomtriques,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-9 Adsorption of the first layer of argon on graphite (*) F. Millot Laboratoire des Composs non dtermin des isothermes d'adsorption d'argon sur le graphite entre 55 et 62 K. Nous proposons une interprtation de nos rsultats. Abstract. 2014 I have determined a set of adsorption isotherms for argon

  18. Relative stability of nanosized wurtzite and graphitic ZnO from density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, Roderick

    Relative stability of nanosized wurtzite and graphitic ZnO from density functional theory Bin Wen to determine the relative stability of wurtzite and graphitic phases of ZnO nanostructures. Our results the threshold number, the relative stability of the wurtzite phase is observed. Finally, we discuss

  19. Effect of the graphite electrode material on the characteristics of molten salt electrolytically produced carbon nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamali, Ali Reza, E-mail: ark42@cam.ac.uk; Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical erosion of a graphite cathode during the electrolysis of molten lithium chloride salt may be used for the preparation of nano-structured carbon materials. It has been found that the structures and morphologies of these carbon nanomaterials are dependent on those of the graphite cathodes employed. A combination of tubular and spherical carbon nanostructures has been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of predominantly planar micro-sized grains and a minor fraction of more irregular nano-sized grains, whilst only spherical carbon nanostructures have been produced from a graphite with a microstructure of primarily nano-sized grains. Based on the experimental results, a best-fit regression equation is proposed that relates the crystalline domain size of the graphite reactants and the carbon products. The carbon nanomaterials prepared possess a fairly uniform mesoporosity with a sharp peak in pore size distribution at around 4 nm. The results are of crucial importance to the production of carbon nanomaterials by way of the molten salt electrolytic method. - Highlights: {yields} Carbon nanomaterials are synthesised by LiCl electrolysis with graphite electrodes. {yields} The degree of crystallinity of graphite reactant and carbon product are related. {yields} A graphite reactant is identified that enables the preparation of carbon nanotubes. {yields} The carbon products possess uniform mesoporosity with narrow pore size distribution.

  20. Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Direct Physical Exfoliation of Few-Layer Graphene from Graphite Grown on a Nickel Foil Using Physical graphene exfoliation from graphite using optimized PDMS PACS codes: 68.65.Pq, 81.05.ue, 81.05.uf for the site-specific direct physical exfoliation of few-layer graphene sheets from cheap and easily

  1. Simple Fabrication of a Highly Sensitive Glucose Biosensor Using Enzymes Immobilized in Exfoliated Graphite Nanoplatelets Nafion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ilsoon

    Simple Fabrication of a Highly Sensitive Glucose Biosensor Using Enzymes Immobilized in Exfoliated for the development of a glucose biosensor. Exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets (xGnP) were tested to enhance to 100s of dollars per gram) often makes them cost-prohibitive for some applications. Exfoliated graphite

  2. Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Study of polypyrrole graphite composite as anode material for secondary lithium-ion batteries of the composite. The composite material has been studied for specific discharge capacity, coulombic efficiency for the Li-ion battery. Of various carbon materials that have been tried, graphite is favored because it (i

  3. Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Emission characteristics and dynamics of C2 from laser produced graphite plasma S. S. Harilal, Riju 1996; accepted for publication 20 December 1996 The emission features of laser ablated graphite plume diagnostic technique. Time resolved optical emission spectroscopy is employed to reveal the velocity

  4. Diffusion within a Layered, Graphite-Like, Spherical Electrode Theoretical Aspects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Philip L.

    Diffusion within a Layered, Graphite-Like, Spherical Electrode Theoretical Aspects Paul B. Antohi. Within this model, which mimics a layered, graphite-like spherical electrode, species can enter or leave further performance optimization of Li+ batteries have generated renewed interest into experimental

  5. Edge-Enriched Graphitic Anodes by KOH Activation for Higher Rate Capability Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UG-36 Edge-Enriched Graphitic Anodes by KOH Activation for Higher Rate Capability Lithium Ion Batteries D. Zakhidov,1,2 R. Sugamata,3 T. Yasue,3 T. Hayashi,3 Y. A. Kim,3 and M. Endo4 1 for Exotic Nanocarbons (JST), Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan\\ Natural graphite is the most commercially

  6. Study of Sn-Coated Graphite as Anode Material for Secondary Lithium-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popov, Branko N.

    Study of Sn-Coated Graphite as Anode Material for Secondary Lithium-Ion Batteries Basker Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Tin-graphite composites have been developed as an alternate anode material for Li-ion batteries using an autocatalytic deposition technique. The specific

  7. Julius Hastings, Chemistry De-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mate- rials using neutron scattering, but the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) would, particularly in the area of neu- tron scattering research. Although Hastings retired in 1987, he maintained his. BGRR: New Research After the BGRR began op- erations, Hastings began using neutron beams

  8. INITIAL COMPARISON OF BASELINE PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES FOR THE VHTR CANDIDATE GRAPHITE GRADES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Mark C

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-purity graphite is the core structural material of choice in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design, a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled configuration that is capable of producing thermal energy for power generation as well as process heat for industrial applications that require temperatures higher than the outlet temperatures of present nuclear reactors. The Baseline Graphite Characterization Program is endeavoring to minimize the conservative estimates of as-manufactured mechanical and physical properties in nuclear-grade graphites by providing comprehensive data that captures the level of variation in measured values. In addition to providing a thorough comparison between these values in different graphite grades, the program is also carefully tracking individual specimen source, position, and orientation information in order to provide comparisons both in specific properties and in the associated variability between different lots, different billets, and different positions from within a single billet. This report is a preliminary comparison between each of the grades of graphite that are considered candidate grades from four major international graphite producers. These particular grades (NBG-18, NBG-17, PCEA, IG-110, and 2114) are the major focus of the evaluations presently underway on irradiated graphite properties through the series of Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiments. NBG-18, a medium-grain pitch coke graphite from SGL from which billets are formed via vibration molding, was the favored structural material in the pebble-bed configuration. NBG-17 graphite from SGL is essentially NBG-18 with the grain size reduced by a factor of two. PCEA, petroleum coke graphite from GrafTech with a similar grain size to NBG-17, is formed via an extrusion process and was initially considered the favored grade for the prismatic layout. IG-110 and 2114, from Toyo Tanso and Mersen (formerly Carbone Lorraine), respectively, are fine-grain grades produced via an isomolding process. An analysis of the comparison between each of these grades will include not only the differences in fundamental and statistically-significant individual strength levels, but also the differences in variability in properties within each of the grades that will ultimately provide the basis for the prediction of in-service performance. The comparative performance of the different types of nuclear-grade graphites will continue to evolve as thousands more specimens are fully characterized from the numerous grades of graphite being evaluated.

  9. Generation of graphitic soot by an urban fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945. These particles, which we extracted from streaks of black rain found on a plaster wall, are being studied. Initial studies show that the artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a nuclear winter. Aerosol generation in urban fire storms have been considered by studying these particles. The presence of graphite as a component of these particles is suggested by electron photomicrographs and has been confirmed using Raman spectroscopy, surface ionization mass spectroscopy, and electron scattering for chemical analysis. Several hypotheses are being considered to explain the presence of this form of carbon. Among these are generation in sooty clouds, in raindrops, in the interior of the first storm, and on the wall surface itself. The distribution of particle sizes suggests that the residence time of particles in the atmosphere would be long if they were not removed by rainout. An experimental and theoretical examination of the conditions necessary to produce graphitic soot is in progress.

  10. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Office of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, RHIC gives physicists of Nuclear Physics within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Total Upgrade Cost: $ 700 millionThe U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory · P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973

  11. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Instrumentation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Brookhaven, the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Neutron Scattering Center-energy physics, as well as synchrotron and neutron experiments. There is a continual need to increase opened new vistas on protein crystallogra- phy using neutrons as a probe. Semiconductor detectors

  12. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Medical Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov FACTS (2/07) Medical Imaging Center for Translational Neuroimaging Tools and techniques to increase understanding of the human brain Scientists have made great advances in understanding be used to advance diagnosis and treatment. Brookhaven scientists are actively pursuing brain

  13. Evaluation of Surface Flux Parameterizations with Long-Term ARM Observations Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Homes, Christopher C.

    , China YANGANG LIU AND SATOSHI ENDO Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (Manuscript received at the Southern Great Plains site by the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Mea- surement program and Forecasting (WRF) model and three U.S. general circulation models (GCMs). The unprecedented 7-yr

  14. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  15. Method of producing exfoliated graphite composite compositions for fuel cell flow field plates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing an electrically conductive composite composition, which is particularly useful for fuel cell bipolar plate applications. The method comprises: (a) providing a supply of expandable graphite powder; (b) providing a supply of a non-expandable powder component comprising a binder or matrix material; (c) blending the expandable graphite with the non-expandable powder component to form a powder mixture wherein the non-expandable powder component is in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the powder mixture; (d) exposing the powder mixture to a temperature sufficient for exfoliating the expandable graphite to obtain a compressible mixture comprising expanded graphite worms and the non-expandable component; (e) compressing the compressible mixture at a pressure within the range of from about 5 psi to about 50,000 psi in predetermined directions into predetermined forms of cohered graphite composite compact; and (f) treating the so-formed cohered graphite composite to activate the binder or matrix material thereby promoting adhesion within the compact to produce the desired composite composition. Preferably, the non-expandable powder component further comprises an isotropy-promoting agent such as non-expandable graphite particles. Further preferably, step (e) comprises compressing the mixture in at least two directions. The method leads to composite plates with exceptionally high thickness-direction electrical conductivity.

  16. Oxidation of PCEA nuclear graphite by low water concentrations in helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Mee, Robert [University of Tennessee (UT); Wang, Peng [ORNL; Romanova, Anna V [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accelerated oxidation tests were performed to determine kinetic parameters of the chronic oxidation reaction of PCEA graphite in contact with helium coolant containing low moisture concentrations in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. To the authors best knowledge such a study has not been done since the detailed analysis of reaction of H-451 graphite with steam [Velasquez, Hightower, Burnette, 1978]. Since that H-451 graphite is now unavailable, it is urgently needed to characterize chronic oxidation behavior of new graphite grades under qualification for gas-cooled reactors. The Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism of carbon oxidation by water results in a non-linear reaction rate expression, with at least six different parameters. They were determined in accelerated oxidation experiments that covered a large range of temperatures (800 to 1100 oC), and partial pressures of water (15 to 850 Pa) and hydrogen (30 to 150 Pa) and used graphite specimens thin enough (4 mm) in order to avoid diffusion effects. Data analysis employed a statistical method based on multiple likelihood estimation of parameters and simultaneous fitting of non-linear equations. The results show significant material-specific differences between graphite grades PCEA and H-451 which were attributed to microstructural dissimilarity of the two materials. It is concluded that kinetic data cannot be transferred from one graphite grade to another.

  17. Capacitance of edge plane of pyrolytic graphite in acetonitrile solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minick, S.K.; Ishida, Takanobu

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The capacitance of the edge plane of pyrolytic graphite electrodes, in acetonitrile solutions, is measured by recording the current response to an applied triangular voltage sweep; TVS, and then fitting the current response with an appropriate function, (via a set of adjustable parameters). The pretreatment of the electrodes, the supporting electrolyte concentration used, and the frequency of the input TVS, were all found to affect the measured capacitance. In these experiments, a background current was also seen and the shape of the current output for the TVS; the charging/discharging curve, is shown to correlate with the magnitude of this background current. In addition, the size of the background current was found to have some dependence on the type of electrode pretreatment procedure used. 60 refs., 49 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Direct printing and reduction of graphite oxide for flexible supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hanyung [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ve Cheah, Chang [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Namjo [Energy Materials and Convergence Research Department, Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Junghoon, E-mail: jleenano@snu.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of WCU Multiscale Mechanical Design, School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report direct printing and photo-thermal reduction of graphite oxide (GO) to obtain a highly porous pattern of interdigitated electrodes, leading to a supercapacitor on a flexible substrate. Key parameters optimized include the amount of GO delivered, the suitable photo-thermal energy level for effective flash reduction, and the substrate properties for appropriate adhesion after reduction. Tests with supercapacitors based on the printed-reduced GO showed performance comparable with commercial supercapacitors: the energy densities were 1.06 and 0.87 mWh/cm{sup 3} in ionic and organic electrolytes, respectively. The versatility in the architecture and choice of substrate makes this material promising for smart power applications.

  19. Graphite fuels combustion off-gas treatment options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, R.J.; Lords, R.E.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scenarios for burning bulk graphite and for burning crushed fuel particles from graphite spent nuclear fuels have been considered. Particulates can be removed with sintered metal filters. Subsequent cooling would then condense semi-volatile fission products into or onto a particulate. These particulates would be trapped by a second sintered metal filter or downstream packed bed. A packed bed scrub column can be used to eliminate most of the iodine-129 and tritium. A molecular sieve bed is proposed to collect the residual {sup 129}I and other tramp radionuclides downstream (Ruthenium, etc.). Krypton-85 can be recovered, if need be, either by cryogenics or by the KALC process (Krypton Adsorption in Liquid Carbon dioxide). Likewise carbon-14 in the form of carbon dioxide could be collected with a caustic or lime scrub solution and incorporated into a grout. Sulfur dioxide present will be well below regulatory concern level of 4.0 tons per year and most of it would be removed by the scrubber. Carbon monoxide emissions will depend on the choice of burner and start-up conditions. Should the system exceed the regulatory concern level, a catalytic converter in the final packed bed will be provided. Radon and its daughters have sufficiently short half-lives (less than two minutes). If necessary, an additional holdup bed can be added before the final HEPA filters or additional volume can be added to the molecular sieve bed to limit radon emissions. The calculated total effective dose equivalent at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory boundary from a single release of all the {sup 3}, {sup 14}C, {sup 85}Kr, and {sup 129}I in the total fuel mass if 0.43 mrem/year.

  20. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, C.L.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2,200 C and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made. 1 fig.

  1. High density-high purity graphite prepared by hot isostatic pressing in refractory metal containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoenig, Clarence L. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous graphite in solid form is hot isostatically pressed in a refractory metal container to produce a solid graphite monolith with a bulk density greater than or equal to 2.10 g/cc. The refractory metal container is formed of tantalum, niobium, tungsten, molybdenum or alloys thereof in the form of a canister or alternatively plasma sprayed, chemically vapor deposited, or coated by some other suitable means onto graphite. Hot isostatic pressing at 2200.degree. C. and 30 KSI (206.8 MPa) argon pressure for two hours produces a bulk density of 2.10 g/cc. Complex shapes can be made.

  2. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  3. FY-09 Report: Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Gen-IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have identified that an air ingress event following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization is a very important incident. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. If this accident occurs, the oxidation will accelerate heat-up of the bottom reflector and the reactor core and will eventually cause the release of fission products. The potential collapse of the core bottom structures causing the release of CO and fission products is one of the concerns. Therefore, experimental validation with the analytical model and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model developed in this study is very important. Estimating the proper safety margin will require experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation. The results from this research will provide crucial inputs to the INL NGNP/VHTR Methods Research and Development project. The second year of this three-year project (FY-08 to FY-10) was focused on (a) the analytical, CFD, and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow; (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments and modeling; (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) implementation of advanced graphite oxidation models into the GAMMA code, and (f) air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses of the whole air-ingress scenario.

  4. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.M. Harpenau

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

  5. The addition of a calender machine to a pyrolytic graphite sheet production plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svenson, Ernest Knute

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis documents the process and challenges of adding a new calender machine to AvCarb Material Solutions' pyrolytic graphite production plant. Before the machine could be used for mass production, several experiments ...

  6. Oxidation of hydrocarbons over ordered arrays of heteropolyacids and polyoxoanions on graphite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaikh, Shahid N. (Media, PA); Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkanes are catalytically oxidized using heteropolyacids (HPAs) or polyoxoanions (POAs) deposited on a graphite surface. The HPAs and POAs are framework-substituted with a different metal in place of a metal-oxygen unit.

  7. Large-scale preparation of graphene by high temperature insertion of hydrogen into graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamali, Ali Reza; Fray, Derek J.

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental evidence for high temperature diffusion of hydrogen into the interlayer space of graphite is provided. This process is discussed as a possible method for the rapid production of high-quality, inexpensive graphene in large quantities...

  8. Low-Cost Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Graphite and Olivine-Based Materials for Li-Ion Batteries K. Zaghib Hydro-Qubec (IREQ), 1800 Lionel-Boulet Varennes, QC, Canada, J3X 1S1 BATT Review Meeting February 25 - 28,...

  9. Thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the Li-graphite system from first-principles calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    We present an ab initio study of the thermodynamics and kinetics of Li [subscript x]C[subscript 6], relevant for anode Li intercalation in rechargeable Li batteries. In graphite, the interlayer interactions are dominated ...

  10. Claisen Rearrangement of Graphite Oxide: A Route to Covalently Functionalized Graphenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, William R.

    On the GO: The basal plane allylic alcohol functionality of graphite oxide (GO) can be converted into N,N-dimethylamide groups through an EschenmoserClaisen sigmatropic rearrangement by using N,N-dimethylacetamide dimethyl ...

  11. Direct Observation of Optically Induced Transient Structures in Graphite Using Ultrafast Electron Crystallography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    initio density functional calculations, we trace the governing mechanism back to electronic structure changes in the electronic properties, direct de- termination of lattice structural dynamics from opticalDirect Observation of Optically Induced Transient Structures in Graphite Using Ultrafast Electron

  12. Enhancing thermal conductivity of fluids with graphite nanoparticles and carbon nanotube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhiqiang (Lexington, KY); Lockwood, Frances E. (Georgetown, KY)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid media such as oil or water, and a selected effective amount of carbon nanomaterials necessary to enhance the thermal conductivity of the fluid. One of the preferred carbon nanomaterials is a high thermal conductivity graphite, exceeding that of the neat fluid to be dispersed therein in thermal conductivity, and ground, milled, or naturally prepared with mean particle size less than 500 nm, and preferably less than 200 nm, and most preferably less than 100 nm. The graphite is dispersed in the fluid by one or more of various methods, including ultrasonication, milling, and chemical dispersion. Carbon nanotubes with graphitic structure is another preferred source of carbon nanomaterial, although other carbon nanomaterials are acceptable. To confer long term stability, the use of one or more chemical dispersants is preferred. The thermal conductivity enhancement, compared to the fluid without carbon nanomaterial, is proportional to the amount of carbon nanomaterials (carbon nanotubes and/or graphite) added.

  13. The effects of marine microorganisms on the mechanical properties of graphite/epoxy composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puh, John Shui-Ming

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with two different lay-ups were conditioned in natural seawater and then tensile tested while simultaneously monitored for acoustic emission activity. Graphite/epoxy composite specimens were fabricated from prepreg tape and then conditioned for 4 and I I...

  14. Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Wetting transition behavior of Xe on Cs and Cs/graphite Stefano Curtarolo,1, * Milton W. Cole,2 surface, covered by a monolayer of Cs. With data obtained from grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations

  15. Absolute x-ray dosimetry on a synchrotron medical beam line with a graphite calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, P. D., E-mail: Peter.Harty@arpansa.gov.au; Ramanathan, G.; Butler, D. J.; Johnston, P. N. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lye, J. E. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Hall, C. J. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Stevenson, A. W. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The absolute dose rate of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter. The calorimetry results were compared to measurements from the existing free-air chamber, to provide a robust determination of the absolute dose in the synchrotron beam and provide confidence in the first implementation of a graphite calorimeter on a synchrotron medical beam line. Methods: The graphite calorimeter has a core which rises in temperature when irradiated by the beam. A collimated x-ray beam from the synchrotron with well-defined edges was used to partially irradiate the core. Two filtration sets were used, one corresponding to an average beam energy of about 80 keV, with dose rate about 50?Gy/s, and the second filtration set corresponding to average beam energy of 90 keV, with dose rate about 20 Gy/s. The temperature rise from this beam was measured by a calibrated thermistor embedded in the core which was then converted to absorbed dose to graphite by multiplying the rise in temperature by the specific heat capacity for graphite and the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the core and beam. Conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water was achieved using Monte Carlo calculations with the EGSnrc code. The air kerma measurements from the free-air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. Results: Absolute measurements of the IMBL dose rate were made using the graphite calorimeter and compared to measurements with the free-air chamber. The measurements were at three different depths in graphite and two different filtrations. The calorimetry measurements at depths in graphite show agreement within 1% with free-air chamber measurements, when converted to absorbed dose to water. The calorimetry at the surface and free-air chamber results show agreement of order 3% when converted to absorbed dose to water. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.9%. Conclusions: The good agreement of the graphite calorimeter and free-air chamber results indicates that both devices are performing as expected. Further investigations at higher dose rates than 50?Gy/s are planned. At higher dose rates, recombination effects for the free-air chamber are much higher and expected to lead to much larger uncertainties. Since the graphite calorimeter does not have problems associated with dose rate, it is an appropriate primary standard detector for the synchrotron IMBL x rays and is the more accurate dosimeter for the higher dose rates expected in radiotherapy applications.

  16. Effect of graphite properties in thermal analysis of CHTR: A parametric study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaushik, Ankur; Basak, Abhishek; Dulera, I. V.; Vijayan, P. K. [Reactor Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India)

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact High Temperature Reactor (CHTR) is a {sup 233}U-Thorium fuelled, lead-bismuth cooled reactor. The CHTR core mainly consists of graphite and beryllium oxide (BeO). The CHTR core consists of nineteen prismatic beryllium oxide (BeO) moderator blocks. These 19 blocks contain centrally located graphite fuel tubes. The BeO moderator blocks are surrounded by reflector blocks (partially graphite and partially BeO). The nuclear heat from the core is removed passively by natural circulation of the coolant between top and bottom plenums, upward through the fuel tubes and returning through the downcomer tubes at the periphery. The temperature gradient in fuel tubes, downcomer tubes and BeO is very high and therefore, to take care of the differential thermal expansion, gaps are provided in the core between the tubes and other core components. These gaps affect the heat transfer through the core in radial direction. In addition, there is a large variation in thermal properties of graphite which in turn affects the thermal behaviour of the core in various operating conditions. The fuel of CHTR is TRISO coated particle fuel. These particles are packed in with graphite powder as matrix and made into cylindrical compacts these compacts are packed in the bores of fuel tube. In this study, the effect of the thermal conductivity variation of the graphite on the temperature distribution of the core and density variation of the matrix graphite material in fuel compact on the maximum fuel kernel temperature is studied along with the overall role of graphite properties variation in heat transfer.

  17. Evaluation of hole quality and bit life in graphite epoxy composites using video scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lednicky, Thomas Edward

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Hough J (Chairman of Commit ee) D . R. M. Alexander (Member) ( e&/ Dr, J. Bo sford (Memb r) W. . Turner (Head o Department) December 1985 ABSTRACT EVALUATION OF HOLE QUALITY AND BIT LIFE IN GRAPHITE EPOXY COMPOSITES USING VIDEO SCANNING... extensively in graphite epoxy composite material. This evaluation was accomplished by measuring the hole quality and also the wear land development. Two methods were used to determine the hole quality on a computer vision system: the hole size...

  18. Mode II delamination fracture toughness of unidirectional graphite/epoxy composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corleto Mena, Carlos Roberto

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by CARLOS ROBERTO CORLETO MENA Submitted to the Graduate College of TEXAS ASM UNIVERSITY in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1986 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by CARLOS ROBERTO CORLETO MENA Approved as to style and content by: Walter L. Bra...

  19. The effect of graphite nodules on fracture behavior of ductile iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Glenn Mark

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF GRAPHITE NODULES ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF DUCTILE IRON A Thesis By GLENN NARK TANNER Suhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&K University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of RASTER OF SCIENCE Nay... 1986 Kajor Subject: Nechanical Engineering THE EFFECT OF GRAPHITE NODULES ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF DUCTILE IRON A Thesis by GLENN MARK TANNER Approved as to style and content by: Halter L. Bradley (Chairman of Committee) pl...

  20. Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Brian Douglas

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

  1. Nondestructive evaluation of distributed damage in graphite/epoxy beams using modal parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Young Ik

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATIOV OF DISTRIBUTED DAMAGE IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY BEAMS USING MODAL PARAMETERS A Thesis YOUNG IK KIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of ItIASTER OF SCIEVCE August 1989 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering NONDESTRI. 'CTIVE EVALUATION OF DISTRIBUTED DAMAGE IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY BEAMS USING MODAL PARAMETERS A Thesis by YOUNG IK KIM Approved as to style and content by: Duane R...

  2. Mode I - mode II delamination fractrue toughness of a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderkley, Peter Stephen

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MODE I - MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by PETER STEPHEN VANDERKLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Demember 1981 Najor Subject: Mechanical Engineering MODE I - MODE II DELAMINATION FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF A UNIDIRECTIONAL GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE A Thesis by PETER STEPHEN VANDERKLEY Approved as to style and content by...

  3. Effect of resin toughness on fracture behavior of graphite/epoxy composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald Nelson

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis Dy RONALD NELSON COHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1982 Mlajor Subject: Interdisciplinary Enqi neeri ng EFFECT OF RESIN TOUGHNESS ON FRACTURE BEHAVIOR OF GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by RONALD NELSON COHEN Approved as to style and content by: (N. L. Bradley, Cha man) (R. A...

  4. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of AS-3502 graphite/epoxy composite material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerstetter, Michael Scott

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AS-3502 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis MICHAEL SCOTT KERSTETTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering NONLINEAR VISCOELASTIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AS-3502 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL SCOTT KERSTETTER Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Kenneth L...

  5. Measurements of the diffusion coefficient of silver 110-m in a nuclear grade graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMillan, Thad Calhoun

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENTS OF TEE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF SILVER 110-m IN A NUCLEAR GRADE. GRAPHITE A Thesis by THAD CALHOUN MCMILLAN, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT OF SILVER 110-m IN A NUCLEAR GRADE GRAPHITE A Thesis by THAD CALHOUN MCMILLAN, Jr. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  6. Stresses due to environmental conditioning of cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglass, David Alan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRESSES DUE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONING OF CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by DAVID ALAN DOUGLASS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering STRESSES DUE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONING OF CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by DAVID ALAN DOUGLASS Approved as to style and content by: Dr. . Weitsman Chasrm n of Comittee g...

  7. TYPE A VERIFICATION REPORT FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR STACK AND GROUNDS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-08-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA).

  8. NMR studies of molecules in liquid crystals and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, M.E.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NMR experiments to measure proton dipole couplings were performed on a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane through n-decane) dissolved in nematic liquid crystals. Computer modeling of the experimental NMR-spectra was done using several different models for intermolecular interactions in these systems. The model of Photinos et al. was found to be best in describing the intermolecular interactions in these systems and can provide a statistical picture of the conformation and orientation of the alkane molecules in their partially-oriented environment. Order parameters and conformational distributions for the alkanes can be calculated from the modeling. The alkanes are found to have conformational distributions very much like those found in liquid alkanes. Proton NMR spectra of tetrahydrofuran (THF) intercalated in two graphite intercalation compounds were also measured. Computer simulations of these spectra provide a picture of THF in the constrained environment between the graphene layers where the THF is oriented at a particular angle, can translate and rotate freely, but does not appear to pseudorotate.

  9. Internal degrees of freedom and transport of benzene on graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrid S. de Wijn

    2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the chaotic internal degrees of freedom of a benzene molecule adsorbed on a graphite substrate, their interplay with thermal noise, and their effects on the diffusion and drift are investigated analytically by making use of the presence of two different time scales as well as by molecular-dynamics simulations. The effects of thermal noise are investigated, and it is found that noise does not significantly alter the dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom, yet affects the friction and diffusion of the center of mass. Qualitative and quantitative theoretical predictions for the friction and diffusion of the molecule on the substrate are made and are compared to molecular-dynamics simulations. Contributions to the friction and diffusion from the finite heat bath as well as the slow dynamics of the center of mass are formally identified. It is shown that the torsion in benzene, which dominates the nonlinear coupling, significantly affects the friction of the molecule on the surface. The results compare favorably with recent results from He/neutron spin echo experiments on this system. Based on the analytical and numerical results, some suggestions are made for experimental conditions under which the effects of internal degrees of freedom might be observable.

  10. Graphite grains in supernova ejecta Insights from a noble gas study of 91 individual KFC1 presolar graphite grains from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graphite grains in supernova ejecta Insights from a noble gas study of 91 individual KFC1 Zurich, Switzerland b Lund University, Department of Geology, Solvegatan 12, SE-22362 Lund, Sweden Museum of Natural History, 1400 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605-2496, USA d Chicago Center

  11. managed for the U.S. Department of Energy by Brookhaven Science Associates, a company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to design new drugs. The petroleum industry develops new catalysts for refining crude oil and making useful. Industry at the NSLS For research that ranges from designing catalysts to develop- ing computer chips, scientists from dozens of industries are drawn to the NSLS because the facility provides advanced analytical

  12. WHY HASN'T EARTH WARMED AS MUCH AS EXPECTED? Stephen Schwartz, Brookhaven National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department accounts for less than 25% of the discrepancy, and cooling by natural temperature variation can account of future fossil fuel CO2 emissions that would be compatible with any chosen maximum allowable increase

  13. Characterization of Porosity Development in Oxidized Graphite using Automated Image Analysis Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on initial activities at ORNL aimed at quantitative characterization of porosity development in oxidized graphite specimens using automated image analysis (AIA) techniques. A series of cylindrical shape specimens were machined from nuclear-grade graphite (type PCEA, from GrafTech International). The specimens were oxidized in air to various levels of weight loss (between 5 and 20 %) and at three oxidation temperatures (between 600 and 750 oC). The procedure used for specimen preparation and oxidation was based on ASTM D-7542-09. Oxidized specimens were sectioned, resin-mounted and polished for optical microscopy examination. Mosaic pictures of rectangular stripes (25 mm x 0.4 mm) along a diameter of sectioned specimens were recorded. A commercial software (ImagePro) was evaluated for automated analysis of images. Because oxidized zones in graphite are less reflective in visible light than the pristine, unoxidized material, the microstructural changes induced by oxidation can easily be identified and analyzed. Oxidation at low temperatures contributes to development of numerous fine pores (< 100 m2) distributed more or less uniformly over a certain depth (5-6 mm) from the surface of graphite specimens, while causing no apparent external damage to the specimens. In contrast, oxidation at high temperatures causes dimensional changes and substantial surface damage within a narrow band (< 1 mm) near the exposed graphite surface, but leaves the interior of specimens with little or no changes in the pore structure. Based on these results it appears that weakening and degradation of mechanical properties of graphite materials produced by uniform oxidation at low temperatures is related to the massive development of fine pores in the oxidized zone. It was demonstrated that optical microscopy enhanced by AIA techniques allows accurate determination of oxidant penetration depth and of distribution of porosity in oxidized graphite materials.

  14. Laminated exfoliated graphite composite-metal compositions for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Shi, Jinjun; Guo, Jiusheng; Jang, Bor Z

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive laminate composition for fuel cell flow field plate or bipolar plate applications. The laminate composition comprises at least a thin metal sheet having two opposed exterior surfaces and a first exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the first of the two exterior surfaces of the metal sheet wherein the exfoliated graphite composite sheet comprises: (a) expanded or exfoliated graphite and (b) a binder or matrix material to bond the expanded graphite for forming a cohered sheet, wherein the binder or matrix material is between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet. Preferably, the first exfoliated graphite composite sheet further comprises particles of non-expandable graphite or carbon in the amount of between 3% and 60% by weight based on the total weight of the non-expandable particles and the expanded graphite. Further preferably, the laminate comprises a second exfoliated graphite composite sheet bonded to the second surface of the metal sheet to form a three-layer laminate. Surface flow channels and other desired geometric features can be built onto the exterior surfaces of the laminate to form a flow field plate or bipolar plate. The resulting laminate has an exceptionally high thickness-direction conductivity and excellent resistance to gas permeation.

  15. Precambrian coal or anthraxolite: A source for graphite in high-grade schists and gneisses-a reply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, J.J.; Seavoy, R.E.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argues that without considering data for igneous carbon (carbonatites) or for ultrahigh metamorphic calcareous gneisses such as are found in the Grenville province of North America, the conclusion that the source of carbon for vein graphite is magmatic or carbonate carbon is not justified. Points out that marbles and calc-silicate gneisses occur with the graphite-bearing granulite facies rocks in Sri Lanka. Calcite may also be seen in the veins with the graphite. Concludes that whether the graphite in epigenetic veins in high grade schists and gneisses has variable carbon isotope ratios depends on whether it was derived from organic material in carbonate or noncarbonate metasediments.

  16. Effect of electrode density on cycle performance and irreversible capacity loss for natural graphite anode in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of electrode thickness and density for unpressed and pressed natural graphite electrodes were studied using electrochemical characterization. Pressing the graphite electrode decreases the reversible capacity and the irreversible capacity loss during formation. As electrode density increased, the capacity retention at high rate increased until 0.9g/cm{sup 3}, and then decreased. The cycle performances of the pressed graphite electrodes were more stable than the unpressed one. Pressing graphite electrode affected on its electrochemical characterization such as irreversible capacity loss, high rate cycling and cycle performance.

  17. The New York Intel-lectual Property Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    'Agostino, Under Secretary for Nuclear Security and Administrator of the Na- tional Nuclear Security Admin, at an event to com- memorate the decommission- ing of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR it was placed on standby in 1968 and then permanently shut down. Decommissioning the BGRR began in the late 1990

  18. Petra Huetenmeyer of Michigan Technological University will

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    the decommissioning of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR), on Thurs- day, May 17, on the west side of the BGRR, at 11 a.m. Please car pool; parking is limited. See details on p.3 Nuclear power continues to David Diamond of BNL's Nuclear Science and Tech- nology Department. That was Diamond's message

  19. Graphics/Sitewide/AOC_Handbook-r3b MLD -9/19/03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamma Field 9A-D Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (A - BGRR Canal; B - Underground Ductwork; C 10B Underground Pipes at the WCF 11 Building 830 Pipe Leak 12 Underground Storage Tanks (not shown Building 650 Sump and Sump Outfall Area 7 Paint Shop 8A Upland Recharge/Meadow Marsh 8B Biology Fields 8C

  20. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

  1. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogeka, G.J.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new fundable'' R D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

  2. Improving interface through surface modification by plasma polymerization, in carbon/graphite fiber reinforced polymeric composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dagli, N.G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon/graphite fiber surfaces were modified by plasma polymerization. An inductively coupled electrodeless glow-discharge system was utilized to treat the surfaces with acrylonitrile or styrene at the established operating conditions. Critical surface erosion for wetting measured by the sessile drop method, of plasma treated pyrolytic graphite blocks, used as a model surface for carbon/graphite fibers, were lower than of untreated block. Contact angles on plasma polymers deposited on different substrates had similar values. Contact angle, measured by Wilhelmy balance method of water, on untreated Fortafil 3 carbon/graphite fiber was 55.1/sup 0/, whereas the commercially treated one was 43.7/sup 0/. Plasma treatments reduced the contact angle to 44.3/sup 0/ in An and 47.3/sup 0/ in styrene monomer cases. Thicknesses of plasma polymers deposited under the established optimum conditions, measured by ellipsometer, were 840 A for PPAN and 2192 A for PPST after one hour treatment. In conclusion, plasma treatments of carbon/graphite fibers are an effective alternative to existing methods for improving interfacial shear strengths and maintaining or improving the tensile strengths of the fibers.

  3. Labs at-a-Glance: Brookhaven National Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy MaterialsFeatured Videos >>Programs »AmesScience

  4. Brookhaven National Laboratory - OU I/IV VOC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute StandardsHFBRI/IV VOC

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory - Sr-90 BGGR/WCF | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesville Energy ResearchAchievingHydraulic Institute

  6. FINAL REPORT on Experimental Validation of Stratified Flow Phenomena, Graphite Oxidation, and Mitigation Strategies of Air Ingress Accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Hee C. NO; Nam Z. Cho

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena that are important during challenging scenarios that may occur in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Generation IV very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Phenomena Identification and Ranking studies to date have identified the air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as very important. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification & validation are of very high priority for the NGNP Project. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air ingress will occur through the break, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. This study indicates that depending on the location and the size of the pipe break, the air ingress phenomena are different. In an effort to estimate the proper safety margin, experimental data and tools, including accurate multidimensional thermal-hydraulic and reactor physics models, a burn-off model, and a fracture model are required. It will also require effective strategies to mitigate the effects of oxidation, eventually. This 3-year project (FY 2008FY 2010) is focused on various issues related to the VHTR air-ingress accident, including (a) analytical and experimental study of air ingress caused by density-driven, stratified, countercurrent flow, (b) advanced graphite oxidation experiments, (c) experimental study of burn-off in the core bottom structures, (d) structural tests of the oxidized core bottom structures, (e) implementation of advanced models developed during the previous tasks into the GAMMA code, (f) full air ingress and oxidation mitigation analyses, (g) development of core neutronic models, (h) coupling of the core neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, and (i) verification and validation of the coupled models.

  7. Aerosol, Cloud, and Climate: From Observation to Model (457th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last 100 years, the Earth has warmed by about 1F, glaciers and sea ice have been melting more quickly than previously, especially during the past decade, and the level of the sea has risen about 6-8 inches worldwide. Scientists have long been investigating this phenomenon of global warming, which is believed to be at least partly due to the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the air from burning fossil fuels. Funded by DOE, teams of researchers from BNL and other national labs have been gathering data in the U.S. and internationally to build computer models of climate and weather to help in understanding general patterns, causes, and perhaps, solutions. Among many findings, researchers observed that atmospheric aerosols, minute particles in the atmosphere, can significantly affect global energy balance and climate. Directly, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight. Indirectly, increased aerosol concentration can lead to smaller cloud droplets, changing clouds in ways that tend to cool global climate and potentially mask overall warming from man-made CO2.

  8. Woven graphite fiber structures for use in ultra-light weigth heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; Loveland, Erick R [ORNL; Sharp, Keith W [ORNL; Schartow, Robert [3TEX Incorporated

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of U.S. Department of Energy efforts to find novel approaches for thermal management and heat recovery, work was undertaken at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the use of graphite-based materials for heat exchanger and thermal management devices. From this effort, lightweight, robust woven graphite-fiber structures were developed which provide high conductivity paths along the direction of the graphite fibers. These structures were produced and characterized for air permeability/pressure drop and thermal (heat transfer) performance. Results have been shown to be favorable for using such structures in ultra-light weight heat exchanger applications such as vehicle radiators or other areas where light weight, compact, conformable heat transfer devices are needed.

  9. Coated graphite articles useful in metallurgical processes and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Bird, Eugene L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphite articles including crucibles and molds used in metallurgical processes involving the melting and the handling of molten metals and alloys that are reactive with carbon when in a molten state and at process temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are provided with a multiple-layer coating for inhibiting carbon diffusion from the graphite into the molten metal or alloys. The coating is provided by a first coating increment of a carbide-forming metal on selected surfaces of the graphite, a second coating increment of a carbide forming metal and a refractory metal oxide, and a third coating increment of a refractory metal oxide. The second coating increment provides thermal shock absorbing characteristics to prevent delamination of the coating during temperature cycling. A wash coat of unstabilized zirconia or titanium nitride can be applied onto the third coating increment to facilitate release of melts from the coating.

  10. Phase transformations of nano-sized cubic boron nitride to white graphene and white graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Xue, Wenhua; Anderson, Ryan S.; Sewell, Cody R. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Xue, Sha; Crunkleton, Daniel W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Shen, Yaogen [Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States); Institute of Alternate Energy, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report quantum-mechanical investigations that predict the formation of white graphene and nano-sized white graphite from the first-order phase transformations of nano-sized boron nitride thin-films. The phase transformations from the nano-sized diamond-like structure, when the thickness d?>?1.4?nm, to the energetically more stable nano-sized white graphite involve low activation energies of less than 1.0?eV. On the other hand, the diamond-like structure transforms spontaneously to white graphite when d???1.4?nm. In particular, the two-dimensional structure with single-layer boron nitride, the so-called white graphene, could be formed as a result of such transformation.

  11. A one-group parametric sensitivity analysis for the graphite isotope ratio method and other related techniques using ORIGEN 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesson, Kristin Elaine

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Several methods have been developed previously for estimating cumulative energy production and plutonium production from graphite-moderated reactors. The Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM) is one well-known technique. This method is based...

  12. Electrochemical and structural characterization of ordered graphite electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDermott, M.T.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) was utilized to examine the structure/reactivity relationships for carbon electrodes in a well-defined matter. The basal plane of HOPG is ideal for this type of study due to its well-ordered surface structure. The electrochemical reactivity of basal plane HOPG was determined in terms of adsorption of anthraquinone 2,6-desulfonate ([Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS]), the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of the ferro/ferricyanide redox couple (k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6]) and electrode capacitance (C[degrees]). [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] tracks defects at basal plane HOPG electrodes indicating that the adsorption of 2,6-AQDS is a good marker for defects on the surface of basal plane HOPG. When measured on the same basal plane surface, k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6] and C[degrees] correlate with [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] indicating that all three electrochemical observables are controlled by the same surface variables. This illustrates the importance of surface defects on electrochemical activity at basal plane HOPG electrodes. The correlation between k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6], C[degrees] and [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS] enabled the evaluation of these parameters at near-perfect basal plane. The data indicate that basal plane HOPG exhibits anomalously low electrochemical reactivity. An investigation of basal plane HOPG electrodes with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) revealed that defects, in the form of cleavage steps, cover 1% of the surface for the HOPG sample studied. Atomic scale STM images of step edges revealed that structural defects induce an electronic perturbation of the surface which occupies a significant area near the defect. [Gamma][sub 2,6-AQDS], k[degrees] for Fe(CN)[sup [minus]3/[minus]4][sub 6] and C[degrees] are influenced not only by the structural defect but also by the defect induced electronic perturbation.

  13. Graphite electrode DC arc furnace. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Graphite Electrode DC Arc Furnace (DC Arc) is a high-temperature thermal process, which has been adapted from a commercial technology, for the treatment of mixed waste. A DC Arc Furnace heats waste to a temperature such that the waste is converted into a molten form that cools into a stable glassy and/or crystalline waste form. Hazardous organics are destroyed through combustion or pyrolysis during the process and the majority of the hazardous metals and radioactive components are incorporated in the molten phase. The DC Arc Furnace chamber temperature is approximately 593--704 C and melt temperatures are as high as 1,500 C. The DC Arc system has an air pollution control system (APCS) to remove particulate and volatiles from the offgas. The advantage of the DC Arc is that it is a single, high-temperature thermal process that minimizes the need for multiple treatment systems and for extensive sorting/segregating of large volumes of waste. The DC Arc has the potential to treat a wide range of wastes, minimize the need for sorting, reduce the final waste volumes, produce a leach resistant waste form, and destroy organic contaminants. Although the DC arc plasma furnace exhibits great promise for treating the types of mixed waste that are commonly present at many DOE sites, several data and technology deficiencies were identified by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) regarding this thermal waste processing technique. The technology deficiencies that have been addressed by the current studies include: establishing the partitioning behavior of radionuclides, surrogates, and hazardous metals among the product streams (metal, slag, and offgas) as a function of operating parameters, including melt temperature, plenum atmosphere, organic loading, chloride concentration, and particle size; demonstrating the efficacy of waste product removal systems for slag and metal phases; determining component durability through test runs of extended duration, evaluating the effect of feed composition variations on process operating conditions and slag product performance; and collecting mass balance and operating data to support equipment and instrument design.

  14. Beryllium and Graphite Neutron Total Cross-Section Measurements from 0.4 to 20 MeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Beryllium and Graphite Neutron Total Cross-Section Measurements from 0.4 to 20 MeV M. J. Rapp,* Y of the neutron total cross section of natural beryllium and carbon (graphite) in the energy range of 0.4 to 20 Me a verification of the accuracy in the measurement and analytical methods used. The measurements of beryllium

  15. Latex and two-roll mill processing of thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide/natural rubber nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latex and two-roll mill processing of thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide/natural rubber t Thermally-exfoliated graphite oxide (TEGO) is a graphene-based material that has been previously shown to graphene-based materials [4]. GO can be exfoliated in water into single-layer graphene oxide platelets

  16. STUDY OF GRAPHITE TARGETS INTERACTING WITH THE 24 GeV PROTON BEAM OF THE BNL MUON TARGET EXPERIMENT*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    experiment, graphite and carbon-carbon composite targets were exposed to the AGS beam and their response materials for the future muon collider/neutrino factory carbon-based solid targets have been considered for the experiment are ATJ graphite and the anisotropic carbon-carbon composite. Each target consists of a pair of 16

  17. Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Improved Lithium Ion Behavior Properties of TiO2@Graphitic-like Carbon Core@Shell Nanostructure Min Intercalation Electrochemistry Capacitance Lithium Ion batteries A B S T R A C T We demonstrate TiO2@graphitic on the electrode surface and enhanced lithium ion intercalation, leading to lower charge transfer resistance

  18. A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 A Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Aging Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-ion Batteries: Power of a commercial LiFePO4-graphite Li-ion battery. Compared to the isothermal reference, the mechanism of porosity;2 Due to their high power and energy densities, Li-ion technologies are the leading battery systems

  19. Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4-Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Simplified Electrochemical and Thermal Model of LiFePO4- Graphite Li-Ion Batteries for Fast Charge, a simplified electrochemical and thermal model of LiFePO4-graphite based Li-ion batteries is developed for battery management system (BMS) applications and comprehensive aging investigations. Based on a modified

  20. Charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei at CERN and comparison with Brookhaven data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Topilskaya, N. S., E-mail: topilska@inr.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of experimental data on charmoniumproduction that were obtained in fixed-target experiments at the SPS synchrotron and in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in beams of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN (Switzerland) is presented. A comparison with data obtained at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) from experiments at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is performed. Measurement of the suppression of J/{psi}-meson production as a possible signal of the production of quark-gluon plasmawas proposed back in 1986 by T. Matsui and H. Satz. An anomalous suppression of J/{psi}-meson production was discovered by the NA50 Collaboration at SPS (CERN) in central collisions of lead nuclei at the c.m. collision energy of 158 GeV per nucleon. Data obtained at the c.m. energy of 200 GeV per nucleon in the PHENIX experiment at RHIC indicate that, depending on multiplicity, the suppression of J/{psi}-meson production at this energy approximately corresponds to the suppression of J/{psi}-meson production in collisions of lead nuclei at the SPS accelerator. Theoretical models that take into account the regeneration of J/{psi} mesons describe better RHIC experimental data. The measurement of charmonium production in proton-proton collisions and in collisions of lead nuclei in LHC beams revealed the importance of taking into account the regeneration process. At the LHC energies, it is also necessary to take into account the contribution of B-meson decays. Future measurements of charmonium production at the LHC to a higher statistical precision and over an extended energy region would be of importance for obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of charmonium production and for studying the properties of matter at high energy density and temperature.

  1. CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

    2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

  2. Comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite crucibles for boron doped silicon epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Dyan; Richardson, Christopher J. K. [Laboratory for Physical Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20740 (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on the comparison of beryllium oxide and pyrolytic graphite as crucible liners in a high-temperature effusion cell used for boron doping in silicon grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis indicates decomposition of the beryllium oxide liner, leading to significant incorporation of beryllium and oxygen in the grown films. The resulting films are of poor crystal quality with rough surfaces and broad x-ray diffraction peaks. Alternatively, the use of pyrolytic graphite crucible liners results in higher quality films.

  3. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  4. Analysis of the effect of matrix degradation on fatigue behavior of a graphite/epoxy laminate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arenburg, Robert Thomas

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRADATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ANALYSiS OF THE EFFECT OF MATRIX DEGRAOATION ON FATIGUE BEHAVIOR OF A GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by ROBERT THOMAS ARENBURG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  5. Hygrothermal effects in an anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Steven Paul

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYGROTHERMAL EFFECTS IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY MATERIAL A Thesis STEVEN PAUL JACKSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SC...'IENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering HYGROTHERMAL ~S IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis STEVE? PAUL JACKSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y. eitsman, Charrman) (W. L. Bradley, M (W. E. Haisler...

  6. Mode I transverse cracking in an epoxy and a graphite fiber reinforced epoxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, David Robert

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iNIODE I TRAiUSVERSE CRACKING IN AN EPOXY AUD A GRAPHITE FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY A Thesis by DAVID ROBERT l7ILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University ir. partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1981 Major Subject: Interdisciplinary Engineering NODE I TRAiUSVERSE CRACKING IN AN EPOXY AiND A GRAPHITE FIBER REINFORCED EPOXY A Thesis by DAVID ROBERT WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: (Walter L. Bradley, Char man...

  7. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M., E-mail: zhuomin.zhang@me.gatech.edu [G. W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10?nm gap.

  8. The SF6 monolayer on graphite by X-ray diffraction C. Marti, T. Ceva, B. Croset, C. De Beauvais and A. Thomy (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1517 The SF6 monolayer on graphite by X-ray diffraction C. Marti, T. Ceva, B. Croset, C. De) Rsum. 2014 La structure du film de SF6 adsorb sur graphite a t tudie entre 35 et 180 K par du cristal 3D, ce qui explique le mouillage imparfait du graphite par SF6. Dans le domaine o la

  9. Jaszczak et al. 1 MICRO-AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaszczak, John A.

    of micro- and nano-scale RGS. The largest of the RGS are hollow scrolls, with the c-axis predominantly at the micro- and nano-scales. The nano-scale cones tend not to be hollow and may have a cone-helix structureJaszczak et al. 1 MICRO- AND NANO-SCALE GRAPHITE CONES AND TUBES FROM HACKMAN VALLEY, KOLA

  10. MTHODE D'OSCILLATION DANS LA PILE, APPLIQUE A LA COMPARAISON D'CHANTILLONS DE GRAPHITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    784. MTHODE D'OSCILLATION DANS LA PILE, APPLIQUE A LA COMPARAISON D'CHANTILLONS DE GRAPHITE Par aux Roses. Sommaire. 2014 On fait osciller lentement dans le rflecteur d'une pile un chantillon de'une pile de l'oscillation d'un absorbeur a t tudi thoriquement par A. M. Weinberg et H. C. Schweinler

  11. Resonating Valence Bonds and Mean-Field d-Wave Superconductivity in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black-Schaffer, Annica M.

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility of inducing superconductivity in a graphite layer by electronic correlation effects. We use a phenomenological microscopic Hamiltonian which includes nearest neighbor hopping and an interaction term which explicitly favors nearest neighbor spin-singlets through the well-known resonance valence bond (RVB) character of planar organic molecules. Treating this Hamiltonian in mean-field theory, allowing for bond-dependent variation of the RVB order parameter, we show that both s- and d-wave superconducting states are possible. The d-wave solution belongs to a two-dimensional representation and breaks time reversal symmetry. At zero doping there exists a quantum critical point at the dimensionless coupling J/t = 1.91 and the s- and d-wave solutions are degenerate for low temperatures. At finite doping the d-wave solution has a significantly higher T{sub c} than the s-wave solution. By using density functional theory we show that the doping induced from sulfur absorption on a graphite layer is enough to cause an electronically driven d-wave superconductivity at graphite-sulfur interfaces. We also discuss applying our results to the case of the intercalated graphites as well as the validity of a mean-field approach.

  12. Graphite and Hexagonal Boron-Nitride have the Same Interlayer Distance. Why?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hod, Oded

    -8 In recent years, the most prominent member of the family of layered materials has been graphene,9-12 which serves as a building block for few-layered graphene and graphite as well as for single- and multi the material into a semimetal. The main factors expected to dominate graphene interlayer binding

  13. Low-Temperature Phase Transformation from Graphite to sp3 Orthorhombic Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    Low-Temperature Phase Transformation from Graphite to sp3 Orthorhombic Carbon Jian-Tao Wang,1, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China 2 Department of Physics and High February 2011) We identify by ab initio calculations an orthorhombic carbon polymorph in Pnma symmetry

  14. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert G.

    must provide high peak energy above sequentially with the analysis time determined primarilyLaser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a graphite furnace with an optical parametric for electrothermal atomic excited atomic ¯ uorescence spectrometry (LEAFS ) in a absorption spectrometry (ETAAS

  15. THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF GRAPHITE-METAL FLUORIDE INTERCALATION COMPOUNDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuillan, Barry William

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inside graphite, except for UF6 which has ~s.1 A. The -6H 0that the lattice energy U(NO+UF6(c)) =- 152 kcal mole- 1 Asince PtF6 is smaller than UF6, the electron affinity of PtF

  16. Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, Harold H.; Lee, Jung K.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A durable electrode material suitable for use in Li ion batteries is provided. The material is comprised of a continuous network of graphite regions integrated with, and in good electrical contact with a composite comprising graphene sheets and an electrically active material, such as silicon, wherein the electrically active material is dispersed between, and supported by, the graphene sheets.

  17. Photoexfoliation of Graphene from Graphite: An Ab Initio Study Yoshiyuki Miyamoto,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    exfoliation process follows exposure to femtosecond laser pulses with a wavelength of 800 nm and the full and intensity speed up the exfoliation and cause transient contraction in subsurface layers. Photoexfoliation] or chemical [37] exfoliation of graphite, or may form by annealing SiC single crystals [8], or by chemical

  18. Self-assembly of long chain alkanes and their derivatives on graphite Teng Yang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824, USA Received 5 November 2007; accepted 16 January the energetic origin of the domain formation observed in the STM images. Our results for the hierarchy8 Although many patterns have been reported even for alkane films on graphite, the energetic grounds

  19. Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    Layering and orientational ordering of propane on graphite: An experimental and simulation study 2002; accepted 30 July 2002 We report the results of an experimental and theoretical study of propane and experiments show that propane adsorbs in a layer-by-layer fashion and exhibits continuous growth beyond

  20. Advanced Surface and Microstructural Characterization of Natural Graphite Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL] [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL] [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoon, Steve [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Denlinger, Matthew [A123 Systems, Inc.] [A123 Systems, Inc.; Wood III, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural graphite powders were subjected to a series of thermal treatments in order to improve the anode irreversible capacity loss (ICL) and capacity retention during long-term cycling of lithium ion batteries. A baseline thermal treatment in inert Ar or N2 atmosphere was compared to cases with a proprietary additive to the furnace gas environment. This additive substantially altered the surface chemistry of the natural graphite powders and resulted in significantly improved long-term cycling performance of the lithium ion batteries over the commercial natural graphite baseline. Different heat-treatment temperatures were investigated ranging from 950-2900 C with the intent of achieving the desired long-term cycling performance with as low of a maximum temperature and thermal budget as possible. A detailed summary of the characterization data is also presented, which includes X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Raman spectroscopy, and temperature-programed desorption mass spectroscopy (TPD-MS). This characterization data was correlated to the observed capacity fade improvements over the course of long-term cycling at high charge-discharge rates in full lithium-ion coin cells. It is believed that the long-term performance improvements are a result of forming a more stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the anode graphite surfaces, which is directly related to the surface chemistry modifications imparted by the proprietary gas environment during thermal treatment.

  1. On the Origin of High-Density Graphite Grains from the Murchison Meteorite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the mineral types that carry isotopically anomalous noble gases [7]. Graphite grains extracted from) stars. s-Process Kr in KFC1 is best explained with 5M8 stars of solar and/or half-solar metallicities. Keywords: Presolar Grains; Dust; Meteorites; AGB stars, s-process. PACS: 26.20.Fj; 26.20.Kn; 91.65.Dt; 96

  2. Influence of the solvent on the stability of bis(terpyridine) structures1 on graphite2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universitt

    . Although electronic structure calculations based on48 density functional theory can reproduce Influence of the solvent on the stability of bis(terpyridine) structures1 on graphite2 Daniela molecular dynamics simulations. As a model system, the sol-9 vation of a bis(terpyridine) (BTP) isomer

  3. Electropolymerization kinetics of pyrrole in aqueous solution on graphite felt electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otero, Toribio Fernndez

    Electropolymerization kinetics of pyrrole in aqueous solution on graphite felt electrodes I. depends on the synthesis conditions, such as the nature of the solvent, the electro- synthesis methodc properties, the synthesis conditions play a vital role in the performance of the material. In this work, we

  4. Graphitic Phase of NaCl. Bulk Properties and Nanoscale Stability Alexander G. Kvashnin,,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomnek, David

    Graphitic Phase of NaCl. Bulk Properties and Nanoscale Stability Alexander G. Kvashnin,,, Pavel B approach to evaluate the stability and physical properties of the nanometer-thickness NaCl layered films and found that the rock salt films with a (111) surface become unstable with thickness below 1 nm

  5. Graphite Waste Tank Cleanup and Decontamination under the Marcoule UP1 D and D Program - 13166

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomasset, Philippe [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, Marcoule (France); Chabeuf, Jean-Michel [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France)] [AREVA D and D BU, La Hague (France); Thiebaut, Valerie [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France)] [CEA/DEN/DAPD/CPUP, Marcoule (France); Chambon, Frederic [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)] [AREVA FEDERAL SERVICES, Columbia, MD (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UP1 plant in Marcoule reprocessed nearly 20,000 tons of used natural uranium gas cooled reactor fuel coming from the first generation of civil nuclear reactors in France. During more than 40 years, the decladding operations produced thousands of tons of processed waste, mainly magnesium and graphite fragments. In the absence of a French repository for the graphite waste, the graphite sludge content of the storage pits had to be retrieved and transferred into a newer and safer pit. After an extensive R and D program, the equipment and process necessary for retrieval operations were designed, built and tested. The innovative process is mainly based on the use of two pumps (one to capture and the other one to transfer the sludge) working one after the other and a robotic arm mounted on a telescopic mast. A dedicated process was also set up for the removal of the biggest fragments. The retrieval of the most irradiating fragments was a challenge. Today, the first pit is totally empty and its stainless steel walls have been decontaminated using gels. In the second pit, the sludge retrieval and transfer operations have been almost completed. Most of the non-pumpable graphite fragments has been removed and transferred to a new storage pit. After more than 6 years of operations in sludge retrieval, a lot of experience was acquired from which important 'lessons learned' could be shared. (authors)

  6. Polymer-Graphite Nanocomposites: Effective Dispersion and Major Property Enhancement via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymer-Graphite Nanocomposites: Effective Dispersion and Major Property Enhancement via SolidVed NoVember 2, 2007 Introduction. Polymer nanocomposites are of scientific and commercial interest-hybridized carbon layers termed "graphene sheets" are isolated or in "paper" form.20-23 Chemi- cally similar

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lima, Oscar Ferreira

    Synthesis, characterization, and magnetic properties of room-temperature nanofluid ferromagnetic characterization, and physical properties of nanofluid magnetic graphite NFMG obtained from the previously. 2009 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3265945 Nanofluids can be defined as fluids

  8. Nucleation and growth in electrodeposition of thin copper films on pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinaci, F.S.; Muller, R.H.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrodeposition of Cu on graphite electrodes was studied, with emphasis on nucleation. Various ex-situ and in-situ methods were investigated for determining the number density of nuclei. Two direct methods were studied (scanning electron microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy); indirect determinations included Raman spectroscopy and analysis of potentiostatic current transients. Though some of the techniques correctly predicted the nucleation densities under special conditions, SEM was the most reliable tool. The large scatter in the data necessitated steps to minimize this effect. To electrodeposit Cu on graphite, a nucleation overpotential of 250 mV was measured with cyclic voltammetry; such a large overpotential does not occur on a Pt or on a Cu-covered graphite electrode. The deposition potential is the dominant parameter governing nucleation density. There is a sharp increase in the nucleation density with applied potential. Cu can be deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite only between the nucleation overpotential and the hydrogen evolution potential. To increase the Cu nucleation density, while avoiding excessive H evolution, a double pulse potential technique was used; nucleation densities on the order of 10{sup 10} nuclei/cm{sup 2} were achieved. The use of inhibitors (PVA, benzotriazole) was also investigated. Deposition on conducting polymer electrodes was also studied; initial results with polyaniline show promise. 57 figs, 6 tabs, refs. (DLC)

  9. Research Overview Sheryl Ehrman, Keystone Professor and Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrman, Sheryl H.

    engineering Some current research interests: - Energy: Li-ion batteries, biofuels, solar hydrogen - CO2. Journal of Electrochemical Society, 152 (2005) A205 2010 CNT coated Si anodes Achievements Li-ion Battery) PEO-b-(PMMA- ran-PMMALi) PTFE Seal Anode Current collector Cathode Current collector Graphitized

  10. Impact of graphite gasket/duplex stainless steel couples on crevice chemistry and likelihood of crevice attack in seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnbull, A. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom). Centre for Materials Measurement and Technology

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical polarization measurements have been made on a graphite laminate gasket and a super-duplex stainless steel (DSS) in deaerated IM NaCl solution over a range of pH. The open circuit potential of the graphite is significantly more noble than that of the duplex stainless steel and the kinetics of the hydrogen ion reduction are greater at potentials more positive than about 0.0 V SCE. The data were used as input to a model of crevice chemistry and predictions made for potentials up to +0.4 V SCE. For crevices of parallel plates of DSS-DSS and DSS-Plastic, the usual acidic conditions were predicted but for a DSS-Graphite combination the pH was predicted to be alkaline. The latter is a consequence of the enhanced kinetics for cathodic reduction of hydrogen ions and water on the graphite which, when contained within the crevice, act to elevate the pH. The predictions suggest that coupling to graphite, contained within the crevice, may act to prevent crevice corrosion initiation in contrast to the usual perception of behavior when coupling to more noble materials. In practice, there have been significant crevice corrosion failures of a super-duplex stainless steel associated with graphite gaskets. However, in all cases, the failures were in chlorinated systems for which the corrosion potentials are particularly high and beyond the range for which a benefit from graphite could be anticipated.

  11. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified were investigated further with a collimated NaI detector. The uncollimated average gamma count rate was less than 15,000 counts per minute (cpm) for the SU 6, 7, and 8 composite area (BNL 2011a). Elevated count rates were observed in portions of each survey unit. The general areas of elevated counts near the Building 801 ventilation and operations and the entry to the Stack were determined to be directly related to the radioactive processes in those structures. To compensate for this radioactive shine, a collimated or shielded detector was used to lower the background count rate (BNL 2011b and c). This allowed the surveyor(s) to distinguish between background and actual radioactive contamination. Collimated gamma survey count rates in these shine affected areas were below 9,000 cpm (BNL 2011a). The average background count rate of 7,500 cpm was reported by BSA for uncollimated NaI detectors (BNL 2011d). The average collimated background ranged from 4,500-6,500 cpm in the westernmost part of SU 8 and from 2,000-3,500 cpm in all other areas (BNL 2011e). Based on these data, no further investigations were necessary for these general areas. SU 8 was the only survey unit that exhibited verified elevated radioactivity levels. The first of two isolated locations of elevated radioactivity had an uncollimated direct measurement of 50,000 cpm with an area background of 7,500 cpm (BNL 2011f). The second small area exhibiting elevated radiation levels was identified at a depth of 6 inches from the surface. The maximum reported count rate of 28,000 cpm was observed during scanning (BNL 2011g). The affected areas were remediated, and the contaminated soils were placed in an intermodal container for disposal. BSA's post-remediation walkover surveys were expanded to include a 10-foot radius around the excavated locations, and it was determined that further investigation was not required for these areas (BNL 2011 f and g). The post-remediation soil samples were collected and analyzed with onsite gamma spectroscopy equipment. These samples were also included with the FSS s

  12. Carbon 41 (2003) 11751180 Thermomechanical behavior of a graphite foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    greater than that of electronics cooling, brake and clutch cooling, oven wall copper [3]. lining, etc-Coronado , D.D.L. Chung Composite Materials Research Laboratory, University at Buffalo, State University of New analysis; D. Viscoelasticity; D. Mechanical properties 1. Introduction K [3]. The material is derived from

  13. 405th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Vadim Ptitsyn

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "E-RHIC - Future Electron-Ion Collider at BNL. While RHIC scientists continue their quest to look deep into nuclear phenomena resulting from collisions of ion beams and beams of polarized protons, new design work is under way for a possible extension of RHIC to include e-RHIC, a 10-billion electron volt, high-intensity polarized proton beam.

  14. 422nd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yangang Liu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As scientists who study aerosols, clouds, and precipitation know, particles in the atmosphere interact with one another and affect the Earth's climate through a myriad of complex processes. Learn more about this topic from Yangang Liu as he presents "Aerosols, Clouds, and Climate: From Micro to Macro."

  15. 430th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Mike Blaskiewicz

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RHIC's current collision rate, known as luminosity, stands at thousands per second. But RHIC physicists want more. One approach to achieving a higher collision rate is known as stochastic cooling. In simple terms, this "cooling" helps keep the gold nuclei that make up RHIC's beams from spreading out. Though this approach has been used in specialized, low energy accelerators, it has never been made to work at high energy or with tightly bunched beams, until now.

  16. 416th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dax Fu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter." Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture.

  17. 426th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    David Jaffe

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "The Pesky Neutrino". In this lecture, Jaffe describes the past, present and possible future of the "pesky" neutrino, the existence of which was first hypothesized in 1930 to rescue energy conservation in the radioactive beta decay of nuclei. Recent evidence that neutrinos are massive is the only experimental evidence in particle physics that is inconsistent with the Standard Model.

  18. 453rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Richard Ferrieri

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this lecture titled "Striving Towards Energy Sustainability: How Will Plants Play a Role in Our Future?" Richard Ferrieri discusses how radiotracers and positron emission tomography (PET imaging) are providing a new look into plant processes that could lead to more renewable biofuels.

  19. 404th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stanislaus Wong

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Nanovision: Nanotubes, Nanowires and Nanoparticles." Wong's "nanovision," as he explains, emerges from how the study of carbon and non-carbon forms of materials at the nanoscale reveals different morphological structures: some are tiny tubes, others are like wires, and others are in particle form. These minute nanostructures yield different properties as they are treated in different ways.

  20. 454th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charles Black

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Black discusses examples of integrating self-assembly into semiconductor microelectronics, where advances in the ability to define circuit elements at ever-higher resolution have largely fueled more than 40 years of consistent performance improvements

  1. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Steinberg

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  2. Environmentally Brookhaven Science Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (biobased content), Energy Policy Act of 2005 (alternative fuels/vehicles), Clean Air Act (non Tool (EPEAT) registered electronic equipment Energy and water efficient Non-ozone depleting Products Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (recycled content), Farm Security and Rural Investment Act

  3. 402nd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ben Burr

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Genetically Modified Plants: What's the Fuss?" Burr explains that the risks presented by conventional plant improvement and gene-transfer technology have been reviewed by the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Food & Drug Administration. These groups have concluded that gene-transfer technology poses no risk or danger above that present in conventional plant breeding.

  4. 391st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bob Sweet

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of how crystallography methods work and how several results obtained using the NSLS have impacted biological science.

  5. 419th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Richard Hahn

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Last 20 Years in Neutrino Science." In this talk, Hahn reviews highlights of the last 20 years in neutrino science and discusses a few ideas for new precision neutrino experiments, some of which will involve collaborative efforts of his group in the Chemistry Department and colleagues in the Physics Department.

  6. Brookhaven Site Office Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,of Science (SC) BESAC HomeU.S.

  7. ___________________ BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12Zero Energy Ready Home4 of. . - Submitted

  8. Work is supported at BNL by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these objectives, large-scale power plants will be necessary. So far, the largest photovoltaics solar farm have solar photovoltaics power plant constructed on Brookhaven National Laboratory grounds to estimate of the solar plant and production over the next 30 years and the beneficial impact of the farm in terms

  9. The U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box 5000, Upton NY 11973 631 344-2345 www.bnl.gov Economic Impact Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    health of both Long Island and New York State as a whole, according to a 2005 report by economic,000 jobs would be created, and virtually all industries, including some of the state's key manufacturing., of Woodbury, Long Island, was Brookhaven's top vendor, earning more than $10 million for completing

  10. Imparting Electrical Conductivity into Asphalt Composites Using Graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baranikumar, Aishwarya

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Philip Park Committee Members, Nasir Gharaibeh Mohammad Naraghi Head of Department, John Niedzwecki August 2013 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Copyright 2013 Aishwarya Baranikumar... into a more professional researcher and further extended my desire to achieve high standards in work quality. I would like to express my thanks to my committee members, Dr. Nasir Gharaibeh and Dr. Mohammad Naraghi for their time, valuable suggestions...

  11. On the Disposition of Graphite Containing TRISO Particles and the Aqueous Transport of Radionuclides via Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Akker, Bret Patrick

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    element) 0.225 (compact only) 5.144 Graphite CSNF 21-PWR12-PWR 44-BWR 24-BWR UO2 21 PWR fuel assemblies 12 PWR fuel assemblies, 44

  12. Use of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen in the production of thermally expanded graphite (Short Communication)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.P. Miloshenko; O.Yu. Fetisova; M.L. Shchipko; B.N. Kuznetsov [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russia). Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The applicability of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen to the production of thermally expanded graphite was studied. The dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion and the specific surface area on the amount of added substances was examined.

  13. Abundances of presolar graphite and SiC from supernovae and AGB stars in the Murchison meteorite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amari, Sachiko; Zinner, Ernst [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Dr., St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Gallino, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Pesolar graphite grains exhibit a range of densities (1.65 2.20 g/cm{sup 3}). We investigated abundances of presolar graphite grains formed in supernovae and in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the four density fractions KE3, KFA1, KFB1 and KFC1 extracted from the Murchison meteorite to probe dust productions in these stellar sources. Seventy-six and 50% of the grains in the low-density fractions KE3 and KFA1, respectively, are supernova grains, while only 7.2% and 0.9% of the grains in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1 have a supernova origin. Grains of AGB star origin are concentrated in the high-density fractions KFB1 and KFC1. From the C isotopic distributions of these fractions and the presence of s-process Kr with {sup 86}Kr/{sup 82}Kr?=?4.430.46 in KFC1, we estimate that 76% and 80% of the grains in KFB1 and KFC1, respectively, formed in AGB stars. From the abundance of graphite grains in the Murchison meteorite, 0.88 ppm, the abundances of graphite from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.24 ppm and 0.44 ppm, respectively: the abundances of graphite in supernovae and AGB stars are comparable. In contrast, it has been known that 1% of SiC grains formed in supernovae and 95% formed in AGB stars in meteorites. Since the abundance of SiC grains is 5.85 ppm in the Murchison meteorite, the abundances of SiC from supernovae and AGB stars are 0.063 ppm and 5.6 ppm, respectively: the dominant source of SiC grains is AGB stars. Since SiC grains are harder and likely to survive better in space than graphite grains, the abundance of supernova graphite grains, which is higher than that of supernova SiC grains, indicates that supernovae proficiently produce graphite grains. Graphite grains from AGB stars are, in contrast, less abundant that SiC grains from AGB stars (0.44 ppm vs. 5.6 ppm). It is difficult to derive firm conclusions for graphite and SiC formation in AGB stars due to the difference in susceptibility to grain destruction. Metallicity of the parent AGB stars of graphite grains is much lower than that of SiC grains and the difference in metallicity might also have affected to the difference in the abundances in the Murchison meteorite.

  14. Experimental investigation of moisture and temperature conditioning of C600/5208 graphite/epoxy composite material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grieger, Kenneth Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I XPERIMENTAI INVESTIGATION OF MOI TURE AND TE11PERATURF CONDITIONING OF CGOO/5208 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE MATL'RIAL KENNETH AILEN GRIFGFR Su5&ritted to the Graduate College of Texa. s AQh University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE December 1979 Majo, Subject: Ae&ospace Engineering EXPERINENTAL INVESTIGATION OF MOISTURE AND TENPERATURE CONDITIONING OF C600/5208 GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITE HATERIAL A Thesis by -KENNETH ALLEN GRIEGER Approved...

  15. The determination of some anions using ion chromatography and ion chromatography-graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillman, Daniel C

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Chemistry THE DETERMINATION OF SOME ANIONS USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND ION CHROMATOGRAPHY-GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY A Thesis by DANIEL C. J. HILLMAN...

  16. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  17. Hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon with graphitized frameworks for high-performance lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Yingying; Fang, Yin; Qian, Xufang; Tu, Bo [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Wu, Zhangxiong [Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Asiri, Abdullah M. [Chemistry Department and The Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Zhao, Dongyuan, E-mail: dyzhao@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hierarchical meso-/micro-porous graphitized carbon with uniform mesopores and ordered micropores, graphitized frameworks, and extra-high surface area of ?2200 m{sup 2}/g, was successfully synthesized through a simple one-step chemical vapor deposition process. The commercial mesoporous zeolite Y was utilized as a meso-/ micro-porous template, and the small-molecule methane was employed as a carbon precursor. The as-prepared hierarchical meso-/micro-porous carbons have homogeneously distributed mesopores as a host for electrolyte, which facilitate Li{sup +} ions transport to the large-area micropores, resulting a high reversible lithium ion storage of 1000 mA h/g and a high columbic efficiency of 65% at the first cycle.

  18. Examination of the solidification macrostructure of spheroidal and flake graphite cast irons using DAAS and ESBD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivera, G. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina); Calvillo, P.R. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Boeri, R. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: boeri@fi.mdp.edu.ar; Houbaert, Y. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Ghent University (Belgium); Sikora, J. [Metallurgy Division INTEMA, National University of Mar del Plata, CONICET, J. B. Justo 4302 (B7608FDQ) Mar del Plata (Argentina)], E-mail: jsikora@fi.mdp.edu.ar

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation focuses on the study of the solidification macrostructure of sand cast flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons. The macrostructure is revealed by using a special technique developed earlier by the authors, called Direct Austempering After Solidification. The observations make use of conventional metallography and Electron Back Scattering Diffraction. The latter technique allows a more detailed observation of the morphology of the austenite grains and the microstructure of the matrix. The results of Electron Back Scattering Diffraction validate the observations made using the macrographic technique. It is verified that the solidification of both flake and spheroidal graphite cast irons is dominated by the growth of large austenite dendrites that form a grain pattern similar to that usually found in most metallic alloys.

  19. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) plutonium recycle test reactor graphite cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) provides the evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) Graphite Cask meets the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B, fissile, non-highway route controlled quantities of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The scope of this SEP includes risk, shieldling, criticality, and.tiedown analyses to demonstrate that onsite transportation safety requirements are satisfied. This SEP also establishes operational and maintenance guidelines to ensure that transport of the PRTR Graphite Cask is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  20. Status of the NGNP graphite creep experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) very high temperature gas reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have three different compressive loads applied to the top half of three diametrically opposite pairs of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment.