National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for brn addressed catalysis

  1. Address:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise Fact sheet overviewing additive manufacturing techniques that are projected to exert a profound impact on manufacturing. Additive Manufacturing: Pursuing the Promise (1.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Unlocking the Potential of Additive Manufacturing in the Fuel Cells Industry Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop A National Strategic Plan For Advanced Manufacturing

    Address:

  2. Catalysis Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory October 8-9, 2002 Organizer: Anders Nilsson Chemical catalysis is one of the research areas of enormous importance for the industrial society. There are important challenges to be met in the near future where development of new processes and catalysts are a necessity. We need to find a way to make methanol from methane, split water into hydrogen using sunlight, find replacement of platinum

  3. EMSL and Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC) Catalysis Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Datye, Abhaya K.; Henkelman, Graeme A.; Lobo, Raul F.; Schneider, William F.; Spicer, Leonard D.; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Vohs, John M.; Baer, Donald R.; Hoyt, David W.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Mueller, Karl T.; Wang, Chong M.; Washton, Nancy M.; Lyubinetsky, Igor; Teller, Raymond G.; Andersen, Amity; Govind, Niranjan; Kowalski, Karol; Kabius, Bernd C.; Wang, Hongfei; Campbell, Allison A.; Shelton, William A.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; King, David L.; Henderson, Michael A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Szanyi, Janos; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Mei, Donghai; Garrett, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Futrell, Jean H.; Laskin, Julia; DuBois, Daniel L.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Plata, Charity

    2011-05-24

    Within the context of significantly accelerating scientific progress in research areas that address important societal problems, a workshop was held in November 2010 at EMSL to identify specific and topically important areas of research and capability needs in catalysis-related science.

  4. Advanced Resources for Catalysis Science; Recommendations for a National Catalysis Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF.; Ray, Douglas

    2005-10-05

    Catalysis is one of the most valuable contributors to our economy and historically an area where the United States has enjoyed, but is now losing, international leadership. While other countries are stepping up their work in this area, support for advanced catalysis research and development in the U.S. has diminished. Yet, more than ever, innovative and improved catalyst technologies are imperative for new energy production processes to ease our dependence on imported resources, for new energy-efficient and environmentally benign chemical production processes, and for new emission reduction technologies to minimize the environmental impact of an active and growing economy. Addressing growing concerns about the future direction of U.S. catalysis science, experts from the catalysis community met at a workshop to determine and recommend advanced resources needed to address the grand challenges for catalysis research and development. The workshop's primary conclusion: To recapture our position as the leader in catalysis innovation and practice, and promote crucial breakthroughs, the U.S. must establish one or more well-funded and well-equipped National Catalysis Research Institutes competitively selected, centered in the national laboratories and, by charter, networked to other national laboratories, universities, and industry. The Institute(s) will be the center of a national collaboratory that gives catalysis researchers access to the most advanced techniques available in the scientific enterprise. The importance of catalysis to our energy, economic, and environmental security cannot be overemphasized. Catalysis is a vital part of our core industrial infrastructure, as it is integral to chemical processing and petroleum refining, and is critical to proposed advances needed to secure a sustainable energy future. Advances in catalysis could reduce our need for foreign oil by making better use of domestic carbon resources, for example, allowing cost-effective and zero

  5. 2012 Catalysis Lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weckhuysen is since 2000 full professor Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis at Utrecht University (The Netherlands). He is also scientific director of the Netherlands Institute of ...

  6. 2012 Catalysis Lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis Lectures May 21-24 2012 Bert Weckhuysen Bert Weckhuysen, who holds the chair of Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis at Utrecht University, will give a series of catalysis lectures during his sabbatical period at Stanford University and SLAC. (1) "Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts: Possibilities and Limitations of In-situ Spectroscopy" (Part I) Monday, May 21, 2012, 4.30-6 p.m. Location: SLAC Redwood Conference Room C&D (2) "Characterization of Heterogeneous

  7. Virtual special issue on catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; et al

    2016-04-21

    Here the catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions.

  8. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  9. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories ...

  10. Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Chemicals Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis to Make ...

  11. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  12. Catalysis Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis Research Areas Facilities and Equipment Intellectual Property Publications Staff Partnerships Licensing Sponsored Research Technical Services Technologist in Residence News Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Photos Videos Ombudsman Ombudsman Argonne National Laboratory Technology Development and Commercialization About Technologies Available for Licensing Capabilities Partnerships News Capabilities Catalysis Research Areas Facilities and Equipment Intellectual Property

  13. Keynote Address

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wednesday's keynote address by Dr. David Danielson, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy.

  14. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark David; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesota's Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  15. Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis | ANSER Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis...

  16. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  17. 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting Agenda 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting Agenda Agenda for the 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting on May 15, 2013. cwg_may2013_agenda.pdf (89.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda DOE Durability Working Group June 2014 Meeting Agenda Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2015

  18. Catalysis Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis Working Group Catalysis Working Group The Catalysis Working Group (CWG) meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, and collaboratively develop both an understanding of and tools for studying electrocatalysis for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and other low- and intermediate-temperature fuel cell systems, including direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), alkaline fuel cells (AFCs), alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs), and phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). The

  19. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  20. Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... D2. Chemical Conversion: Alternatively, the sugars can be converted to fuels or an entire suite of other useful products using chemical catalysis. E. Product Recovery: Products are ...

  1. Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Thompson, Michael R.

    2008-03-11

    The report presents results of a workshop held August 6-8, 2007, by DOE SC Basic Energy Sciences to determine the basic research needs for catalysis research.

  2. DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    16, 2014 Marriott Wardman Park Hotel 2660 Woodley Road NM, Washington, D.C. 8:30 - 9:00 Continental breakfast: breads, coffee, tea Joint Durability and Catalysis Working Groups Meeting Delaware A 9:00 - 9:05 Welcome & introductory comments DWG co-chairs - Debbie Myers (ANL), Rod Borup (LANL), Donna Ho (DOE); CWG co-chairs - Piotr Zelenay (LANL), Nancy Garland (DOE) 9:05 - 9:25 Are We There Yet? Pt-Alloy Catalyst - Anu Kongkanand (GM) 9:25 - 9:45 Pt-Co/C Catalysts: PEMFC Performance and

  3. The energy landscape of ;#8203;adenylate kinase during catalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The energy landscape of ;8203;adenylate kinase during catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The energy landscape of ;8203;adenylate kinase during catalysis ...

  4. Catalysis | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Heterogeneous Catalysis - J. K. Norskov Homogeneous and Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysis - Tobin Marks Thursday, May 16, 2002 - Breakout Summary Reports Catalysts Design Driven ...

  5. Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage (Mira Early Science Program ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and ...

  6. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts The Bioenergy ...

  7. Catalysis by Design - Theoretical and Experimental Studies of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis by Design - Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Model Catalysts for Lean NOx ... Lean NOx Traps - Microstructural Studies of Real World and Model Catalysts Catalysis by ...

  8. EERE Success Story-Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of Efficient "Lean-Burn" Engines for Vehicle Transportation EERE Success Story-Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of ...

  9. Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Presentation ...

  10. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support ...

  11. Pre-Competitive Catalysis Research: Fundamental Sulfation/Desulfation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pre-Competitive Catalysis Research: Fundamental SulfationDesulfation Studies of Lean NOx Traps Pre-Competitive Catalysis Research: Fundamental SulfationDesulfation Studies of...

  12. Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis | ANSER Center |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Biomimetic Chalcogels for Solar Fuel Catalysis

  13. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  14. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  15. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Huo, Ziyang; E.Habas, Susan E; Soejima, Tetsuro; Aliaga, Cesar E; Samorjai, Gabor A; Yang, Peidong

    2011-01-24

    Supported catalysts are widely used in industry and can be optimized by tuning the composition and interface of the metal nanoparticles and oxide supports. Rational design of metal-metal oxide interfaces in nanostructured catalysts is critical to achieve better reaction activities and selectivities. We introduce here a new class of nanocrystal tandem catalysts that have multiple metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. We utilized a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers of less than 10 nm on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO2-Pt and Pt-SiO2, can be used to catalyse two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO2-Pt interface catalysed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H2, which were subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalysed by the nearby Pt-SiO2 interface. Consequently, propanal was produced selectively from methanol and ethylene on the nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst. This new concept of nanocrystal tandem catalysis represents a powerful approach towards designing high-performance, multifunctional nanostructured catalysts

  16. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  17. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRL/LCLS Annual Users Conference, will focus on understanding processes in homogeneous (both biological and small molecule) and heterogeneous catalysis, using synchrotron-based methods. The workshop will cover more traditional applications (using XANES and EXAFS), as well as applications of XES, RIXS and

  18. Catalysis and Synthesis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis and Synthesis Catalysis and Synthesis Many different types of chemical reactions depend on catalysts in order to work, and the hunt for better catalysts has deep connections to our nation's economy. From biofuels to plastics, the majority of the products we depend on in our everyday lives rely on catalysts. An estimate from the American Chemical Society found that catalysts and catalytic processes are responsible for more than 20 percent of America's gross domestic product. The

  19. Heterogeneous Catalysis and Surface Science - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heterogeneous Catalysis and Surface Science / Part I: Surface Science in JCAP Laboratories Heterogeneous Catalysis and Surface Science research in JCAP focuses on the basic understanding of the relationships among the structure, composition, and reactivity of electrocatalysts. Knowledge gained from surface science experimentation can be implemented toward the discovery of better heterogeneous catalysts for solar-fuel production from carbon dioxide and water. REFERENCE Soriaga, M. P. et al.

  20. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and...

  1. Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850sup 0C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of catalysis of coal ...

  2. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:16 Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in...

  3. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Lean ...

  4. Synergistic Catalysis between Pd and Fe in Gas Phase Hydrodeoxygenatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synergistic Catalysis between Pd and Fe in Gas Phase Hydrodeoxygenation of m-Cresol Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synergistic Catalysis between Pd and Fe in Gas Phase ...

  5. Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Tuesday 10/8/02 Chair: Lars Pettersson 1:30-1:40 Anders Nilsson Welcome 1:40-2:30 Gabor Somorjai University of California, Berkeley and LBLN Need for New Directions of Research at the Frontiers of Catalysis Science 2:30-3:00 Geoff Thornton University of Manchester Influence of defects on the reactivity of ZnO 3:00-3:30 Anders Nilsson Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Surfaces and Reactions 3:30-3:45 Break Chair:

  6. Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Noxtech, Inc. 2002_deer_slone.pdf (595.6 KB) More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and Demonstration Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development

  7. change_address_111609

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE OF ADDRESS and EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION TO: HUMAN RESOURCES DATE: Z# Social Security # Print First Name Print Middle Name or Initial Print Last Name (Currently in Payroll System) Complete appropriate changes: NAME CHANGE: Print Name Change to ADDRESS CHANGE: Mailing Address City State Zip TELEPHONE NUMBER CHANGE: FROM Area Code and # TO Area Code and # Cell Area Code and # Home phone Message phone EMERGENCY NOTIFICATION CHANGE: Name Relationship Day Phone Evening Phone Address City State

  8. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai , G.A.

    2007-06-11

    The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

  9. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  10. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  11. CNEEC - TRG3: Nanoscale Control in Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TRG3: Nanoscale control in catalysis TRG3 Leader: Thomas F. Jaramillo Participating CNEEC PI’s: Stacey Bent, Bruce Clemens, Arthur Grossman, Thomas F. Jaramillo, Jens Nørskov, Friedrich Prinz, Jennifer Wilcox The grand challenge in TRG3 is the manipulation of catalyst materials at the nanoscale to significantly improve activity and selectivity for energy conversion reactions. A number of promising renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and solar fuel reactors depend upon the

  12. Heterogeneous Catalysis for Thermochemical Conversion | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heterogeneous Catalysis for Thermochemical Conversion Our mission is to transform thermal biomass deconstruction products (syngas and pyrolysis oil) into the fuels and chemicals that keep society moving forward. Illustration of a stacked series of red and grey spheres in a square shape, where red spheres represent oxygen and grey spheres represent titanium) with a stack of orange and small white spheres, where orange spheres represent platinum and white spheres represent hydrogen, in a square

  13. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  14. Catalysis Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis Science Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Catalysis Science Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Notice: NOVEMBER 16, 2015 is the Catalysis Science target date for submission of proposals to be considered for funding within fiscal year 2016. Proposals

  15. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering ETH Zurich Head of Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry (LSK) Swiss Light Source Paul Scherrer Institute Understanding a functioning catalyst requires understanding at the atomic scales in a time-resolved manner. X-rays can be readily used to accomplish that task, because of the large

  16. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioproducts | Department of Energy Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts The Bioenergy Technologies Office works with industry to develop pathways that use heat, pressure, and catalysis to convert domestic, non-food biomass into gasoline, jet fuel, and other products. thermochemical_four_pager.pdf (4.64 MB) More Documents & Publications 2013 Peer Review

  17. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: January 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2015 Catalysis Working Group Meeting: January 2015 The Catalysis Working Group held a meeting on January 21, 2015, in Los Alamos, New Mexico. Meeting Agenda and Presentations Catalysis Working Group January 2015 Meeting Agenda (22.89 KB) Electrocatalysts with Ultra-Low PGM Loadings-Vojislav Stamenkovic, Argonne National Laboratory (15.95 MB) Improving Stability and Activity of Pt Monolayer in Non-Pt Core-Shell Electrocatalysts-Radoslav Adzic, Brookhaven National Laboratory (3.33 MB)

  18. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2015 The Catalysis Working Group held a meeting on June 8, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting. Meeting Agenda and Presentations Catalysis Working Group June 2015 Meeting Agenda (97.68 KB) Non-PGM Catalyst Targets: Summary-Piotr Zelenay, Los Alamos National Laboratory (657.07 KB) Alternative Metal Oxide Supports for Cathode Catalyst Powder in Automotive

  19. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: May 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Meeting: May 2013 Catalysis Working Group Meeting: May 2013 The Catalysis Working Group held a meeting on May 15, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting. Agenda Catalysis Working Group Meeting Agenda Presentations Electrocatalysts for Automotive Fuel Cells: Status and Challenges, Nilesh Dale, Nissan Technical Center North America Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications, Stephen

  20. Visualizing Group II Intron Catalysis through the Stages of Splicing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Visualizing Group II Intron Catalysis through the Stages of Splicing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Visualizing Group II ...

  1. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme...

  2. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research ...

  3. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Metal Oxide Nano-Array Catalysts for Low ...

  4. Control Heterogeneous Catalysis at Atomic and Electronic-level...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Heterogeneous Catalysis at Atomic and Electronic-level Using Intermetallic Compounds Precious metals and metal alloys are important heterogeneous catalysts for renewable...

  5. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies of Oxidation Catalyst for Diesel ...

  6. Computational catalyst screening: Scaling, bond-order and catalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Computational catalyst screening: Scaling, bond-order and catalysis This content will become publicly available on December 29, 2017 Prev Next Title: Computational catalyst ...

  7. Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Materials Design and Discovery: Catalysis and Energy Storage (Mira Early Science Program Final Technical Report): ALCF-2 Early Science Program Technical Report Citation Details ...

  8. University of Delaware | Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Activity map produced from the new high-throughput computational engine. Example for ethylene glycol catalysis. Reforming, hydrodeoxygenation, dehydrogenation, and ...

  9. Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Caterpillar, Inc. 2003_deer_park.pdf (588.44 KB) More Documents & Publications Lean-NOx Catalyst Development for Diesel Engine Applications Fuel Effects on Emissions Control Technologies

  10. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2014 The Catalysis Working Group held a meeting on June 16, 2014, in Washington, D.C., in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting. Meeting Agenda and Presentations Catalysis Working Group June 2014 Meeting Agenda (100.38 KB) Are We There Yet? Pt-Alloy Catalysts-Anu Kongkanand, GM (1.05 MB) Pt-Co/C Catalysts: PEMFC Performance and Durability-Jim Waldecker, Ford (2.3 MB) Successes and

  11. Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arlington, VA - May 14, 2012 Catalysis Working Group Kick-off Meeting Co-Chairs: Piotr Zelenay Los Alamos National Laboratory Nancy L. Garland U.S. Department of Energy 2 2...

  12. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation: University of Delaware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAT'LS TRANSFER FORM In The Spotlight Tweets by @CCEIUD Fueling the Quest for Green Energy August 24, 2016 -- Watch an introduction to the University of Delaware's Catalysis ...

  13. Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC) | U.S.

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    DOE Office of Science (SC) Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Integrated Mesoscale Architectures for Sustainable Catalysis (IMASC) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page IMASC Header Director Cynthia Friend Lead Institution Harvard University Year Established 2014 Mission To drive

  14. Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Make Fuels and Chemicals | Department of Energy Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Chemicals Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis to Make Fuels and Chemicals BETO works with the emerging U.S. bioindustry to sustainably convert non-food biomass resources into cost-competitive biofuels, biopower, and bioproducts. biochemical_four_pager.pdf (2.61 MB) More Documents & Publications Replacing the Whole

  15. Theoretical Study on Catalysis by Protein Enzymes and Ribozyme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theoretical Study on Catalysis by Protein Enzymes and Ribozyme Theoretical Study on Catalysis by Protein Enzymes and Ribozyme 2000 NERSC Annual Report 17shkarplus.jpg The energetics were determined for three mechanisms proposed for TIM catalyzed reactions. Results from reaction path calculations suggest that the two mechanisms that involve an enediol intermediate are likely to occur, while the direct intra-substrate proton transfer mechanism (in green) is energetically unfavorable due to the

  16. Homogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in 3D Controlled Environment | The

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ames Laboratory Homogeneous and Interfacial Catalysis in 3D Controlled Environment FWP/Project Description: Project Leader(s): Marek Pruski Principal Investigators: Marek Pruski, Aaron Sadow, Igor Slowing Key Scientific Personnel: Takeshi Kobayashi This collaborative research effort is geared toward bringing together the best features of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for developing new catalytic principles. Novel silica-based, single-site mesoporous catalysts with controlled,

  17. Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis Temperature Transient Effects in Plasma-Catalysis 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company 2002_deer_hoard.pdf (481.22 KB) More Documents & Publications Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction A Parametric Study of the Effect of Temperature and Hydrocarbon Species on the Product Distribution from a Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor Development of NOx Adsorber System for Dodge Ram 2007 Heavy duty Pickup Truck

  18. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Thursday, 21 May 2015 11:16 Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab

  19. Brinkman Addresses JLab | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brinkman Addresses JLab Brinkman Addresses JLab Brinkman Addresses JLab Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, addressed Jefferson Lab staff on the Office of Science perspective during his visit Monday. Dr. William F. Brinkman, Director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, addressed Jefferson Lab staff on the Office of Science perspective during his visit Monday. "There is still a lot of interesting nuclear physics that we want to do

  20. Some General Themes in Catalysis at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John C.

    2012-07-19

    Some general themes in catalysis at LANL are: (1) Storage and release of energy within chemical bonds (e.g. H{sub 2} storage in and release from covalent bonds, N{sub 2} functionalization, CO{sub 2} functionalization, H{sub 2} oxidation/evolution, O{sub 2} reduction/evolution); (2) Can we control the chemistry of reactive substrates to effect energy relevant transformations in non-traditional media (e.g. can we promote C-C couplings, dehydrations, or hydrogenations in water under relatively mild conditions)? (3) Can we supplant precious metal or rare earth catalysts to effect these transformations, by using earth abundant metals/elements instead? Can we use organocatalysis and circumvent the use of metals completely? (4) Can we improve upon existing rare earth catalyst systems (e.g. in rare earth oxides pertinent to fluid cracking or polymerization) and reduce amounts required for catalytic efficacy? Carbohydrates can be accessed from non-food based biomass sources such as woody residues and switchgrass. After extracted from the plant source, our goal is to upgrade these classes of molecules into useful fuels.

  1. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial

  2. Keynote Address | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Keynote Address Keynote Address An overview and update on Environmental Management given by Alice Williams, Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Environmental Management. Keynote Address (2.53 MB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment Chairs Meeting - October 2012

  3. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic system

  4. Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control 2002deeraardahl.pdf (7.98 ...

  5. Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control 2002_deer_aardahl.pdf (7.98 MB) More Documents & Publications Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma-assisted catalysis: Catalyst development and mechanistic studies

  6. Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda Agenda for the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. 1_cwg_may2012_agenda.pdf (34.13 KB) More Documents & Publications Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting Agenda Advanced Cathode Catalysts

  7. Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and SCR | Department of Energy Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Transmural Catalysis - High Efficiency Catalyst Systems for NOx Adsorbers and SCR Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_atkinson.pdf (327.1 KB) More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Lean NOx Trap

  8. Keynote Address | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    40PM to 2:05PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Wednesday keynote address by Dan Arvizu, Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  9. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  10. Frontiers, Opportunities, and Challenges in Biochemical and Chemical Catalysis of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Aaron M.; Bercaw, John E.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Dobbek, Holger; DuBois, Daniel L.; Dupuis, Michel; Ferry, James G.; Fujita, Etsuko; Hille, Russ; Kenis, Paul; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.; Morris, Robert H.; Peden, Charles HF; Portis, Archie; Ragsdale, Steve; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.; Reek, Joost; Seefeldt, Lance C.; Thauer, Rudolf K.; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2013-08-14

    Our central premise is that catalytic scientists can learn by studying how these important metabolic processes occur in nature. Complementarily, biochemists can learn by studying how catalytic scientists view these same chemical transformations promoted by synthetic catalysts. From these studies, hypotheses can be developed and tested through manipulation of enzyme structure and by synthesizing simple molecular catalysts to incorporate different structural features of the enzymes. It is hoped that these studies will lead to new and useful concepts in catalyst design for fuel production and utilization. This paper describes the results of a workshop held to explore these concepts in regard to the development of new and more efficient catalytic processes for the conversion of CO2 to a variety of carbon-based fuels. The organization of this overview/review is as follows: 1) The first section briefly explores how interactions between the catalysis and biological communities have been fruitful in developing new catalysts for the reduction of protons to hydrogen, the simplest fuel generation reaction. 2) The second section assesses the state of the art in both biological and chemical reduction of CO2 by two electrons to form either carbon monoxide (CO) or formate (HCOO-). It also attempts to identify common principles between biological and synthetic catalysts and productive areas for future research. 3) The third section explores both biological and chemical processes that result in the reduction of CO2 beyond the level of CO and formate, again seeking to identify common principles and productive areas of future research. 4) The fourth section explores the formation of carbon-carbon bonds in biological and chemical systems in the same vein as the other sections. 5) A fifth section addresses the role of non-redox reactions of CO2 in biological systems and their role in carbon metabolism, with a parallel discussion of chemical systems. 6) In section 6, the topics of

  11. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent development of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.

  12. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore » of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  13. Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Heterogeneous Catalysis and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Separation of Heavy Metals | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility The research team is also using GAMESS in an INCITE project entitled State-of-the-Art Simulations of Liquid Phenomena. As part of the INCITE work, they predicted that the turning point between surface and interior solvation in a nitrate ion occurs at a cluster size of around 64 water molecules. Spencer Pruitt, Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Heterogeneous Catalysis and Separation of Heavy

  14. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  15. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  16. Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Iron Catalysis in Oxidations by Ozone Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Ozone is used commercially for treatment of potable and non-potable water, and as an industrial oxidant. ISU and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a method for using iron in ozone oxidation that significantly improves the speed of oxidation reactions. Description Ozone is recognized as potent and effective oxidizing agent, and has a

  17. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT). deer07_narula.pdf (372.33 KB) More Documents & Publications Catalysts via First Principles Catalysts via First

  18. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  19. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  20. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  1. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis Print Electrocatalysts are responsible for expediting reactions in many promising renewable energy technologies. However, the extreme sensitivity of their surface redox states to temperatures, to gas pressures, and to electrochemical reaction conditions renders them difficult to investigate by conventional surface-science techniques. Recently a team of Stanford and Berkeley Lab researchers used x-rays at the ALS in a novel way to observe the behavior of

  2. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  3. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities ...

  4. Agenda: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities Agenda: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities A Public Meeting ...

  5. EERE Success Story-Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient "Lean-Burn" Engines for Vehicle Transportation | Department of Energy Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of Efficient "Lean-Burn" Engines for Vehicle Transportation EERE Success Story-Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of Efficient "Lean-Burn" Engines for Vehicle Transportation May 7, 2015 - 1:29pm Addthis Building on a catalysis research program sponsored by EERE's Vehicles Technology Office (VTO) and DOE's Office of

  6. Enhanced Bifunctional Oxygen Catalysis in Strained LaNiO3 Perovskites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    low temperature oxygen electro catalysis on noble metal films, leading to significant enhancements in bifunctional activity essential for fuel cells and Metal-air batteries. ...

  7. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  8. Hydrogen catalysis and scavenging action of Pd-POSS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, A; Gee, R H; Maxwell, R; Saab, A

    2007-02-01

    Prompted by the need for a self-supported, chemically stable, and functionally flexible catalytic nanoparticle system, we explore a system involving Pd clusters coated with a monolayer of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) cages. With an initial theoretical focus on hydrogen catalysis and sequestration in the Pd-POSS system, we report Density Functional Theory (DFT) results on POSS binding energies to the Pd(110) surface, hydrogen storing ability of POSS, and possible pathways of hydrogen radicals from the catalyst surface to unsaturated bonds away from the surface.

  9. Fuels and energy for the future: The role of catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.; Nielsen, R.

    2004-07-01

    There are many reasons to decrease the dependency on oil and to increase the use of other energy sources than fossil fuels. The wish for energy security is balanced by a wish for sustainable growth. Catalysis plays an important role in creating new routes and flexibility in the network of energy sources, energy carriers, and energy conversion. The process technologies resemble those applied in the large scale manufacture of commodities. This is illustrated by examples from refinery fuels, synfuels, and hydrogen and the future role of fossil fuels is discussed.

  10. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy - Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefelmeyer, James

    2014-10-03

    I. Project Summary Catalytic processes are a major technological underpinning of modern society, and are essential to the energy sector in the processing of chemical fuels from natural resources, fine chemicals synthesis, and energy conversion. Advances in catalyst technology are enormously valuable since these lead to reduced chemical waste, reduced energy loss, and reduced costs. New energy technologies, which are critical to future economic growth, are also heavily reliant on catalysts, including fuel cells and photo-electrochemical cells. Currently, the state of South Dakota is underdeveloped in terms of research infrastructure related to catalysis. If South Dakota intends to participate in significant economic growth opportunities that result from advances in catalyst technology, then this area of research needs to be made a high priority for investment. To this end, a focused research effort is proposed in which investigators from The University of South Dakota (USD) and The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) will contribute to form the South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG). The multidisciplinary team of the (SDCG) include: (USD) Dan Engebretson, James Hoefelmeyer, Ranjit Koodali, and Grigoriy Sereda; (SDSMT) Phil Scott Ahrenkiel, Hao Fong, Jan Puszynski, Rajesh Shende, and Jacek Swiatkiewicz. The group is well suited to engage in a collaborative project due to the resources available within the existing programs. Activities within the SDCG will be monitored through an external committee consisting of three distinguished professors in chemistry. The committee will provide expert advice and recommendations to the SDCG. Advisory meetings in which committee members interact with South Dakota investigators will be accompanied by individual oral and poster presentations in a materials and catalysis symposium. The symposium will attract prominent scientists, and will enhance the visibility of research in the state of South Dakota. The SDCG requests

  11. Catalysis by Design - Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysts for Lean NOx Treatment | Department of Energy Design - Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Model Catalysts for Lean NOx Treatment Catalysis by Design - Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Model Catalysts for Lean NOx Treatment Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs. 2006_deer_narula.pdf (277.05 KB) More Documents & Publications Lean NOx Traps

  12. Charge Transfer and Catalysis at the Metal Support Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Lawrence Robert

    2012-07-31

    Kinetic, electronic, and spectroscopic characterization of model Pt–support systems are used to demonstrate the relationship between charge transfer and catalytic activity and selectivity. The results show that charge flow controls the activity and selectivity of supported metal catalysts. This dissertation builds on extensive existing knowledge of metal–support interactions in heterogeneous catalysis. The results show the prominent role of charge transfer at catalytic interfaces to determine catalytic activity and selectivity. Further, this research demonstrates the possibility of selectively driving catalytic chemistry by controlling charge flow and presents solid-state devices and doped supports as novel methods for obtaining electronic control over catalytic reaction kinetics.

  13. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert; Abraham, Jacob; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, J.; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, Bill; Chien, Andrew; Coteus, Paul; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Fazzari, Saverio; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Rob; Stearley, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  14. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  15. Final technical report, Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metiu, Horia

    2014-08-22

    We organized in August 2013 a “Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis” with the participation of 20 invited distinguished quantum chemists and other researchers who use computations to study catalysis. Symposium website; http://catalysis.cnsi.ucsb.edu/

  16. JLab Test Public Address System | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Public Address System May 18 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System On Wednesday, May 18, Jefferson Lab will conduct the monthly test of its Public Address ...

  17. Surface Catalysis of Water Oxidation by the Blue Ruthenium Dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier C.; Norris, Michael R.; Templeton, Joseph L.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2010-04-08

    Single-electron activation of multielectron catalysis has been shown to be viable in catalytic water oxidation with stepwise proton-coupled electron transfer, leading to high-energy catalytic precursors. For the blue dimer, cis,cis-[(bpy)2(H2O)RuIIIORuIII(H2O)(bpy)2]4+, the first well-defined molecular catalyst for water oxidation, stepwise 4e-/4H+ oxidation occurs to give the reactive precursor [(O)RuVORuV(O)]4+. This key intermediate is kinetically inaccessible at an unmodified metal oxide surface, where the only available redox pathway is electron transfer. We report here a remarkable surface activation of indium-tin oxide (In2O3:Sn) electrodes toward catalytic water oxidation by the blue dimer at electrodes derivatized by surface phosphonate binding of [Ru(4,4'-((HO)2P(O)CH2)2bpy)2(bpy)]2+. Surface binding dramatically improves the rate of surface oxidation of the blue dimer and induces water oxidation catalysis.

  18. Keynote Address: Update on Environmental Management | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Address: Update on Environmental Management Keynote Address: Update on Environmental Management Keynote presentation made by David G. Huizenga for the NTSF annual meeting held from ...

  19. EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EPA -- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act EPA -- Addressing Children's ...

  20. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening ...

  1. Deputy Secretary Poneman Addresses Nuclear Deterrence Summit...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addresses Nuclear Deterrence Summit Deputy Secretary Poneman Addresses Nuclear Deterrence Summit February 17, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Alexandria, VA - U.S. Deputy Secretary of ...

  2. Theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis using large finite crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem, L.

    1985-12-19

    A theoretical-approach is described for heterogeneous catalysis using large finite crystals and an exactly soluble model. First, reviews of some themes which are well-known to physicists but need a translation into chemical language: wave vectors, the tight-binding model, and energy bands. Next a description of the finite simple cubic crystal and its analytical wave functions and energies in the Hueckel scheme is given. Also the analytical Hueckel wave functions for a finite face-centered cubic (FCC) crystal cut along square, (100)-type faces is described. Then the calculation of the perturbation interaction energy between H/sub 2/ and large finite (simple cubic or FCC) crystals of Ni atoms, having up to 13,824 atoms is described. The interaction energy is shown to be independent of crystal size, whatever the position of attack of the H/sub 2/ molecule. 28 references, 9 figures, 8 tables.

  3. Address conversion unit for multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fava, T.F.; Lary, R.F.; Blackledge, R.

    1987-03-03

    An address conversion unit is described for use in one processor in a multi-processor data processing system including a common memory, the processors and common memory being interconnected by a common bus including means for transferring address signals defining a common address space. The processor includes private bus means including means for transferring signals including address signals defining a private address space. A processor unit means is connected to the private bus means and includes means for transmitting and receiving signals including address signals over the private bus means for engaging in data transfers thereover. The address conversion unit is connected to the private bus means and common bus means for receiving address signals over the private bus means from the processor unit means in the private address space. The unit comprises: A. pointer storage means for storing a pointer identifying a portion of the common bus memory space; B. pointer generation means connected to receive a common bus address and for generating a pointer in response thereto for storage in the pointer storage means; and C. common bus address generation means connected to the private bus and the pointer storage means for receiving an address from the processor unit means and for generating a common bus address in response thereto. The common bus address is used to initiate transfers between the processor unit means and the common memory over the common bus.

  4. Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting: May 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kick-Off Meeting: May 2012 Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting: May 2012 The Catalysis Working Group held a kick-off meeting May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting. Agenda Catalysis Working Group Kick-off Meeting Agenda Presentations DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities, Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cells: Just a Dream - or Future Reality, Nenad Markovic,

  5. POLICY GUIDANCE MEMORANDUM #03 Addressing Missclassified Positions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum provides policy guidance on how to consistently address misclassified positions within the Department and is effective immediately. There are several different circumstances that affect how a misclassified position will be addressed.

  6. Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of Efficient Lean-Burn Engines for Vehicle Transportation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on a catalysis research program sponsored by EEREs Vehicles Technology Office (VTO) and DOEs Office of Science, researchers at Cummins, Inc. and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ...

  7. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page CCEI Header Director Dionisios Vlachos Lead Institution University of Delaware Year Established 2009 Mission To focus on developing innovative, transformational heterogeneous

  8. Center for Biological Electron Transfer and Catalysis (BETCy) | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Center for Biological Electron Transfer and Catalysis (BETCy) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Center for Biological Electron Transfer and Catalysis (BETCy) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page BETCy Header Director John Peters Lead Institution Montana State University Year Established 2014 Mission To investigate the

  9. Improving Catalysis by Putting the Best Face Forward | U.S. DOE Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science (SC) Improving Catalysis by Putting the Best Face Forward Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » 04.01.12 Improving Catalysis by

  10. The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation is an Energy Frontier Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Friday, September 2, 2016 11:00 AM  322 ISE Yong Wang The Gene & Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University Biography: Dr. Wang joined PNNL in 1994 and was promoted to Laboratory Fellow (highest scientific rank in national labs) in 2005. He led the Catalysis and Reaction Engineering Team from 2000 to

  11. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoscale Level | Department of Energy Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Studies on a simple platinum-alumina system constitute a first step toward a "catalyst by design" approach. deer08_narula.pdf (273.18 KB) More Documents & Publications Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental

  12. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhatt, B.

    2000-08-20

    Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work

  13. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaobin Wang

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE | Department of Energy Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally Acceptable Shale Gas Development Selected by DOE November 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Fifteen research projects aimed at addressing the technical challenges of producing natural gas from shales and tight sands, while simultaneously

  15. Keynote Address: Future Vision | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0, 2014 1:00PM to 1:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Tuesday's keynote address by Raffi Garabedian, Chief Technology Officer, First Solar

  16. Addressing Challenges of Identifying Geometrically Diverse Sets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Addressing Challenges of Identifying Geometrically Diverse Sets of Crystalline Porous Materials Previous Next List R. L. Martin, B. Smit, and M. Haranczyk, J. Chem Inf. Model. 52...

  17. Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a ...

  18. Shape-selective catalysis in dimethyl ether conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sardesai, A.; Lee, S.

    1999-07-01

    Coal-derived syngas can be effectively converted to dimethyl ether (DME) in a single-stage, liquid-phase process. This Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME) process utilizes a dual catalytic system, which comprises of a physical blend between the methanol synthesis and the methanol dehydration catalyst slurried in an inert mineral oil. Such produced DME has vast potential as a building block chemical in the petrochemical industry to produce value-added specialty chemicals. The current research efforts are made to exploit the utilization of shape-selective catalysis using zeolites to produce targeted petrochemicals, including lower olefinic hydrocarbons. The catalysts probed in this investigation include zeolites of different physical, morphological, and chemical configurations. The effect of acidity of ZSM-5 type zeolites as well as the effect of the different channel size and orientation of the zeolites on product selectivity and catalyst deactivation are examined. Results obtained from experimentation of this study show that ZSM-5 type zeolite with low acidity (high SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratio, in this case 150) exhibits the highest selectivity towards lower (C{sub 2}-C{sub 4}) olefins in general. Controlled selectivity toward targeted olefinic species can be accomplished via devising catalytic reaction systems in such a way that the structural property of the catalyst and reactive interaction between molecules in the pores are geared toward formation of targeted molecular species which also at the same time prevent the formation of less desirable products. The internal morphology of the catalyst also has a pronounced effect on the deactivation phenomenon, where it is observed that zeolites possessing high acidity and a unidimensional channel structure are prone towards catalyst deactivation by coking and pore blockage.

  19. Structural Insights into the Mechanism of PEPCK Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holyoak,T.; Sullivan, S.; Nowak, T.

    2006-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase catalyzes the reversible decarboxylation of oxaloacetic acid with the concomitant transfer of the {gamma}-phosphate of GTP to form PEP and GDP as the first committed step of gluconeogenesis and glyceroneogenesis. The three structures of the mitochondrial isoform of PEPCK reported are complexed with Mn{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}-PEP, or Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP and provide the first observations of the structure of the mitochondrial isoform and insight into the mechanism of catalysis mediated by this enzyme. The structures show the involvement of the hyper-reactive cysteine (C307) in the coordination of the active site Mn{sup 2+}. Upon formation of the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-PEP or PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complexes, C307 coordination is lost as the P-loop in which it resides adopts a different conformation. The structures suggest that stabilization of the cysteine-coordinated metal geometry holds the enzyme as a catalytically incompetent metal complex and may represent a previously unappreciated mechanism of regulation. A third conformation of the mobile P-loop in the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complex demonstrates the participation of a previously unrecognized, conserved serine residue (S305) in mediating phosphoryl transfer. The ordering of the mobile active site lid in the PEPCK-Mn{sup 2+}-malonate-Mn{sup 2+}GDP complex yields the first observation of this structural feature and provides additional insight into the mechanism of phosphoryl transfer.

  20. State of Supported Nickel Nanoparticles during Catalysis in Aqueous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, Zizwe; Kasakov, Stanislav; Shi, Hui; Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Zhao, Chen; Wang, Yong; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2015-11-09

    The state of Ni supported on HZSM-5 zeolite, silica, and sulfonated carbon was determined during aqueous phase catalysis of phenol hydrodeoxygenation using in situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). On sulfonated carbon and HZSM-5 supports, the NiO and Ni(OH)2 were readily reduced to Ni(0) under reaction conditions (~35 bar H2 in aqueous phenol solutions containing up to 0.5 wt. % phosphoric acid at 473 K). On the silica support, less than 70% of the Ni was converted to Ni(0) under reaction conditions, which is attributed to the formation of Ni phyllosilicates. Over a broad range of reaction conditions there was no leaching of Ni from the supports. In contrast, rapid leaching of the Ni(II) from HZSM-5 was observed, when 15 wt. % aqueous acetic acid was substituted for the aqueous phenol solution. Once the metallic state of Ni was established there was no leaching in 15 wt. % acetic acid at 473 K and 35 bar H2. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. The STEM was supported under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program: Chemical Imaging Initiative at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. STEM was performed at EMSL, a DOE Office of Science user facility sponsored by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL.

  1. Converting Homogeneous to Heterogeneous in Electrophilic Catalysis using Monodisperse Metal Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witham, Cole A.; Huang, Wenyu; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Toste, F. Dean

    2009-10-15

    A continuing goal in catalysis is the transformation of processes from homogeneous to heterogeneous. To this end, nanoparticles represent a new frontier in heterogeneous catalysis, where this conversion is supplemented by the ability to obtain new or divergent reactivity and selectivity. We report a novel method for applying heterogeneous catalysts to known homogeneous catalytic reactions through the design and synthesis of electrophilic platinum nanoparticles. These nanoparticles are selectively oxidized by the hypervalent iodine species PhICl{sub 2}, and catalyze a range of {pi}-bond activation reactions previously only homogeneously catalyzed. Multiple experimental methods are utilized to unambiguously verify the heterogeneity of the catalytic process. The discovery of treatments for nanoparticles that induce the desired homogeneous catalytic activity should lead to the further development of reactions previously inaccessible in heterogeneous catalysis. Furthermore, our size and capping agent study revealed that Pt PAMAM dendrimer-capped nanoparticles demonstrate superior activity and recyclability compared to larger, polymer-capped analogues.

  2. 2015 State of Indian Nations Address

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The President of the National Congress of American Indians will deliver his annual State of the Indian Nations address to Member of Congress, government officials, tribal leaders and citizens, and...

  3. Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Rio Arriba Leadership Summit addresses challenges, opportunities Community leaders gather in Española for a round-table discussion. July 6, 2016 DOE's Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization presented Mentor and Protégé of the Year awards to LANS and RG

  4. 2010 CATALYSIS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27 - JULY 2, 2010, NEW LONDON, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya Datye

    2010-07-02

    Catalysis is a key technology for improving the quality of life while simultaneously reducing the adverse impact of human activities on the environment. The discovery of new catalytic processes and the improvement of existing ones are also critically important for securing the nation's energy supply. The GRC on Catalysis is considered one the most prestigious conference for catalysis research, bringing together leading researchers from both academia, industry and national labs to discuss the latest, most exciting research in catalysis and the future directions for the field. The 2010 GRC on Catalysis will follow time-honored traditions and feature invited talks from the world's leading experts in the fundamentals and applications of catalytic science and technology. We plan to have increased participation from industry. The extended discussions in the company of outstanding thinkers will stimulate and foster new science. The conference will include talks in the following areas: Alternative feedstocks for chemicals and fuels, Imaging and spectroscopy, Design of novel catalysts, Catalyst preparation fundamentals, Molecular insights through theory, Surface Science, Catalyst stability and dynamics. In 2010, the Catalysis conference will move to a larger conference room with a new poster session area that will allow 40 posters per session. The dorm rooms provide single and double accommodations, free WiFi and the registration fee includes all meals and the famous lobster dinner on Thursday night. Afternoons are open to enjoy the New England ambiance with opportunities for hiking, sailing, golf and tennis to create an outstanding conference that will help you network with colleagues, and make long lasting connections.

  5. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-04-14

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently grow from below. By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000?C growth temperature.

  6. Geek-Up[3.11.2011]: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source Tools |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 11.2011]: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source Tools Geek-Up[3.11.2011]: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source Tools March 11, 2011 - 4:37pm Addthis L. Keith Woo | Photo courtesy of Ames National Laboratory L. Keith Woo | Photo courtesy of Ames National Laboratory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Ames Laboratory researcher and Iowa State University professor L. Keith Woo is on the search for catalysts that lead

  7. Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Progress on Acidic Zirconia Mixed Oxides for Efficient NH3-SCR Catalysis Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype confirms Details progress on non-zeolitic zirconia-based mixed oxides as promising new SCR catalyst materials and results of engine bench testing of full-size SCR prototype

  8. Recent advances in automotive catalysis for NOx emission control by small-pore microporous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beale, Andrew M.; Gao, Feng; Lezcano-Gonzalez, Ines; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2015-10-05

    The ever increasing demand to develop highly fuel efficient engines coincides with the need to minimize air pollution originating from the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines. Dramatically improved fuel efficiency can be achieved at air-to-fuel ratios much higher than stoichiometric. In the presence of oxygen in large excess, however, traditional three-way catalysts are unable to reduce NOx. Among the number of lean-NOx reduction technologies, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx by NH3 over Cu- and Fe-ion exchanged zeolite catalysts has been extensively studied over the past 30+ years. Despite the significant advances in developing a viable practical zeolite-based catalyst for lean NOx reduction, the insufficient hydrothermal stabilities of the zeolite structures considered cast doubts about their real-world applicability. During the past decade a renewed interest in zeolite-based lean NOx reduction was spurred by the discovery of the very high activity of Cu-SSZ-13 (and the isostructural Cu-SAPO-34) in the NH3 SCR of NOx. These new, small-pore zeolite-based catalysts not only exhibited very high NOx conversion and N2 selectivity, but also exhibited exceptional high hydrothermal stability at high temperatures. In this review we summarize the key discoveries of the past ~5 years that lead to the introduction of these catalysts into practical application. The review first briefly discusses the structure and preparation of the CHA structure-based zeolite catalysts, and then summarizes the key learnings of the rather extensive (but not complete) characterisation work. Then we summarize the key findings of reaction kinetics studies, and provide some mechanistic details emerging from these investigations. At the end of the review we highlight some of the issues that are still need to be addressed in automotive exhaust control catalysis. Funding A.M.B. and I.L.G. would like to thank EPSRC for funding. F.G., C.H.F.P. and J.Sz. gratefully acknowledge

  9. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  10. Shared address collectives using counter mechanisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael; Dozsa, Gabor; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Mamidala, Amith R; Miller, Douglas

    2014-02-18

    A shared address space on a compute node stores data received from a network and data to transmit to the network. The shared address space includes an application buffer that can be directly operated upon by a plurality of processes, for instance, running on different cores on the compute node. A shared counter is used for one or more of signaling arrival of the data across the plurality of processes running on the compute node, signaling completion of an operation performed by one or more of the plurality of processes, obtaining reservation slots by one or more of the plurality of processes, or combinations thereof.

  11. Enzyme-Like Catalysis of the Nazarov Cyclization by Supramolecular Encapsulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Courtney; Pluth, Michael; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-03-29

    A primary goal in the design and synthesis of molecular hosts has been the selective recognition and binding of a variety of guests using non-covalent interactions. Supramolecular catalysis, which is the application of such hosts towards catalysis, has much in common with many enzymatic reactions, chiefly the use of both spatially appropriate binding pockets and precisely oriented functional groups to recognize and activate specific substrate molecules. Although there are now many examples which demonstrate how selective encapsulation in a host cavity can enhance the reactivity of a bound guest, all have failed to reach the degree of increased reactivity typical of enzymes. We now report the catalysis of the Nazarov cyclization by a self-assembled coordination cage, a carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction which proceeds under mild, aqueous conditions. The acceleration in this system is over a million-fold, and represents the first example of supramolecular catalysis that achieves the level of rate enhancement comparable to that observed in several enzymes. We explain the unprecedented degree of rate increase as due to the combination of (a) preorganization of the encapsulated substrate molecule, (b) stabilization of the transition state of the cyclization by constrictive binding, and (c) increase in the basicity of the complexed alcohol functionality.

  12. Solvation and Acid Strength Effects on Catalysis by Faujasite Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gounder, Rajamani P.; Jones, Andrew J.; Carr, Robert T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and chemical titration data indicate that differences in monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation and methanol dehydration turnover rates (per H+) among FAU zeolites treated thermally with steam (H-USY) and then chemically with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (CDHUSY) predominantly reflect differences in the size and solvating properties of their supercage voids rather than differences in acid strength. The number of protons on a given sample was measured consistently by titrations with Na+, with CH3 groups via reactions of dimethyl ether, and with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine during methanol dehydration catalysis; these titration values were also supported by commensurate changes in acidic OH infrared band areas upon exposure to titrant molecules. The number of protons, taken as the average of the three titration methods, was significantly smaller than the number of framework Al atoms (Alf) obtained from X-ray diffraction and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on H-USY (0.35 H+/Alf) and CD-HUSY (0.69 H+/Alf). These data demonstrate that the ubiquitous use of Alf sites as structural proxies for active H+ sites in zeolites can be imprecise, apparently because distorted Al structures that are not associated with acidic protons are sometimes detected as Alf sites. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants, normalized non-rigorously by the number of Alf species, decreased with increasing Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples and became undetectable at sub-stoichiometric exchange levels (0.32 and 0.72 Na+/Alf ratios, respectively), an unexpected finding attributed incorrectly in previous studies to the presence of minority ‘‘super-acidic’’ sites. These rate constants, when normalized rigorously by the number of residual H+ sites were independent of Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples, reflecting the stoichiometric replacement of protons that are uniform in

  13. Chemistry - Oxygen Vacancies and Catalysis on Ceria Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Charles T.; Peden, Charles HF.

    2005-07-29

    Chemistry occurring at the surface of metal oxides is critical in a variety of industrial applications including catalysis and photocatalysis, optical display technology, solar energy devices and corrosion prevention. Defects have long been recognized to be the most reactive sites on the surfaces of many oxide materials. The most common types of defects present on the surfaces of metal oxides are oxygen vacancies and step edges. The nature of surface oxygen vacancies, and their number, distribution and diffusion across the surface of oxides, are thus issues of major scientific importance. One of the most interesting oxides in this respect is CeO2, since oxygen vacancies play the key role in giving this material it's industrially important ''oxygen-storage capacity''. This capacity makes modern automotive exhaust treatment catalysts containing CeO2 much more effective than their predecessors without CeO2. Ceria is also well known as a support which enhances the performance of transition metal catalysts, relative to other oxide supports, in a variety of other reactions including water-gas shift, steam reforming of oxygenates and PROX 1-7, all of which hold promise for enabling a hydrogen economy 1. Related to ceria's facile redox capacity (ability to rapidly form and eliminate oxygen vacancy defects) is the poorly understood observation that some less reducible oxides, such as zirconia (ZrO2), are used as additives that actually enhance this ''oxygen storage'' property of CeO2. In this issue, Esch and coworkers in Trieste, Italy report an exciting study that for the first time clearly elucidates the structure, distribution and formation of oxygen vacancies on a cerium oxide surface 8. They have elegantly combined beautiful, atomic-resolution imaging using scanning-tunneling microscopy (STM) on a ceria surface with state-of-the-art quantum mechanical calculations using Density Functional Theory (DFT) to raise our understanding of CeO2 surfaces to a much higher level

  14. Mapping virtual addresses to different physical addresses for value disambiguation for thread memory access requests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gala, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-02

    A multiprocessor system includes nodes. Each node includes a data path that includes a core, a TLB, and a first level cache implementing disambiguation. The system also includes at least one second level cache and a main memory. For thread memory access requests, the core uses an address associated with an instruction format of the core. The first level cache uses an address format related to the size of the main memory plus an offset corresponding to hardware thread meta data. The second level cache uses a physical main memory address plus software thread meta data to store the memory access request. The second level cache accesses the main memory using the physical address with neither the offset nor the thread meta data after resolving speculation. In short, this system includes mapping of a virtual address to a different physical addresses for value disambiguation for different threads.

  15. Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Public Meeting on “Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities” On Friday, April 11, 2014, at 10 a.m. in room HVC-215 of the U.S. Capitol, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The meeting will focus on infrastructure vulnerabilities related to the electricity, natural gas and petroleum transmission, storage and distribution systems (TS&D). The meeting will consist of two facilitated panels of experts on identifying and addressing vulnerabilities within the nation’s energy TS&D infrastructure. Following the panels, an opportunity will be provided for public comment via an open microphone session. The meeting will be livestreamed at energy.gov/live

  16. Global-Address Space Networking (GASNet) Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-04-06

    GASNet (Global-Address Space Networking) is a language-independent, low-level networking layer that provides network-independent, high-performance communication primitives tailored for implementing parallel global address space SPMD languages such as UPC and Titanium. The interface is primarily intended as a compilation target and for use by runtime library writers (as opposed to end users), and the primary goals are high performance, interface portability, and expressiveness. GASNet is designed specifically to support high-performance, portable implementations of global address spacemore » languages on modern high-end communication networks. The interface provides the flexibility and extensibility required to express a wide variety of communication patterns without sacrificing performance by imposing large computational overheads in the interface. The design of the GASNet interface is partitioned into two layers to maximize porting ease without sacrificing performance: the lower level is a narrow but very general interface called the GASNet core API - the design is basedheavily on Active Messages, and is implemented directly on top of each individual network architecture. The upper level is a wider and more expressive interface called GASNet extended API, which provides high-level operations such as remote memory access and various collective operations. This release implements GASNet over MPI, the Quadrics "elan" API, the Myrinet "GM" API and the "LAPI" interface to the IBM SP switch. A template is provided for adding support for additional network interfaces.« less

  17. Framework for Address Cooperative Extended Transactions

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Framework for Addressing Cooperative Extended Transactions (FACET) is an object-oriented software framework for building models of complex, cooperative behaviors of agents. it can be used to implement simulation models of societal processes such as the complex interplay of participating individuals and organizations engaged in multiple concurrent transactions in pursuit of their various goals. These transactions can be patterned on, for example, clinical guidelines and procedures, business practices, government and corporate policies, etc. FACET canmore » also address other complex behaviors such as biological life cycles or manufacturing processes. FACET includes generic software objects representing the fundamental classes of agent -- Person and Organization - with mechanisms for resource management, including resolution of conflicting requests for participation and/or use of the agent's resources. The FACET infrastructure supports stochastic behavioral elements and coping mechanisms by which specified special conditions and events can cause an active cooperative process to be preempted, diverting the participants onto appropriate alternative behavioral pathways.« less

  18. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient

  19. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Gary

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  20. NMR Computational Studies of Solid Acidity/Fundamental Studies of Catalysis by Solid Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Haw

    2008-06-28

    This project focused on catalysis by zeolites and the synergy of spectroscopic characterization and theoretical modeling. In collaboration with the Waroquier group in Belgium we used state-of-the-art quantum chemical simulations on a supramolecular model of both the HZSM-5 zeolite and the co-catalytic hydrocarbon pool species and calculated a full catalytic cycle (including all rate constants) for methanol-to-olefin (MTO) catalysis involving a hydrocarbon pool species. This work not only represents the most robust computational analysis of a successful MTO route to date, but it also succeeds in tying together the many experimental clues. That work was featured on the cover of Angewandte Chemie. More recently we elucidated several unsuspected roles for formaldehyde in methanol to olefin catalysis. Formaldehyde proves to be a key species responsible for both the growth of the catalytically active hydrocarbon pool and its inevitable aging into deactivated polycyclic aromatic species. The apparent inevitability of formaldehyde formation at high temperatures, in particular in contact with active metal or metal oxide surfaces, may put some fundamental limitations on the economic potential of conversion of methanol to olefins.

  1. Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy Upgrade Technical Challenges: HVAC, Envelope and IAQ (301) Opportunities for Building America Research to Address...

  2. Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ...

  3. Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilist...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case ...

  4. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. ...

  5. Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating the reagent addition time Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Addressable morphology control of silica ...

  6. ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The American ...

  7. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by ...

  8. DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Transmission System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ACTION PLAN ADDRESSING THE ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION SYSTEM DRAFT DOE Action Plan Addressing the Electricity Transmission System 1 Table of Contents * ...

  9. NERSC Implements Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment NERSC Implements Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment February 23, 2015 Contact: ...

  10. Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation ...

  11. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings, Inc. ...

  12. Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and ...

  13. Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy Stakeholders Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy Stakeholders October 4, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Photo ...

  14. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  15. Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multifamily Low-Income ...

  16. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges....

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the...

  17. Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change...

  18. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and...

  19. Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Indonesia National Action Plan Addressing Climate Change AgencyCompany...

  20. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and ...

  1. Cynthia J. Jenks Work Address: Home Address: Ames Laboratory 3101 Greenwood Rd.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyclotron Road at Berkeley Lab Cyclotron Road at Berkeley Lab Addthis The Department of Energy is testing a new model for clean energy research and development (R&D) through a program called Cyclotron Road. The goal is to support scientific R&D that is still too risky for private-sector investment, and too applied for academia

    J. Jenks Work Address: Home Address: Ames Laboratory 3101 Greenwood Rd. 311 TASF Ames, IA 50014 2408 Pammel Drive Cell: (515) 451-4663 Iowa State University

  2. Final Report on Internet Addressable Lightswitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Peter

    2001-08-27

    This report describes the work performed to develop and test a new switching system and communications network that is useful for economically switching lighting circuits in existing commercial buildings. The first section of the report provides the general background of the IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) research and development work as well as the context for the development of the new switching system. The research and development effort that went into producing the first proof-of-concept (the IBECS Addressable Power Switch or APS) and the physical prototype of that concept is detailed in the second section. In the third section of the report, we detail the refined Powerline Carrier Based IBECS Title 24 Wall Switch system that evolved from the APS prototype. The refined system provided a path for installing IBECS switching technology in existing buildings that may not be already wired for light level switching control. The final section of the report describes the performance of the IBECS Title 24 Switch system as applied to a small demonstration in two offices at LBNL's Building 90. We learned that the new Powerline Carrier control systems (A-10 technology) that have evolved from the early X-10 systems have solved most of the noise problems that dogged the successful application of X-10 technologies in commercial buildings. We found that the new A-10 powerline carrier control technology can be reliable and effective for switching lighting circuits even in electrically noisy office environments like LBNL. Thus we successfully completed the task objectives by designing, building and demonstrating a new switching system that can provide multiple levels of light which can be triggered either from specially designed wall switches or from a digital communications network. By applying commercially available powerline carrier based technologies that communicate over the in-place lighting wiring system, this type of control can be

  3. Electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blackburn, Bryan M.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Van Assche, IV, Frederick Martin

    2015-05-19

    Electrode configurations for electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases are provided. According to an embodiment, electric-field electrodes can be incorporated in devices such as gas sensors and fuel cells to shape an electric field provided with respect to sensing electrodes for the gas sensors and surfaces of the fuel cells. The shaped electric fields can alter surface dynamics, system thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and adsorption/desorption processes. In one embodiment, ring-shaped electric-field electrodes can be provided around sensing electrodes of a planar gas sensor.

  4. Understanding catalysis in a multiphasic two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Sai, Na; Lu, Ping; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Liu, Sheng; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Luk, Ting S.; Kaehr, Bryan James; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2015-10-07

    Establishing processing–structure–property relationships for monolayer materials is crucial for a range of applications spanning optics, catalysis, electronics and energy. Presently, for molybdenum disulfide, a promising catalyst for artificial photosynthesis, considerable debate surrounds the structure/property relationships of its various allotropes. Here we unambiguously solve the structure of molybdenum disulfide monolayers using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy supported by density functional theory and show lithium intercalation to direct a preferential transformation of the basal plane from 2H (trigonal prismatic) to 1T' (clustered Mo). These changes alter the energetics of molybdenum disulfide interactions with hydrogen (ΔGH), and, with respect to catalysis, the 1T' transformation renders the normally inert basal plane amenable towards hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen evolution. Furthermore, we show basal plane activation of 1T' molybdenum disulfide and a lowering of ΔGH from +1.6 eV for 2H to +0.18 eV for 1T', comparable to 2H molybdenum disulfide edges on Au(111), one of the most active hydrogen evolution catalysts known.

  5. Understanding catalysis in a multiphasic two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenide.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chou, Stanley Shihyao; Sai, Na; Lu, Ping; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Liu, Sheng; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Luk, Ting S.; Kaehr, Bryan James; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2015-10-07

    Establishing processing–structure–property relationships for monolayer materials is crucial for a range of applications spanning optics, catalysis, electronics and energy. Presently, for molybdenum disulfide, a promising catalyst for artificial photosynthesis, considerable debate surrounds the structure/property relationships of its various allotropes. Here we unambiguously solve the structure of molybdenum disulfide monolayers using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy supported by density functional theory and show lithium intercalation to direct a preferential transformation of the basal plane from 2H (trigonal prismatic) to 1T' (clustered Mo). These changes alter the energetics of molybdenum disulfide interactions with hydrogen (ΔGH), and, with respect to catalysis, the 1T' transformationmore » renders the normally inert basal plane amenable towards hydrogen adsorption and hydrogen evolution. Furthermore, we show basal plane activation of 1T' molybdenum disulfide and a lowering of ΔGH from +1.6 eV for 2H to +0.18 eV for 1T', comparable to 2H molybdenum disulfide edges on Au(111), one of the most active hydrogen evolution catalysts known.« less

  6. ASER Web Addresses and Points of Contact at DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ASER Web Addresses and Points of Contact at DOE Sites March 29, 2013 Site and Web Address ASER Contact Name Phone E-mail Ames Laboratory http:www.ameslab.govoperationsesha...

  7. Proton Mediated Chemistry and Catalysis in a Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-04-10

    Synthetic supramolecular host assemblies can impart unique reactivity to encapsulated guest molecules. Synthetic host molecules have been developed to carry out complex reactions within their cavities, despite the fact that they lack the type of specifically tailored functional groups normally located in the analogous active sites of enzymes. Over the past decade, the Raymond group has developed a series of self-assembled supramolecules and the Bergman group has developed and studied a number of catalytic transformations. In this Account, we detail recent collaborative work between these two groups, focusing on chemical catalysis stemming from the encapsulation of protonated guests and expanding to acid catalysis in basic solution. We initially investigated the ability of a water-soluble, self-assembled supramolecular host molecule to encapsulate protonated guests in its hydrophobic core. Our study of encapsulated protonated amines revealed rich host-guest chemistry. We established that self-exchange (that is, in-out guest movement) rates of protonated amines were dependent on the steric bulk of the amine rather than its basicity. The host molecule has purely rotational tetrahedral (T) symmetry, so guests with geminal N-methyl groups (and their attendant mirror plane) were effectively desymmetrized; this allowed for the observation and quantification of the barriers for nitrogen inversion followed by bond rotation. Furthermore, small nitrogen heterocycles, such as N-alkylaziridines, N-alkylazetidines, and N-alkylpyrrolidines, were found to be encapsulated as proton-bound homodimers or homotrimers. We further investigated the thermodynamic stabilization of protonated amines, showing that encapsulation makes the amines more basic in the cavity. Encapsulation raises the effective basicity of protonated amines by up to 4.5 pK{sub a} units, a difference almost as large as that between the moderate and strong bases carbonate and hydroxide. The thermodynamic stabilization

  8. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Pepco Holdings, Inc. (PHI) is pleased to respond to the US Department of Energy (DOE) request for information regarding addressing policy and logistical challenges to smart grid implementation. This follows on the heels of

  9. Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistical Challenges | Department of Energy Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges (549.44 KB) More Documents & Publications Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid

  10. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Southern recognizes that many policy and logistical concerns must be addressed for the promises of smart grid technologies and applications to be fully realized in ways that are beneficial, secure, and cost-effective

  11. 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Plenary - Keynote Address

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Text Version) | Department of Energy Plenary - Keynote Address (Text Version) 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Plenary - Keynote Address (Text Version) This is the text version of the 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting Plenary - Keynote Address video. The Honorable Byron Dorgan, U.S. Senate (retired) presented the keynote address at the 2016 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting.

  12. Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint Center for Energy Storage Research March 19, 2015, Videos Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology George Crabtree gives keynote at Loyola University In March 2015, George Crabtree gave the keynote address, "Addressing Climate Change with Next Generation Energy Storage Technology" at the Institute of Environmental Sustainability Climate Change Conference at Loyola University

  13. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change DOE-LPO_Report_Financing-Innovation-Climate-Change.pdf (1.97 MB) More Documents & Publications LPO Financial Performance Report PORTFOLIO PERFORMANCE Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change Powering New Markets: Utility-scale Photovoltaic Solar

  14. Individually addressable cathodes with integrated focusing stack or detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas; Whealton, John; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and method are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A plurality of individually addressable cathodes are integrated with an electrostatic focusing stack and/or a plurality of detectors on the addressable field emission array. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  15. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS, AND MECHANISTIC EVALUATION OF IRON-BASED CATALYSIS FOR SYNTHESIS GAS CONVERSION TO FUELS AND CHEMICALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Enrique Iglesia

    2005-03-31

    This project explores the extension of previously discovered Fe-based catalysts to hydrogen-poor synthesis gas streams derived from coal and biomass sources. These catalysts have previously shown unprecedented Fischer-Tropsch synthesis rate, selectivity with synthesis gas derived from methane. During the first reporting period, we certified a microreactor, installed required analytical equipment, and reproduced synthetic protocols and catalytic performance previously reported. During the second reporting period, we prepared several Fe-based compositions for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and tested the effects of product recycle under both subcritical and supercritical conditions. During this third reporting period, we have prepared a large number of Fe-based catalyst compositions using precipitation and impregnations methods with both supercritical and subcritical drying and with the systematic use of surface active agents to prevent pore collapse during drying steps required in synthetic protocols. These samples were characterized during this period using X-ray diffraction, surface area, and temperature-programmed reduction measurements. These studies have shown that these synthesis methods lead to even higher surface areas than in our previous studies and confirm the crystalline structures of these materials and their reactivity in both oxide-carbide interconversions and in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis reaction rates and selectivities with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio feeds (H{sub 2}/CO = 1) were the highest reported in the literature at the low-temperature and relatively low pressure in our measurements. Current studies are exploring the optimization of the sequence of impregnation of Cu, K, and Ru promoters, of the activation and reaction conditions, and of the co-addition of light hydrocarbons to increase diffusion rates of primary olefin products so as to increase the selectivity to unsaturated products. Finally, we are also addressing

  16. Acid Catalysis in Basic Solution: A Supramolecular Host PromotesOrthoformate Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-12-12

    Though many enzymes can promote chemical reactions by tuning substrate properties purely through the electrostatic environment of a docking cavity, this strategy has proven challenging to mimic in synthetic host-guest systems. Here we report a highly-charged, water soluble, metal-ligand assembly with a hydrophobic interior cavity that thermodynamically stabilizes protonated substrates and consequently catalyzes the normally acidic hydrolysis of orthoformates in basic solution, with rate accelerations of up to 890-fold. The catalysis reaction obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics, exhibits competitive inhibition, and the substrate scope displays size selectivity consistent with the constrained binding environment of the molecular host. Synthetic chemists have long endeavored to design host molecules capable of selectively binding slow-reacting substrates and catalyzing their chemical reactions. While synthetic catalysts are often site-specific and require certain properties of the substrate to insure catalysis, enzymes are often able to modify basic properties of the bound substrate such as pK{sub a} in order to enhance reactivity. Two common motifs used by nature to activate otherwise unreactive compounds are the precise arrangement of hydrogen-bonding networks and electrostatic interactions between the substrate and adjacent residues of the protein. Precise arrangement of hydrogen bonding networks near the active sites of proteins can lead to well-tuned pK{sub a}-matching, and can result in pK{sub a} shifts of up to eight units, as shown in bacteriorhodopsin. Similarly, purely electrostatic interactions can greatly favor charged states and have been responsible for pK{sub a} shifts of up to five units for acetoacetate decarboxylase. Attempts have been made to isolate the contributions of electrostatic versus covalent interactions to such pK{sub a} shifts; however this remains a difficult challenge experimentally. This challenge emphasizes the importance of synthesizing

  17. Wavelet-based surrogate time series for multiscale simulation of heterogeneous catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Savara, Aditya Ashi; Daw, C. Stuart; Xiong, Qingang; Gur, Sourav; Danielson, Thomas L.; Hin, Celine N.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Frantziskonis, George N.

    2016-01-28

    We propose a wavelet-based scheme that encodes the essential dynamics of discrete microscale surface reactions in a form that can be coupled with continuum macroscale flow simulations with high computational efficiency. This makes it possible to simulate the dynamic behavior of reactor-scale heterogeneous catalysis without requiring detailed concurrent simulations at both the surface and continuum scales using different models. Our scheme is based on the application of wavelet-based surrogate time series that encodes the essential temporal and/or spatial fine-scale dynamics at the catalyst surface. The encoded dynamics are then used to generate statistically equivalent, randomized surrogate time series, which canmore » be linked to the continuum scale simulation. As a result, we illustrate an application of this approach using two different kinetic Monte Carlo simulations with different characteristic behaviors typical for heterogeneous chemical reactions.« less

  18. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolyticmore » activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.« less

  19. Multifunctional cellulase catalysis targeted by fusion to different carbohydrate-binding modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Johnnie A.; Takasuka, Taichi E.; Deng, Kai; Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Udell, Hannah S.; Prom, Ben M.; Kim, Hyunkee; Adams, Paul D.; Northen, Trent R.; Fox, Brian G.

    2015-12-21

    Carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) bind polysaccharides and help target glycoside hydrolases catalytic domains to their appropriate carbohydrate substrates. To better understand how CBMs can improve cellulolytic enzyme reactivity, representatives from each of the 18 families of CBM found in Ruminoclostridium thermocellum were fused to the multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain of CelE (Cthe_0797, CelEcc), which can hydrolyze numerous types of polysaccharides including cellulose, mannan, and xylan. Since CelE is a cellulosomal enzyme, none of these fusions to a CBM previously existed. CelEcc_CBM fusions were assayed for their ability to hydrolyze cellulose, lichenan, xylan, and mannan. Several CelEcc_CBM fusions showed enhanced hydrolytic activity with different substrates relative to the fusion to CBM3a from the cellulosome scaffoldin, which has high affinity for binding to crystalline cellulose. Additional binding studies and quantitative catalysis studies using nanostructure-initiator mass spectrometry (NIMS) were carried out with the CBM3a, CBM6, CBM30, and CBM44 fusion enzymes. In general, and consistent with observations of others, enhanced enzyme reactivity was correlated with moderate binding affinity of the CBM. Numerical analysis of reaction time courses showed that CelEcc_CBM44, a combination of a multifunctional enzyme domain with a CBM having broad binding specificity, gave the fastest rates for hydrolysis of both the hexose and pentose fractions of ionic-liquid pretreated switchgrass. In conclusion, we have shown that fusions of different CBMs to a single multifunctional GH5 catalytic domain can increase its rate of reaction with different pure polysaccharides and with pretreated biomass. This fusion approach, incorporating domains with broad specificity for binding and catalysis, provides a new avenue to improve reactivity of simple combinations of enzymes within the complexity of plant biomass.

  20. Working Together to Address Natural Gas Storage Safety | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Address Natural Gas Storage Safety Working Together to Address Natural Gas Storage Safety April 1, 2016 - 11:15am Addthis Working Together to Address Natural Gas Storage Safety Franklin (Lynn) Orr Franklin (Lynn) Orr Under Secretary for Science and Energy Marie Therese Dominguez Marie Therese Dominguez Administrator, U.S. Department of Transportation's Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration As a part of the Administration's ongoing commitment to support state and

  1. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Across U.S. Industry | Department of Energy Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry eip_report_pg9.pdf (2.52 MB) More Documents & Publications ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry Energy Technology Solutions Energy Technology Solutions: Public-Private

  2. Addressing Barriers to Upgrade Projects at Affordable Multifamily

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Properties (201) | Department of Energy Addressing Barriers to Upgrade Projects at Affordable Multifamily Properties (201) Addressing Barriers to Upgrade Projects at Affordable Multifamily Properties (201) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Addressing Barriers to Upgrade Projects at Affordable Multifamily Properties (201), call slides and discussion summary. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (1.83 MB) More Documents & Publications Incorporating Energy

  3. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks-From Field to Fuel Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Allen Julian, Chief Business Officer, MBI julian_biomass_2014.pdf (1.66 MB) More Documents & Publications 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Biochemical Conversion 2015 Peer Review Report Process Design and

  4. Secretary Chu Addresses the International Atomic Energy Agency General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference | Department of Energy Addresses the International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference Secretary Chu Addresses the International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference September 20, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu addressed the International Atomic Energy Agency's 54th General Conference today in Vienna. His prepared remarks are below: Thank you, Ambassador Enkhsaikhan. Congratulations on your election as President of this Conference.

  5. Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. The Department of Energy is seeking comments on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, as well as recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges. Steffes Corporation Smart Grid

  6. Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multifamily / Low-Income Peer Exchange Call: Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 26, 2012. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (546.02 KB) More Documents & Publications Outreach to Multifamily Landlords and Tenants Stewards of Affordable Housing

  7. Expanding Opportunity and Addressing Unique Challenges Facing Women and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Girls of Color | Department of Energy Expanding Opportunity and Addressing Unique Challenges Facing Women and Girls of Color Expanding Opportunity and Addressing Unique Challenges Facing Women and Girls of Color November 17, 2014 - 11:35am Addthis When President Obama founded the White House Council on Women and Girls (CWG) within the first two months of taking office, he charged us with working to address inequalities and barriers facing women and girls in our schools, workplaces, and

  8. Energy Saver RSS Subscribers: Update Your Feed Address | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy RSS Subscribers: Update Your Feed Address Energy Saver RSS Subscribers: Update Your Feed Address September 28, 2015 - 12:46pm Addthis Just a short administrative note for Energy Saver RSS subscribers: our feed address is changing. To continue reading the Energy Saver Blog through your RSS feed reader, please update the link in your reader to http://energy.gov/rss/energysaver/1280681. Thanks for reading and subscribing to Energy Saver! Addthis Related Articles The Energy Savers Blog

  9. DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liabilities | Department of Energy Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique

  10. Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses Headquarters Program & Staff Office Mailing Addresses The following addresses are for delivery of regular mail and small packages: Delivery to the Headquarters buildings in Washington, DC: Name of Individual Title Routing Symbol/Forrestal Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Name of Individual Title Routing Symbol/L'Enfant Plaza Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000

  11. Utility Regulation and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities | Department of Energy Utility Regulation and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Utility Regulation and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Utility Regulation and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Implementing a range of alternative utility-rate reforms could minimize solar

  12. Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Logistical Challenges | Department of Energy Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative is a generation and transmission cooperative (G&T) that provides the wholesale electrical requirements and other services for 25 electric distribution cooperatives and 16 municipal utilities in the Upper Midwest. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing

  13. Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Climate Change | Department of Energy Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change Bush Administration Plays Leading Role in Studying and Addressing Global Climate Change February 27, 2007 - 3:49pm Addthis Washington, DC - Continuing to take the lead in addressing global climate change, Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Stephen Johnson, and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Administrator Vice

  14. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays enables the multi-target electrochemical sensing of biological and chemical analytes. Authors: Harper, Jason C. ; Polsky, ...

  15. Secretary Bodman Addresses Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas Exhibition Secretary Bodman Addresses Turkmenistan Industrial Oil and Gas Exhibition November 16, 2007 - 4:31pm Addthis Holds Bilateral ...

  16. Research Projects to Address Technical Challenges Facing Small...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Facing Small Oil and Natural Gas Producers Selected by DOE for Further Development Research Projects to Address Technical Challenges Facing Small Oil and Natural Gas ...

  17. Africa - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical Potential of Solar...

  18. Pensacola Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pensacola Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Providing comment on: Consumer facing programs such as feedback, demandresponse, energy efficiency, and ...

  19. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DRAFT EIS PUBLIC HEARINGS- Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation ... and Notice of Public Hearing Implementing the National Broadband Plan by ...

  20. Address (Smart Grid Project) (France) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    France) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Address Country France Coordinates 46.073231, 2.427979 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  1. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium ...

  2. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium molecules on an electrode array followed by post-assembly electro-addressable ...

  3. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's ... to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. ...

  4. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reliability and Resiliency of the US Electric Grid: SGIG Article in Metering International, March 2012 Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing ...

  5. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges....

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. The Alliance to Save ...

  6. Addressing Challenging Materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Addressing Challenging Materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory No abstract prepared. Authors: Jubin, Robert Thomas 1 ; Patton, Bradley D 1 ; Robinson, Sharon M 1 ; ...

  7. Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other ... These critical materials, including many rare earth elements, are essential for ...

  8. Keynote Address: Billy Parish of Mosaic | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0, 2014 3:00PM to 3:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Billy Parish, President and Founder of Mosaic, will address Summit attendees

  9. Microsoft Word - Actions to address lessons learned.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Actions to address Work Planning and Scheduling System lessons learned Action Executive owner Staff assigned Due date Understand the business environment of vendor references....

  10. Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening Keynote Address...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening Keynote Address - 2010 JGI User Meeting) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthetic Biology for Advanced Fuels (Opening ...

  11. Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review ...

  12. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical ... September 17, 2010 Federal Register, the New York Independent System Operator, Inc. ...

  13. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementati...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supplemental Comments by The Office of the Ohio Consumers Counsel ("OCC") City Utilities of Springfield Missouri Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical ...

  14. Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Studies on Lithium Manganese Rich MNC Composite Cathodes ... Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials

  15. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks-From Field to Fuel Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Allen Julian, Chief Business Officer, MBI ...

  16. Towards Addressing Surface Effects in Ordinary Isotropic Peridynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Towards Addressing Surface Effects in Ordinary Isotropic Peridynamic Models Position Aware ... Resource Relation: Conference: SIAM Conference on 'Analysis of Partial Differential ...

  17. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change Friday, August 29, 2014 - 10:26am Several national laboratories and institutions have joined ...

  18. Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental

  19. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan M.

    2015-12-15

    A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium molecules on an electrode array followed by post-assembly electro-addressable conversion of the unreactive group to a chemical or biological recognition group. Electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays enables the multi-target electrochemical sensing of biological and chemical analytes.

  20. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening keynote of the Symbiosis Conference. symbiosis_conference_hamilton.pdf (1.4 MB) More Documents & Publications The Future of Bioenergy Feedstock Production Symbiosis Biofeedstock Conference: Expanding Commercialization of Mutualistic Microbes to Increase Feedstock Production Symbiosis

  1. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  2. JLab Will Test its Public Address System | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 22 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System On Wednesday, June 22, Emergency Management Team staff will conduct the monthly test of Jefferson Lab's Public Address (PA) System - the live audible announcement feature - available through the lab's Cisco phones. This monthly operational test of the system occurs at 5:30 p.m. on the third or fourth Wednesday of each month. No actions are required or expected from members of the lab community with this test. The Public Address

  3. JLab Will Test its Public Address System | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 20 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System On Wednesday, July 20, Emergency Management Team staff will conduct the monthly test of Jefferson Lab's Public Address (PA) System - the live audible announcement feature - available through the lab's Cisco phones. This monthly operational test of the system occurs at 5:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. No actions are required or expected from members of the lab community with this test. The Public Address System may be

  4. Molecular-scale, Three-dimensional Non-Platinum Group Metal Electrodes for Catalysis of Fuel Cell Reactions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Molecular-scale, Three-dimensional Non-Platinum Group Metal Electrodes for Catalysis of Fuel Cell Reactions John B. Kerr Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) September 30, 2009 Team Members: Adam Weber, Rachel Segalman, Robert Kostecki, Jeff Reimer, John Arnold, Martin Head-Gordon (LBNL). Piotr Zelenay, James Boncella, Yu Seung Kim, Neil Henson, Jerzy Chlistunoff (LANL). Steve Hamrock, Radoslav Atanasoski (3M) Budget: DOE share - $9.58MM over four years; 3M share - in-kind over four

  5. Mechanistic Details and Reactivity Descriptors in Oxidation and Acid Catalysis of Methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Carr, Robert T.; Chai, Song-Hai; Iglesia, Enrique

    2015-02-06

    Acid and redox reaction rates of CH₃OH-O₂ mixtures on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters, together with isotopic, spectroscopic, and theoretical assessments of catalyst properties and reaction pathways, were used to define rigorous descriptors of reactivity and to probe the compositional effects for oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) and dehydration reactions. ³¹P-MAS NMR, transmission electron microscopy and titrations of protons with di-tert-butylpyridine during catalysis showed that POM clusters retained their Keggin structure upon dispersion on SiO₂ and after use in CH₃OH reactions. The effects of CH₃OH and O₂ pressures and of D-substitution on ODH rates show that C-H activation in molecularly adsorbed CH₃OH is the sole kinetically relevant step and leads to reduced centers as intermediates present at low coverages; their concentrations, measured from UV-vis spectra obtained during catalysis, are consistent with the effects of CH₃OH/O₂ ratios predicted from the elementary steps proposed. First-order ODH rate constants depend strongly on the addenda atoms (Mo vs W) but weakly on the central atom (P vs Si) in POM clusters, because C-H activation steps inject electrons into the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) of the clusters, which are the d-orbitals at Mo⁶⁺ and W⁶⁺ centers. H-atom addition energies (HAE) at O-atoms in POM clusters represent the relevant theoretical probe of the LUMO energies and of ODH reactivity. The calculated energies of ODH transition states at each O-atom depend linearly on their HAE values with slopes near unity, as predicted for late transition states in which electron transfer and C-H cleavage are essentially complete. HAE values averaged over all accessible O-atoms in POM clusters provide the appropriate reactivity descriptor for oxides whose known structures allow accurate HAE calculations. CH₃OH dehydration proceeds via parallel pathways mediated by late carbenium-ion transition states; effects of

  6. Department of Energy Releases Strategic Plan to Address Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Releases Strategic Plan to Address Energy Challenges October 2, 2006 - 9:01am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today released the ...

  7. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing DOE Order 420.1C & A Proposed Generic Methodology Presentation from the May 2015 Seismic Lessons-Learned Panel ...

  8. Keynote Address: Cristin Dorgelo, White House Office of Science...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cristin Dorgelo, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Keynote Address: Cristin Dorgelo, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy May 21, 2014 2:20PM to ...

  9. The State of the Ames Laboratory Address 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Alex King, director of The Ames Laboratory, discusses the budget situation, improvements at Ames Lab and infrastructure improvements during the State of the Lab address on Tuesday, May 24, 2011.

  10. Keynote Address: Ali Zaidi, the White House Domestic Policy Council...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ali Zaidi, the White House Domestic Policy Council Keynote Address: Ali Zaidi, the White House Domestic Policy Council May 21, 2014 2:05PM to 2:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Keynote...

  11. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    research and development (r&d) portfolio for energy-Intensive Processes (eIP) addresses the top technology opportunities to save energy and reduce carbon emissions across the ...

  12. United Indigenous Voices Address Sustainability: Climate Change and Traditional Places

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the First Stewards Symposium, over 300 industry and policy leaders from around the nation will discuss four main themes generated from the 2012 First Stewards Symposium that address issues...

  13. NAP Coalition Response to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation | Department of Energy NAP Coalition Response to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation NAP Coalition Response to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation The NAP Coalition is a "Coalition of Coalitions" that has been formed for the purpose of implementing the National Action Plan released by FERC in cooperation with DOE in June of 2010. Organizations working

  14. Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation | Department of Energy Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District (The District) an Independent Special District of the State of Florida is appreciative of the opportunity to submit for your consideration the following comments in response to the U.S.

  15. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    change | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change Friday, August 29, 2014 - 10:26am Several national laboratories and institutions have joined forces to develop and apply the most complete climate and Earth system model to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues. Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy, or ACME, is designed to accelerate the development and application of fully

  16. Role of CA Utility Programs in Addressing MELS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Role of CA Utility Programs in addressing MELS Mangesh Basarkar, Emerging Technologies, PG&E DOE MELS Workshop Pacific Energy Center, San Francisco, June 3, 2016 OVERVIEW  Growing realization for utilities on the impact of miscellaneous electric loads (MELS) in buildings  Lot of ongoing data collection activities in support of products, programs and services for addressing MELS  Data collection activities primarily happens in the:  Emerging Technologies Programs  Codes and

  17. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels | Department of Energy Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels white paper exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production

  18. ADR Lunchtime Program: Addressing Unconscious Bias in the ADR Process |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Addressing Unconscious Bias in the ADR Process ADR Lunchtime Program: Addressing Unconscious Bias in the ADR Process This session focuses on strategies, issues, and insights into how unconscious bias impacts our perceptions, beliefs, and behaviors in today's workplace. Real-world case studies and current research are provided to increase awareness of the elements of the mediation/ADR process that may be impacted by biased communication and perception. The discussion

  19. ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Inc. (ASHRAE), founded in 1894, is an international organization of over 50,000 members. ASHRAE fulfills its mission of advancing heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration to serve humanity and promote a

  20. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation | Department of Energy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on

  1. PROJECT PROFILE: Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practicality | Department of Energy Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to Practicality PROJECT PROFILE: Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to Practicality Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $6,000,000 Natural soiling is responsible for about 4% output power loss and may be adding one cent per kilowatt hour to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) depending on the site.

  2. Keynote Address: Ali Zaidi, the White House Domestic Policy Council |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An overview and update on Environmental Management given by Alice Williams, Associate Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Environmental Management. Keynote Address (2.53 MB) More Documents & Publications EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis West Valley Demonstration Project Low-Level Waste Shipment Chairs Meeting - October 2012 Department of Energy

    2:05PM to 2:30PM PDT Pacific Ballroom Keynote address by Ali Zaidi, Deputy Director for Energy Policy, the White House

  3. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Department of Energy Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) This document is intended to assist industry and regulators identify important issues and parameters that may be necessary for the evaluation and mitigation of adverse effects of induced seismicity. egs-is-protocol-final-draft-20110531.pdf (218.87 KB) More

  4. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Ernie Majer, James Nelson, Ann Robertson-Tait, Jean Savy, and Ivan Wong January 2012 | DOE/EE-0662 Cover Image Courtesy of Katie L. Boyle, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory i i Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Preface In June 2009, the New York Times published an article about the public fear of geothermal development causing earthquakes. The article

  5. DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges DOE Awards Over a Billion Supercomputing Hours to Address Scientific Challenges January 26, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC. - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that approximately 1.6 billion supercomputing processor hours have been awarded to 69 cutting-edge research projects through the Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.

  6. Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy Students Innovate to Address Gas Shortages Following Hurricane Sandy November 9, 2012 - 3:43pm Addthis Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Franklin High School students working on their online map of gas and charging stations. | Photo courtesy Dayana Bustamante Ian Kalin Director of the Energy Data Initiative What are the key

  7. Addressing Security and Reliability Concerns of Large Power Transformers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Services » Addressing Security and Reliability Concerns of Large Power Transformers Addressing Security and Reliability Concerns of Large Power Transformers Large power transformers (LPTs) are critical to the nation's power grid, with more than 90 percent of consumed power passing through high-voltage transformers at some point. LPTs, however, face a number of challenges that make them one of the most vulnerable components on the grid. They are expensive, difficult to

  8. NERSC Implements Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environment Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment NERSC Implements Organizational Changes to Better Address Evolving Data Environment February 23, 2015 Contact: Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, 510-486-5849 Sudip Dosanjh, director of the Department of Energy's National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, announced several organizational changes to help the center's 6,000 users more productively manage their data-intensive research. The changes took effect

  9. Keynote Address to the Western Governors' Association 2016 Annual Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- As Delivered | Department of Energy to the Western Governors' Association 2016 Annual Meeting -- As Delivered Keynote Address to the Western Governors' Association 2016 Annual Meeting -- As Delivered June 14, 2016 - 3:06pm Addthis Secretary Moniz's Keynote Address to the Western Governors' Association 2016 Annual Meeting Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, thank you. I had planned to say how pleased I was to be back with the Western Governors' Association.

  10. Theoretical Studies in Heterogenous Catalysis: Towards a Rational Design of Novel Catalysts for Hydrodesulfurization and Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Liu, P.

    2008-10-01

    Traditionally, knowledge in heterogeneous catalysis has come through empirical research. Nowadays, there is a clear interest to change this since millions of dollars in products are generated every year in the chemical and petrochemical industries through catalytic processes. To obtain a fundamental knowledge of the factors that determine the activity of heterogeneous catalysts is a challenge for modern science since many of these systems are very complex in nature. In principle, when a molecule adsorbs on the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst, it can interact with a large number of bonding sites. It is known that the chemical properties of these bonding sites depend strongly on the chemical environment around them. Thus, there can be big variations in chemical reactivity when going from one region to another in the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst. A main objective is to understand how the structural and electronic properties of a surface affect the energetics for adsorption processes and the paths for dissociation and chemical reactions. In recent years, advances in instrumentation and experimental procedures have allowed a large series of detailed works on the surface chemistry of heterogeneous catalysts. In many cases, these experimental studies have shown interesting and unique phenomena. Theory is needed to unravel the basic interactions behind these phenomena and to provide a general framework for the interpretation of experimental results. Ideally, theoretical calculations based on density-functional theory have evolved to the point that one should be able to predict patterns in the activity of catalytic surfaces. As in the case of experimental techniques, no single theoretical approach is able to address the large diversity of phenomena occurring on a catalyst. Catalytic surfaces are usually modeled using either a finite cluster or a two-dimensionally periodic slab. Many articles have been published comparing the results of these two approaches. An

  11. Reusable Oxidation Catalysis Using Metal-Monocatecholato Species in a Robust Metal–Organic Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Honghan; Shin, JaeWook; Meng, Ying Shirley; Adelhardt, Mario; Sutter, Jörg; Meyer, Karsten; Cohen, Seth M.

    2014-04-02

    An isolated metal-monocatecholato moiety has been achieved in a highly robust metal–organic framework (MOF) by two fundamentally different postsynthetic strategies: postsynthetic deprotection (PSD) and postsynthetic exchange (PSE). Compared with PSD, PSE proved to be a more facile and efficient functionalization approach to access MOFs that could not be directly synthesized under solvothermal conditions. Metalation of the catechol functionality residing in the MOFs resulted in unprecedented Fe-monocatecholato and Cr-monocatecholato species, which were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and ⁵⁷Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. The resulting materials are among the first examples of Zr(IV)-based UiO MOFs (UiO = University of Oslo) with coordinatively unsaturated active metal centers. Importantly, the Cr-metalated MOFs are active and efficient catalysts for the oxidation of alcohols to ketones using a wide range of substrates. Catalysis could be achieved with very low metal loadings (0.5–1 mol %). Unlike zeolite-supported, Cr-exchange oxidation catalysts, the MOF-based catalysts reported here are completely recyclable and reusable, which may make them attractive catalysts for ‘green’ chemistry processes.

  12. Plasma-assisted heterogeneous catalysis for NOx reduction in lean-burn engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Wan, C.Z.; Rice, G.W.; Voss, K.E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper discusses the combination of a plasma with a catalyst to improve the reduction of NO{sub x} under lean-burn conditions. The authors have been investigating the effects of a plasma on the NO{sub x} reduction activity and temperature operating window of various catalytic materials. One of the goals is to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between the gas-phase plasma chemistry and the heterogeneous chemistry on the catalyst surface. The authors have observed that plasma assisted heterogeneous catalysis can facilitate NO{sub x} reduction under conditions that normally make it difficult for either the plasma or the catalyst to function by itself. By systematically varying the plasma electrode and catalyst configuration, they have been able to elucidate the process by which the plasma chemistry affects the chemical reduction of NO{sub x} on the catalyst surface. They have discovered that the main effect of the plasma is to induce the gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO{sub 21}. The reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} is then accomplished by heterogeneous reaction of O with activated hydrocarbons on the catalyst surface. The use of a plasma opens the opportunity for a new class of catalysts that are potentially more durable, more active, more selective and more sulfur-tolerant compared to conventional lean-NO{sub x} catalysts.

  13. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  14. Wind vs. Biofuels: Addressing Climate, Health and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Mark Jacobson

    2007-01-29

    The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.

  15. Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2007-01-29

    The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.

  16. Buckland Students Explore Ways to Address Rural Alaska Energy Challenges |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Buckland Students Explore Ways to Address Rural Alaska Energy Challenges Buckland Students Explore Ways to Address Rural Alaska Energy Challenges May 23, 2016 - 6:03pm Addthis Students pose in front of Buckland’s 10.53-kW solar system used to power the village’s new water plant. Photo from Alison Jech, Buckland School. Students pose in front of Buckland's 10.53-kW solar system used to power the village's new water plant. Photo from Alison Jech, Buckland School.

  17. Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offices | Department of Energy About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Ames Site Office 111 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-9557 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne Site Office 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000 U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office Berkeley

  18. Mailing Addresses for National Laboratories and Technology Centers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mailing Addresses for National Laboratories and Technology Centers Mailing Addresses for National Laboratories and Technology Centers Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center 1450 Queen Ave. SW Albany, OR 97321-2198 541-967-5892 U.S. Department of Energy Ames Laboratory #311 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-2680 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne National Laboratory (East) 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000

  19. Structures of trihydroxynaphthalene reductase-fungicide complexes: implications for structure-based design and catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, D.-I.; Basarab, G.S.; Gatenby, A.A.; Valent, B.; Jordan, D.B.

    2010-03-08

    Trihydroxynaphthalene reductase catalyzes two intermediate steps in the fungal melanin biosynthetic pathway. The enzyme, a typical short-chain dehydrogenase, is the biochemical target of three commercial fungicides. The fungicides bind preferentially to the NADPH form of the enzyme. Three X-ray structures of the Magnaporthe grisea enzyme complexed with NADPH and two commercial and one experimental fungicide were determined at 1.7 {angstrom} (pyroquilon), 2.0 {angstrom} (2,3-dihydro-4-nitro-1H-inden-1-one, 1), and 2.1 {angstrom} (phthalide) resolutions. The chemically distinct inhibitors occupy similar space within the enzyme's active site. The three inhibitors share hydrogen bonds with the side chain hydroxyls of Ser-164 and Tyr-178 via a carbonyl oxygen (pyroquilon and 1) or via a carbonyl oxygen and a ring oxygen (phthalide). Active site residues occupy similar positions among the three structures. A buried water molecule that is hydrogen bonded to the NZ nitrogen of Lys-182 in each of the three structures likely serves to stabilize the cationic form of the residue for participation in catalysis. The pro S hydrogen of NADPH (which is transferred as a hydride to the enzyme's naphthol substrates) is directed toward the carbonyl carbon of the inhibitors that mimic an intermediate along the reaction coordinate. Modeling tetrahydroxynaphthalene and trihydroxynaphthalene in the active site shows steric and electrostatic repulsion between the extra hydroxyl oxygen of the former substrate and the sulfur atom of Met-283 (the C-terminal residue), which accounts, in part, for the 4-fold greater substrate specificity for trihydroxynaphthalene over tetrahydroxynaphthalene.

  20. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Isaccs

    2010-01-08

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  1. Opportunities for Catalysis in The 21st Century. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J. M.; Bercaw, J.

    2002-05-16

    Chemical catalysis affects our lives in myriad ways. Catalysis provides a means of changing the rates at which chemical bonds are formed and broken and of controlling the yields of chemical reactions to increase the amounts of desirable products from these reactions and reduce the amounts of undesirable ones. Thus, it lies at the heart of our quality of life: The reduced emissions of modern cars, the abundance of fresh food at our stores, and the new pharmaceuticals that improve our health are made possible by chemical reactions controlled by catalysts. Catalysis is also essential to a healthy economy: The petroleum, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries, contributors of $500 billion to the gross national product of the United States, rely on catalysts to produce everything from fuels to ''wonder drugs'' to paints to cosmetics. Today, our Nation faces a variety of challenges in creating alternative fuels, reducing harmful by-products in manufacturing, cleaning up the environment and preventing future pollution, dealing with the causes of global warming, protecting citizens from the release of toxic substances and infectious agents, and creating safe pharmaceuticals. Catalysts are needed to meet these challenges, but their complexity and diversity demand a revolution in the way catalysts are designed and used. This revolution can become reality through the application of new methods for synthesizing and characterizing molecular and material systems. Opportunities to understand and predict how catalysts work at the atomic scale and the nanoscale are now appearing, made possible by breakthroughs in the last decade in computation, measurement techniques, and imaging and by new developments in catalyst design, synthesis, and evaluation.

  2. Support for Speakers and Attendees at 2008 GRC Conference Catalysis (to be held at Colby Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire on June 22-27, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart L. Soled and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  3. Plan for addressing issues relating to oil shale plant siting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noridin, J. S.; Donovan, R.; Trudell, L.; Dean, J.; Blevins, A.; Harrington, L. W.; James, R.; Berdan, G.

    1987-09-01

    The Western Research Institute plan for addressing oil shale plant siting methodology calls for identifying the available resources such as oil shale, water, topography and transportation, and human resources. Restrictions on development are addressed: land ownership, land use, water rights, environment, socioeconomics, culture, health and safety, and other institutional restrictions. Descriptions of the technologies for development of oil shale resources are included. The impacts of oil shale development on the environment, socioeconomic structure, water availability, and other conditions are discussed. Finally, the Western Research Institute plan proposes to integrate these topics to develop a flow chart for oil shale plant siting. Western Research Institute has (1) identified relative topics for shale oil plant siting, (2) surveyed both published and unpublished information, and (3) identified data gaps and research needs. 910 refs., 3 figs., 30 tabs.

  4. Agenda: Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Public Meeting on “Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities” On Friday, April 11, 2014, at 10 a.m. in room HVC-215 of the U.S. Capitol, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The meeting will focus on infrastructure vulnerabilities related to the electricity, natural gas and petroleum transmission, storage and distribution systems (TS&D). The meeting will consist of two facilitated panels of experts on identifying and addressing vulnerabilities within the nation’s energy TS&D infrastructure. Following the panels, an opportunity will be provided for public comment via an open microphone session.

  5. Briefing Memo: Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U. S. Department of Energy Public Meeting on “Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities” On Friday, April 11, 2014, at 10 a.m. in room HVC-215 of the U.S. Capitol, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The meeting will focus on infrastructure vulnerabilities related to the electricity, natural gas and petroleum transmission, storage and distribution systems (TS&D). The meeting will consist of two facilitated panels of experts on identifying and addressing vulnerabilities within the nation’s energy TS&D infrastructure. Following the panels, an opportunity will be provided for public comment via an open microphone session.

  6. Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy Stakeholders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy investments are tapping a vast resource of clean, baseload energy from the earth's heat, according to Douglas Hollett, Program Manager for the Department's Geothermal Technologies Office. Hollett addressed over 1,000 this week at the annual conference of the Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) in Reno, Nevadathe industry's largest annual gathering of geothermal energy stakeholders in the nation.

  7. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments by the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel | Department of Energy Smart Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel The Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel ("OCC") hereby submits the following comments in response to the United States Department of Energy ("DOE") Request for Information

  8. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to smart grid Implementation:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eMeter Response to Department of Energy RFI | Department of Energy smart grid Implementation: eMeter Response to Department of Energy RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to smart grid Implementation: eMeter Response to Department of Energy RFI eMeter is a smart grid software company that provides smart network application platform (SNAP) software to integrate smart meters and smart grid communications networks and devices with utility IT systems. eMeter also provides smart grid

  9. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Room 8H033 Washington, DC 20585 Submitted electronically via smartgridpolicy@hq.doe.gov Smart Grid Request for Information: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy The Alliance to Save Energy (the Alliance) thanks the Department of Energy for the opportunity to comment on broad issues of policy and logistical challenges faced in smart grid implementation. The Alliance to Save

  10. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Edison Electric Institute | Department of Energy Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute The Edison Electric Institute ("EEI"), on behalf of its member companies, hereby submits the following comments in response to the request by the Department of Energy ("DOE" or "Department") for information on a wide range of issues dealing with Smart

  11. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Alliance to Save Energy. | Department of Energy Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. The Alliance to Save Energy is a coalition of prominent business, government, environmental, and consumer leaders who promote the efficient use of energy worldwide to benefit consumers, the environment, economy, and national security. The Alliance to Save Energy (the Alliance) thanks the

  12. Community Leaders to Address Energy Solutions Through Leadership Program -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Releases | NREL Community Leaders to Address Energy Solutions Through Leadership Program May 16, 2007 Thirteen local community leaders were chosen to join the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Executive Energy Leadership program. Energy Execs will participate in monthly educational sessions covering topics such as solar technology, wind energy and transportation of the future. Sessions will include an in depth look at future markets and

  13. NEW APPROACH TO ADDRESSING GAS GENERATION IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R; Leduc, D; Askew, N

    2009-06-25

    Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) document why the transportation of radioactive material is safe in Type A(F) and Type B shipping containers. The content evaluation of certain actinide materials require that the gas generation characteristics be addressed. Most packages used to transport actinides impose extremely restrictive limits on moisture content and oxide stabilization to control or prevent flammable gas generation. These requirements prevent some users from using a shipping container even though the material to be shipped is fully compliant with the remaining content envelope including isotopic distribution. To avoid these restrictions, gas generation issues have to be addressed on a case by case basis rather than a one size fits all approach. In addition, SARP applicants and review groups may not have the knowledge and experience with actinide chemistry and other factors affecting gas generation, which facility experts in actinide material processing have obtained in the last sixty years. This paper will address a proposal to create a Gas Generation Evaluation Committee to evaluate gas generation issues associated with Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging material contents. The committee charter could include reviews of both SARP approved contents and new contents not previously evaluated in a SARP.

  14. Imulation of polymer forming processes - addressing industrial needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibault, F.; DiRaddo, R. [Industrial Materials Institute-National Research Council (Canada)

    2011-05-04

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of simulation and design optimization capabilities, for polymer forming processes, in the context of addressing industrial needs. Accomplishments generated from close to twenty years of research in this field, at the National Research Council (NRC), are presented. Polymer forming processes such as extrusion blow moulding, stretch blow moulding and thermoforming have been the focus of the work, yet the research is extendable to similar polymer forming operations such as micro-blow moulding, sheet blow moulding and composites stamping. The research considers material models, process sequence integration and design optimization, derivative processes and 3D finite elements with multi-body contact.

  15. Content-addressable memory based enforcement of configurable policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Michael J

    2014-05-06

    A monitoring device for monitoring transactions on a bus includes content-addressable memory ("CAM") and a response policy unit. The CAM includes an input coupled to receive a bus transaction tag based on bus traffic on the bus. The CAM stores data tags associated with rules of a security policy to compare the bus transaction tag to the data tags. The CAM generates an output signal indicating whether one or more matches occurred. The response policy unit is coupled to the CAM to receive the output signal from the CAM and to execute a policy action in response to the output signal.

  16. A novel electron gun with an independently addressable cathode array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Pea, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.

    2006-08-01

    The design of a novel electron gun with an array of independently addressable cathode elements is presented. Issues relating to operation in a 6.5 Tesla axial magnetic field are discussed. Simulations with the TriComp [1] electromagnetic field code that were used to determine the space charge limited tube characteristic and to model focusing of the electron beam in the magnetic field are reviewed. Foil heating and stress calculations are discussed. The results of CYLTRAN [2] simulations yielding the energy spectrum of the electron beam and the current transmitted through the foil window are presented.

  17. CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CONTRACTOR AND ADDRESS COEPPRACT FOR: TERM: COMMT.SSION OBLIGATION PAYMENT TO m MADE BY: CONTRACT NO. AT(30-l)-1247 CONTRACT pl AMERICAN MACHINE Ah'D FOUNDRY COMP'N' Second Avenue and 56th Street Brooklyn, New York MA$HR\?No AND OTHER WORK AND SERVICES August o' 19% to December 31 9 0 'lyj! 512O,ox).OO Division of Disbursement, United States Treasury Department,' New York, New York. Subn-it invoices to: United States Atomic Energy Corrcni&ion, P. 0. %x 30, Ansonia Station New York 23, l!tw

  18. Recent NRC research activities addressing valve and pump issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, D.L.

    1996-12-01

    The mission of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is to ensure the safe design, construction, and operation of commercial nuclear power plants and other facilities in the U.S.A. One of the main roles that the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES) plays in achieving the NRC mission is to plan, recommend, and implement research programs that address safety and technical issues deemed important by the NRC. The results of the research activities provide the bases for developing NRC positions or decisions on these issues. Also, RES performs confirmatory research for developing the basis to evaluate industry responses and positions on various regulatory requirements. This presentation summarizes some recent RES supported research activities that have addressed safety and technical issues related to valves and pumps. These activities include the efforts on determining valve and motor-operator responses under dynamic loads and pressure locking events, evaluation of monitoring equipment, and methods for detecting and trending aging of check valves and pumps. The role that RES is expected to play in future years to fulfill the NRC mission is also discussed.

  19. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, D. Kent

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  20. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  1. Network Security Mechanisms Utilizing Dynamic Network Address Translation LDRD Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PRICE, CARRIE M.; STANTON, ERIC; LEE, ERIK J.; MICHALSKI, JOHN T.; CHUA, KUAN SEAH; WONG, YIP HENG; TAN, CHUNG PHENG

    2002-11-01

    A new protocol technology is just starting to emerge from the laboratory environment. Its stated purpose is to provide an additional means in which networks, and the services that reside on them, can be protected from adversarial compromise. This report has a two-fold objective. First is to provide the reader with an overview of this emerging Dynamic Defenses technology using Dynamic Network Address Translation (Dynat). This ''structure overview'' is concentrated in the body of the report, and describes the important attributes of the technology. The second objective is to provide a framework that can be used to help in the classification and assessment of the different types of dynamic defense technologies along with some related capabilities and limitations. This information is primarily contained in the appendices.

  2. Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-28

    Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

  3. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfones are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.

  4. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O.

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  5. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable β-keto sulfonesmore » are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.« less

  6. Fundamental Understanding of the Interaction of Acid Gases with CeO2 : From Surface Science to Practical Catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tumuluri, Uma; Rother, Gernot; Wu, Zili

    2016-03-21

    Acid gases including CO2, SO2, and NOx are ubiquitous in large-scale energy applications including heterogeneous catalysis. The adverse environmental and health effects of these acid gases have resulted in high interest in the research and development of technologies to remove or convert these acid gases. The main challenge for the development of these technologies is to develop catalysts that are highly efficient, stable, and cost-effective, and many catalysts have been reported in this regard. CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have gained prominence in the removal and conversion of CO2, SO2, and NOx because of their structural robustness and redox and acid–basemore » properties. In this article, we provide a brief overview of the application of CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts for the removal of CO2, SO2, and NOx gases with an emphasis on the fundamental understanding of the interactions of these acid gases with CeO2. The studies summarized in this review range from surface science using single crystals and thin films with precise crystallographic planes to practical catalysis applications of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline CeO2 materials with defects and dopants. After an introduction to the properties of CeO2 surfaces, their catalytic properties for conversions of different acid gases are reviewed and discussed. Lastly, we find that the surface atomic structure, oxygen vacancies, and surface acid–base properties of CeO2 play vital roles in the surface chemistry and structure evolution during the interactions of acid gases with CeO2 and CeO2-based catalysts.« less

  7. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  8. Software programs that address site-specific inventory characteristics issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dare, J. H.; Cournoyer, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The proper characterization of Hazardous, Mixed Low-Level, and Mixed Transuranic waste enhances productivity and safety. Hazardous material criteria that need to be considered include physical and health hazards inherent to the waste stream. Other factors that may influence characterization include: particulate diameter, complexing or chelating agent properties, lead, and mercury content, pressurized containers, and P-listed wastes. To meet these requirements are only a simple matter of generating a database with the proper fields. Manufactures and institutional databases bank huge sources of information, such as, work control documents, substance identification, container types, components of mixtures, physical property data, and regulatory data. In this report, utilization of commercially available software programs to take advantage of these resources in addressing waste characterization issues are presented. The application of user-friendly programs eliminates part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of certifying to general waste acceptance criteria with minimal impact on programmatic work. In other words, tapping into manufacturer and institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of these resources in managing a cost effective waste certification program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program.

  9. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore » the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  10. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO₂ emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  11. Addressing the Need for Independence in the CSE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Ferragut, Erik M; Sheldon, Frederick T; Grimaila, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information system security risk, defined as the product of the monetary losses associated with security incidents and the probability that they occur, is a suitable decision criterion when considering different information system architectures. Risk assessment is the widely accepted process used to understand, quantify, and document the effects of undesirable events on organizational objectives so that risk management, continuity of operations planning, and contingency planning can be performed. One technique, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES), is a methodology for estimating security costs to stakeholders as a function of possible risk postures. In earlier works, we presented a computational infrastructure that allows an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the loss that each stakeholder stands to sustain, as a result of security breakdowns. Additional work has applied CSES to specific business cases. The current state-of-the-art of CSES addresses independent events. In typical usage, analysts create matrices that capture their expert opinion, and then use those matrices to quantify costs to stakeholders. This expansion generalizes CSES to the common real-world case where events may be dependent.

  12. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mark J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Eddlemon, Gerald K.

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nations waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in other

  13. Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Rashmi; Shah, Nihar; Phadke, Amol

    2012-07-01

    Evaporative coolers (ECs) provide significant gains in energy efficiency compared to vapor compression air conditioners, but simultaneously have significant onsite water demand. This can be a major barrier to deployment in areas of the world with hot and arid climates. To address this concern, this study determined where in the world evaporative cooling is suitable, the water consumption of ECs in these cities, and the potential that greywater can be used reduce the consumption of potable water in ECs. ECs covered 69percent of the cities where room air conditioners are may be deployed, based on comfort conditions alone. The average water consumption due to ECs was found to be 400 L/household/day in the United States and Australia, with the potential for greywater to provide 50percent this amount. In the rest of the world, the average water consumption was 250 L/household/day, with the potential for greywater to supply 80percent of this amount. Home size was the main factor that contributed to this difference. In the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Northern India, and the Midwestern and Southwestern United States alkalinity levels are high and water used for bleeding will likely contribute significantly to EC water consumption. Although technically feasible, upfront costs for household GW systems are currently high. In both developed and developing parts of the world, however, a direct EC and GW system is cost competitive with conventional vapor compression air conditioners. Moreover, in regions of the world that face problems of water scarcity the benefits can substantially outweigh the costs.

  14. Addressing Fission Product Validation in MCNP Burnup Credit Criticality Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Don; Bowen, Douglas G; Marshall, William BJ J

    2015-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3 in September 2012. This ISG provides guidance for NRC staff members’ review of burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and dry storage of pressurized water reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in casks. The ISG includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MAs). Based on previous work documented in NRC Regulatory Guide (NUREG) Contractor Report (CR)-7109, the ISG recommends that NRC staff members accept the use of either 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth—in addition to bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF—to conservatively account for the bias and bias uncertainty associated with the specified unvalidated FP&MAs. The ISG recommends (1) use of 1.5% of the FP&MA worth if a modern version of SCALE and its nuclear data are used and (2) 3% of the FP&MA worth for well qualified, industry standard code systems other than SCALE with the Evaluated Nuclear Data Files, Part B (ENDF/B),-V, ENDF/B-VI, or ENDF/B-VII cross sections libraries. The work presented in this paper provides a basis for extending the use of the 1.5% of the FP&MA worth bias to BUC criticality calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code. The extended use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias is shown to be acceptable by comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII–based nuclear data. The comparison supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when the MCNP code is used for criticality calculations, provided that the cask design is similar to the hypothetical generic BUC-32 cask model and that the credited FP&MA worth is no more than 0.1 Δkeff (ISG-8, Rev. 3, Recommendation 4).

  15. Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge EM's Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge addresses mercury contamination, and advocates for research and technology development to resolve key technical uncertainties with the pollutant in environmental remediation, facility deactivation and decommissioning, and tank waste processing. Technology Plan to Address the EM Mercury Challenge (5.55 MB) More Documents & Publications

  16. High-Potential Electrocatalytic O2 Reduction with Nitroxyl / NOx Mediators: Implications for Fuel Cells and Aerobic Oxidation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerken, James B.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2015-07-15

    Efficient reduction of O2 to water is a central challenge in energy conversion and aerobic oxidation catalysis. In the present study, we investigate the electrochemical reduction of O2 with soluble organic nitroxyl and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mediators. When used alone, neither organic nitroxyls, such as TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyl-N-oxyl), nor NOx species, such as sodium nitrite, are effective mediators of electrochemical O2 reduction. The combination of nitroxyl/NOx species, however, mediates sustained O2 reduction at electrochemical potentials of 0.19–0.33 V (vs. Fc/Fc+) in acetonitrile containing trifluoroacetic acid. Mechanistic analysis of the coupled redox reactions supports a process in which the nitrogen oxide catalyst drives aerobic oxidation of a nitroxyl mediator to an oxoammonium species, which then is reduced back to the nitroxyl at the cathode. The electrolysis potential is dictated by the oxoammonium/nitroxyl reduction potential. The high potentials observed with this ORR system benefit from the mechanism-based specificity for four-electron reduction of oxygen to water mediated by NOx species, together with kinetically efficient reduction of oxidized NOx species by TEMPO and other organic nitroxyls. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  17. Join @Energy for the 2015 State of the Union Address | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Join @Energy for the 2015 State of the Union Address Join @Energy for the 2015 State of the Union Address January 20, 2015 - 12:08pm Addthis Join us for live coverage of the State...

  18. AMO Deputy Director Addresses Water-Energy Nexus at 2016 Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Deputy Director Addresses Water-Energy Nexus at 2016 Energy Efficiency Global Forum AMO Deputy Director Addresses Water-Energy Nexus at 2016 Energy Efficiency Global Forum May 20, ...

  19. U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to an error when processing Novell Address Book (".nab") files and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via an overly long email address.

  20. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. DOE PETC third quarterly report, February 25, 1994--May 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    Environmental concerns are leading to the replacement of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline by high-octane-number branched paraffins and oxygenated compounds such as methyl t-butyl ether. The ether is produced from methanol and isobutylene, and the latter can be formed from n-butane by isomerization followed by dehydrogenation. Paraffin isomerization reactions are catalyzed by very strong acids such as aluminum chloride supported on alumina. The aluminum chloride-containing catalysts are corrosive, and their disposal is expensive. Alternatively, hydroisomerization is catalyzed by zeolite-supported metals at high temperatures, but high temperatures do not favor branched products at equilibrium. Thus there is a need for improved catalysts and processes for the isomerization of n-butane and other straight-chain paraffins. Consequently, researchers have sought for solid acids that are noncorrosive and active enough to catalyze isomerization of paraffins at low temperatures. For example, sulfated zirconia catalyzes isomerization of n-butane at temperatures as low as 25{degrees}C. The addition of iron and manganese promoters has been reported to increase the activity of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization by three orders of magnitude. Although the high activity of this catalyst is now established, the reaction network is not known, and the mechanism has not been investigated. The goal of this work is to investigate low-temperature reactions of light paraffins catalyzed by solid superacids of the sulfated zirconia type. The present report is concerned with catalysis of n-butane conversion catalyzed by the Fe- and Mn- promoted sulfated zirconia described in the previous report in this series.

  1. Addressing Cybersecurity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the private sector to develop better cybersecurity tools, introducing quantum mechanics. March 17, 2016 locks Los Alamos National Lab partners with the private sector to ...

  2. Keynote Address

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) FY 2013 Budget Request - 5.65B * ... Waste * West Valley Site, New York * Babcock and Wilcox facility, Virginia * Idaho National ...

  3. 5-address

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pHmore » values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  5. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pH values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper

  6. NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation. September 10, 2009 | Department of Energy NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation. September 10, 2009 NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation. September 10, 2009 The Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) is pleased to provide comments on how to address the numerous challenges facing the development and deployment of smart grid technologies. Smart grid is a more robust application of

  7. U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference | Department of Energy Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference September 19, 2011 - 4:48pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu addressed the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference today in Vienna. Opening with a message from President Barack Obama, Secretary Chu highlighted the importance of safety and security in the nuclear

  8. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies | Department of Energy Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies January 25, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman will give the keynote address at the 4th annual IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies (ISGT 2013) on

  9. Response to Request for Information titled "Addressing Policy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation" | Department of Energy to Request for Information titled "Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation" Response to Request for Information titled "Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation" Response to Request for Information titled "Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation." urrent smart grid initiatives are

  10. GREET Model Expanded to Better Address Biofuel Life-Cycle Analysis Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Questions | Department of Energy GREET Model Expanded to Better Address Biofuel Life-Cycle Analysis Research Questions GREET Model Expanded to Better Address Biofuel Life-Cycle Analysis Research Questions November 23, 2015 - 2:57pm Addthis GREET Model Expanded to Better Address Biofuel Life-Cycle Analysis Research Questions The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model allows researchers and analysts to fully evaluate the energy and emission

  11. President Obama Praises NAMII in State of the Union Address | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy President Obama Praises NAMII in State of the Union Address President Obama Praises NAMII in State of the Union Address October 10, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis A view of additive manufacturing machines at the NAMII facility in Youngstown, Ohio. Photo credit: National Additive Manufacturing Institute. A view of additive manufacturing machines at the NAMII facility in Youngstown, Ohio. Photo credit: National Additive Manufacturing Institute. In his 2013 State of the Union address, President

  12. DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Conference | Department of Energy to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management Conference DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management Conference January 31, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis David Sheeley David Sheeley Editor/Writer PHOENIX - EM and the DOE Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) are working to address barriers that hinder small businesses from competing for prime

  13. U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Conference | Department of Energy Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency General Conference September 19, 2011 - 2:24pm Addthis VIENNA, AUSTRIA - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu addressed the International Atomic Energy Agency's General Conference today in Vienna. Opening with a message from President Barack Obama, Secretary Chu highlighted the importance of safety and security in

  14. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reliability, flexibility, and efficiency of our electric grid. PDF icon GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges More Documents & ...

  15. Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy RFI Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

  16. Genes and Genomics for Improving Energy Crops (Keynote Address - 2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pennell, Roger

    2011-04-28

    Roger Pennell, Vice President of Trait Development at Ceres, Inc., delivers a keynote address at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting on March 25, 2010

  17. Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL and UW collaboration in evaluating and developing RCCI operation in fully built multi-cylinder engine to address hardware, aftertreatment, and control challenges PDF icon ...

  18. Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at ISC High performance conference in Germany - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia ... Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in Germany Home...

  19. Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tungsten impurity transport experiments in Alcator C-Mod to address high priority research and development for ITER Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tungsten impurity ...

  20. Keynote Address: Cristin Dorgelo, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cristin Dorgelo, Assistant Director of Grand Challenges for The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy will deliver a keynote address.

  1. U-237: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis PROBLEM: Mozilla Firefox CVE-2012-1950 Address Bar URI Spoofing Vulnerability PLATFORM: Version(s): Mozilla Firefox 6 - 12 ABSTRACT: To exploit this issue, an attacker...

  2. The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy...

  3. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. DOE PETC seventh quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-02-01

    Iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is a catalyst for the conversion of propane, but the rate of conversion of propane is much less than the rate of conversion of butane. Whereas this catalyst appears to be a good candidate for practical, industrial conversion of butane, it appears to lack sufficient activity for practical conversion of propane. The propane conversion data reported here provide excellent insights into the chemistry of the catalytic conversion. Solid and catalysts, namely, sulfated zirconia, iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia, and USY zeolite, were tested for conversion of propane at 1 atm, 200-450{degrees}C, and propane partial pressures in the range of 0.01-0.05 atm. Both promoted and unpromoted sulfated zirconia were found to be active for conversion of propane into butanes, pentanes, methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene in the temperature range of 200-350{degrees}C, but catalyst deactivation was rapid. At the higher temperatures, only cracking and dehydrogenation products were observed. In contrast to the zirconia-supported catalysts, USY zeolite was observed to convert propane (into propylene, methane, and ethylene) only at temperatures {ge}400{degrees}C. The initial (5 min on stream) rates of propane conversion in the presence of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia, sulfated zirconia, and USY zeolite at 450{degrees}C and 0.01 atm propane partial pressure were 3.3 x 10{sup -8}, 0.3 x 10{sup -8}, and 0.06 x 10{sup -8} mol/(s{center_dot}g), respectively. The product distributions in the temperature range 200-450{degrees}C are those of acid-base catalysis, being similar to what has been observed in superacid solution chemistry at temperatures <0{degrees}C. If propane conversion at 450{degrees}C can be considered as a probe of acid strength of the catalyst, the activity comparison suggests that the promoted sulfated zirconia is a stronger acid than sulfated zirconia, which is a stronger acid than USY zeolite.

  4. Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations | Department of Energy to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations Memorandum from the Electricity Advisory Committee to Secretary Chu and Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman on recommendations to

  5. U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Issues Solicitation to Address the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy-Water Nexus | Department of Energy Clean Energy Research Center Issues Solicitation to Address the Energy-Water Nexus U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Issues Solicitation to Address the Energy-Water Nexus March 4, 2015 - 4:31pm Addthis News Media Contact 202 586 4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center Issues Solicitation to Address the Energy-Water Nexus WASHINGTON - Today the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a $12.5 million Funding Opportunity

  6. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges. | Department of Energy RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal's core technology is the ability to understand the access control of the network as a whole - not simply the behavior of a single device. RedSeal analyzes the interactions of firewalls,

  7. April 30, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting to address training - Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HSS/UNION MEETING TO ADDRESS TRAINING INTEGRATED EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND FINAL ACTION LIST HSS and the labor unions who participated in the initial 2007 HSS Focus Group meetings agreed to a path forward in which various unions combined to form core working groups to address union identified issues by topical area. The following is a synthesis of actions/activities identified in the April 30 HSS/Union meeting to address training issues with focus in the areas of the development of DOE-wide HAMMER

  8. Design, Synthesis and Mechanistic Evaluation of Iron-Based Catalysis for Synthesis Gas Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akio Ishikawa; Manuel Ojeda; Nan Yao; Enrique Iglesia

    2007-03-31

    seventh reporting period, we have explored several methods to modify the silanol groups on SiO{sub 2} by using either a homogeneous deposition-precipitation method or surface titration of Si-OH on SiO{sub 2} with zirconium (IV) ethoxide to prevent the formation of unreducible and unreactive CoO{sub x} species during synthesis and FTS catalysis. We have synthesized monometallic Co/ZrO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} catalysts with different Co loadings (11-20 wt%) by incipient wetness impregnation methods and characterized the prepared Co supported catalysts by H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR) and H{sub 2}-chemisorption. We have measured the catalytic performance in FTS reactions and shown that although the hydroxyl groups on the SiO{sub 2} surface are difficult to be fully titrated by ZrO{sub 2}, modification of ZrO{sub 2} on SiO{sub 2} surface can improve the Co clusters dispersion and lead to a larger number of exposed Co surface atoms after reduction and during FTS reactions. During this seventh reporting period, we have also advanced our development of the reaction mechanism proposed in the previous reporting period. Specifically, we have shown that our novel proposal for the pathways involved in CO activation on Fe and Co catalysts is consistent with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations carried out in collaboration with Prof. Manos Mavrikakis (University of Wisconsin-Madison). Finally, we have also worked on the preparation of several manuscripts describing our findings about the preparation, activation and mechanism of the FTS with Fe-based catalysts and we have started redacting the final report for this project.

  9. Second Five-Year Plan to Address Uranium Contamination in the Navajo Nation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies recently completed a second Five-Year Plan to address uranium contamination on the Navajo Nation, which follows a progress report on the first plan that was initiated in January...

  10. Energy levels of the electrons localized over the surface of an inert film with address electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrin, A. B.

    2013-03-15

    The problem of searching for the potential energy and the energy spectrum of the electrons localized over the surface of a thin liquid or solid inert film due to address electrodes placed under the film is considered.

  11. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal's core technology is the ability to understand the access control of the network as a ...

  12. APRIL 30, 2008, HSS/UNION MEETING TO ADDRESS TRAINING INTEGRATED...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Draft 05-15-08 HSSUnion Meeting To Address 10 CFR 851 and DOE Safety Standards Implementation July 17, 2008 Integrated Executive Summary and Final Action List HSS and the labor ...

  13. Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Argonne Site Office Jacquelyn York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Brookhaven Site ...

  14. U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is vulnerable to an exploit where a malformed address book could cause heap memory corruption, which could lead to remote code execution under the privilege of the user that...

  15. Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy Upgrade Technical Challenges: HVAC, Envelope and IAQ (301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy Upgrade Technical Challenges: HVAC, Envelope and IAQ (301), call slides and discussion summary.

  16. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-07

    AMO is developing advanced technologies that cut energy use and carbon emissions in some of the most energy-intensive processes within U.S. manufacturing. The brochure describes the AMO R&D projects that address these challenges.

  17. Oil and Gas Company Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu http www adnoc ae default aspx Al Furat Petroleum Company Al Furat...

  18. U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy Development/Wildlife Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is leading a new International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task to address concerns about the environmental effects of wind energy technology.

  19. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Logistical Challenges. | Department of Energy York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. In response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information regarding smart grid implementation listed in the September 17, 2010 Federal Register, the New York Independent System Operator, Inc. (NYISO) offers the attached white paper entitled

  20. GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges GridWise Alliance: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The GridWise Alliance is a coalition of over 150 companies, organizations, and academic institutions advocating for a smart grid for a more sustainable future. We are consensus-driven and technology neutral and do not advocate for specific platforms or technologies, but, rather, for policies that will

  1. President Bush Highlights Energy in the State of the Union Address |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Highlights Energy in the State of the Union Address President Bush Highlights Energy in the State of the Union Address February 3, 2005 - 10:01am Addthis "To keep our economy growing, we also need reliable supplies of affordable, environmentally responsible energy. Nearly four years ago, I submitted a comprehensive energy strategy that encourages conservation, alternative sources, a modernized electricity grid, and more production here at home -- including safe,

  2. Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation | Department of Energy Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation The Galvin Electricity Initiative, a non-profit organization, has dedicated its resources to researching and developing both prototypes and policy reforms

  3. Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy and Logistical Challenges | Department of Energy Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Smart Grid Consortium, Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges It represents a unique public-private partnership of largely New York State utilities, authorities, universities, industrial companies, and institutions and research organizations which came together in a collaborative manner to facilitate

  4. April 30, 2008; HSS/Union Working Group Meeting to address training … Meeting Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * * training. * area discussed. Center (NTC) National Training Center. * * * Conduct of Meeting. A 1. 2. 3. 4. HAMMER. HSS/UNION MEETING TO ADDRESS TRAINING DRAFT MEETING SUMMARY Introductory Remarks. Glenn Podonsky made the following points: More than a dialogue, the intent of HSS is to participate in a productive manner, to develop working relationships with the unions, to work the issues, identify actions, and institutionalize a process for addressing and resolving issues to improve worker

  5. Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges In light of the fact that smart grid deployments are moving forward with pace and at scale, DRSG advises the DOE against seeking to redefine the term "smart grid" as a semantic exercise, as such an effort would introduce delay, generate uncertainty, and likely prove counterproductive. DOE Smart

  6. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involving the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.

  7. Substrate-Assisted Catalysis in the Reaction Catalyzed by Salicylic Acid Binding Protein 2 (SABP2), a Potential Mechanism of Substrate Discrimination for Some Promiscuous Enzymes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Guo, Haobo; Chaiprasongsuk, Minta; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Feng; Yang, Xiaohan; Guo, Hong

    2015-08-05

    Although one of an enzyme’s hallmarks is the high specificity for their natural substrates, substrate promiscuity has been reported more frequently. We know that promiscuous enzymes generally show different catalytic efficiencies to different substrates, but our understanding of the origin of such differences is still lacking. We report the results of quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations and an experimental study of salicylic acid binding protein 2 (SABP2). SABP2 has promiscuous esterase activity toward a series of substrates but shows a high activity toward its natural substrate, methyl salicylate (MeSA). Finally, our results demonstrate that this enzyme may use substrate-assisted catalysis involvingmore » the hydroxyl group from MeSA to enhance the activity and achieve substrate discrimination.« less

  8. Reprogrammable read only variable threshold transistor memory with isolated addressing buffer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lodi, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    A monolithic integrated circuit, fully decoded memory comprises a rectangular array of variable threshold field effect transistors organized into a plurality of multi-bit words. Binary address inputs to the memory are decoded by a field effect transistor decoder into a plurality of word selection lines each of which activates an address buffer circuit. Each address buffer circuit, in turn, drives a word line of the memory array. In accordance with the word line selected by the decoder the activated buffer circuit directs reading or writing voltages to the transistors comprising the memory words. All of the buffer circuits additionally are connected to a common terminal for clearing all of the memory transistors to a predetermined state by the application to the common terminal of a large magnitude voltage of a predetermined polarity. The address decoder, the buffer and the memory array, as well as control and input/output control and buffer field effect transistor circuits, are fabricated on a common substrate with means provided to isolate the substrate of the address buffer transistors from the remainder of the substrate so that the bulk clearing function of simultaneously placing all of the memory transistors into a predetermined state can be performed.

  9. Addressing environmental justice under the National Environment Policy Act at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, T.M.; Bleakly, D.R.

    1997-04-01

    Under Executive Order 12898, Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations, the Department of Energy (DOE) and Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico (SNL) are required to identify and address, as appropriate, disproportionately high, adverse human health or environmental effects of their activities on minority and low-income populations. The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) also requires that environmental justice issues be identified and addressed. This presents a challenge for SNL because it is located in a culturally diverse area. Successfully addressing potential impacts is contingent upon accurately identifying them through objective analysis of demographic information. However, an effective public participation process, which is necessarily subjective, is also needed to understand the subtle nuances of diverse populations that can contribute to a potential impact, yet are not always accounted for in a strict demographic profile. Typically, there is little or no coordination between these two disparate processes. This report proposes a five-step method for reconciling these processes and uses a hypothetical case study to illustrate the method. A demographic analysis and community profile of the population within 50 miles of SNL were developed to support the environmental justice analysis process and enhance SNL`s NEPA and public involvement programs. This report focuses on developing a methodology for identifying potentially impacted populations. Environmental justice issues related to worker exposures associated with SNL activities will be addressed in a separate report.

  10. Fast nanoscale addressability of nitrogen-vacancy spins via coupling to a dynamic ferromagnetic vortex

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolf, M. S.; Badea, R.; Berezovsky, J.

    2016-06-14

    The core of a ferromagnetic vortex domain creates a strong, localized magnetic field, which can be manipulated on nanosecond timescales, providing a platform for addressing and controlling individual nitrogen-vacancy centre spins in diamond at room temperature, with nanometre-scale resolution. Here, we show that the ferromagnetic vortex can be driven into proximity with a nitrogen-vacancy defect using small applied magnetic fields, inducing significant nitrogen-vacancy spin splitting. We also find that the magnetic field gradient produced by the vortex is sufficient to address spins separated by nanometre-length scales. By applying a microwave-frequency magnetic field, we drive both the vortex and the nitrogen-vacancymore » spins, resulting in enhanced coherent rotation of the spin state. Lastly, we demonstrate that by driving the vortex on fast timescales, sequential addressing and coherent manipulation of spins is possible on ~ 100 ns timescales.« less

  11. Join @Energy for the 2016 State of the Union Address | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    @Energy for the 2016 State of the Union Address Join @Energy for the 2016 State of the Union Address January 11, 2016 - 11:10am Addthis Join us for live coverage of the State of the Union, starting at 9PM ET on Tuesday. | Image courtesy of Carly Wilkins. Join us for live coverage of the State of the Union, starting at 9PM ET on Tuesday. | Image courtesy of Carly Wilkins. Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Follow along with

  12. Keynote Address to the American Council on Renewable Energy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Address to the American Council on Renewable Energy Keynote Address to the American Council on Renewable Energy June 20, 2007 - 2:07pm Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman Thank you, Michael, for that introduction and thank you all for coming. It is good to be in New York, back among the financial community. For those of you who don't know, when I left M.I.T - where I taught chemical engineering - to enter the business world I started out as a venture

  13. Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engine | Department of Energy Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine ORNL and UW collaboration in evaluating and developing RCCI operation in fully built multi-cylinder engine to address hardware, aftertreatment, and control challenges deer11_wagner.pdf (7.69 MB) More Documents & Publications High Efficiency Clean Combustion in Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Engines High Efficiency

  14. Keck Institute for Space Studies "Addressing the MARS ISRU Challenge"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Workshop - JCAP Keck Institute for Space Studies "Addressing the MARS ISRU Challenge" Workshop Keck Institute for Space Studies "Addressing the MARS ISRU Challenge" Workshop Tue, Jun 28, 2016 3:30pm 15:30 Fri, Jul 1, 2016 4:30pm 16:30 California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA USA Members of JCAP and JPL helped co-organize a workshop on the "production of oxygen and fuel from CO2 using sunlight", which was held at Caltech from June 28-July 1. More

  15. Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Earth and Other Critical Materials | Department of Energy Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials January 9, 2013 - 12:13pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy announced today that a team led by Ames Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has been selected for an award of up to $120

  16. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Smart Grid Technologies | Department of Energy Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies February 12, 2013 - 3:53pm Addthis DOE's Office of Electricy Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) issued a notice of an open meeting on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 (9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET) of the smart grid data privacy multi-stakeholder

  17. DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announce a funding opportunity in the area of renewable hydrogen technology research and development, specifically addressing discovery and development of advanced materials systems and chemical proceesses for direct photochemical and/or thermochemical water splitting for application in the solar production of hydrogen fuel.

  18. Energy Department Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman Addresses 2011 FERC Reliability Technical Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Patricia Hoffman today addressed the 2011 Federal Energy Regulatory Commission technical conference in Washington, D.C. In remarks prepared for delivery, Assistant Secretary Hoffman discussed recent evaluations of proposed Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) rules and the impact those rules could be expected to have on our nation’s electrical grid.

  19. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  20. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2009-07-14

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  1. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2009-07-14

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  2. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  3. Materials Data on H4BrN (SG:215) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on S4(BrN)3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Addressing the Manufacturing Issues Associated with the use of Ceramic Materials for Diesel Engine Components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSpadden, SB

    2001-09-12

    This CRADA supports the objective of selecting appropriate ceramic materials for manufacturing several diesel engine components and addressing critical manufacturing issues associated with these components. Materials that were evaluated included several varieties of silicon nitride and stabilized zirconia. The critical manufacturing issues that were addressed included evaluation of the effect of grain size and the effect of the grinding process on mechanical properties, mechanical performance, reliability, and expected service life. The CRADA comprised four tasks: (1) Machining of Zirconia and Silicon Nitride Materials; (2) Mechanical Properties Characterization and Performance Testing; (3) Tribological Studies; and (4) Residual Stress Studies. Using instrumented equipment at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) Machining and Inspection Research User Center (MIRUC), zirconia and silicon nitride materials were ground into simulated component geometries. These components were subsequently evaluated for mechanical properties, wear, and residual stress characteristics in tasks two, three, and four.

  6. Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy Upgrade Technical Challenges: HVAC, Envelope & IAQ (301)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exchange Call Series: Opportunities for Building America Research to Address Energy Upgrade Technical Challenges: HVAC, Envelope & IAQ (301) July 21, 2015 Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda  Call Logistics and Introductions  Opening Polls  Residential Network and Peer Exchange Call Overview  Introduction to Building America Technology to Market Roadmaps  Eric Werling, Building America Program Director, DOE Building Technologies Office  Questions, Discussion, and

  7. Jackie Chen to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Germany to give keynote address at ISC High performance conference in Germany - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing

  8. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) appreciates the opportunity to provide comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on this Request for Information (RFI) regarding the policy and logistical challenges of the smart grid. 75 Fed. Reg. 57006 (Sept. 17, 2010). INTRODUCTION NARUC is the national organization of State commissions responsible for economic and safety regulation of

  9. Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    36 QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 Chapter VII: Addressing Environmental Aspects of TS&D Infrastructure QER Report: Energy Transmission, Storage, and Distribution Infrastructure | April 2015 8-1 Chapter VIII This chapter gives an overview of current and projected employment in and related to the energy sector and discusses programs to assist in meeting the demand for new workers going forward. The first section provides estimates of jobs

  10. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  11. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-08-05

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  12. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis:Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Frenkel; Q Wang; N Marinkovic; J Chen; L Barrio; R Si; A Lopez Camara; A Estella; J Rodriquez; J Hanson

    2011-12-31

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  13. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W.; Chawla, M.K.; Swor, C.T.

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  14. Addressing a single spin in diamond with a macroscopic dielectric microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Tobar, M. E.; Bradac, C.; Nand, N.; Volz, T.; Castelletto, S.

    2014-09-29

    We present a technique for addressing single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond over macroscopic distances using a tunable dielectric microwave cavity. We demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for a single negatively charged NV center (NV{sup }) in a nanodiamond (ND) located directly under the macroscopic microwave cavity. By moving the cavity relative to the ND, we record the ODMR signal as a function of position, mapping out the distribution of the cavity magnetic field along one axis. In addition, we argue that our system could be used to determine the orientation of the NV{sup } major axis in a straightforward manner.

  15. RE-SCHEDULED FROM JAN 22 TO JAN 28 - COLLOQUIUM: Addressing Big Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenges in Simulation-based Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab 8, 2014, 4:00pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium RE-SCHEDULED FROM JAN 22 TO JAN 28 - COLLOQUIUM: Addressing Big Data Challenges in Simulation-based Science Professor Manish Parashar Rutgers University Presentation: PDF icon Presentation Abstract: PDF icon COLL.01.28.14.pdf COLLOQUIUM RE-SCHEDULED FROM JAN. 22 TO JAN 28 Data-related challenges are quickly dominating computational and data-enabled sciences, and are

  16. SOFTWARE TOOLS THAT ADDRESS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL ISSUES DURING NUCLEAR FACILITY D and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. COURNOYER; R. GRUNDEMANN

    2001-03-01

    The 49-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is where analytical chemistry and metallurgical studies on samples of plutonium and nuclear materials are conduct in support of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons program. The CMR Facility is expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) over the next ten to twenty years. Over the decades, several hazardous material issues have developed that need to be address. Unstable chemicals must be properly reassigned or disposed of from the workspace during D and D operation. Materials that have critical effects that are primarily chronic in nature, carcinogens, reproductive toxin, and materials that exhibit high chronic toxicity, have unique decontamination requirements, including the decontrolling of areas where these chemicals were used. Certain types of equipment and materials that contain mercury, asbestos, lead, and polychlorinated biphenyls have special provisions that must be addressed. Utilization of commercially available software programs for addressing hazardous material issues during D and D operations such as legacy chemicals and documentation are presented. These user-friendly programs eliminate part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of legacy hazardous materials. A key element of this approach is having a program that inventories and tracks all hazardous materials. Without an inventory of chemicals stored in a particular location, many important questions pertinent to D and D operations can be difficult to answer. On the other hand, a well-managed inventory system can address unstable and highly toxic chemicals and hazardous material records concerns before they become an issue. Tapping into the institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of the institution in managing a cost effective D and D program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program. Using laboratory requirements as a logic flow

  17. Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1996-08-01

    Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

  18. The following data/assumptions will better address the LLW differences between t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data/assumptions will better address the LLW differences between the LEU option and the LEU/Th option of Alternative 1. 1. There is 397 kg fissile ( 233 U and 235 U) in the HTGR fuel. 2. Based on past experience of LLW to Nevada National Security Site, it is expected that the maximum quantity of fissile in a Type B shipping container (CASTOR cask) will be restricted to 1 kg. To protect a 1 kg maximum, it is assumed that 900 grams would be the maximum in a CASTOR cask. Therefore, from a fissile

  19. Enabling a Highly-Scalable Global Address Space Model for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apra, Edoardo; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Yu, Weikuan

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the trajectory to the petascale has been built on increased complexity and scale of the underlying parallel architectures. Meanwhile, software de- velopers have struggled to provide tools that maintain the productivity of computational science teams using these new systems. In this regard, Global Address Space (GAS) programming models provide a straightforward and easy to use addressing model, which can lead to improved produc- tivity. However, the scalability of GAS depends directly on the design and implementation of the runtime system on the target petascale distributed-memory architecture. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation, and optimization of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) runtime library on the Cray XT5 2.3 PetaFLOPs computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We optimized our implementation with the flow intimation technique that we have introduced in this paper. Our optimized ARMCI implementation improves scalability of both the Global Arrays (GA) programming model and a real-world chemistry application NWChem from small jobs up through 180,000 cores.

  20. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO ADDRESS PU-FE EUTECTICISSUE IN 3013 STORAGE VESSEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N; Allen Smith, A

    2007-03-06

    On November 22, 2005, the Manager of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in Richland, WA issued an Occurrence Report involving a potential Pu-Fe eutectic failure mechanism for the stainless steel (SS) 3013 cans containing plutonium (Pu) metal. Four additional reports addressed nuclear safety concerns about the integrity of stainless steel containers holding plutonium during fire scenarios. The reports expressed a belief that the probability and consequences of container failure due to the formation of a plutonium-iron eutectic alloy had been overlooked. Simplified thermal model to address the Pu-Fe eutectic concerns using axisymmetric model similar to the models used in the 9975 SARP were performed. The model uses Rocky Flats configuration with 2 stacked Pu buttons inside a 3013 assembly. The assembly has an outer can, an inner can, and a convenience can, all stainless steel. The boundary conditions are similar to the regulatory 30 minutes HAC fire analyses. Computer simulations of the HAC fire transients lasting 4 hours of burn time show that the interface between the primary containment vessel and the Pu metal in the 9975 package will not reach Pu-Fe eutectic temperature of 400 C.

  1. CNEEC - Batteries Tutorial by Prof. Cui

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Catalysis

  2. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  3. System for routing messages in a vertex symmetric network by using addresses formed from permutations of the transmission line indicees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faber, Vance; Moore, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs .GAMMA..sub.d (k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k and .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) with degree 3-1, diameter k+1, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k.gtoreq.4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction .delta..sub.1. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations.

  4. Strategies to Address Identified Education Gaps in the Preparation of a National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-06-30

    This report will discuss strategies available to address identified gaps and weaknesses in education efforts aimed at the preparation of a skilled and properly trained national security workforce.The need to adequately train and educate a national security workforce is at a critical juncture. Even though there are an increasing number of college graduates in the appropriate fields, many of these graduates choose to work in the private sector because of more desirable salary and benefit packages. This is contributing to an inability to fill vacant positions at NNSA resulting from high personnel turnover from the large number of retirements. Further, many of the retirees are practically irreplaceable because they are Cold War scientists that have experience and expertise with nuclear weapons.

  5. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; et al

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore » review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  6. Gas turbine based cogeneration facilities: Key issues to be addressed at an early design stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandesteene, J.L.; De Backer, J.

    1998-07-01

    The basic design of a cogeneration facility implies much more than looking for a gas turbine generating set that matches the steam host heat demand, and making an economical evaluation of the project. Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) has designed, built and commissioned since the early nineties 350 MW of cogeneration facilities, mainly producing electricity and steam with natural gas fired gas turbines, which is the present most common option for industrial combined heat and power production. A standardized cogeneration design does not exist. Each facility has to be carefully adapted to the steam host's particular situation, and important technical issues have to be addressed at an early stage of plant design. Unexpected problems, expensive modifications, delays during execution of the project and possible long term operational limitations or drawbacks may result if these questions are left unanswered. This paper comments the most frequent questions on design values, required flexibility of the HRSG, reliability and backup, control system, connection to the grid

  7. The necessity for a practical approach to address organic emissions from cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonley, C.; Schreiber, B.; Kellerman, S.; Kellett, C.

    1998-12-31

    There is an inherent difficulty in monitoring organic emissions from hazardous waste combustion in the cement process. Data gathered by the EPA and the industry indicate that organic emissions at the main stack of cement kilns are principally from process characteristics and/or the desorption of organic constituents contained in the raw materials. Organic emissions are primarily based on the facility design and origin of the raw materials. One would generally conclude that organic emissions from fuels are essentially non-existent. To understand alternatives for monitoring organic emissions, this paper reviews some of the historical background behind the issue and reviews trends of characteristic organic emissions data. Based on this discussion and review, some approaches are presented to address organic emissions testing and monitoring when utilizing hazardous waste fuel in a cement kiln.

  8. Strategies to address climate change in central and Eastern Euopean countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simeonova, K.

    1996-12-31

    The paper presents analyses based on information mainly from the National Communications of nine Central and Eastern European countries that are undertaking radical transition from centrally planned to market driven economics (EIT). It is designed primarily to provide an overview of the policies and measures to address climate change that have been implemented, or under implementation or planned. In order to better understand the objective of policies and measures and the way they have been implemented in EIT countries that analysis has been supplemented by a review of the national circumstances and overall policy contexts in EIT countries that are relevant to climate change policies and measures problems. Therefore, these issues will be discussed in the paper along with analysis of mitigation policies and measures by sector.

  9. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  10. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Edmonds, James A.

    2007-10-24

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world’s electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  11. Utility Regulation and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Implementing a range of alternative utility-rate reforms could minimize solar value losses at increasing levels of distributed PV penetration (see Barbose et al. 2016). In conjunction with the technical issues described above, the connections between distributed PV and electric distribution systems hinge on utility business models and regulations. As PV deployment has leapt forward and presaged a truly significant solar contribution, however, it has become clear that utilities’ traditional treatment of distributed PV cannot be taken for granted—nor can the future value and deployment of distributed PV. At the heart of this issue is net energy metering (NEM). Under NEM, PV owners can sell to a utility the electricity they generate but cannot consume on site, often at full retail rates. This widespread policy has helped drive the rapid growth of distributed PV, but the success has raised concerns about the potential for higher electricity rates and cost-shifting to non-solar customers, reduced utility shareholder profitability, reduced utility earnings opportunities, and inefficient resource allocation. The resulting reform efforts have revolved largely around changing NEM rules and retail rate structures. Most of the reforms to date address NEM concerns by reducing the benefits provided to distributed PV customers and thus constraining PV deployment. A new analysis estimates that eliminating NEM nationwide, by compensating exports of PV electricity at wholesale rather than retail rates would cut cumulative distributed PV deployment by 20% in 2050 compared with a continuation of current policies. This would slow the PV cost reductions that arise from larger scale and market certainty. It could also thwart achievement of the SunShot deployment goals even if the initiative’s cost targets are achieved. This undesirable prospect is stimulating the development of alternative reform strategies that address concerns about distributed PV compensation without

  12. Addressing Facility Needs for Concrete Assessment Using Ultrasonic Testing: Mid-year Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Payan, Cedric; Roberts, Peter M.

    2012-03-28

    The UFD Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel (June 30, 2011) emphasizes the need for the development of monitoring techniques and technologies for dry storage cask materials. A high priority is given to the development of 'systems for early detection of confinement boundary degradation.' This requires both new techniques for monitoring and inspection, as well as new measurable parameters to quantify mechanical degradation. The use of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) has been shown to provide sensitive parameters correlating to mechanical degradation in a wide variety of materials. Herein we report upon recent research performed to address the high priority of concrete degradation using a selection of these techniques and compare to a ASTM standard ultrasonic technique. Also reported are the near term plans to continue this research in the remaining FY and into the coming years. This research was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the Acoustics Lab of the Geophysics group in the Earth and Environmental Sciences division, and in collaboration with the Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation at the University of the Mediterranean (Aix en Provence, France) and the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of using an NDE technique based on non-linear ultrasound for determining the depth and degree of microcracking in the near surface of concrete and to assess the degree of sensitivity of such technique. This objective is reached by the means of combining linear and nonlinear measurements, associated with numerical simulation. We first study the global effect of thermal damage on concrete's linear and nonlinear properties by resonance inspection techniques. We show that standard pulse wave speed techniques are not relevant to extract mechanical properties of concrete. The high sensitivity of measured nonlinearity is shown and serves as a

  13. 20% Wind Energy - Diversifying Our Energy Portfolio and Addressing Climate Change (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-05-01

    This brochure describes the R&D efforts needed for wind energy to meet 20% of the U.S. electrical demand by 2030. In May 2008, DOE published its report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, which presents an in-depth analysis of the potential for wind energy in the United States and outlines a potential scenario to boost wind electric generation from its current production of 16.8 gigawatts (GW) to 304 GW by 2030. According to the report, achieving 20% wind energy by 2030 could help address climate change by reducing electric sector carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 825 million metric tons (20% of the electric utility sector CO2 emissions if no new wind is installed by 2030), and it will enhance our nation's energy security by diversifying our electricity portfolio as wind energy is an indigenous energy source with stable prices not subject to fuel volatility. According to the report, increasing our nation's wind generation could also boost local rural economies and contribute to significant growth in manufacturing and the industry supply chain. Rural economies will benefit from a substantial increase in land use payments, tax benefits and the number of well-paying jobs created by the wind energy manufacturing, construction, and maintenance industries. Although the initial capital costs of implementing the 20% wind scenario would be higher than other generation sources, according to the report, wind energy offers lower ongoing energy costs than conventional generation power plants for operations, maintenance, and fuel. The 20% scenario could require an incremental investment of as little as $43 billion (net present value) more than a base-case no new wind scenario. This would represent less than 0.06 cent (6 one-hundredths of 1 cent) per kilowatt-hour of total generation by 2030, or roughly 50 cents per month per household. The report concludes that while achieving the 20% wind scenario is technically achievable, it will require enhanced transmission infrastructure

  14. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Breakout Session 2-A: The Future of Algae-Based Biofuels How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Dr. John McGowen, Director of Operations and Program Manager, Arizona Center for Algae Technology and Innovation: Arizona State University mcgowen_bioenergy_2015.pdf (2.1 MB) More

  15. Aug. 17 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System | Jefferson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Aug. 17 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System Aug. 17 at 5:30 p.m.: JLab Will Test its Public Address System On Wednesday, Aug. 17, Emergency Management Team staff will conduct the monthly test of Jefferson Lab's Public Address (PA) System - the live audible announcement feature - available through the lab's Cisco phones. This monthly operational test of the system occurs at 5:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. No actions are required or expected from members

  16. Architectural Framework for Addressing Legacy Waste from the Cold War - 13611

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Gregory A.; Glazner, Christopher G.; Steckley, Sam

    2013-07-01

    We present an architectural framework for the use of a hybrid simulation model of enterprise-wide operations used to develop system-level insight into the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) environmental cleanup of legacy nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site. We use this framework for quickly exploring policy and architectural options, analyzing plans, addressing management challenges and developing mitigation strategies for DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM). The socio-technical complexity of EM's mission compels the use of a qualitative approach to complement a more a quantitative discrete event modeling effort. We use this model-based analysis to pinpoint pressure and leverage points and develop a shared conceptual understanding of the problem space and platform for communication among stakeholders across the enterprise in a timely manner. This approach affords the opportunity to discuss problems using a unified conceptual perspective and is also general enough that it applies to a broad range of capital investment/production operations problems. (authors)

  17. U-165: Apple iOS Bugs Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Spoof Address Bar URLs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in Apple iOS. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system. A remote user can spoof the address bar URL.

  18. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (1994)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations (1994).  Directs each federal agency to make environmental justice part of...

  19. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05

    dissociation. PVD Mo clusters turned out to be very reactive toward thiophene bond activation. Sulfur and carbon residuals form, which poison the catalyst and sulfide the Mo clusters. Sulfided silica-supported MoSx samples are not reactive toward thiophene bond activation. In addition to S and C deposits, H2, H2S, and small organic molecules were detected in the gas phase. Catalyst reactivation procedures, including O2 and atomic hydrogen treatments, have been tested. Cluster size effects have been seen: thiophene adsorbs molecularly with larger binding energies on smaller clusters. However, larger clusters have smaller activation energy for C4H4S bond activation than smaller clusters. The latter is consistent with early catalysis studies. Kinetics and dynamics parameters have been determined quantitatively. We spent a significant amount of time on upgrades of our equipment. A 2nd-hand refurbished X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) has been integrated into the existing molecular beam scattering system and is already operational (supported by the DoE supplemental grant available in October 2009). We also added a time of flight (TOF) system to the beam scattering apparatus and improved on the accessible impact energy range (new nozzle heater and gas mixing manifold) for the beam scattering experiments. In addition, a GC-based powder atmospheric flow reactor for studies on powder samples is now operational. Furthermore, a 2nd UHV kinetics system has been upgraded as well. In summary, mostly single crystal systems have so far been considered in basic science studies about HDS. Industrial catalysts, however, can be better approximated with the supported cluster systems that we studied in this project. Furthermore, an entirely new class of HDS systems, namely fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes, has been included. Studying new materials and systems has the potential to impact science and technology. The systems investigated are closely related to energy and

  20. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

  1. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  2. Nuclear decontamination technology evaluation to address contamination of a municipal water system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFee, J.; Langsted, J.; Young, M.; Porcon, J.; Day, E.

    2007-07-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) are considering the impact and recovery from contamination of municipal water systems, including intentional contamination of those systems. Industrial chemicals, biological agents, drugs, pesticides, chemical warfare agents, and radionuclides all could be introduced into a municipal water system to create detrimental health effects and disrupt a community. Although unintentional, the 1993 cryptosporidium contamination of the Milwaukee WS water system resulted in 100 fatalities and disrupted the city for weeks. Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure Inc, (Shaw), as a subcontractor on a DHS contract with Michael Baker Jr., Inc., was responsible for evaluation of the impact and recovery from radionuclide contamination in a municipal water system distribution system. Shaw was tasked to develop a matrix of nuclear industry decontamination technologies and evaluate applicability to municipal water systems. Shaw expanded the evaluation to include decontamination methods commonly used in the drinking water supply. The matrix compared all technologies for implementability, effectiveness, and cost. To address the very broad range of contaminants and contamination scenarios, Shaw bounded the problem by identification of specific contaminant release scenario(s) for specific water system architecture(s). A decontamination technology matrix was developed containing fifty-nine decontamination technologies potentially applicable to the water distribution system piping, pumps, tanks, associated equipment, and/or contaminated water. Qualitatively, the majority of the nuclear industry decontamination technologies were eliminated from consideration due to implementability concerns. However, inclusion of the municipal water system technologies supported recommendations that combined the most effective approaches in both industries. (authors)

  3. Electrochemistry: Catalysis at the boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-04-09

    Renewable energy provides an opportunity to power society without the potential impacts from the use of fossil fuels, but a major limitation of sources such as solar and wind is their intermittent availability. Efficient storage of energy from these renewable sources is critical in developing their widespread utilization. One approach to the storage of renewable energy is the production of fuels, such as ethanol, from water and carbon dioxide. Unlike traditional centralized fuel production, electrochemical systems can operate under mild pressures and temperatures in dispersed, small-scale reactors. Renewable sources of energy are inherently dispersed, and therefore are well matched with the production of fuels electrochemically. However, the development of efficient catalysts is essential for the intended chemical transformations.

  4. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I: Analytical Characterization Instructors: Professor Paul Dauenhauer (University of Minnesota) Jeff Everhart (University of Delaware) 322 ISE Lab 10:45-11:00 Break 11:00-12:30 ...

  5. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  6. Celebration of DOE's 35th Anniversary and the Secretary of Energy's Honor Awards, Keynote Address: Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-10-18

    Dr. Steven Chu gives a keynote address marking the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy (DOE). He highlights outstanding achievements of the Department and its scientists. Several of the Department's many Nobel Prize winners over the years are mentioned.

  7. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASU Confidential Proprietary How ATP 3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D John A. McGowen, PhD, PMP Director of Operations and Program Management Arizona Center For Algae Technology and Innovation Arizona State University Bioenergy 2015 Washington, DC June 24, 2015 Policy  Support from USDA for algae as precision agriculture  EPA and USDA collaboration critical on CO 2 and GMO policies, crop designation, agricultural practices and policies and tax

  8. Materials Data on SiP3H29C10BrN (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geophysical and geochemical technologies quantitatively inferring subsurface evolution under current and future engineered conditions finding viable, low-risk resources...

  10. Addressing Chromium in Groundwater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    From 1956 to 1972, a non-nuclear power plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory periodically flushed water out of its cooling towers into Sandia Canyon. The water contained chromium, which was commonly used throughout the industry as a corrosion inhibitor in cooling tower systems.

  11. Addressing Big Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formulations enabled by cur- rent high-performance distributed computing environments. ... based on managed data pipelines, in-memory data-staging, in-situ placement and ...

  12. ARM - People Address Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govAboutPerson Information About Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Facility Documents ARM Management Plan (PDF, 1.3MB) Field Campaign Guidelines (PDF, 574KB) ARM Climate Research Facility Expansion Workshop (PDF, 1.46MB) Facility Activities ARM and the Recovery Act Contributions to International Polar Year Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send

  13. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of

  14. Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Argonne Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Brookhaven Site Office Evelyn Landini Jennifer Hartmann elandini@bnl.gov jhartmann@bnl.gov Idaho Site Office Paul Allen allenph@id.doe.gov Kansas City Site Office Hilary Cole Hilary.Cole@nnsa.doe.gov Lawrence Livermore Site Office Jewell Lee Jewell.Lee@nnsa.doe.gov Los Alamos Site Office Barbara Romero Robert M. Poole

  15. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahle, Markus Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-16

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  16. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Whealton, John H.; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  17. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  18. Characterization of submillisecond response optical addressing phase modulator based on low light scattering polymer network liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiangjie, Zhao E-mail: zxjdouble@gmail.com; Cangli, Liu; Jiazhu, Duan; Dayong, Zhang; Yongquan, Luo

    2015-01-07

    Optically addressed conventional nematic liquid crystal spatial light modulator has attracted wide research interests. But the slow response speed limited its further application. In this paper, polymer network liquid crystal (PNLC) was proposed to replace the conventional nematic liquid crystal to enhance the response time to the order of submillisecond. The maximum light scattering of the employed PNLC was suppressed to be less than 2% at 1.064 μm by optimizing polymerization conditions and selecting large viscosity liquid crystal as solvent. The occurrence of phase ripple phenomenon due to electron diffusion and drift in photoconductor was found to deteriorate the phase modulation effect of the optical addressed PNLC phase modulator. The wavelength effect and AC voltage frequency effect on the on state dynamic response of phase change was investigated by experimental methods. These effects were interpreted by electron diffusion and drift theory based on the assumption that free electron was inhomogeneously distributed in accordance with the writing beam intensity distribution along the incident direction. The experimental results indicated that the phase ripple could be suppressed by optimizing the wavelength of the writing beam and the driving AC voltage frequency when varying the writing beam intensity to generate phase change in 2π range. The modulation transfer function was also measured.

  19. EPA-- Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Addressing Children's Health through Reviews Conducted Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act and Section 309 of the Clean Air Act

  20. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  1. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  2. Technical Study Addresses a Key Challenge to Harmonizing U.S. and International PV Module Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations. Photovoltaic (PV) manufacturers in the United States test the safety of their products using standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety standards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice - and sometimes maintain separate product lines. By meeting with standards organizations such as the Solar ABCs and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leaders have worked to identify different stakeholders priorities and concerns. UL, specifically, has expressed concern that the international standards do not address all possible risks. For example, new encapsulant materials could soften at high temperatures and frameless modules could slide apart, exposing live electrical parts or allowing glass to fall on a person below. The deformation of a solid material under the influence of mechanical stresses is known as 'creep.' Current module qualification tests are limited to 85 C, whereas modules can, for short times, reach 105 C outdoors. In response to UL's concern, NREL designed and executed an experiment to compare on-sun and accelerated rates of creep for modules fabricated with various encapsulants, including some that have low melting points. Objectives were to (1) evaluate the potential for creep in outdoor exposure, (2) provide guidance on the risks and design needs with thermoplastic materials, and (3) provide a basis for modifying standards to account for materials with potential to creep. The study tested experimental materials with eight representative encapsulants in both outdoor and indoor (chamber) exposure. The study found that modules with materials that were expected to creep did so in the indoor exposure, but not in most outdoor environments and mounting configurations. The results provide a basis for defining an accelerated test needed to

  3. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven (DOE Secretary of Energy)

    2012-03-14

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  4. Major prime contractors have developed a plan to address Hanford Beryllium exposure and are continuing to improve the Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Plan (CBDPP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OMC-CS-532H Rev. 2 Published 05/05/16 Beryllium Information Booklet Beryllium Information Provided By: HPMC Occupational Medical Services http://www.hanford.gov/health/ Physical Address: MSIN G3-70 1979 Snyder Street, Suite 150 Richland, WA 99354 Mailing Address: P.O. Box 150 Richland, WA 99352 HPMC Occupational Medical Services - Beryllium Information Booklet OMC-CS-532H Rev. 2 Published 05/05/16 1 Table of Contents Disclaimer

  5. On the Path to SunShot: Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    670 LBNL-1004371 Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Cover photos (clockwise from top left): Solar Design Associates, Inc., NREL 08563; SolarReserve; Dennis Schroeder, NREL 30551; and iStock 000075760625 On the Path to SunShot: Utility Regulatory and Business Model Reforms for Addressing the Financial Impacts of Distributed Solar on Utilities Galen Barbose 1 , John Miller 2 , Ben Sigrin 2 , Emerson Reiter 2 ,

  6. Addressing the Federal-State-Local Interface Issues During a Catastrophic Event Such as an Anthrax Attack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Upton, Jaki F.

    2010-02-01

    On October 9, 2008, federal, state and local policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and public health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Addressing the Federal-State-Local Interface Issues During a Catastrophic Event Such as an Anthrax Attack. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about recovery and restoration through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems. The Principal Federal Official (PFO) provided an overview of the role of the PFO in a catastrophic event. A high-level summary of an anthrax scenario was presented. The remainder of the day was focused on interactive discussions among federal, state and local emergency management experts in the areas of: • Decision-making, prioritization, and command and control • Public health/medical services • Community resiliency and continuity of government. Key topics and issues that resulted from discussions included: • Local representation in the Joint Field Office (JFO) • JFO transition to the Long-Term Recovery Office • Process for prioritization of needs • Process for regional coordination • Prioritization - process and federal/military intervention • Allocation of limited resources • Re-entry decision and consistency • Importance of maintaining a healthy hospital system • Need for a process to establish a consensus on when it is safe to re-enter. This needs to be across all jurisdictions including the military. • Insurance coverage for both private businesses and individuals • Interaction between the government and industry. The symposium was sponsored by the Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration, a collaborative regional program jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Department of Defense. To aid the program’s efforts and inform the development of blueprint for recovery from a biological incident

  7. PROJECT PROFILE: Development of Tools, Training, and Outreach to Address Solar Glare and Flux-Related Avian Impacts (SuNLaMP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project reduces soft costs associated with siting, permitting, environmental compliance, and operations and maintenance to address glare and flux-related avian hazards for concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Enhancements, training, and technical assistance will be provided for the Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT), which determines when and where solar glare can occur throughout the year from a user-specified solar array as viewed from user-prescribed observation points. By addressing glare and avian issues, this project will allow for solar projects to be installed on or near airport property in compliance of federal regulations.

  8. Textured Metal Catalysts for Heterogeneous Catalysis - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    access to micropores Highly effective for aqueous phase hydrogenations Applications and Industries Bioproductsbiofuels manufacturing Chemical manufacturing Patents and Patent...

  9. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, Robert G.; Stephens, Howard P.; Stohl, Frances V.

    1985-01-01

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  10. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  11. Hydrodesulfurization catalysis by Chevrel phase compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarty, Kevin F.; Schrader, Glenn L.

    1985-12-24

    A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M.sub.x Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts. The most active catalysts were the "large" cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the "small" cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

  12. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammells, Anthony F.

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  13. Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with heretofore unprecedented detail. Examples of new computational methods include optimization of structures determined experimentally by diffraction scattering based on...

  14. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-12-31

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  15. [Zeolite catalysis in conversion of cellulosics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, G.T.

    1992-01-01

    To transform biomass into fermentable substrate for yeast, we are using zeolites instead of enzymes to catalyze the two bottleneck reactions in biomass conversion, xylose isomerization and ceuobiose hydrolysis. The experimental results on these reactions carried out over various zeolites and other catalysts are presented herein. The advantages and disadvantages of using these catalysts over enzymes are also discussed. Heterogeneous solid catalysts other than zeolites has been employed for cellobiose-to-glucose hydrolysis. The size and shape selectivity that makes zeoutes unique for some reactions can add diffusional hindrance. We have spent some time screening various known solid acidic catalysts. We report that a class of cationic ion exchange resins in the acidified form (e.g. Amberlite) has worked well as an acidic catalyst in hydrolyzing cellobiose to glucose. Our experimental results, together with those obtained from a homogeneous acid catalyst (e.g. sulfuric acid) for comparison are provided. Having succeeded in finding an alternative solid acid catalyst for hydrolysis, we explored other solid resin or other homogeneous but non-enzyme catalyst to carry out the xylose-to-xylulose isomerization. A fairly extensive search has been made. We explored the use of sodium aluminates in the homogeneous phase isomerization of glucose to fructose and obtained a very high conversion of glucose to fructose with the final mixture containing 85% of fructose instead of the common 45%. Fructose apparently complexes with aluminates, and its equilibrium concentration is shifted to considerably higher values than permitted by simple glucose/fructose equilibrium. We have recently found a number of catalysts capable of promoting isomerization between aldoses and ketoses. One solid resin, known as polyvinyl pyridine (PVP), is able to convert xylose to xylulose at a pH below 7. Our usage of alternative isomerization catalysts, including PVP, are described.

  16. Mesoporous Silica Nanomaterials for Applications in Catalysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    horses have ability to deliver Doxorubicin to cancer cells and induce their death. ... was able to transfect cancer cell lines, such as human HeLa and CHO cancer cell lines. ...

  17. Method for producing catalysis from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Derbyshire, Frank; Kaufman, Phillip B.; Jagtoyen, Marit

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

  18. The impact of nanoscience on heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.

    2003-03-03

    Most catalysts consist of nanometer-sized particles dispersed on a high-surface area support. Advances in characterization methods have led to a molecular level understanding of the relationships between nanoparticle properties and catalytic performance. Together with novel approaches to nanoparticle synthesis, this knowledge is contributing to the design and development of new catalysts.

  19. PROJECT PROFILE: Addressing Environmental Challenges to Deployment through the Development of an Avian-Solar Science Plan and a Prototype Avian Risk Assessment Tool (SuNLaMP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The soft costs associated with solar project development can increase with potential wildlife impacts. Avian impact issues associated with utility scale solar development, in particular avian fatalities, are not well understood. This project will address these issues to help reach SunShot soft cost target goals by better understanding avian issues at utility scale solar facilities and their soft cost implications using a systematic, standardized, science-based approach that could be applied across the industry.

  20. ORISE: Contact Us - phone numbers, email addresses, shipping addresses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Contact Us Employee Phone Directory Enter the name of the person you are looking for: To use this directory, you must know the full last name of the employee. Last Name:* First Name: Search (*required field) General Information Communications Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education MC-100-44 P.O. Box 117 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Work: (865) 576-3146 Fax: (865) 241-2923 communications@orau.org ORISE Director's Office Andy Page, Director Oak Ridge

  1. Addresses and Phone Numbers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additions to natural gas in underground storage to be nearly 50% higher this summer Although it's still spring, natural gas supply companies and utilities are already preparing for next winter and are building their inventories of natural gas to meet future heating demand. About 2.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas will be added to gas inventories in underground storage over the summer months to get ready for the winter heating season, which starts November 1. That is significantly higher than

  2. Addressing Plug and Process Loads

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenters: Rois Langer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Moira Hafer, Stanford University; Jason Sielcken, U.S. General Services Administration (GSA)

  3. Addressing concerns and achieving expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    Approximately 2-1/2 years ago many of us were gathered here in Prague at a similar conference with a similar name, {open_quotes}Energy and Environment: Transitions in Eastern Europe.{close_quotes} Over 300 professionals from 26 nations attended. The objective of the conference was to: Facilitate the Solution of Long and Short Term Energy and Environmental Problems in Eastern Europe by Bringing Together People, ideas and technologies which could be applied to specific problems in a logical step-by-step manner. It was conceded at the time that the long term solution would consist of thoughtfully integrated steps and that the conference was the first step. We are here in the Czech Republic again this week to continue what was started. As before, this conference continues to: (1) Provide a forum to identify and discuss cost-effective environmentally acceptable energy and environmental technology options and their associated socioeconomic issues. (2) Stimulate the Formation of business partnerships (3) Identify key barrier issues hindering technology applications and identify implementation pathways that eliminate or avoid obstacles to progress.

  4. 2013 Director's New Year Address

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    has in store for the ALS. An immediate answer is - a celebration - as the ALS marks its 20th year of operation. We'll spend some time this year looking back at what we've...

  5. Keynote address: International nuclear cooperation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    These meetings provide an important opportunity for the nuclear community to assess the scope and direction of its wide-ranging activities. Nuclear technology has given us the tools to understand and shape our physical environment in ways which can solve ancient problems of health, food supply, energy, and many others which affect the quality of our lives. International cooperation is necessary to secure the peaceful benefits of nuclear technology. Meeting global energy needs must be high on any priority list of issues for the coming decade and the 21st century. The satisfaction of energy needs is today and will increasingly be a crucial factor in international stability. Hand in hand with the need to assure energy sufficiency is the need to assure the long-term protection of the environment. Three key elements that give a useful framework for approaching the future of nuclear cooperation are technological factors, economic issues, and political acceptability. Technological avenues to greater safety must be vigorously pursued. Economic alternatives must be identified and objectively weighed. Most important of all, the framework of public confidence must be strengthened.

  6. Upcoming Webinars to Focus on Topics Addressed in the National Academies of Sciences’ "Analytical Foundations for the Next Generation Electric Grid" Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The National Academies of Sciences’ Board of Mathematical Sciences and Their Application will conduct two webinars in April, 2016 in conjunction with the recent release of its report entitled Analytical Foundations for the Next Generation Electric Grid. The focus of the study, which was funded in part by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, was to identify the critical areas of mathematical and computational research that must be addressed for the next-generation electric transmission and distribution system. The report also includes a series of recommendations.

  7. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Multiaxial Creep-Fatigue and Creep-Ratcheting Failures of Grade 91 and Haynes 230 Alloys Toward Addressing Design Issues of Gen IV Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Tasnim; Lissenden, Cliff; Carroll, Laura

    2015-04-01

    The proposed research will develop systematic sets of uniaxial and multiaxial experimental data at a very high temperature (850-950°C) for Alloy 617. The loading histories to be prescribed in the experiments will induce creep-fatigue and creep-ratcheting failure mechanisms. These experimental responses will be scrutinized in order to quantify the influences of temperature and creep on fatigue and ratcheting failures. A unified constitutive model (UCM) will be developed and validated against these experimental responses. The improved UCM will be incorporated into the widely used finite element commercial software packages ANSYS. The modified ANSYS will be validated so that it can be used for evaluating the very high temperature ASME-NH design-by-analysis methodology for Alloy 617 and thereby addressing the ASME-NH design code issues.

  9. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged

  10. Carbon dioxide and climate. [Appendix includes names and addresses of the Principal Investigators for the research projects funded in FY1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01

    Global climate change is a serious environmental concern, and the US has developed An Action Agenda'' to deal with it. At the heart of the US effort is the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP), which has been developed by the Committee on Earth and Environmental Sciences (CEES) of the Federal Coordinating Council for Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (FCCSET). The USGCRP will provide the scientific basis for sound policy making on the climate-change issue. The DOE contribution to the USGCRP is the Carbon Dioxide Research Program, which now places particular emphasis on the rapid improvement of the capability to predict global and regional climate change. DOE's Carbon Dioxide Research Program has been addressing the carbon dioxide-climate change connection for more than twelve years and has provided a solid scientific foundation for the USGCRP. The expansion of the DOE effort reflects the increased attention that the Department has placed on the issue and is reflected in the National Energy Strategy (NES) that was released in 1991. This Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1991 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments. The Environmental Sciences Division of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research supports a Carbon Dioxide Research Program to determine the scientific linkage between the rise of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially carbon dioxide, and climate and vegetation change. One facet is the Core CO{sub 2} Program, a pioneering program that DOE established more than 10 years ago to understand and predict the ways that fossil-fuel burning could affect atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration, global climate, and the Earth's biosphere. Major research areas are: global carbon cycle; climate detection and models of climate change; vegetation research; resource analysis; and, information and integration.

  11. In-Situ Radiological Surveys to Address Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements During Remediation Activities at the Shallow Land Disposal Area, Armstrong County, Pennsylvania - 12268

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Phillip; Mihalo, Mark; Eberlin, John; Lambert, Mike; Matthews, Brian

    2012-07-01

    Cabrera Services Inc. (CABRERA) is the remedial contractor for the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site in Armstrong County Pennsylvania, a United States (US) Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) contract. The remediation is being completed under the USACE's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) which was established to identify, investigate, and clean up or control sites previously used by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED). As part of the management of the FUSRAP, the USACE is overseeing investigation and remediation of radiological contamination at the SLDA Site in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), 42 US Code (USC), Section 9601 et. seq, as amended and, the National Oil and Hazardous Substance Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP), Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Section 300.430(f) (2). The objective of this project is to clean up radioactive waste at SLDA. The radioactive waste contains special nuclear material (SNM), primarily U-235, in 10 burial trenches, Cabrera duties include processing, packaging and transporting the waste to an offsite disposal facility in accordance with the selected remedial alternative as defined in the Final Record of Decision (USACE, 2007). Of particular importance during the remediation is the need to address nuclear criticality safety (NCS) controls for the safe exhumation and management of waste containing fissile materials. The partnership between Cabrera Services, Inc. and Measutronics Corporation led to the development of a valuable survey tool and operating procedure that are essential components of the SLDA Criticality Safety and Material Control and Accountability programs. Using proven existing technologies in the design and manufacture of the Mobile Survey Cart, the continued deployment of the Cart will allow for an efficient and reliable methodology to

  12. Addressing numerical challenges in introducing a reactive transport code into a land surface model: a biogeochemical modeling proof-of-concept with CLM–PFLOTRAN 1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; et al

    2016-03-04

    methods are efficient. When the reaction network is highly nonlinear or the half saturation or residual concentration is very low, the allowable time-step cuts may need to be increased for robustness for the log transformation method, or STOL may need to be tightened for the clipping and scaling methods to avoid false convergence.As some biogeochemical processes (e.g., methane and nitrous oxide reactions) involve very low half saturation and thresholds, this work provides insights for addressing nonphysical negativity issues and facilitates the representation of a mechanistic biogeochemical description in Earth system models to reduce climate prediction uncertainty.« less

  13. Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur, J. Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (target area ), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a

  14. Coupling a Reactive Transport Code with a Global Land Surface Model for Mechanistic Biogeochemistry Representation: 1. Addressing the Challenge of Nonnegativity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Collier, Nathaniel O.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Painter, Scott L.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive transport codes (e.g., PFLOTRAN) are increasingly used to improve the representation of biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystem models (e.g., the Community Land Model, CLM). As CLM and PFLOTRAN use explicit and implicit time stepping, implementation of CLM biogeochemical reactions in PFLOTRAN can result in negative concentration, which is not physical and can cause numerical instability and errors. The objective of this work is to address the nonnegativity challenge to obtain accurate, efficient, and robust solutions. We illustrate the implementation of a reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant nitrogen uptake reactions and test the implementation at arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. We examine use of scaling back the update during each iteration (SU), log transformation (LT), and downregulating the reaction rate to account for reactant availability limitation to enforce nonnegativity. Both SU and LT guarantee nonnegativity but with implications. When a very small scaling factor occurs due to either consumption or numerical overshoot, and the iterations are deemed converged because of too small an update, SU can introduce excessive numerical error. LT involves multiplication of the Jacobian matrix by the concentration vector, which increases the condition number, decreases the time step size, and increases the computational cost. Neither SU nor SE prevents zero concentration. When the concentration is close to machine precision or 0, a small positive update stops all reactions for SU, and LT can fail due to a singular Jacobian matrix. The consumption rate has to be downregulated such that the solution to the mathematical representation is positive. A first-order rate downregulates consumption and is nonnegative, and adding a residual concentration makes it positive. For zero-order rate or when the reaction rate is not a function of a reactant, representing the availability limitation of each

  15. Coupling a Reactive Transport Code with a Global Land Surface Model for Mechanistic Biogeochemistry Representation: 1. Addressing the Challenge of Nonnegativity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Collier, Nathaniel O.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; et al

    2016-01-01

    Reactive transport codes (e.g., PFLOTRAN) are increasingly used to improve the representation of biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystem models (e.g., the Community Land Model, CLM). As CLM and PFLOTRAN use explicit and implicit time stepping, implementation of CLM biogeochemical reactions in PFLOTRAN can result in negative concentration, which is not physical and can cause numerical instability and errors. The objective of this work is to address the nonnegativity challenge to obtain accurate, efficient, and robust solutions. We illustrate the implementation of a reaction network with the CLM-CN decomposition, nitrification, denitrification, and plant nitrogen uptake reactions and test the implementation atmore » arctic, temperate, and tropical sites. We examine use of scaling back the update during each iteration (SU), log transformation (LT), and downregulating the reaction rate to account for reactant availability limitation to enforce nonnegativity. Both SU and LT guarantee nonnegativity but with implications. When a very small scaling factor occurs due to either consumption or numerical overshoot, and the iterations are deemed converged because of too small an update, SU can introduce excessive numerical error. LT involves multiplication of the Jacobian matrix by the concentration vector, which increases the condition number, decreases the time step size, and increases the computational cost. Neither SU nor SE prevents zero concentration. When the concentration is close to machine precision or 0, a small positive update stops all reactions for SU, and LT can fail due to a singular Jacobian matrix. The consumption rate has to be downregulated such that the solution to the mathematical representation is positive. A first-order rate downregulates consumption and is nonnegative, and adding a residual concentration makes it positive. For zero-order rate or when the reaction rate is not a function of a reactant, representing the availability limitation

  16. Addressing numerical challenges in introducing a reactive transport code into a land surface model: A biogeochemical modeling proof-of-concept with CLM PFLOTRAN 1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, Guoping; Yuan, Fengming; Bisht, Gautam; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.; Kumar, Jitendra; Mills, Richard T.; Xu, Xiaofeng; Andre, Ben; Hoffman, Forrest M.; et al

    2016-03-04

    efficient. When the reaction network is highly nonlinear or the half saturation or residual concentration is very low, the allowable time-step cuts may need to be increased for robustness for the log transformation method, or STOL may need to be tightened for the clipping and scaling methods to avoid false convergence. As some biogeochemical processes (e.g., methane and nitrous oxide reactions) involve very low half saturation and thresholds, this work provides insights for addressing nonphysical negativity issues and facilitates the representation of a mechanistic biogeochemical description in Earth system models to reduce climate prediction uncertainty.« less

  17. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K.; Venkatech, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

    2009-09-30

    /or different answers in response to a set of focused energy-related questions. The focus was on understanding reasons for model differences, not on policy implications, even though a policy of high renewable penetration was used for the analysis. A group process was used to identify the potential question (or questions) to be addressed through the project. In late 2006, increasing renewable energy penetration in the electricity sector was chosen from among several options as the general policy to model. From this framework, the analysts chose a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) as the way to implement the required renewable energy market penetration in the models. An RPS was chosen because it was (i) of interest and represented the group's consensus choice, and (ii) tractable and not too burdensome for the modelers. Because the modelers and analysts were largely using their own resources, it was important to consider the degree of effort required. In fact, several of the modelers who started this process had to discontinue participation because of other demands on their time. Federal and state RPS policy is an area of active political interest and debate. Recognizing this, participants used this exercise to gain insight into energy model structure and performance. The results are not intended to provide any particular insight into policy design or be used for policy advocacy, and participants are not expected to form a policy stance based on the outcomes of the modeling. The goals of this REMAP project - in terms of the main topic of renewable penetration - were to: (1) Compare models and understand why they may give different results to the same question, (2) Improve the rigor and consistency of assumptions used across models, and (3) Evaluate the ability of models to measure the impacts of high renewable-penetration scenarios.

  18. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi-family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multi-family Buildings Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 26, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    26, 2012 Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multi- family/Low Income Peer Exchange Call: Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multi-family Buildings Call Slides and Discussion Summary Agenda * Call Logistics and Attendance  How are you working with owners and tenants on multi-family upgrades? * Program Experience and Lessons:  Michael Croston, Repower Bremerton * Discussion:  What are some of the key challenges for working with rental properties?  What are effective

  19. Fundamental Studies in Catalysis Enabled the use of Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The technology has since been used on other fuel efficient diesel vehicles in the U.S. market, including the Volkswagen Jetta TDI. In addition to supporting this market success ...

  20. Theoretical/Computational Tools for Energy-Relevant Catalysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Essential to these efforts will be the development of novel new approaches in not only theoretical chemistry and materials science (BES), but also computational science and applied ...

  1. Technology Development for Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, B.H.

    1997-12-16

    The goal of the proposed work is the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The catalyst that is developed will be suitable for testing at the Advanced Fuels Development Facility at LaPorte, Texas or similar sized plant. Previous work by the offeror has produced a catalyst formulation that is 1.5 times as active as the `standard-catalyst` developed by German workers for slurry phase synthesis. The proposed work will optimize the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for this low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work will be conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies will be conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors will be studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance will be determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  2. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: July 2016 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2016 Classification Training Course Catalog. To ensure that all classification and declassification decisions are based on these principles, the Office of Classification has undertaken the establishment and maintenance of a comprehensive classification and declassification education program. The training and education program is perpetually evolving with new courses and special briefings as events dictate. Basic courses that are in constant demand are described in this course catalog. Other more

  3. Theoretical Study on Catalysis by Protein Enzymes and Ribozyme

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    determine the catalytic mechanism in the presence of the enzyme environment, a combined quantummolecular mechanics (QMMM) approach is used, performed with the CHARMM program....

  4. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  5. Biphasic catalysis in water/carbon dioxide micellar systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Gunilla B.; Tumas, William; Johnston, Keith P.

    2002-01-01

    A process is provided for catalyzing an organic reaction to form a reaction product by placing reactants and a catalyst for the organic reaction, the catalyst of a metal complex and at least one ligand soluble within one of the phases of said aqueous biphasic system, within an aqueous biphasic system including a water phase, a dense phase fluid, and a surfactant adapted for forming an emulsion or microemulsion within the aqueous biphasic system, the reactants soluble within one of the phases of the aqueous biphasic system and convertible in the presence of the catalyst to a product having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble; and, maintaining the aqueous biphasic system under pressures, at temperatures, and for a period of time sufficient for the organic reaction to occur and form the reaction product and to maintain sufficient density on the dense phase fluid, the reaction product characterized as having low solubility in the phase in which the catalyst is soluble.

  6. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vice versa. At the ALS, researchers were able to directly observe redox processes in thin-film iron and cobalt perovskite oxide electrocatalysts using surface-sensitive, x-ray...

  7. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe; Tillotson, Thomas; Hrubesh, Lawrence; Simpson, Randall

    2007-05-01

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  8. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    most promising renewable energy technologies-fuel cells, water splitters, and artificial photosynthesis-rely upon catalysts to expedite the chemical reactions. Catalysts are...

  9. Rare-earth nanoparticles for catalysis | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing new materials based on these two elements is expected to impact favorably the supply chain of the more scarce rare earths. The SULI student in this program will work...

  10. Oxygen Catalysis: The Other Half of the Equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.

    2008-10-01

    Artificial photosynthesis--splitting water with light--is an attractive way to make hydrogen, but what happens to the oxygen? A catalyst that aids in the efficient production of gaseous oxygen improves the viability of this approach.

  11. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for use as catalysts at the heart of a basic chemical reaction known as ... One of the best examples is water splitting. Electricity generated from the sun via solar ...

  12. Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory: Catalytic Testing for Thermochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automation of systems provides: * 247 manned and unmanned operation * Full product analysis via online gas chromatography and residual gas analysis * Logging of process ...

  13. Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norskov, Jens

    2011-05-19

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

  14. Role of acid catalysis in dimethyl ether conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartamella, T.L.; Lee, S.

    1996-12-31

    Acidity plays an important role in the conversion of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) to hydrocarbons and oxygenates. In the conversion to hydrocarbons over zeolite catalyst, Broensted acidity is the main contributor to the first hydrocarbon formed. Here, acidity is also an important factor in determining olefin, paraffin, and aromatic content in the final product distribution. Catalyst life has also been found to be related to acidity content in zeolites. DME conversion to oxygenates is especially dependent on high acidity catalysts. Superacids like BF{sub 3}, HF-BF{sub 3}, and CF{sub 3}COOH have been used in the past for conversion of DME in carbonylation reactions to form methyl acetate and acetic acid at high pressures. Recently, heteropoly acids and their corresponding metal substituted salts have been used to convert DME to industrially important petrochemicals resulting in shorter reaction times and without the use of harsh operating conditions.

  15. Rhodium mediated bond activation: from synthesis to catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Hung-An

    2012-03-06

    Recently, our lab has developed monoanionic tridentate ligand, To{sup R}, showing the corresponding coordination chemistry and catalyst reactivity of magnesium, zirconium, zinc and iridium complexes. This thesis details synthetic chemistry, structural study and catalytic reactivity of the To{sup R}-supported rhodium compounds. Tl[To{sup R}] has been proved to be a superior ligand transfer agent for synthesizing rhodium complexes. The salt metathesis route of Tl[To{sup M}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} and [Rh({mu}- Cl)(COE)]{sub 2} gives To{sup M}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.2) and To{sup M}RhH({eta}{sup 3}-C{sub 8}H{sub 13}) (3.1) respectively while Tl[To{sup P}] with [Rh({mu}-Cl)(CO)]{sub 2} affords To{sup P}Rh(CO){sub 2} (2.3). 2.2 reacts with both strong and weak electrophiles, resulting in the oxazoline N-attacked and the metal center-attacked compounds correspondingly. Using one of the metal center-attacked electrophiles, 2.3 was demonstrated to give high diastereoselectivity. Parallel to COE allylic C-H activation complex 3.1, the propene and allylbenzene allylic C-H activation products have also been synthesized. The subsequent functionalization attempts have been examined by treating with Brnsted acids, Lewis acids, electrophiles, nucleophiles, 1,3-dipolar reagents and reagents containing multiple bonds able to be inserted. Various related complexes have been obtained under these conditions, in which one of the azide insertion compounds reductively eliminates to give an allylic functionalization product stoichiometrically. 3.1 reacts with various primary alcohols to give the decarbonylation dihydride complex To{sup M}Rh(H){sub 2}CO (4.1). 4.1 shows catalytic reactivity for primary alcohol decarbonylation under a photolytic condition. Meanwhile, 2.2 has been found to be more reactive than 4.1 for catalytic alcohol decarbonylation under the same condition. Various complexes and primary alcohols have been investigated as well. The proposed mechanism is based on the stochiometric reactions of the possible metal and organic intermediates. Primary amines, hypothesized to undergo a similar reaction pathway, have been verified to give dehydrogenative coupling product, imines. In the end, the well-developed neutral tridentate Tpm coordinates to the rhodium bis(ethylene) dimer in the presence of TlPF{sub 6} to give the cationic complex, [TpmRh(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}][PF{sub 6}] (5.1). 5.1 serves as the first example of explicit determination of the solid state hapticity, evidenced by X-ray structure, among all the cationic Tpm{sup R}M(C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}{sup +} (Tpm{sup R} = Tpm, Tpm*, M = Rh, Ir) derivatives. The substitution chemistry of this compound has been studied by treating with soft and hard donors. The trimethylphosphine-sbustituted complex activates molecular hydrogen to give the dihydride compound.

  16. Hangman Catalysis for Photo- and Photoelectro- Chemical Activation of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nocera, Daniel

    2014-04-15

    The focus of this DOE program is solar fuels specifically the chemistry for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) from water and the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to water These three reactions are at the heart of renewable energy conversion. The bond-making and bond-breaking chemistry that underpins these transformations is not well understood. We are developing insight into such chemistry by creating a series of ligand constructs that poise an acid-base functionality over a redox active metal platform. These hangman ligands utilize the acid-base functionality to form a secondary coordination sphere that can assist proton movement and facilitate substrate assembly and activation within the molecular cleft. The grant period funding cycle focused on synthesis and reactivity of hangman porphyrins and corroles for HER, OER and ORR.

  17. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CORE CAPABILITIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND CORE CAPABILITIES CCEI 1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction and Overview of Discoveries and Breakthroughs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Core Capabilities: Multiscale Modeling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Solution-phase Chemistry with Accelerated Molecular Dynamics Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  18. Model catalysis by size-selected cluster deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Scott

    2015-11-20

    This report summarizes the accomplishments during the last four years of the subject grant. Results are presented for experiments in which size-selected model catalysts were studied under surface science and aqueous electrochemical conditions. Strong effects of cluster size were found, and by correlating the size effects with size-dependent physical properties of the samples measured by surface science methods, it was possible to deduce mechanistic insights, such as the factors that control the rate-limiting step in the reactions. Results are presented for CO oxidation, CO binding energetics and geometries, and electronic effects under surface science conditions, and for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction, ethanol oxidation reaction, and for oxidation of carbon by water.

  19. ©2013 Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation * University of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass sources and feed them directly into their process, Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis (CFP). Within the reactor, particles of biomass are rapidly heated within seconds to 900 F, ...

  20. The Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation is an Energy Frontier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    State faculty, he has received a number of awards, including a DARPA Young Faculty Award, ... Research in his laboratory is currently sponsored by NSF, DOE-BES, DARPA, AFOSR, AFRL, ...