National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for brn addressed catalysis

  1. Address:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister / Vol. 72, No.Resources |AdditiveAddress:

  2. INSTITUTE FOR INTEGRATED CATALYSIS Catalysis Research for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This work includes catalysis for upgrading biomass feedstocks; for chemical energy storage, retrieval

  3. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Winterowd; Carleton DeTar; Savvas Zafeiropoulos

    2015-09-22

    One of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years has been the discovery and characterization of graphene. A two-dimensional layer of Carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice, graphene exhibits many interesting electronic properties, most notably that the low energy excitations behave as massless Dirac fermions. These excitations interact strongly via the Coulomb interaction and thus non-perturbative methods are necessary. Using methods borrowed from lattice QCD, we study the graphene effective theory in the presence of an external magnetic field. Graphene, along with other $(2+1)$-dimensional field theories, has been predicted to undergo spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry including the formation of a gap as a result of the external magnetic field. This phenomenon is known as magnetic catalysis. Our study investigates magnetic catalysis using a fully non-perturbative approach.

  4. Magnetic Catalysis in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winterowd, Christopher; Zafeiropoulos, Savvas

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important developments in condensed matter physics in recent years has been the discovery and characterization of graphene. A two-dimensional layer of Carbon arranged in a hexagonal lattice, graphene exhibits many interesting electronic properties, most notably that the low energy excitations behave as massless Dirac fermions. These excitations interact strongly via the Coulomb interaction and thus non-perturbative methods are necessary. Using methods borrowed from lattice QCD, we study the graphene effective theory in the presence of an external magnetic field. Graphene, along with other $(2+1)$-dimensional field theories, has been predicted to undergo spontaneous breaking of flavor symmetry including the formation of a gap as a result of the external magnetic field. This phenomenon is known as magnetic catalysis. Our study investigates magnetic catalysis using a fully non-perturbative approach.

  5. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jingguang; Frenkel, Anatoly; Rodriguez, Jose; Adzic, Radoslav; Bare, Simon R.; Hulbert, Steve L.; Karim, Ayman; Mullins, David R.; Overbury, Steve

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  6. Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Electron Microscopy Catalysis Projects: Success Stories from the High...

  7. Catalysis Research for Energy Independence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -conversions to significantly reduce the carbon footprint of the global energy system. We provide a fundamental understandingCatalysis Research for Energy Independence Chemical transformations are at the heart of energy production and use, and catalysis lies at the core of efficiently and effectively using our current energy

  8. Zeolite catalysis: technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinemann, H.

    1980-07-01

    Zeolites have been used as catalysts in industry since the early nineteen sixties. The great majority of commercial applications employ one of three zeolite types: zeolite Y; Mordenite; ZSM-5. By far the largest use of zeolites is in catalytic cracking, and to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. This paper reviews the rapid development of zeolite catalysis and its application in industries such as: the production of gasoline by catalytic cracking of petroleum; isomerization of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ paraffin hydrocarbons; alkylation of aromatics with olefins; xylene isomerization; and conversion of methanol to gasoline.

  9. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development...

  10. Enhanced Micellar Catalysis LDRD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betty, Rita G.; Tucker, Mark David; Taggart, Gretchen; Kinnan, Mark K.; Glen, Crystal Chanea; Rivera, Danielle; Sanchez, Andres; Alam, Todd Michael

    2012-12-01

    The primary goals of the Enhanced Micellar Catalysis project were to gain an understanding of the micellar environment of DF-200, or similar liquid CBW surfactant-based decontaminants, as well as characterize the aerosolized DF-200 droplet distribution and droplet chemistry under baseline ITW rotary atomization conditions. Micellar characterization of limited surfactant solutions was performed externally through the collection and measurement of Small Angle X-Ray Scattering (SAXS) images and Cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy (cryo-TEM) images. Micellar characterization was performed externally at the University of Minnesota's Characterization Facility Center, and at the Argonne National Laboratory Advanced Photon Source facility. A micellar diffusion study was conducted internally at Sandia to measure diffusion constants of surfactants over a concentration range, to estimate the effective micelle diameter, to determine the impact of individual components to the micellar environment in solution, and the impact of combined components to surfactant phase behavior. Aerosolized DF-200 sprays were characterized for particle size and distribution and limited chemical composition. Evaporation rates of aerosolized DF-200 sprays were estimated under a set of baseline ITW nozzle test system parameters.

  11. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: January 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda and presentations from the Catalysis Working Group meeting held January 21, 2015, in Los Alamos, New Mexico.

  12. Catalysis Working Group Meeting: June 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda and presentations from the Catalysis Working Group meeting held on June 8, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia.

  13. Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    This fact sheet provides information about Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

  14. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Kliewer, Christopher J.

    2009-02-02

    The understanding of selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is of paramount importance to our society today. In this review we outline the current state of the art in research on selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis. Current in-situ surface science techniques have revealed several important features of catalytic selectivity. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy has shown us the importance of understanding the reaction intermediates and mechanism of a heterogeneous reaction, and can readily yield information as to the effect of temperature, pressure, catalyst geometry, surface promoters, and catalyst composition on the reaction mechanism. DFT calculations are quickly approaching the ability to assist in the interpretation of observed surface spectra, thereby making surface spectroscopy an even more powerful tool. HP-STM has revealed three vitally important parameters in heterogeneous selectivity: adsorbate mobility, catalyst mobility, and selective site-blocking. The development of size controlled nanoparticles from 0.8 to 10 nm, of controlled shape, and of controlled bimetallic composition has revealed several important variables for catalytic selectivity. Lastly, DFT calculations may be paving the way to guiding the composition choice for multi-metallic heterogeneous catalysis for the intelligent design of catalysts incorporating the many factors of selectivity we have learned.

  15. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applications in Chemical Catalysis Tuesday, October 25, 2011 - 8:00am 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users Conference This workshop, part of the 2011 SSRLLCLS Annual Users...

  16. Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Thompson, Michael R.

    2008-03-11

    The report presents results of a workshop held August 6-8, 2007, by DOE SC Basic Energy Sciences to determine the basic research needs for catalysis research.

  17. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Presentation from the...

  18. Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction Plasma Assisted Catalysis System for NOx Reduction 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Noxtech, Inc. 2002deerslone.pdf More...

  19. Thermochemical Conversion: Using Heat and Catalysis to Make Biofuels...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Catalysis to Make Biofuels and Bioproducts The Bioenergy Technologies Office works with industry to develop pathways that use heat, pressure, and catalysis to convert domestic,...

  20. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering ETH Zurich Head of Laboratory for Catalysis and Sustainable Chemistry (LSK) Swiss...

  1. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration, and the development of ways to imprint chiral centers on achiral solid surfaces. Chiral catalysis is not only a problem of great importance in its own right, but also the ultimate test of how to control selectivity in catalysis. The time is ripe for fundamental work in heterogeneous chiral catalysis to provide the U.S. with a leadership role in developing the next generation of catalytic processes for medicinal and agrochemical manufacturing. Our team provides the required expertise for a synergistic and comprehensive integration of physical and chemical experimentation with solid state and molecular reactivity theories to solve this problem.

  2. DOE Laboratory Catalysis Research Symposium - Abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunham, T.

    1999-02-01

    The conference consisted of two sessions with the following subtopics: (1) Heterogeneous Session: Novel Catalytic Materials; Photocatalysis; Novel Processing Conditions; Metals and Sulfides; Nuclear Magnetic Resonance; Metal Oxides and Partial Oxidation; Electrocatalysis; and Automotive Catalysis. (2) Homogeneous Catalysis: H-Transfer and Alkane Functionalization; Biocatalysis; Oxidation and Photocatalysis; and Novel Medical, Methods, and Catalyzed Reactions.

  3. Nanocrystal assembly for tandem catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor; Yamada, Yusuke; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu

    2014-10-14

    The present invention provides a nanocrystal tandem catalyst comprising at least two metal-metal oxide interfaces for the catalysis of sequential reactions. One embodiment utilizes a nanocrystal bilayer structure formed by assembling sub-10 nm platinum and cerium oxide nanocube monolayers on a silica substrate. The two distinct metal-metal oxide interfaces, CeO.sub.2--Pt and Pt--SiO.sub.2, can be used to catalyze two distinct sequential reactions. The CeO.sub.2--Pt interface catalyzed methanol decomposition to produce CO and H.sub.2, which were then subsequently used for ethylene hydroformylation catalyzed by the nearby Pt--SiO.sub.2 interface. Consequently, propanal was selectively produced on this nanocrystal bilayer tandem catalyst.

  4. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    A. Ethylene and its industrial derivatives. Ernst Bern,1974, 8(159). and its industrial Ernst Bern, 1973. u.s.A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS Heinz Heinemann TWO-

  5. Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of catalysis of coal gasification at elevated pressures. Evaluation of 20 compounds at 850sup 0C Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of catalysis of coal...

  6. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B

    2000-01-20

    In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.

  7. Geometrically induced magnetic catalysis and critical dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonino Flachi; Kenji Fukushima; Vincenzo Vitagliano

    2015-04-27

    We discuss the combined effect of magnetic fields and geometry in interacting fermionic systems. At leading order in the heat-kernel expansion, the infrared singularity (that in flat space leads to the magnetic catalysis) is regulated by the chiral gap effect, and the catalysis is deactivated by the effect of the scalar curvature. We discover that an infrared singularity is found in higher-order terms that mix the magnetic field with curvature, and these lead to a novel form of geometrically induced magnetic catalysis. The dynamical mass squared is then modified not only due to the chiral gap effect by an amount proportional to the curvature, but also by a magnetic shift $\\propto (4-D)eB$, where $D$ represents the number of space-time dimensions. We argue that $D=4$ is a critical dimension across which the behavior of the magnetic shift changes qualitatively.

  8. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations betweenHomogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somorjai , G.A.

    2007-06-11

    The International Symposium on Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis (ISHHC) has a long and distinguished history. Since 1974, in Brussels, this event has been held in Lyon, France (1977), Groeningen, The Netherlands (1981); Asilomar, California (1983); Novosibirsk, Russia (1986); Pisa, Italy (1989); Tokyo, Japan (1992); Balatonfuered, Hungary (1995); Southampton, United Kingdom (1999); Lyon, France (2001); Evanston, Illinois (2001) and Florence, Italy (2005). The aim of this international conference in Berkeley is to bring together practitioners in the three fields of catalysis, heterogeneous, homogeneous and enzyme, which utilize mostly nanosize particles. Recent advances in instrumentation, synthesis and reaction studies permit the nanoscale characterization of the catalyst systems, often for the same reaction, under similar experimental conditions. It is hoped that this circumstance will permit the development of correlations of these three different fields of catalysis on the molecular level. To further this goal we aim to uncover and focus on common concepts that emerge from nanoscale studies of structures and dynamics of the three types of catalysts. Another area of focus that will be addressed is the impact on and correlation of nanosciences with catalysis. There is information on the electronic and atomic structures of nanoparticles and their dynamics that should have importance in catalyst design and catalytic activity and selectivity.

  9. PETER DAVID JOHNSON Home Address: Work Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    for the Advancement of Science 2009 Outstanding Referee, Journals of the American Physical Society 2011 APS Oliver E1 PETER DAVID JOHNSON Home Address: Work Address: 4 Terrell Lane CMPMSD Stony Brook Physics 510B NY 11790 Brookhaven National Laboratory USA Upton NY 11973 Education 1972 B.Sc. Physics, Imperial College

  10. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefelmeyer, James D.; Koodali, Ranjit; Sereda, Grigoriy; Engebretson, Dan; Fong, Hao; Puszynski, Jan; Shende, Rajesh; Ahrenkiel, Phil

    2012-03-13

    The South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG) is a collaborative project with mission to develop advanced catalysts for energy conversion with two primary goals: (1) develop photocatalytic systems in which polyfunctionalized TiO2 are the basis for hydrogen/oxygen synthesis from water and sunlight (solar fuels group), (2) develop new materials for hydrogen utilization in fuel cells (fuel cell group). In tandem, these technologies complete a closed chemical cycle with zero emissions.

  11. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yimin; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-05-12

    In this perspective, we present an overview of nanoscience applications in catalysis, energy conversion, and energy conservation technologies. We discuss how novel physical and chemical properties of nanomaterials can be applied and engineered to meet the advanced material requirements in the new generation of chemical and energy conversion devices. We highlight some of the latest advances in these nanotechnologies and provide an outlook at the major challenges for further developments.

  12. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Ken Rapp, Liyu Li, Jonathan Male, Dave King Pacific Northwest National...

  13. Low-Temperature Hydrocarbon/CO Oxidation Catalysis in Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (OFCVT). deer07rappe.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Temperature HydrocarbonCO Oxidation Catalysis in Support of HCCI Emission Control Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of...

  14. Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis for Hydrogen Generation | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to APS Science Highlights rss feed Blue Ruthenium Dimer Catalysis for Hydrogen Generation APRIL 15, 2013 Bookmark and Share Key intermediates in the water oxidation catalytic...

  15. Lean NOx Catalysis Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications Lean-NOx Catalyst Development for Diesel Engine Applications Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions Control Fuel Effects on...

  16. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between Theory and Experiments Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap between Theory and Experiments Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  17. Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Catalysis by Design: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Experiments at Nanoscale Level Studies on a simple platinum-alumina...

  18. Theoretical/Computational Tools for Energy-Relevant Catalysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TheoreticalComputational Tools for Energy-Relevant Catalysis FWPProject Description: Project Leader(s): James Evans, Mark Gordon Principal Investigators: James Evans, Mark Gordon...

  19. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Coates, Leighton; Herwig, Kenneth W; Kidder, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes the Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis, held at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 16 and 17, 2010. The goal of the Workshop was to bring experts in heterogeneous catalysis and biocatalysis together with neutron scattering experimenters to identify ways to attack new problems, especially Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, using neutron scattering. The Workshop locale was motivated by the neutron capabilities at ORNL, including the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the new and developing instrumentation at the SNS. Approximately 90 researchers met for 1 1/2 days with oral presentations and breakout sessions. Oral presentations were divided into five topical sessions aimed at a discussion of Grand Challenge problems in catalysis, dynamics studies, structure characterization, biocatalysis, and computational methods. Eleven internationally known invited experts spoke in these sessions. The Workshop was intended both to educate catalyst experts about the methods and possibilities of neutron methods and to educate the neutron community about the methods and scientific challenges in catalysis. Above all, it was intended to inspire new research ideas among the attendees. All attendees were asked to participate in one or more of three breakout sessions to share ideas and propose new experiments that could be performed using the ORNL neutron facilities. The Workshop was expected to lead to proposals for beam time at either the HFIR or the SNS; therefore, it was expected that each breakout session would identify a few experiments or proof-of-principle experiments and a leader who would pursue a proposal after the Workshop. Also, a refereed review article will be submitted to a prominent journal to present research and ideas illustrating the benefits and possibilities of neutron methods for catalysis research.

  20. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somorjai Ed., G.A.

    2007-01-01

    Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of ChemicalAcademy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, P. R. China CarbonApplied Catalysis Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical

  1. Neutrons for Catalysis: A Workshop on Neutron Scattering Techniques for Studies in Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    -EM Fischer Tropsch Catalysis on Fe- or Co-catalysts, ,,CTL" Coal to Liquids ­ ,a rough (?) analogy #12;Peter Albers, AQ-EM Carbonaceous Deposits on Catalysts #12;Peter Albers, AQ-EM IINS on Coked Catalysts from Industrial Plants High-temperature and low-temperature cokes deposited on catalysts during

  2. Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolization: Catalysis by Hemilabile Ligands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Enolization: Catalysis by Hemilabile Ligands Antonio Ramirez of a lithium diisopropylamide (LDA)-mediated ester enolization. Hemilabile amino ether MeOCH2CH2NMe2, binding-based catalysis are thwarted by the occlusion of the catalyst on the lithium salt products and byproducts (eq 1

  3. Dynamic control of catalysis within biological cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biman Jana; Biman Bagchi

    2011-05-26

    We develop a theory of enzyme catalysis within biological cells where the substrate concentration [S](t) is time dependent, in contrast to the Michaelis-Menten theory that assumes a steady state. We find that the time varying concentration can combine, in a non-linear way, with the ruggedness of the free energy landscape of enzymes (discovered both in single molecule studies and in simulations) to provide a highly efficient switch (or, bifurcation) between two catalytically active states, at a critical substrate concentration. This allows a dynamic control of product synthesis in cell.

  4. Catalysis and Synthesis | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports fromSheetsCascadia AnalysisCatalysis and Synthesis

  5. Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctober 1996Technologies /JuneOperatingBusinessin Catalysis

  6. Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Lean Natural Gas Engine Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, II, James E; Storey, John Morse; Theiss, Timothy J; Ponnusamy, Senthil; Ferguson, Harley Douglas; Williams, Aaron M; Tassitano, James B

    2007-09-01

    Distributed energy is an approach for meeting energy needs that has several advantages. Distributed energy improves energy security during natural disasters or terrorist actions, improves transmission grid reliability by reducing grid load, and enhances power quality through voltage support and reactive power. In addition, distributed energy can be efficient since transmission losses are minimized. One prime mover for distributed energy is the natural gas reciprocating engine generator set. Natural gas reciprocating engines are flexible and scalable solutions for many distributed energy needs. The engines can be run continuously or occasionally as peak demand requires, and their operation and maintenance is straightforward. Furthermore, system efficiencies can be maximized when natural gas reciprocating engines are combined with thermal energy recovery for cooling, heating, and power applications. Expansion of natural gas reciprocating engines for distributed energy is dependent on several factors, but two prominent factors are efficiency and emissions. Efficiencies must be high enough to enable low operating costs, and emissions must be low enough to permit significant operation hours, especially in non-attainment areas where emissions are stringently regulated. To address these issues the U.S. Department of Energy and the California Energy Commission launched research and development programs called Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) and Advanced Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engines (ARICE), respectively. Fuel efficiency and low emissions are two primary goals of these programs. The work presented here was funded by the ARES program and, thus, addresses the ARES 2010 goals of 50% thermal efficiency (fuel efficiency) and <0.1 g/bhp-hr emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx). A summary of the goals for the ARES program is given in Table 1-1. ARICE 2007 goals are 45% thermal efficiency and <0.015 g/bhp-hr NOx. Several approaches for improving the efficiency and emissions of natural gas reciprocating engines are being pursued. Approaches include: stoichiometric engine operation with exhaust gas recirculation and three-way catalysis, advanced combustion modes such as homogeneous charge compression ignition, and extension of the lean combustion limit with advanced ignition concepts and/or hydrogen mixing. The research presented here addresses the technical approach of combining efficient lean spark-ignited natural gas combustion with low emissions obtained from a lean NOx trap catalyst aftertreatment system. This approach can be applied to current lean engine technology or advanced lean engines that may result from related efforts in lean limit extension. Furthermore, the lean NOx trap technology has synergy with hydrogen-assisted lean limit extension since hydrogen is produced from natural gas during the lean NOx trap catalyst system process. The approach is also applicable to other lean engines such as diesel engines, natural gas turbines, and lean gasoline engines; other research activities have focused on those applications. Some commercialization of the technology has occurred for automotive applications (both diesel and lean gasoline engine vehicles) and natural gas turbines for stationary power. The research here specifically addresses barriers to commercialization of the technology for large lean natural gas reciprocating engines for stationary power. The report presented here is a comprehensive collection of research conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on lean NOx trap catalysis for lean natural gas reciprocating engines. The research was performed in the Department of Energy's ARES program from 2003 to 2007 and covers several aspects of the technology. All studies were conducted at ORNL on a Cummins C8.3G+ natural gas engine chosen based on industry input to simulate large lean natural gas engines. Specific technical areas addressed by the research include: NOx reduction efficiency, partial oxidation and reforming chemistry, and the effects of sulfur poisons on the partial oxidation

  7. Frontiers in Catalysis Science and Engineering Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineering School of Chemistry and Biochemistry J. Carl & Sheila Pirkle Faculty Fellow Abstract Metal salenFrontiers in Catalysis Science and Engineering Seminar Series Heterogenized M-Salen Catalysts

  8. Materials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    the next generation of catalysts, separation processes, gas and liquid storage technologiesMaterials and interfaces for catalysis, separation, storage, and environmental applications Advanced materials and interfaces (including surfaces, thin films, and membranes) are a key to developing

  9. Catalysis Working Group Kick-Off Meeting Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agenda for the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

  10. Theoretical investigation of solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lee-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Solar energy conversion and water oxidation catalysis are two great scientific and engineering challenges that will play pivotal roles in a future sustainable energy economy. In this work, I apply electronic structure ...

  11. Addressing Water Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewith, Robbie

    Addressing Water Contamination without Using Chemicals For more information contact WIPO at: World challenge Farmers and gardeners apply pesticides to their crops. Contaminated waters are released when-off contaminates local water supplies and pollutes the environment. As a consequence a range of pesticides may

  12. New and Future Developments in Catalysis. Activation of Carbon Dioxide, 1st edition Supporting Information to Chapter 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    New and Future Developments in Catalysis. Activation of Carbon Dioxide, 1st Developments in Catalysis. Activation of Carbon Dioxide, 1st edition S2 Cartesian

  13. Mechanisms and Design in Homogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark R. Landis

    2010-05-26

    The major goal of this research is the determination of structure-activity relationships with respect to the elementary reactions that constitute catalytic alkene polymerization. Three classes of structure-activity relationships pertain to this work: (1) The influence of the nature of the propagating alkyl (secondary, primary, ?-substituted) and alkene monomer on the rates and selectivity of propagation, termination, isomerization, hydrogenolysis, etc. Such analyses are possible by direct observation methods (2) Influence of Cp-ligand substituents on fundamental reaction steps by application of direct observation and quenched-flow methods (3) Influence of counterion and solvent polarity on rates and selectivities of elementary steps during polymerization. At this point our rate of progress is limited by a combination of inefficiencies in some data collection modes (particularly quenched-flow studies) and by a relatively narrow range of accessible rates (especially for the NMR methods). Therefore, the bulk of our work concerns the development NMR, mass spectrometric, and chromatographic methods for probing catalytic reactions in a high throughput mode. Although these methods will be applied in the context of alkene polymerization, the NMR and mass spectrometric methods are completely general and will benefit research in all areas of catalysis.

  14. Some General Themes in Catalysis at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, John C.

    2012-07-19

    Some general themes in catalysis at LANL are: (1) Storage and release of energy within chemical bonds (e.g. H{sub 2} storage in and release from covalent bonds, N{sub 2} functionalization, CO{sub 2} functionalization, H{sub 2} oxidation/evolution, O{sub 2} reduction/evolution); (2) Can we control the chemistry of reactive substrates to effect energy relevant transformations in non-traditional media (e.g. can we promote C-C couplings, dehydrations, or hydrogenations in water under relatively mild conditions)? (3) Can we supplant precious metal or rare earth catalysts to effect these transformations, by using earth abundant metals/elements instead? Can we use organocatalysis and circumvent the use of metals completely? (4) Can we improve upon existing rare earth catalyst systems (e.g. in rare earth oxides pertinent to fluid cracking or polymerization) and reduce amounts required for catalytic efficacy? Carbohydrates can be accessed from non-food based biomass sources such as woody residues and switchgrass. After extracted from the plant source, our goal is to upgrade these classes of molecules into useful fuels.

  15. Geek-Up[3.11.2011]: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Geek-Up3.11.2011: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source Tools Geek-Up3.11.2011: Energy Efficiency, Catalysis and Open Source Tools March 11, 2011 - 4:37pm Addthis L....

  16. ISHHC XIII International Symposium on the Relations between Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somorjai Ed., G.A.

    2007-01-01

    K. Lee Semiconductor Photocatalysis in Advanced Oxidationthermal) catalysis or photocatalysis on nanoporous supportswith Heterogeneous Photocatalysis using Nanostructured

  17. Final technical report, Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metiu, Horia

    2014-08-22

    We organized in August 2013 a “Symposium on New Theoretical Concepts and Directions in Catalysis” with the participation of 20 invited distinguished quantum chemists and other researchers who use computations to study catalysis. Symposium website; http://catalysis.cnsi.ucsb.edu/

  18. Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  19. Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, George A.

    2006-10-17

    The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic system that performs both esterification (of free fatty acids) and transesterification (of soybean oil) in a one-pot fashion. This will allow the biodiesel producers to use the aforementioned cheap feedstocks without any pretreatment. In addition, the catalyst system is heterogeneous and is highly recyclable and reusable. Although markets currently exist for glycerin, concern is mounting that the price of glycerin may plummet to $.05 - $.10 per pound if future production exceeds demand. Developing a system to make high value chemicals such as 1,3-propanediol from the glycerin stream will add value for biodiesel producers who implement the new technology. Given the fact that both DuPont and Shell chemicals have announced the commercialization of two new PDO-based polymers, a rapid increase of market demand for a cheaper PDO source is very likely. 4. Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives From our progress reports, the four areas are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D)

  20. Frontiers in Catalysis Science and Engineering Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontiers in Catalysis Science and Engineering Seminar Series H· Transfer from Transition-Metal Hydrides. Applications to Radical Polymerizations and Cyclizations Presented by... Jack R. Norton(II) metalloradical, but both the metalloradical and the hydride are present during the operation of newer (Cr

  1. Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Homogeneous Catalysis Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol Catalyzed, with CŔH Activation (generated by dissolution[6] of Au2O3) react with methane at 1808C to selectively generate methanol (as a mixture of the ester and methanol) in high yield (Table 1, entries 1 and 2). As expected, the irreversible

  2. Frontiers in Catalysis Science and Engineering Seminar Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of 5-HMF and derivatives Presented by... Prof. Z Conrad Zhang · Industrial Catalysis · Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics · Dalian, China Abstract One of the most notable advances toward biorefinery in recent. This talk covers the recent progress in three areas of research in my laboratory at the Dalian Institute

  3. JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS 177, 343351 (1998) ARTICLE NO. CA982143

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    1998-01-01

    - modynamically favorable at high temperatures, but often leads to high yields of coke and smaller hydrocarbons, but it requires a selective catalyst in order to avoid complete oxidation to CO and CO2. A number of recentJOURNAL OF CATALYSIS 177, 343­351 (1998) ARTICLE NO. CA982143 Structure and Properties of Vanadium

  4. Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Ortholithiations: Lithium Chloride Catalysis Lekha Gupta, 2008 Ortholithiations of a range of arenes mediated by lithium diisopropylamide (LDA) in THF at -78 °C protocols with unpurified commercial samples of n-butyl- lithium to prepare LDA or commercially available

  5. SouthWest Catalysis Society 2011 Spring Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    , TX 77478 scott.mitchell@sabicusa.com Lin Luo The Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. Freeport, TX of Texas A&M University to co-sponsor a symposium honoring Prof. Jack Lunsford for his accomplishments Award for Excellence in Applied Catalysis later in the day. On-site registration will begin at 7:30 AM

  6. Synergism of Catalysis and Reaction Center Rehybridization. A Novel Mode of Catalysis in the Hydrolysis of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Michael

    in the Hydrolysis of Carbon Dioxide Michael Lewis and Rainer Glaser* Contribution from the Department of Chemistry dioxide in carbonic anhydrase has long been an active area of research due to its fundamental importance-known that the hydrolysis of carbon dioxide in solution proceeds with catalysis from the solvent;3 however the structure

  7. This issue of Topics in Catalysis is devoted to ``Nanotechnology in Catalysis'' and covers some of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resasco, Daniel

    silica, catalyst supports and catalytic membranes. Nanosized hollow spheres (silica or carbon) have been that generates the possibility of creating controlled porosity and molecular sieving effects. Gold nanoparticles attention by many catalysis research groups because of their very high carbon monoxide oxidation catalytic

  8. Recent advances of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides for catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhu, Huiyuan; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-09-21

    There is a need to reduce the use of noble metal elements especially in the field of catalysis, where noble metals are ubiquitously applied. To this end, perovskite oxides, an important class of mixed oxide, have been attracting increasing attention for decades as potential replacements. Benefiting from the extraordinary tunability of their compositions and structures, perovskite oxides can be rationally tailored and equipped with targeted physical and chemical properties e.g. redox behavior, oxygen mobility, and ion conductivity for enhanced catalysis. Recently, the development of highly efficient perovskite oxide catalysts has been extensively studied. This review article summarizes the recent developmentmore »of lanthanum-based perovskite oxides as advanced catalysts for both energy conversion applications and traditional heterogeneous reactions.« less

  9. Plasma-Activated Lean NOx Catalysis for Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-Duty NOx Emissions Control: Reformer-Assisted vs. Plasma-Facilitated Lean NOx Catalysis Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma-assisted...

  10. Support for U.S. Participants at the 15th International Congress on Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, Israel E.

    2013-08-05

    The grant was used to partially assist the travel expenses of U.S. academic scientists to attend the 15th International Congress on Catalysis. The conference was held in Munich, Germany from July 1-6, 2012. The importance of the International Congress was to bring together the international community of faculty members who participate in catalysis research, and to share information that would lead to further developments and directions in the field of study. Graduate students and Post Docs were invited to apply for travel assistance based on criteria established by the North American Catalysis Society (NACS) and the local Catalysis Clubs.

  11. KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Staged O2 Introduction and Selective H2 Combustion during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Staged O2 Introduction and Selective H2 Combustion2 increased the selectivity of propane conversion to aromatics o

  12. Hydrogen catalysis and scavenging action of Pd-POSS nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiti, A; Gee, R H; Maxwell, R; Saab, A

    2007-02-01

    Prompted by the need for a self-supported, chemically stable, and functionally flexible catalytic nanoparticle system, we explore a system involving Pd clusters coated with a monolayer of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) cages. With an initial theoretical focus on hydrogen catalysis and sequestration in the Pd-POSS system, we report Density Functional Theory (DFT) results on POSS binding energies to the Pd(110) surface, hydrogen storing ability of POSS, and possible pathways of hydrogen radicals from the catalyst surface to unsaturated bonds away from the surface.

  13. Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-13

    Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

  14. USD Catalysis Group for Alternative Energy - Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoefelmeyer, James

    2014-10-03

    I. Project Summary Catalytic processes are a major technological underpinning of modern society, and are essential to the energy sector in the processing of chemical fuels from natural resources, fine chemicals synthesis, and energy conversion. Advances in catalyst technology are enormously valuable since these lead to reduced chemical waste, reduced energy loss, and reduced costs. New energy technologies, which are critical to future economic growth, are also heavily reliant on catalysts, including fuel cells and photo-electrochemical cells. Currently, the state of South Dakota is underdeveloped in terms of research infrastructure related to catalysis. If South Dakota intends to participate in significant economic growth opportunities that result from advances in catalyst technology, then this area of research needs to be made a high priority for investment. To this end, a focused research effort is proposed in which investigators from The University of South Dakota (USD) and The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (SDSMT) will contribute to form the South Dakota Catalysis Group (SDCG). The multidisciplinary team of the (SDCG) include: (USD) Dan Engebretson, James Hoefelmeyer, Ranjit Koodali, and Grigoriy Sereda; (SDSMT) Phil Scott Ahrenkiel, Hao Fong, Jan Puszynski, Rajesh Shende, and Jacek Swiatkiewicz. The group is well suited to engage in a collaborative project due to the resources available within the existing programs. Activities within the SDCG will be monitored through an external committee consisting of three distinguished professors in chemistry. The committee will provide expert advice and recommendations to the SDCG. Advisory meetings in which committee members interact with South Dakota investigators will be accompanied by individual oral and poster presentations in a materials and catalysis symposium. The symposium will attract prominent scientists, and will enhance the visibility of research in the state of South Dakota. The SDCG requests funding through the Department of Energy (DoE) to establish this multidisciplinary research cluster in the area of catalysis. This long-term approach includes synthesis, characterization, catalyst evaluation, modeling, and scale-up. The project includes plans to acquire instrumentation critical to enabling competitive research. These acquisitions will complement existing resources in the state. The effect of implementation of the proposed efforts will be to significantly enhance state infrastructure in personnel and equipment, and lead to a nationally and internationally recognized research center.

  15. Quark Antiscreening at Strong Magnetic Field and Inverse Magnetic Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. J. Ferrer; V. de la Incera; X. J. Wen

    2015-02-17

    The dependence of the QCD coupling constant with a strong magnetic field and the implications for the critical temperature of the chiral phase transition are investigated. It is found that the coupling constant becomes anisotropic in a strong magnetic field and that the quarks, confined by the field to the lowest Landau level where they pair with antiquarks, produce an antiscreening effect. These results lead to inverse magnetic catalysis, providing a natural explanation for the behavior of the critical temperature in the strong-field region.

  16. 2012 Chinese Journal of Catalysis Vol. 33 No. 10 : 0253-9837(2012)10-1706-06 DOI: 10.3724/SP.J.1088.2012.20617 : 17061711

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weixue

    2012-01-01

    of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning, China

  17. Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities at Portsmouth and Paducah Addressing Deferred Maintenance, Infrastructure Costs, and Excess Facilities...

  18. DEPARTMENT OF DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    in this department. And the Advanced Energy Initiative, which proposes to significantly increase our national investment in alternative fuel and clean energy technologies. It's about a 22 percent increase up to a levelU.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT ADDRESS WITH SECRETARY OF ENERGY SAMUEL W. BODMAN

  19. Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowd, Daniel

    ID-SAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validity Enforcement Toby Ehrenkranz ://netsec.cs.uoregon.edu #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE What's The Problem? While routers know which direction a packet should are unreliable ID-SAVE attacks this root cause! 1 #12;Ehrenkranz WiP ID-SAVE ID-SAVE Basics Create and maintain

  20. State of the Lab Address

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  1. State of the Lab Address

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2010-01-01

    In his third-annual State of the Lab address, Ames Laboratory Director Alex King called the past year one of "quiet but strong progress" and called for Ames Laboratory to continue to build on its strengths while responding to changing expectations for energy research.

  2. Catalysis of Electroweak Baryogenesis via Fermionic Higgs Portal Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Chao; Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf

    2015-02-27

    We investigate catalysis of electroweak baryogenesis by fermionic Higgs portal dark matter using a two Higgs doublet model augmented by vector-like fermions. The lightest neutral fermion mass eigenstate provides a viable dark matter candidate in the presence of a stabilizing symmetry Z_2 or gauged U(1)_D symmetry. Allowing for a non-vanishing CP-violating phase in the lowest-dimension Higgs portal dark matter interactions allows generation of the observed dark matter relic density while evading direct detection bounds. The same phase provides a source for electroweak baryogenesis. We show that it is possible to obtain the observed abundances of visible and dark matter while satisfying present bounds from electric dipole moment (EDM) searches and direct detection experiments. Improving the present electron (neutron) EDM sensitivity by one (two) orders of magnitude would provide a conclusive test of this scenario.

  3. Highly efficient solid state catalysis by reconstructed (001) Ceria surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solovyov, VF; Ozaki, T; Atrei, A; Wu, LJ; Al-Mahboob, A; Sadowski, JT; Tong, X; Nykypanchuk, D; Li, Q

    2014-04-10

    Substrate engineering is a key factor in the synthesis of new complex materials. The substrate surface has to be conditioned in order to minimize the energy threshold for the formation of the desired phase or to enhance the catalytic activity of the substrate. The mechanism of the substrate activity, especially of technologically relevant oxide surfaces, is poorly understood. Here we design and synthesize several distinct and stable CeO2 (001) surface reconstructions which are used to grow epitaxial films of the high-temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7. The film grown on the substrate having the longest, fourfold period, reconstruction exhibits a twofold increase in performance over surfaces with shorter period reconstructions. This is explained by the crossover between the nucleation site dimensions and the period of the surface reconstruction. This result opens a new avenue for catalysis mediated solid state synthesis.

  4. Inverse magnetic catalysis in holographic models of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiminad A. Mamo

    2015-05-11

    We study the effect of magnetic field $B$ on the critical temperature $T_{c}$ of the confinement-deconfinement phase transition in hard-wall AdS/QCD, and holographic duals of flavored and unflavored $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super-Yang Mills theories on $\\mathbb{R}^3\\times \\rm S^1$. For all of the holographic models, we find that $T_{c}(B)$ decreases with increasing magnetic field $B\\ll T^2$, consistent with the inverse magnetic catalysis recently observed in lattice QCD for $B\\lesssim 1~GeV^2$. We also predict that, for large magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$, the critical temperature $T_{c}(B)$, eventually, starts to increase with increasing magnetic field $B\\gg T^2$ and asymptotes to a constant value.

  5. Theoretical Investigation of Uranyl Dihydroxide: Oxo Ligand Exchange, Water Catalysis, and Vibrational Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Theoretical Investigation of Uranyl Dihydroxide: Oxo Ligand Exchange, Water Catalysis is employed to investigate uranyl dihydroxide, UO2(OH)2, isomerization reaction energy barriers, including those occurring via proton shuttles. The ground-state structure of a uranyl dihydroxide complex

  6. Applied Catalysis A: General 243 (2003) 1524 On the potential role of hydroxyl groups in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    2003-01-01

    Applied Catalysis A: General 243 (2003) 15­24 On the potential role of hydroxyl groups in CO of metallic Au atoms and a cationic Au with a hydroxyl group. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved

  7. Transformation of Sorbitol to Biofuels by Heterogeneous Catalysis: Chemical and Industrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Transformation of Sorbitol to Biofuels by Heterogeneous Catalysis: Chemical and Industrial ainsi que des exemples d'applications industrielles. Abstract -- Transformation of Sorbitol to Biofuels and biodiesel production led to first generation biofuels. Nowadays, research is focused on lignocellulosic

  8. Catalysis Today 215 (2013) 3642 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weixue

    2013-01-01

    , Wei-Xue Li State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 14 December 2012 Received

  9. Dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and applications to catalysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yanhui

    2004-09-30

    The research in this dissertation examines the chemistry and applications of dendrimers in homogeneous catalysis. We examined interactions between dendrimers and charged probe molecules, prepared dendrimer-encapsulated metal nanoparticles...

  10. Synergism of Catalysis and Reaction Center Rehybridization. An ab Initio Study of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Michael

    were also obtained for the hydrolysis of SO3.18 Obviously, the catalysis arises in all of these cases/mol, and this result can be rationalized just as in the case of the other heterocumulenes and SO3

  11. Molecular computations for reactions and phase transitions: applications to protein stabilization, hydrates and catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Brian J.

    In this work we have made significant contributions in three different areas of interest: therapeutic protein stabilization, thermodynamics of natural gas clathrate-hydrates, and zeolite catalysis. In all three fields, ...

  12. Addressing the workforce pipeline challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Bond; Kevin Kostelnik; Richard Holman

    2006-11-01

    A secure and affordable energy supply is essential for achieving U.S. national security, in continuing U.S. prosperity and in laying the foundations to enable future economic growth. To meet this goal the next generation energy workforce in the U.S., in particular those needed to support instrumentation, controls and advanced operations and maintenance, is a critical element. The workforce is aging and a new workforce pipeline, to support both current generation and new build has yet to be established. The paper reviews the challenges and some actions being taken to address this need.

  13. Addresses and Phone Numbers | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge KiosksAbout AwardedAcronyms ThisNationalAddresses and

  14. Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Address Power Reliability Concerns Raised as a Result of Pending Environmental Regulations for Electric Generation Stations Recommendations to Address Power Reliability Concerns...

  15. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening...

  16. Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling Interagency Collaboration to Address Environmental Impacts of Shale Gas Drilling April 23, 2013 -...

  17. Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snir, Marc [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wisniewski, Robert [Intel Corporation] [Intel Corporation; Abraham, Jacob [unknown] [unknown; Adve, Sarita [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign] [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Bagchi, Saurabh [Purdue University] [Purdue University; Balaji, Pavan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Belak, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Bose, Pradip [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center; Cappello, Franck [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Carlson, Bill [unknown] [unknown; Chien, Andrew [University of Chicago] [University of Chicago; Coteus, Paul [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center] [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center; DeBardeleben, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Diniz, Pedro [University of Southern California] [University of Southern California; Engelmann, Christian [ORNL] [ORNL; Erez, Mattan [University of Texas at Austin] [University of Texas at Austin; Fazzari, Saverio [Booz Allen Hamilton] [Booz Allen Hamilton; Geist, Al [ORNL] [ORNL; Gupta, Rinku [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Johnson, Fred [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN] [Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Oak Ridge, TN; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Leyffer, Sven [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Liberty, Dean [AMD] [AMD; Mitra, Subhasish [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Munson, Todd [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Schreiber, Rob [HP Labs] [HP Labs; Stearley, Jon [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Van Hensbergen, Eric [ARM] [ARM

    2014-01-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on Addressing failures in exascale computing' held in Park City, Utah, 4-11 August 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system, discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system, and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia, and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  18. Addressing failures in exascale computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snir, Marc; Wisniewski, Robert W.; Abraham, Jacob A.; Adve, Sarita; Bagchi, Saurabh; Balaji, Pavan; Belak, Jim; Bose, Pradip; Cappello, Franck; Carlson, William; Chien, Andrew A.; Coteus, Paul; Debardeleben, Nathan A.; Diniz, Pedro; Engelmann, Christian; Erez, Mattan; Saverio, Fazzari; Geist, Al; Gupta, Rinku; Johnson, Fred; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Leyffer, Sven; Liberty, Dean; Mitra, Subhasish; Munson, Todd; Schreiber, Robert; Stearly, Jon; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2014-05-01

    We present here a report produced by a workshop on “Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing” held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of an exascale system; and build on those results, examining potential solutions from both a hardware and software perspective and focusing on a combined approach. The workshop brought together participants with expertise in applications, system software, and hardware; they came from industry, government, and academia; and their interests ranged from theory to implementation. The combination allowed broad and comprehensive discussions and led to this document, which summarizes and builds on those discussions.

  19. Application of solid ash based catalysts in heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaobin Wang

    2008-10-01

    Solid wastes, fly ash, and bottom ash are generated from coal and biomass combustion. Fly ash is mainly composed of various metal oxides and possesses higher thermal stability. Utilization of fly ash for other industrial applications provides a cost-effective and environmentally friendly way of recycling this solid waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects. On the one hand, due to the higher stability of its major component, aluminosilicates, fly ash could be employed as catalyst support by impregnation of other active components for various reactions. On the other hand, other chemical compounds in fly ash such as Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} could also provide an active component making fly ash a catalyst for some reactions. In this paper, physicochemical properties of fly ash and its applications for heterogeneous catalysis as a catalyst support or catalyst in a variety of catalytic reactions were reviewed. Fly-ash-supported catalysts have shown good catalytic activities for H{sub 2} production, deSOx, deNOx, hydrocarbon oxidation, and hydrocracking, which are comparable to commercially used catalysts. As a catalyst itself, fly ash can also be effective for gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds, aqueous-phase oxidation of organics, solid plastic pyrolysis, and solvent-free organic synthesis. 107 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Address conversion unit for multiprocessor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fava, T.F.; Lary, R.F.; Blackledge, R.

    1987-03-03

    An address conversion unit is described for use in one processor in a multi-processor data processing system including a common memory, the processors and common memory being interconnected by a common bus including means for transferring address signals defining a common address space. The processor includes private bus means including means for transferring signals including address signals defining a private address space. A processor unit means is connected to the private bus means and includes means for transmitting and receiving signals including address signals over the private bus means for engaging in data transfers thereover. The address conversion unit is connected to the private bus means and common bus means for receiving address signals over the private bus means from the processor unit means in the private address space. The unit comprises: A. pointer storage means for storing a pointer identifying a portion of the common bus memory space; B. pointer generation means connected to receive a common bus address and for generating a pointer in response thereto for storage in the pointer storage means; and C. common bus address generation means connected to the private bus and the pointer storage means for receiving an address from the processor unit means and for generating a common bus address in response thereto. The common bus address is used to initiate transfers between the processor unit means and the common memory over the common bus.

  1. Changing Your Outlook Address Book Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanyal, Suman

    Changing Your Outlook Address Book Information Changes in Customer Services now allow users to update portions of their own Outlook Address Book information. To update your entry, fol- low

  2. Addressing the needs of mobile users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Timothy Youngjin

    2008-01-01

    of mobile information needs . . Pie chart of when needs wereaddressed . . Pie chart of how needs were addressed . . .Pie chart of why needs were addressed later Pie chart of why

  3. Running out of 32-bit Addresses Not all that many unique addresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the number of blocks in the compressed address ­ (-) subtract this number from 8 ­ (*) multiply the result in larger blocks · Solution: a larger address space ­ IPv6 has 128-bit addresses (2128 = 3.403 × 1038) ­ 1500 addresses/square foot of Earth's surface J 4 IPv6 vs. IPv4: Address Comparison · IPv4 has

  4. 2010 CATALYSIS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE, JUNE 27 - JULY 2, 2010, NEW LONDON, NEW HAMPSHIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhaya Datye

    2010-07-02

    Catalysis is a key technology for improving the quality of life while simultaneously reducing the adverse impact of human activities on the environment. The discovery of new catalytic processes and the improvement of existing ones are also critically important for securing the nation's energy supply. The GRC on Catalysis is considered one the most prestigious conference for catalysis research, bringing together leading researchers from both academia, industry and national labs to discuss the latest, most exciting research in catalysis and the future directions for the field. The 2010 GRC on Catalysis will follow time-honored traditions and feature invited talks from the world's leading experts in the fundamentals and applications of catalytic science and technology. We plan to have increased participation from industry. The extended discussions in the company of outstanding thinkers will stimulate and foster new science. The conference will include talks in the following areas: Alternative feedstocks for chemicals and fuels, Imaging and spectroscopy, Design of novel catalysts, Catalyst preparation fundamentals, Molecular insights through theory, Surface Science, Catalyst stability and dynamics. In 2010, the Catalysis conference will move to a larger conference room with a new poster session area that will allow 40 posters per session. The dorm rooms provide single and double accommodations, free WiFi and the registration fee includes all meals and the famous lobster dinner on Thursday night. Afternoons are open to enjoy the New England ambiance with opportunities for hiking, sailing, golf and tennis to create an outstanding conference that will help you network with colleagues, and make long lasting connections.

  5. Growth mechanism of graphene on platinum: Surface catalysis and carbon segregation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Jie Lindvall, Niclas; Yurgens, August; Nam, Youngwoo; Cole, Matthew T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Woo Park, Yung

    2014-04-14

    A model of the graphene growth mechanism of chemical vapor deposition on platinum is proposed and verified by experiments. Surface catalysis and carbon segregation occur, respectively, at high and low temperatures in the process, representing the so-called balance and segregation regimes. Catalysis leads to self-limiting formation of large area monolayer graphene, whereas segregation results in multilayers, which evidently “grow from below.” By controlling kinetic factors, dominantly monolayer graphene whose high quality has been confirmed by quantum Hall measurement can be deposited on platinum with hydrogen-rich environment, quench cooling, tiny but continuous methane flow and about 1000?°C growth temperature.

  6. Journal of Catalysis 237 (2006) 111117 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    2006-01-01

    , and the carboxylation of methane has been demonstrated in both water and strong acids using soluble V-based catalysts [4Journal of Catalysis 237 (2006) 111­117 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcat Methane oxidation to acetic Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1462, USA Received 13

  7. Catalysis by Confinement: Enthalpic Stabilization of NO Oxidation Transition States by Micropororous and Mesoporous Siliceous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    . INTRODUCTION The homogeneous oxidation of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) with O2 as the oxidant transformation in selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR) by NH3 on metal- exchanged zeolites7-11 and in NOxCatalysis by Confinement: Enthalpic Stabilization of NO Oxidation Transition States

  8. Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 37 (2002) 2735 NOx reduction by urea under lean conditions over

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulari, Erdogan

    2002-01-01

    Applied Catalysis B: Environmental 37 (2002) 27­35 NOx reduction by urea under lean conditions over using a single step sol­gel process (designated as 2% Pt-SG) and tested its activity for NOx reduction and hydrothermally stable in the range of 150­500 C in the reduction of NOx by hy- drocarbons or oxygenated

  9. A general approach to the enantioselective a-oxidation of aldehydes via synergistic catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    with Zhong, we reported the first catalytic enantioselective a-oxidation of aldehydes, utilizing nitroA general approach to the enantioselective a-oxidation of aldehydes via synergistic catalysis Scott 6th September 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c1sc00556a A new enantioselective a-oxidation of aldehydes has been

  10. Laboratory Evolution of Escherichia coli Thioredoxin for Enhanced Catalysis of Protein Oxidation in the Periplasm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardwell, James

    catalytic activity in the oxidation of alkaline phosphatase but was unable to oxidize FlgI and restore cellLaboratory Evolution of Escherichia coli Thioredoxin for Enhanced Catalysis of Protein Oxidation, Michigan 48109 Thioredoxin exported into the Escherichia coli periplasm cat- alyzes the oxidation

  11. Asymmetric Catalysis at the Mesoscale: Gold Nanoclusters Embedded in Chiral Self-Assembled Monolayer as Heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asymmetric Catalysis at the Mesoscale: Gold Nanoclusters Embedded in Chiral Self of the catalytically active metallic sites and the surrounding chiral SAM for the formation of a mesoscale the catalytically active site from the nanoscale to the mesoscale, which implies a principle of operating systems

  12. High surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy storage and catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    and it is widely applied, for example in photocatalysis, electrochemical energy storage, in white pigmentsHigh surface area crystalline titanium dioxide: potential and limits in electrochemical energy storage and catalysis T. Fröschl1 , U. Hörmann2 , P. Kubiak3 , G. Kucerova2 , M. Pfanzelt3 , C.K. Weiss4

  13. Challenges for the application of quantum chemical calculations to problems in catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    2004) A long-standing goal of researchers in the field of catalysis is to develop first-principles of a catalysed reaction occurring in a reactor given knowledge only of reactor configuration, catalyst accurate determinations of reactor performance given a set of rate parameters describing catalyst

  14. Catalysis Today 165 (2011) 8995 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weixue

    2011-01-01

    of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China b Center for Computational and Theoretical Chemistry, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, China a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 31 August 2010 Received in revised

  15. JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS 92, 127-135 (1985) Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol to Formaldehyde'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    1985-01-01

    JOURNAL OF CATALYSIS 92, 127-135 (1985) Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Methanol to Formaldehyde/mol at 275°C (I). Because of the extreme industrial impor- tance of formaldehyde for plastics, dyes, etc con- cepts are generally accepted regarding the oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde over Mo03: (a

  16. Catalysis Winter School 2012 Oxford University / Imperial College London / University College London

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Mark

    . Simon Jones (Ox): Modified Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen production from Formic acid 8. Thomas-borane (H3B.NMe2H) dehydrocoupling 2. Ed Emmett (Ox): Sulfonyl group incorporation using palladium catalysis and DABSO 3. Adam Healy (Ox): New insights into bio-catalytic hydrogen oxidation using electrochemistry

  17. Solvation and Acid Strength Effects on Catalysis by Faujasite Zeolites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gounder, Rajamani P.; Jones, Andrew J.; Carr, Robert T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and chemical titration data indicate that differences in monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation and methanol dehydration turnover rates (per H+) among FAU zeolites treated thermally with steam (H-USY) and then chemically with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (CDHUSY) predominantly reflect differences in the size and solvating properties of their supercage voids rather than differences in acid strength. The number of protons on a given sample was measured consistently by titrations with Na+, with CH3 groups via reactions of dimethyl ether, and with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine during methanol dehydration catalysis; these titration values were also supported by commensurate changes in acidic OH infrared band areas upon exposure to titrant molecules. The number of protons, taken as the average of the three titration methods, was significantly smaller than the number of framework Al atoms (Alf) obtained from X-ray diffraction and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on H-USY (0.35 H+/Alf) and CD-HUSY (0.69 H+/Alf). These data demonstrate that the ubiquitous use of Alf sites as structural proxies for active H+ sites in zeolites can be imprecise, apparently because distorted Al structures that are not associated with acidic protons are sometimes detected as Alf sites. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants, normalized non-rigorously by the number of Alf species, decreased with increasing Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples and became undetectable at sub-stoichiometric exchange levels (0.32 and 0.72 Na+/Alf ratios, respectively), an unexpected finding attributed incorrectly in previous studies to the presence of minority ‘‘super-acidic’’ sites. These rate constants, when normalized rigorously by the number of residual H+ sites were independent of Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples, reflecting the stoichiometric replacement of protons that are uniform in reactivity by Na+ cations. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants (per H+; 763 K), however, were higher on H-USY than CD-HUSY (by a factor of 1.4). Equilibrium constants for the formation of protonated methanol dimers via adsorption of gaseous methanol onto adsorbed methanol monomers, determined from kinetic studies of methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (433 K), were also higher on H-USY than CD-HUSY (by a factor of 2.1). These larger constants predominantly reflect stronger dispersive interactions in H-USY, consistent with its smaller supercage voids that result from the occlusion of void space by extraframework Al (Alex) residues. These findings appear to clarify enduring controversies about the mechanistic interpretation of the effects of Na+ and Alex species on the catalytic reactivity of FAU zeolites. They also illustrate the need to normalize rates by the number of active sites instead of more convenient but less accurate structural proxies for such sites.

  18. The roles of redox active cofactors in catalysis : structural studies of iron sulfur cluster and flavin dependent enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Peter John

    2013-01-01

    Cofactors are highly prevalent in biological systems and have evolved to take on many functions in enzyme catalysis. Two cofactors, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and [4Fe-4S] clusters, were originally determined to aid ...

  19. DeLib Materials Donation Form Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    DeLib Materials Donation Form Name: Address: Phone Materials:____________ I, ______________________________ (signature), hereby deed this gift of library materials to the Distributed eLibrary of Weill Cornell Medical

  20. 2015 State of Indian Nations Address

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The President of the National Congress of American Indians will deliver his annual State of the Indian Nations address to Member of Congress, government officials, tribal leaders and citizens, and...

  1. Persian address pronouns and politeness in interaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanbakhsh, Golnaz

    2011-11-23

    In this thesis, I aim to investigate the variation of Persian pronominal address system and politeness strategies in contemporary Iranian society from a quantitative and qualitative sociolinguistic perspective. I focus ...

  2. Addressing the needs of mobile users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Timothy Youngjin

    2008-01-01

    search terms o?ine on a mobile device, and then address theminput modality to a mobile device, and recognizing input cannoti?cation cues for mobile devices. In CHI ’00: CHI ’00

  3. "Exploring novel biomaterial approaches to address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    "Exploring novel biomaterial approaches to address neurodegenerative diseases and injuries Engineering and Biomaterials Research Group Neural regeneration within the central nervous system (CNS to help effectively translate them to the clinic. We propose an innovative combination of biomaterial

  4. Charge Transfer and Support Effects in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hervier, Antoine

    2011-12-21

    The kinetic, electronic and spectroscopic properties of two?dimensional oxide?supported catalysts were investigated in order to understand the role of charge transfer in catalysis. Pt/TiO{sub 2} nanodiodes were fabricated and used as catalysts for hydrogen oxidation. During the reaction, the current through the diode, as well as its I?V curve, were monitored, while gas chromatography was used to measure the reaction rate. The current and the turnover rate were found to have the same temperature dependence, indicating that hydrogen oxidation leads to the non?adiabatic excitation of electrons in Pt. A fraction of these electrons have enough energy to ballistically transport through Pt and overcome the Schottky barrier at the interface with TiO{sub 2}. The yield for this phenomenon is on the order of 10{sup ?4} electrons per product molecule formed, similar to what has been observed for CO oxidation and for the adsorption of many different molecules. The same Pt/TiO{sub 2} system was used to compare currents in hydrogen oxidation and deuterium oxidation. The current through the diode under deuterium oxidation was found to be greater than under hydrogen oxidation by a factor of three. Weighted by the difference in turnover frequencies for the two isotopes, this would imply a chemicurrent yield 5 times greater for D{sub 2} compared to H{sub 2}, contrary to what is expected given the higher mass of D{sub 2}. Reversible changes in the rectification factor of the diode are observed when switching between D{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. These changes are a likely cause for the differences in current between the two isotopes. In the nanodiode experiments, surface chemistry leads to charge flow, suggesting the possibility of creating charge flow to tune surface chemistry. This was done first by exposing a Pt/Si diode to visible light while using it as a catalyst for H{sub 2} oxidation. Absorption of the light in the Si, combined with the band bending at the interface, gives rise to a steady?state flow of hot holes to the surface. This leads to a decrease in turnover on the surface, an effect which is enhanced when a reverse bias is applied to the diode. Similar experiments were carried out for CO oxidation. On Pt/Si diodes, the reaction rate was found to increase when a forward bias was applied. When the diode was exposed to visible light and a reverse bias was applied, the rate was instead decreased. This implies that a flow of negative charges to the surface increases turnover, while positive charges decrease it. Charge flow in an oxide supported metal catalyst can be modified even without designing the catalyst as a solid state electronic device. This was done by doping stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric TiO{sub 2} films with F, and using the resulting oxides as supports for Pt films. In the case of stoichiometric TiO{sub 2}, F was found to act as an n?type dopant, creating a population of filled electronic states just below the conduction band, and dramatically increasing the conductivity of the oxide film. The electrons in those states can transfer to surface O, activating it for reaction with CO, and leading to increased turnover for CO oxidation. This reinforces the hypothesis that CO oxidation is activated by a flow of negative charges to the surface. The same set of catalysts was used for methanol oxidation. The electronic properties of the TiO{sub 2} films again correlated with the turnover rates, but also with selectivity. With stoichiometric TiO{sub 2} as the support, F?doping caused an increase in selectivity toward the formation of partial oxidation products, formaldehyde and methyl formate, versus the total oxidation product, CO{sub 2}. With non?stoichiometric TiO{sub 2}, F?doping had the reverse effect. Ambient Pressure X?Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy was used to investigate this F?doping effect in reaction conditions. In O2 alone, and in CO oxidation conditions, the O1s spectrum showed a high binding energy peak that correlated in intensity with the activity of the different films: for stoichiomet

  5. On (no) inverse magnetic catalysis in the QCD hard and soft wall models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudal, D; Mertens, T G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of an external magnetic field in holographic QCD models where the backreaction is modeled in via an appropriate choice of the background metric. We add a phenomenological soft wall dilaton to incorporate better IR behavior (confinement). Elaborating on previous studies conducted by [JHEP 1505 (2015) 121], we first discuss the Hawking-Page transition, the dual of the deconfinement transition, as a function of the magnetic field. We confirm that the critical deconfinement temperature can drop with the magnetic field. Secondly, we study the quark condensate holographically as a function of the applied magnetic field and demonstrate that this model does not exhibit inverse magnetic catalysis at the level of the chiral transition. The quest for a holographic QCD model that qualitatively describes the inverse magnetic catalysis at finite temperature is thus still open. Throughout this work, we pay special attention to the different holographic parameters and we attempt to fix t...

  6. Kokes Awards for the 23rd North American Catalysis Society Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Gary

    2014-01-31

    The Tri-State Catalysis Society awarded 107 Kokes Travel Awards. The program was very successful and to date this was the most Kokes Travel Awards ever awarded at a North American Catalysis Society Meeting. It provided students who merited an award the opportunity to attend the meeting, present a paper in the form of either an oral presentation or a poster presentation, and to serve the North American Catalysis Society by participating in the organization of the meeting. Students worked very hard during the week of the meeting to make it a success. Financial support for the Kokes awards was provided by DOE, NSF, NACS, as well as the Tri-State Catalysis Society, the latter through fund raising activities, and other donations. AT the meeting, each student received over $1050 in kind to offset the costs of registration fees ($260), hotel accommodations ($295.7), transportation ($400 travel allowance), as well as T-shirts ($20), and banquet tickets ($95 provided by donations from society members). In addition, for the first time, students received certificates that were signed by the President of NACS, Professor Enrique Iglesia, and by the Kokes Awards Chair, Gary Jacobs (see last page). A list of meeting co-chairs (i.e., Uschi M. Graham, Umit S. Ozkan, and Madan Bhassin) and the honorary chair (Burtron H. Davis) was also included on the certificate, along with the name of the recipient. The awardees were chosen on a merit-based guideline which also included the requirements of having a presentation accepted at the meeting and being a student at a North American University. The Richard J. Kokes Student Travel Award Committee (Gary Jacobs, Rodney Andrews, and Peter Smirniotis) with help from the Organizing Committee were able to secure money from four sources as detailed in Table 1. As detailed by our Treasurer, Dr. Helge Toufar of Clariant, the total amount spent was $105,000.

  7. Kokes Awards for the 22nd North American Catalysis Society Meeting, June 5-10, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabio H. Ribeiro

    2011-06-05

    The biennial North American Catalysis Society (NACS) Meetings are the premiere conferences in the area of catalysis, surface science, and reaction engineering. The 22nd meeting will be held the week of June 5-10, 2011 in Detroit, Michigan. The objective of the Meetings is to bring together leading researchers for intensive scientific exchange and interactions. Financial support that offsets some of the associated costs (specifically, registration fee, airline tickets, and hotel accommodations) would encourage graduate students, and for the first time undergraduate students, to attend and participate meaningfully in this conference. The funds sought in this proposal will help support the Richard J. Kokes Travel Award program. Graduate students eligible for these merit-based Awards are those who study at a North American university and who will present at the Meeting. We have currently 209 applications and we expect to be able to fund about half of them. The NACS has traditionally sought to encourage graduate student, and this year for the first time undergraduate studies, participation at the National Meetings and providing financial support is the most effective means to do so. Their attendance would contribute significantly to their scientific training and communication and presentation skills. They would be exposed to the leading researchers from the US and abroad; they would meet their peers from other universities; they would learn about cutting-edge results that could benefit their research projects; and they may become interested in becoming active participants in the catalysis community. These young investigators represent the next generation of scientists and engineers, and their proper training will lead to future scientific breakthroughs and technological innovations that benefit the US economy. Advances in catalysis can come in the form of more energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly chemical processes, improved fuel cell performance, efficient hydrogen production, and a cleaner environment.

  8. Butadiene Complexes of Titanium(II) and Titanium(0): Synthesis, Butadiene Dimerization Catalysis, and Crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    Butadiene Complexes of Titanium(II) and Titanium(0): Synthesis, Butadiene Dimerization Catalysis, where dmpe is 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphino)- ethane, reacts with 1,3-butadiene and trans,trans-1,4-diphenyl-1,3-butadiene at -20 °C to produce the titanium(II) butadiene complexes TiMe2(4-C4H4R2)(dmpe), where

  9. NMR Computational Studies of Solid Acidity/Fundamental Studies of Catalysis by Solid Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Haw

    2008-06-28

    This project focused on catalysis by zeolites and the synergy of spectroscopic characterization and theoretical modeling. In collaboration with the Waroquier group in Belgium we used state-of-the-art quantum chemical simulations on a supramolecular model of both the HZSM-5 zeolite and the co-catalytic hydrocarbon pool species and calculated a full catalytic cycle (including all rate constants) for methanol-to-olefin (MTO) catalysis involving a hydrocarbon pool species. This work not only represents the most robust computational analysis of a successful MTO route to date, but it also succeeds in tying together the many experimental clues. That work was featured on the cover of Angewandte Chemie. More recently we elucidated several unsuspected roles for formaldehyde in methanol to olefin catalysis. Formaldehyde proves to be a key species responsible for both the growth of the catalytically active hydrocarbon pool and its inevitable aging into deactivated polycyclic aromatic species. The apparent inevitability of formaldehyde formation at high temperatures, in particular in contact with active metal or metal oxide surfaces, may put some fundamental limitations on the economic potential of conversion of methanol to olefins.

  10. Shared address collectives using counter mechanisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael; Dozsa, Gabor; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Mamidala, Amith R; Miller, Douglas

    2014-02-18

    A shared address space on a compute node stores data received from a network and data to transmit to the network. The shared address space includes an application buffer that can be directly operated upon by a plurality of processes, for instance, running on different cores on the compute node. A shared counter is used for one or more of signaling arrival of the data across the plurality of processes running on the compute node, signaling completion of an operation performed by one or more of the plurality of processes, obtaining reservation slots by one or more of the plurality of processes, or combinations thereof.

  11. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  12. Mapping virtual addresses to different physical addresses for value disambiguation for thread memory access requests

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gala, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin

    2014-09-02

    A multiprocessor system includes nodes. Each node includes a data path that includes a core, a TLB, and a first level cache implementing disambiguation. The system also includes at least one second level cache and a main memory. For thread memory access requests, the core uses an address associated with an instruction format of the core. The first level cache uses an address format related to the size of the main memory plus an offset corresponding to hardware thread meta data. The second level cache uses a physical main memory address plus software thread meta data to store the memory access request. The second level cache accesses the main memory using the physical address with neither the offset nor the thread meta data after resolving speculation. In short, this system includes mapping of a virtual address to a different physical addresses for value disambiguation for different threads.

  13. Financing Innovation to Address Global Climate Change

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Loan Programs Office (LPO) is helping address the global challenge of climate change by providing critical financing needed to deploy some of the world’s largest and most innovative clean energy and advanced technology vehicles manufacturing projects, preventing more than 25 million metric tons of CO2 emissions to date.

  14. Address: Computer Sciences Department University of Tulsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Sandip

    VITA Sandip Sen Address: Computer Sciences Department University of Tulsa 600 South College Avenue Tulsa, OK 74104-3189 Phone: 918-631-2985 FAX: 918-631-3077 e-mail: sandip@utulsa.edu URL: http, University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK (September, 2004 ­ present) Associate Professor, Department of Mathematical

  15. An electronically addressed spatial light modulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKnight, Douglas J

    pixelated binary spatial light modulator operating in reflection. Each pixel contains a memory element which stores the programmed logical state of the pixel. The addressing and pixel circuits were fabricated in a 1.5m nMOS technology on a 10 mm square chip...

  16. Addressable Advertising on Digital Television Vincent Dureau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masthoff, Judith

    Addressable Advertising on Digital Television Vincent Dureau Chief Technology Officer, OpenTV 275 of digital technology is having a profound effect on television advertising. While television advertising costs are increasing, its efficiency is decreasing. The traditional models for advertising on television

  17. A. General Information A1 Address Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    .montana.edu/wwwcat/appopts.html A2 Source of institutional control (Check only one): A2 Public X A3 Classify your undergraduate of students for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting dateA. General Information A1 Address Information A1 Name of College/University: Montana State

  18. A. GENERAL INFORMATION A1. Address Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    @cofc.edu Is there a separate URL application site on the Internet? If so, pleasespecify: A2. Source of institutional control categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date or as of October 15, 2002. FULL-TIME PARTA. GENERAL INFORMATION A1. Address Information Name of College or University College of Charleston

  19. UNO Student ID Number__________________________________________________________________ Permanent Mailing Address________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    UNO Graduate Other adult occupants must be either a spouse, domestic partner, or a relative that is a full-time UNO student and at least 21 years old at the time of application. If applicable, a copy.00. Personal Information Other Adult Occupant LAST FIRST MIDDLE Mailing Address: UNO Office of Student Housing

  20. Probing the Role of Metal Ions in RNA Catalysis: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    Probing the Role of Metal Ions in RNA Catalysis: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Characterization of a Metal Ion Interaction with the 2-Moiety of the Guanosine Nucleophile in the Tetrahymena Group I Ribozyme: Deciphering the role of individual metal ions in RNA catalysis is a tremendous challenge, as numerous metal

  1. Catalysis Center for Energy Innovation (CCEI) | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26thIWalter H. Zinn, 1969CALCD Energy(SC)(SC) Catalysis

  2. Addressing the Crisis in Fundamental Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Stubbs

    2007-12-18

    I present the case for fundamental physics experiments in space playing an important role in addressing the current "dark energy'' crisis. If cosmological observations continue to favor a value of the dark energy equation of state parameter w=-1, with no change over cosmic time, then we will have difficulty understanding this new fundamental physics. We will then face a very real risk of stagnation unless we detect some other experimental anomaly. The advantages of space-based experiments could prove invaluable in the search for the a more complete understanding of dark energy. This talk was delivered at the start of the Fundamental Physics Research in Space Workshop in May 2006.

  3. Address (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLC JumpInformationAddingFrance)Address (Smart

  4. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy...

  5. Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Addressable morphology control of silica structures by manipulating the reagent addition time Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Addressable morphology control of silica...

  6. Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Okaloosa Gas District Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  7. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges....

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the...

  8. Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company: DOE Smart Grid RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Southern Company:...

  9. Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation...

  10. Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings, Inc. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Pepco Holdings,...

  11. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  12. Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Progress Energy draft regarding Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

  13. Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Dairyland Power Cooperative Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  14. DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from...

  15. Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh: Copenhagen and Beyond Jump to: navigation, search Name Policy Agenda for Addressing Climate Change in Bangladesh:...

  16. NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation. September 10, 2009 NBP RFI-Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid...

  17. Addressing mechanical reliability issues in Sandia MEMS devices...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Addressing mechanical reliability issues in Sandia MEMS devices. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Addressing mechanical reliability issues in Sandia MEMS devices. No...

  18. Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilist...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case...

  19. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  20. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems This...

  1. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

  2. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash...

  3. Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Strategies to Address Split Incentives in Multifamily Buildings Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Multifamily ...

  4. Design of a new reactor-like high temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope for catalysis studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Nguyen, Luan; Zhang, Shiran

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the design of a new reactor-like high-temperature near ambient pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HT-NAP-STM) for catalysis studies. This HT-NAP-STM was designed for exploration of structures of catalyst surfaces at atomic...

  5. Chloroyttrium 2(1-(Arylimino)alkyl)quinolin-8-olate Complexes: Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalysis of the Ring-Opening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    the polymerization in the BnOH-free process. Most polymers generated by BnOH-assisted catalysis possess Mn values materials" because they are biocompatible, readily biodegradable, and easily recyclable. Because showed low catalytic activity and resulted in polymers with relatively low molecular weights.5 In sharp

  6. Structure of Human Epoxide Hydrolase Reveals Mechanistic Inferences on Bifunctional Catalysis in Epoxide and Phosphate Ester Hydrolysis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    is unclear. Recent experiments demonstrate that the N-terminal domain of human sEH catalyzes the metalStructure of Human Epoxide Hydrolase Reveals Mechanistic Inferences on Bifunctional Catalysis ReceiVed February 4, 2004 ABSTRACT: The X-ray crystal structure of human soluble epoxide hydrolase (s

  7. Channeling of Fusion Alpha-Particle Power Using Minority Ion Catalysis A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with electrons kept cold, so that the effective fusion reactivity can be increased [9­11]. The meansChanneling of Fusion Alpha-Particle Power Using Minority Ion Catalysis A. I. Zhmoginov and N. J greatly facilitate controlled nuclear fusion. The parameter range for achieving this temperature disparity

  8. Reaction Kinetics and Catalysis Letters, Vol. 1, No. 2/1974/209-213 STOCHASTIC SIMULATION OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tóth, János

    OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS BY DIGITAL COMPUTER, H. APPLICATIONS T. Sipos1, J.TSth 2 and P. ~.rdi1 1. Danube Oil chemical reactions (especially those of biological interest, e.g. reactions exhibiting oscillationReaction Kinetics and Catalysis Letters, Vol. 1, No. 2/1974/209-213 STOCHASTIC SIMULATION

  9. Decarboxylative Arylation of Amino Acids via Photoredox Catalysis: A One-Step Conversion of Biomass to Drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, David W. C.

    Decarboxylative Arylation of Amino Acids via Photoredox Catalysis: A One-Step Conversion of Biomass. This method offers rapid entry to prevalent benzylic amine architectures from an abundant biomass the worldwide abundance of biomass6 that incorporates carboxylate functionality (e.g., amino acids, -hydroxy

  10. Catalysis Workshop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports fromSheetsCascadia Analysis

  11. Final Report on Internet Addressable Lightswitch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Pettler, Peter

    2001-08-27

    This report describes the work performed to develop and test a new switching system and communications network that is useful for economically switching lighting circuits in existing commercial buildings. The first section of the report provides the general background of the IBECS (Integrated Building Environmental Communications System) research and development work as well as the context for the development of the new switching system. The research and development effort that went into producing the first proof-of-concept (the IBECS Addressable Power Switch or APS) and the physical prototype of that concept is detailed in the second section. In the third section of the report, we detail the refined Powerline Carrier Based IBECS Title 24 Wall Switch system that evolved from the APS prototype. The refined system provided a path for installing IBECS switching technology in existing buildings that may not be already wired for light level switching control. The final section of the report describes the performance of the IBECS Title 24 Switch system as applied to a small demonstration in two offices at LBNL's Building 90. We learned that the new Powerline Carrier control systems (A-10 technology) that have evolved from the early X-10 systems have solved most of the noise problems that dogged the successful application of X-10 technologies in commercial buildings. We found that the new A-10 powerline carrier control technology can be reliable and effective for switching lighting circuits even in electrically noisy office environments like LBNL. Thus we successfully completed the task objectives by designing, building and demonstrating a new switching system that can provide multiple levels of light which can be triggered either from specially designed wall switches or from a digital communications network. By applying commercially available powerline carrier based technologies that communicate over the in-place lighting wiring system, this type of control can be economi cally installed even in existing buildings that were not wired for dual-level lighting.

  12. Is It Homogeneous or Heterogeneous Catalysis Derived from [RhCp*Cl2]2? In Operando-XAFS, Kinetic and Crucial Kinetic Poisoning Evidence for Subnanometer Rh4 Cluster-Based Benzene Hydrogenation Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bayram, Ercan; Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Roberts, John A.; Szymczak, Nathaniel; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Ozkar, Saim; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Finke, Richard G.

    2011-11-23

    Determining the true, kinetically dominant catalytically active species, in the classic benzene hydrogenation system pioneered by Maitlis and co-workers 34 years ago starting with [RhCp*Cl2]2 (Cp* = [{eta}5-C5(CH3)5]), has proven to be one of the most challenging case studies in the quest to distinguish single-metal-based 'homogeneous' from polymetallic, 'heterogeneous' catalysis. The reason, this study will show, is the previous failure to use the proper combination of (i) operando spectroscopy to determine the dominant form(s) of the precatalyst's mass under catalysis (i.e., operating) conditions, plus then and crucially also (ii) the previous lack of the necessary kinetic studies, catalysis being a 'wholly kinetic phenomenon' as J. Halpern long ago noted. An important contribution from this study will be to reveal the power of quantitiative kinetic poisoning experiments for distinguishing single-metal, or in this case subnanometer Rh4 cluster-based catalysis from larger, polymetallic Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysis, at least under favorable conditions. The combined operando-XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure) spectroscopy and kinetic evidences provide a compelling case for Rh4-based, with average stoichiometry 'Rh4Cp*2.4Cl4Hc', benzene hydrogenation catalysis in 2-propanol with added Et3N and at 100 C and 50 atm initial H2 pressure. The results also reveal, however, that if even ca. 1.4% of the total soluble Rh(0)n had formed nanoparticles, then those Rh(0)n nanoparticles would have been able to account for all the observed benzene hydrogenation catalytic rate (using commercial, ca. 2 nm, polyethyleneglycol-dodecylether hydrosol stabilized Rh(0)n nanoparticles as a model system). The results 'especially the poisoning methodology developed and employed' are of significant, broader interest since determining the nature of the true catalyst continues to be a central, often vexing issue in any and all catalytic reactions. The results are also of fundamental interest in that they add to a growing body of evidence indicating that certain, appropriately ligated, coordinatively unsaturated, subnanometer M4 transition-metal clusters can be relatively robust catalysts. Also demonstrated herein is that Rh4 clusters are poisoned by Hg(0), demonstrating for the first time that the classic Hg(0) poisoning test of 'homogeneous' vs 'heterogeneous'catalysts cannot distinguish Rh4-based subnanometer catalysts from Rh(0)n nanoparticle catalysts, at least for the present examples of these two specific, Rh-based catalysts.

  13. Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare Earth and Other Critical Materials Ames Laboratory to Lead New Research Effort to Address Shortages in Rare...

  14. The Legacy of the Gettysburg Address, 1863-1965 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peatman, Jared Elliott

    2011-10-21

    My project examines the legacy of the Gettysburg Address from 1863 to 1965. After an introduction and a chapter setting the stage, each succeeding chapter surveys the meaning of the Gettysburg Address at key moments: the initial reception...

  15. DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by Smart Grid Technologies DOE Convenes Multi-stakeholder Process to Address Privacy for Data Enabled by...

  16. Individually addressable cathodes with integrated focusing stack or detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E.; Baylor, Larry R.; Voelkl, Edgar; Simpson, Michael L.; Paulus, Michael J.; Lowndes, Douglas; Whealton, John; Whitson, John C.; Wilgen, John B.

    2005-07-12

    Systems and method are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A plurality of individually addressable cathodes are integrated with an electrostatic focusing stack and/or a plurality of detectors on the addressable field emission array. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  17. Probing the Impact of the EchinT C-Terminal Domain on Structure and Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Bardaweel; J Pace; T Chou; V Cody; C Wagner

    2011-12-31

    Histidine triad nucleotide binding protein (Hint) is considered as the ancestor of the histidine triad protein superfamily and is highly conserved from bacteria to humans. Prokaryote genomes, including a wide array of both Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive bacteria, typically encode one Hint gene. The cellular function of Hint and the rationale for its evolutionary conservation in bacteria have remained a mystery. Despite its ubiquity and high sequence similarity to eukaryote Hint1 [Escherichia coli Hint (echinT) is 48% identical with human Hint1], prokaryote Hint has been reported in only a few studies. Here we report the first conformational information on the full-length N-terminal and C-terminal residues of Hint from the E. coli complex with GMP. Structural analysis of the echinT-GMP complex reveals that it crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1} with four homodimers in the asymmetric unit. Analysis of electron density for both the N-terminal residues and the C-terminal residues of the echinT-GMP complex indicates that the loops in some monomers can adopt more than one conformation. The observation of conformational flexibility in terminal loop regions could explain the presence of multiple homodimers in the asymmetric unit of this structure. To explore the impact of the echinT C-terminus on protein structure and catalysis, we conducted a series of catalytic radiolabeling and kinetic experiments on the C-terminal deletion mutants of echinT. In this study, we show that sequential deletion of the C-terminus likely has no effect on homodimerization and a modest effect on the secondary structure of echinT. However, we observed a significant impact on the folding structure, as reflected by a significant lowering of the T{sub m} value. Kinetic analysis reveals that the C-terminal deletion mutants are within an order of magnitude less efficient in catalysis compared to wild type, while the overall kinetic mechanism that proceeds through a fast step, followed by a rate-limiting hydrolysis step, was conserved. Nevertheless, the ability of the C-terminal deletion mutants to hydrolyze lysyl-AMP generated by LysU was greatly impaired. Taken together, our results highlight the emerging role of the C-terminus in governing the catalytic function of Hints.

  18. Sulfation of metal-organic framework: Opportunities for acid catalysis and proton conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goesten, M.G.; Stavitski, E.; Juan-Alcaniz, J.; Ramos-Fernandez, E.V.; Sai Sankar Gupta, K.B.; van Bekkum, H.; Gascon, J. and Kapteijn, F.

    2011-05-24

    A new post-functionalization method for metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) has been developed to introduce acidity for catalysis. Upon treatment with a mixture of triflic anhydride and sulfuric acid, chemically stable MOF structures MIL-101(Cr) and MIL-53(Al) can be sulfated, resulting in a Broensted sulfoxy acid group attached to up to 50% of the aromatic terephthalate linkers of the structure. The sulfated samples have been extensively characterized by solid-state NMR, XANES, and FTIR spectroscopy. The functionalized acidic frameworks show catalytic activity similar to that of acidic polymers like Nafion{reg_sign} display in the esterification of n-butanol with acetic acid (TOF {approx} 1 min{sup -1} {at} 343 K). Water adsorbs strongly up to 4 molecules per sulfoxy acid group, and an additional 2 molecules are taken up at lower temperatures in the 1-D pore channels of S-MIL-53(Al). The high water content and Broensted acidity provide the structure S-MIL-53(Al) a high proton conductivity up to moderate temperatures.

  19. Molecular Insights into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis by Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forouhar,F.; Ross Anderson, J.; Mowat, C.; Vorobiev, S.; Hussain, A.; Abashidze, M.; Bruckmann, C.; Thackray, S.; Seetharaman, J.; et al.

    2007-01-01

    Tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) constitute an important, yet relatively poorly understood, family of heme-containing enzymes. Here, we report extensive structural and biochemical studies of the Xanthomonas campestris TDO and a related protein SO4414 from Shewanella oneidensis, including the structure at 1.6-{angstrom} resolution of the catalytically active, ferrous form of TDO in a binary complex with the substrate l-Trp. The carboxylate and ammonium moieties of tryptophan are recognized by electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions with the enzyme and a propionate group of the heme, thus defining the l-stereospecificity. A second, possibly allosteric, l-Trp-binding site is present at the tetramer interface. The sixth coordination site of the heme-iron is vacant, providing a dioxygen-binding site that would also involve interactions with the ammonium moiety of l-Trp and the amide nitrogen of a glycine residue. The indole ring is positioned correctly for oxygenation at the C2 and C3 atoms. The active site is fully formed only in the binary complex, and biochemical experiments confirm this induced-fit behavior of the enzyme. The active site is completely devoid of water during catalysis, which is supported by our electrochemical studies showing significant stabilization of the enzyme upon substrate binding.

  20. The demands of the university teaching, addressed to students ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-02

    The demands of the university teaching, addressed to students (including those said to be “advanced”) with a modest (and frequently less than mod-.

  1. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from the Edison Electric Institute The Edison Electric...

  2. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges....

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy. The Alliance to Save...

  3. Addressing Uncertainty in Desigh Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilisti...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF Tom Houston, Greg Mertz, Carl Costantino, Michael...

  4. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and...

  5. Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote Address at IEEE PES Conference on Innovative Smart Grid Technologies Assistant Secretary Patricia Hoffman to Deliver Keynote...

  6. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX™ Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy Feedstocks—From Field to Fuel Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX™ Technology Allen Julian, Chief Business Officer, MBI

  7. Africa - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa - Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technical Potential of...

  8. New partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partnership uses advanced computer science modeling to address climate change | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing...

  9. New Project is the ACME of Addressing Climate Change

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complete climate and Earth system model to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues. Eight Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories, including...

  10. The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for Addressing DOE Order 420.1C & A Proposed Generic Methodology The INL Seismic Risk Assessment Project: Requirements for...

  11. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of the Ohio Consumers' Counsel Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation: Comments by the Office of the...

  12. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementation: Federal Register Notice Volume 75, No. 180 - Sep. 17, 2010 Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation: Federal Register Notice Volume...

  13. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to smart grid Implementati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    smart grid Implementation: eMeter Response to Department of Energy RFI Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to smart grid Implementation: eMeter Response to Department of...

  14. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    via smartgridpolicy@hq.doe.gov Smart Grid Request for Information: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of the Alliance to Save Energy The Alliance to Save...

  15. Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials Addressing the Voltage Fade Issue with Lithium-Manganese-Rich Oxide Cathode Materials 2012 DOE Hydrogen and...

  16. Keynote Address National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    Keynote Address National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources Prof. Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems that there is a real need for alternative energy sources. What do we understand by Alternative Energy Sources? In order Consumption 1997-98 Keynote address at Two days National Seminar on Alternative Energy Sources, 27-28 Aug

  17. Addressing the Level of Florida's Electricity Prices Theodore Kury1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    for 2 Edison Electric Institute, "Typical Bills and Average Rates Report." The report is reproduced Addressing the Level of Florida's Electricity Prices Theodore Kury1 Public tenet of this step of the plan is to "address Florida's relatively expensive electricity costs so

  18. Common Data Set 2010-11 A1 Address Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Associate A5 Terminal Associate http://admissions.unl.edu/apply/index.aspx Source of institutional control for each of the following categories as of the institution's official fall reporting date or as of OctoberCommon Data Set 2010-11 A1 Address Information A1 Name of College/University: A1 Mailing Address: A

  19. Method for the electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harper, Jason C.; Polsky, Ronen; Dirk, Shawn M.; Wheeler, David R.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan M.

    2015-12-15

    A method for preparing an electrochemical biosensor uses bias-assisted assembly of unreactive -onium molecules on an electrode array followed by post-assembly electro-addressable conversion of the unreactive group to a chemical or biological recognition group. Electro-addressable functionalization of electrode arrays enables the multi-target electrochemical sensing of biological and chemical analytes.

  20. IP address management : augmenting Sandia's capabilities through open source tools.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayar, R. Daniel

    2005-08-01

    Internet Protocol (IP) address management is an increasingly growing concern at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the networking community as a whole. The current state of the available IP addresses indicates that they are nearly exhausted. Currently SNL doesn't have the justification to obtain more IP address space from Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). There must exist a local entity to manage and allocate IP assignments efficiently. Ongoing efforts at Sandia have been in the form of a multifunctional database application notably known as Network Information System (NWIS). NWIS is a database responsible for a multitude of network administrative services including IP address management. This study will explore the feasibility of augmenting NWIS's IP management capabilities utilizing open source tools. Modifications of existing capabilities to better allocate available IP address space are studied.

  1. Support for Speakers and Attendees at 2008 GRC Conference Catalysis (to be held at Colby Sawyer College, New London, New Hampshire on June 22-27, 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart L. Soled and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2009-01-01

    The GRC on Catalysis is one of the most prestigious catalysis conferences as it brings together leading researchers from around the world to discuss their latest, most exciting work in catalysis. The 2008 conference will continue this tradition. The conference will cover a variety of themes including new catalytic materials, theoretical and experimental approaches to improve understanding of kinetics and transport phenomena, and state of the art nanoscale characterization probes to monitor active sites. The conference promotes interactions among established researchers and young scientists. It provides a venue for students to meet, talk to and learn from some of the world leading researchers in the area. It also gives them a platform for displaying their own work during the poster sessions. The informal nature of the meeting, excellent quality of the presentations and posters, and ability to meet many outstanding colleagues makes this an excellent conference.

  2. Opportunities for Catalysis in The 21st Century. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J. M.; Bercaw, J.

    2002-05-16

    Chemical catalysis affects our lives in myriad ways. Catalysis provides a means of changing the rates at which chemical bonds are formed and broken and of controlling the yields of chemical reactions to increase the amounts of desirable products from these reactions and reduce the amounts of undesirable ones. Thus, it lies at the heart of our quality of life: The reduced emissions of modern cars, the abundance of fresh food at our stores, and the new pharmaceuticals that improve our health are made possible by chemical reactions controlled by catalysts. Catalysis is also essential to a healthy economy: The petroleum, chemical, and pharmaceutical industries, contributors of $500 billion to the gross national product of the United States, rely on catalysts to produce everything from fuels to ''wonder drugs'' to paints to cosmetics. Today, our Nation faces a variety of challenges in creating alternative fuels, reducing harmful by-products in manufacturing, cleaning up the environment and preventing future pollution, dealing with the causes of global warming, protecting citizens from the release of toxic substances and infectious agents, and creating safe pharmaceuticals. Catalysts are needed to meet these challenges, but their complexity and diversity demand a revolution in the way catalysts are designed and used. This revolution can become reality through the application of new methods for synthesizing and characterizing molecular and material systems. Opportunities to understand and predict how catalysts work at the atomic scale and the nanoscale are now appearing, made possible by breakthroughs in the last decade in computation, measurement techniques, and imaging and by new developments in catalyst design, synthesis, and evaluation.

  3. New York Independent System Operator, Smart Grid RFI: Addressing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Response of New York State Smart Grid Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges SmartGrid Consortium: Smart Grid Roadmap for the State of New York 2009 Smart Grid System...

  4. Biographical Sketch: Constantino Lagoa Address: Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagoa, Constantino

    Biographical Sketch: Constantino Lagoa Address: Electrical Engineering Department Pennsylvania State University Room 205 Electrical Engineering West University Park, PA 16802 Office Phone: Dept ­ Present Professor of Electrical Engineering Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania

  5. Email Address: (For Example: Bachelor of Science in Architecture)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Email Address: (For Example: Bachelor of Science in Architecture) Date Degree Received: Did you receive Honor, High Honor, Highest Honor? Undergraduate Degrees: Enter your degree designator: Duplicate Diploma Request Form Georgia Institute of Technology PERSONAL INFORMATION Legal Name: PRINT FULL

  6. The State of the Ames Laboratory Address 2011

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    King, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Alex King, director of The Ames Laboratory, discusses the budget situation, improvements at Ames Lab and infrastructure improvements during the State of the Lab address on Tuesday, May 24, 2011.

  7. United Indigenous Voices Address Sustainability: Climate Change and Traditional Places

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the First Stewards Symposium, over 300 industry and policy leaders from around the nation will discuss four main themes generated from the 2012 First Stewards Symposium that address issues...

  8. Mailing Address: Center for Energy and Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    justice, conservation and renewable energy options, integrated resource planning, and technology-Electric..................................................................................... 20 2. A Comparative Analysis of Solar and Non-Solar Energy Costs#12;ii Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University

  9. Custodian's campus addressCustodian's department Custodian's name Custodian's phone #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    , then write the vendor number here. If a taxpayer ID is required, then attach IRS Form W-9. All information. Fill in this space if the taxpayer ID is not on the invoice, or when there is not an address

  10. Improved Modeling of Transition Metals, Applications to Catalysis and Technetium Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cundari, T. R.

    2004-03-05

    There is considerable impetus for identification of aqueous OM catalysts as water is the ultimate ''green'' solvent. In collaboration with researchers at Ames Lab, we investigated effective fragment and Monte Carlo techniques for aqueous-phase hydroformylation (HyF). The Rh of the HyF catalyst is weakly aquated, in contrast to the hydride of the Rh-H bond. As the insertion of the olefin C=C into Rh-H determines the linear-to-branched aldehyde ratio, it is reasonable to infer that solvent plays an important role in regiochemistry. Studies on aqueous-phase organometallic catalysis were complemented in studies of the gas-phase reaction. A Rh-carbonyl-phosphine catalyst was investigated. Two of the most important implications of this research include (a) pseudorotation among five-coordinate intermediates is significant in HyF, and (b) CO insertion is the rate-determining step. The latter is in contrast to experimental deductions, highlighting the need for more accurate modeling. To this end, we undertook studies of (a) experimentally relevant PR{sub 3} co-ligands (PMe{sub 3}, PPh{sub 3}, P(p-PhSO{sub 3{sup -}}){sub 3}, etc.), and (b) HyF of propene. For the propylene research, simulations indicated that the linear: branched aldehyde ratio (linear is more desirable) is determined by thermodynamic discrimination of two distinct pathways. Other projects include a theory-experiment study of C-H activation by early transition metal systems, which establishes that weakly-bound adducts play a key role in activity selectivity. By extension, more selective catalysts for functionalization of methane (major component of natural gas) will require better understanding of these adducts, which are greatly affected by steric interactions with the ligands. In the de novo design of Tc complexes, we constructed (and are now testing) a coupled quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics protocol. Initial research shows it to be capable of accurately predicting structure ''from scratch.'' Challenges include conformational, geometric, coordination, spin, and particularly linkage (e.g., Tc-SCN versus Tc-NCS) isomerism. In general, our protocol can rapidly (<1 day with desktop software/hardware) predict the structure of diverse Tc complexes with an accuracy commensurate to organics. Our de novo strategy is also being used to investigate tris-pyrazolyl borate (Tp) complexes. Data suggests a fundamental difference in methane activation between TpRe and related CpRe complexes. Furthermore, Tp is a more electronically ''flexible'' platform for catalysts modification than Cp.

  11. New Iron(II) and Manganese(II) Complexes of Two Ultra-Rigid, Cross-Bridged Tetraazamacrocycles for Catalysis and Biomimicry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubin, Tim

    for Catalysis and Biomimicry Timothy J. Hubin, James M. McCormick, Simon R. Collinson, Maria Buchalova, Christopher M. Perkins,§ Nathaniel W. Alcock, Pawan K. Kahol, Ahasuya Raghunathan, and Daryle H. Busch. (2) (a) Jang, H. G.; Cox, D. D.; Que, L., Jr. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 1991, 113, 9200. (b) Han, S.; Eltis

  12. Applied Catalysis A: General 192 (2000) 227234 Hydrogen production via the direct cracking of methane over Ni/SiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2000-01-01

    Applied Catalysis A: General 192 (2000) 227­234 Hydrogen production via the direct cracking is a potential route to the production of CO-free hydrogen and filamentous carbon. Eventually, however. ©2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Methane cracking; Hydrogen production

  13. Wind vs. Biofuels: Addressing Climate, Health and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Professor Mark Jacobson

    2007-01-29

    The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.

  14. Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2007-01-29

    The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.

  15. Strategies to Address Global Warming Is Sundance Kid a Criminal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Strategies to Address Global Warming & Is Sundance Kid a Criminal? Jim Hansen In my opinion, it is still feasible to solve the global warming problem before we pass tipping points that would guarantee ppm yields global warming about 2°C (3.6°F) above the preindustrial level. Such a level of atmospheric

  16. Address Lot Description 981 MADISON DR A PARKING LOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Address Lot Description 981 MADISON DR A PARKING LOT 156 BLUESTONE DR A PARKING LOT EXTENDED 810 MADISON DR B PARKING LOT 897 UNIVERSITY BLVD C PARKING LOT 1170 HARRISON ST C1 PARKING LOT 1161 HARRISON ST C2 PARKING LOT 761 DUKE DRIVE C3 PARKING LOT 441 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR WAY C4 PARKING LOT 650 DUKE

  17. how new hampshire's coastal watershed communities are addressing growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    how new hampshire's coastal watershed communities are addressing growth Setting Goals, Redefining Boundaries #12;Amanda Stone, NROC Coordinator University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension 36 County University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension/ New Hampshire Sea Grant Kingman Farm University of New

  18. Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Nathan L. B. Bangs ADDRESS Institute for Geophysics The University of Texas Pickle Research Campus@utig.ig.utexas.edu EDUCATION B.A. Williams College, 1983, Geology and Physics M.A. Columbia University, 1986, Marine Geophysics M. Phil. Columbia University, 1987, Marine Geophysics Ph.D. Columbia University, 1991, Marine

  19. Resilience and Water Governance Addressing Fragmentation and Uncertainty in Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control Act, commonly known as the Clean Water Act (CWA), to dean up point source discharges fromFIVE Resilience and Water Governance Addressing Fragmentation and Uncertainty in Water Allocation and Water Quality Law BARBARA A. COSENS AND CRAIG A. STOW The U.S. EPA reports that almost half

  20. * Corresponding author address: Jrg Schweizer, WSL Institute for Snow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    ___________________ * Corresponding author address: Jürg Schweizer, WSL Institute for Snow Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research SLF, Davos, Switzerland 2 Department of Geological Sciences of Calgary, Calgary AB, Canada ABSTRACT: The release of a dry-snow slab avalanche is preceded by a series

  1. Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Eric Isaccs

    2010-01-08

    Argonne Director Eric Isaacs addresses the National Press Club on 9/15/2009. To build a national economy based on sustainable energy, the nation must first "reignite its innovation ecology," he said. Issacs makes the case for investing in science to secure America's future.

  2. Saturday's Auctions Suburb Address Type Price Result Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Saturday's Auctions Suburb Address Type Price Result Agent Ascot Park 7 Joy St 2 br h N/A PN RW: 47 Number Reported Auctions: 30 Sold: 24 Withdrawn: N/A % Cleared: 80 % Total Sales: $11 Clearance Rate methodology please click here For a more comprehensive list of results covering all reported

  3. 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 1 Email addresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Gary

    1 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 1 August 31 · Email addresses · Drop box · Questions? 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 2 The Really Big Ideas · Just bits for data and program · Program is a sequence of "variables" (registers) 31 August 2004 Comp120 Fall 2004 3 Just Bits · Program and data have the same

  4. Commerce Office Addresses 2 Export Administration Regulations January 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Commerce Office Addresses 2 Export Administration Regulations January 2001 OFFICES OF EXPORT Division Office of Export Enforcement P.O. Box 70 Washington, D.C. 20044 Telefax: 202/482-5889 Telephone No of Export Enforcement P.O. Box 70 Washington, DC 20044 Telefax: 202-482-0964 Telephone No: 202/482- 2252

  5. Aligning Technology Solutions to Address Over-the-Horizon Threats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aligning Technology Solutions to Address Over-the-Horizon Threats As the world's geopolitical for the U.S. Government bridging the gap between policy development and technology implementation WHAT WE-the-horizon security threats and issues Analysis results to support U.S. policymakers and the science and technology

  6. Curriculum Vitae for Richard E. Nisbett Address: Department of Psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lustig, Cindy

    Curriculum Vitae for Richard E. Nisbett March 2004 Address: Department of Psychology The University- Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished University Professor, 1992- Theodore M. Newcomb Professor of Psychology Scientist, Research Center for Group Dynamics, 1978-1997. Professor of Psychology, 1976-. Associate

  7. Willie Harris Address: Soil and Water Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    .G. Harris. 1994. Quantitative thermal analysis of soil minerals. p. 360-411. In J. Ammonette and L. In M. Sumner (ed.) Handbook of soil science. Rhue, R.D., and Harris, W.G. 1999. Phosphorus sorption/desorption1 Willie Harris Address: Soil and Water Science Department 2169 McCarty Hall University of Florida

  8. I. PROBLEM ADDRESSED In recent years, global warming, depleting conventional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Naren

    such as solar panels, wind turbines or diesel generators. Typically, and more so recently dueI. PROBLEM ADDRESSED In recent years, global warming, depleting conventional sources of energy physical and operational state, including environmental sensor data (e.g. temperature), operational state

  9. Name Address Alumnae Hall 91 Alumnae Dr. EG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Name Address Alumnae Hall 91 Alumnae Dr. EG Anthony-Seeger Hall 821 S. Main EG Ashby Hall 50 Bluestone Dr. AUX Burruss Hall 820 Madison Dr. EG Cleveland Hall 61 E. Grace EG Converse Hall 30 Bluestone Dr. AUX Duke Hall 820 S. Main EG Mr. Chips Convenience Store 190 Bluestone Dr. AUX Frederikson Hall

  10. Pointers and Structures in C Variables that hold memory addresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Pointers and Structures in C Chapter 4 2 Overview · Pointers · Variables that hold memory addresses · Using pointers to do "call-by-reference" in C · Struct · Multiple values grouped together · Dereferencing to access individual elements #12;3 Exercise: Write a swap function void swap(int x, int y

  11. Using Social Networks to Harvest Email Addresses Iasonas Polakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markatos, Evangelos P.

    campaigns. Our blind harvest- ing technique uses names collected from the Facebook and Twitter networks available in Twitter to narrow down the search space and, by utilizing the Facebook email search functionality, we are able to successfully map 43.4% of the user profiles to their actual email address

  12. Math Learning Center Undergraduate Tutor Application LOCAL/ Bozeman address: Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Math Learning Center Undergraduate Tutor Application Name: ID# LOCAL/ Bozeman address: Phone: City Rosenstein in the Math Department. (Email: sabrina.rosenstein@montana.edu) Name of reference Please list all the college math courses you have taken and the grade received. In the space below, discuss your reasons

  13. Arts and Sciences Annual Faculty Address March 3, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Arts and Sciences Annual Faculty Address March 3, 2008 Carol Folt, Dean of the Faculty (Note ­ everywhere, you experience a campus exploding with energy, optimism and ambition. Record numbers of talented intolerance, global political, economic and environmental instability are prevalent. The outlook for millions

  14. Methanol Synthesis over Cu/ZnO/Al2O3: The Active Site in Industrial Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrens, Malte

    2012-03-28

    Unlike homogeneous catalysts, heterogeneous catalysts that have been optimized through decades are typically so complex and hard to characterize that the nature of the catalytically active site is not known. This is one of the main stumbling blocks in developing rational catalyst design strategies in heterogeneous catalysis. We show here how to identify the crucial atomic structure motif for the industrial Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} methanol synthesis catalyst. Using a combination of experimental evidence from bulk-, surface-sensitive and imaging methods collected on real high-performance catalytic systems in combination with DFT calculations. We show that the active site consists of Cu steps peppered with Zn atoms, all stabilized by a series of well defined bulk defects and surface species that need jointly to be present for the system to work.

  15. Operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence for a single electron redox process in copper catalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Qingquan; Zhang, Jian; Peng, Pan; Zhang, Guanghui; Huang, Zhiliang; Yi, Hong; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Lei, Aiwen

    2015-05-26

    An unprecedented single electron redox process in copper catalysis is confirmed using operando X-ray absorption and EPR spectroscopies. The oxidation state of the copper species in the interaction between Cu(II) and a sulfinic acid at room temperature, and the accurate characterization of the formed Cu(I) are clearly shown using operando X-ray absorption and EPR evidence. Further investigation of anion effects on Cu(II) discloses that bromine ions can dramatically increase the rate of the redox process. Moreover, it is proven that the sulfinic acids are converted into sulfonyl radicals, which can be trapped by 2-arylacrylic acids and various valuable ?-keto sulfonesmore »are synthesized with good to excellent yields under mild conditions.« less

  16. Briefing Memo: Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U. S. Department of Energy Public Meeting on “Enhancing Resilience in Energy Infrastructure and Addressing Vulnerabilities” On Friday, April 11, 2014, at 10 a.m. in room HVC-215 of the U.S. Capitol, the Department of Energy (DOE), acting as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, will hold a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). The meeting will focus on infrastructure vulnerabilities related to the electricity, natural gas and petroleum transmission, storage and distribution systems (TS&D). The meeting will consist of two facilitated panels of experts on identifying and addressing vulnerabilities within the nation’s energy TS&D infrastructure. Following the panels, an opportunity will be provided for public comment via an open microphone session.

  17. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProject Develops Student-StakeholdersProtocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity

  18. NEW APPROACH TO ADDRESSING GAS GENERATION IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R; Leduc, D; Askew, N

    2009-06-25

    Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) document why the transportation of radioactive material is safe in Type A(F) and Type B shipping containers. The content evaluation of certain actinide materials require that the gas generation characteristics be addressed. Most packages used to transport actinides impose extremely restrictive limits on moisture content and oxide stabilization to control or prevent flammable gas generation. These requirements prevent some users from using a shipping container even though the material to be shipped is fully compliant with the remaining content envelope including isotopic distribution. To avoid these restrictions, gas generation issues have to be addressed on a case by case basis rather than a one size fits all approach. In addition, SARP applicants and review groups may not have the knowledge and experience with actinide chemistry and other factors affecting gas generation, which facility experts in actinide material processing have obtained in the last sixty years. This paper will address a proposal to create a Gas Generation Evaluation Committee to evaluate gas generation issues associated with Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging material contents. The committee charter could include reviews of both SARP approved contents and new contents not previously evaluated in a SARP.

  19. Regional Seminars to Address Current Nuclear Export Control Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Killinger, Mark H.

    2002-07-01

    The control of nuclear-related exports, a critical component of the nonproliferation regime, is facing several opportunities and challenges. As countries sign and ratify the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) safeguards Additional Protocol (AP), they will begin to report far more export information, including exports of a list of items similar to the Nuclear Supplier Group's Trigger List that existed when the AP was developed in the mid-1990s. This positive development contrasts with challenges such as globalization, transshipments, and tracking of end-uses. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is proposing that the US Department of Energy (DOE) develop regional seminars that address these types of issues related to export/import controls. The DOE seminars would be designed to supplement regional seminars sponsored by the IAEA and member states on topics related to the Additional Protocol (referred to as "IAEA seminars"). The topic of nuclear export/import controls is not thoroughly addressed in the IAEA seminars. The proposed DOE seminars would therefore have two objectives: familiarizing countries with the export/import provisions of the Additional Protocol, and addressing challenges such as those noted above. The seminars would be directed particularly at countries that have not ratified the AP, and at regions where export-related problems are particularly prevalent. The intent is to encourage governments to implement more effective nuclear export control systems that meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  20. Greening Industrial Facilities: A Sustainable Approach to Addressing Energy Concerns 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Love, D.

    2008-01-01

    savings of $3.9 million related to energy reductions. xxxvi Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing ?Six Sigma and Lean Manufacturing practices can be used to address energy efficiency and assure return on investment. For example, 3M?s Brownwood, Texas... facility recently completed a Six Sigma project that improved the operation of the thermal oxidizer, while minimizing the amount of natural gas the unit uses. The project saved $212,000 in the first year alone and also saved 6,808 million BTUs of energy...

  1. A novel electron gun with an independently addressable cathode array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudys, Joseph Matthew; Reed, Kim Warren; Peńa, Gary Edward; Schneider, Larry X.

    2006-08-01

    The design of a novel electron gun with an array of independently addressable cathode elements is presented. Issues relating to operation in a 6.5 Tesla axial magnetic field are discussed. Simulations with the TriComp [1] electromagnetic field code that were used to determine the space charge limited tube characteristic and to model focusing of the electron beam in the magnetic field are reviewed. Foil heating and stress calculations are discussed. The results of CYLTRAN [2] simulations yielding the energy spectrum of the electron beam and the current transmitted through the foil window are presented.

  2. Robust Dynamical Decoupling Sequences for Individual Nuclear Spin Addressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Casanova; J. F. Haase; Z. -Y. Wang; M. B. Plenio

    2015-06-11

    We propose the use of non-equally spaced decoupling pulses for high-resolution selective addressing of nuclear spins by a quantum sensor. The analytical model of the basic operating principle is supplemented by detailed numerical studies that demonstrate the high degree of selectivity and the robustness against static and dynamic control field errors of this scheme. We exemplify our protocol with an NV center-based sensor to demonstrate that it enables the identification of individual nuclear spins that form part of a large spin ensemble.

  3. Imulation of polymer forming processes - addressing industrial needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibault, F.; DiRaddo, R. [Industrial Materials Institute-National Research Council (Canada)

    2011-05-04

    The objective of this paper is to present the development of simulation and design optimization capabilities, for polymer forming processes, in the context of addressing industrial needs. Accomplishments generated from close to twenty years of research in this field, at the National Research Council (NRC), are presented. Polymer forming processes such as extrusion blow moulding, stretch blow moulding and thermoforming have been the focus of the work, yet the research is extendable to similar polymer forming operations such as micro-blow moulding, sheet blow moulding and composites stamping. The research considers material models, process sequence integration and design optimization, derivative processes and 3D finite elements with multi-body contact.

  4. Content-addressable memory based enforcement of configurable policies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berg, Michael J

    2014-05-06

    A monitoring device for monitoring transactions on a bus includes content-addressable memory ("CAM") and a response policy unit. The CAM includes an input coupled to receive a bus transaction tag based on bus traffic on the bus. The CAM stores data tags associated with rules of a security policy to compare the bus transaction tag to the data tags. The CAM generates an output signal indicating whether one or more matches occurred. The response policy unit is coupled to the CAM to receive the output signal from the CAM and to execute a policy action in response to the output signal.

  5. Robust Dynamical Decoupling Sequences for Individual Nuclear Spin Addressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Casanova; Z. -Y. Wang; J. F. Haase; M. B. Plenio

    2015-10-10

    We propose the use of non-equally spaced decoupling pulses for high-resolution selective addressing of nuclear spins by a quantum sensor. The analytical model of the basic operating principle is supplemented by detailed numerical studies that demonstrate the high degree of selectivity and the robustness against static and dynamic control field errors of this scheme. We exemplify our protocol with an NV center-based sensor to demonstrate that it enables the identification of individual nuclear spins that form part of a large spin ensemble.

  6. Addressing Complexity In Laboratory Experiments- The Scaling Of Dilute

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLC JumpInformationAddingFrance)Address

  7. Keynote Address: Update on Environmental Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting Takeaways from 201440PM toAddress:

  8. Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and Disposal | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof Energy Moving Forward to Address Nuclear Waste Storage and

  9. OUR-D001 This revision supercedes all earlier revisions. rev. 5/13 Student Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    University of California, Davis Office of the University Registrar One Shields Avenue, 12 Mrak Hall, Davis your bill mailed? ________________________________________________________________________ Marital_______________________________________ Billing Address Address

  10. Compensated individually addressable array technology for human breast imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, D. Kent (San Francisco, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A method of forming broad bandwidth acoustic or microwave beams which encompass array design, array excitation, source signal preprocessing, and received signal postprocessing. This technique uses several different methods to achieve improvement over conventional array systems. These methods are: 1) individually addressable array elements; 2) digital-to-analog converters for the source signals; 3) inverse filtering from source precompensation; and 4) spectral extrapolation to expand the bandwidth of the received signals. The components of the system will be used as follows: 1) The individually addressable array allows scanning around and over an object, such as a human breast, without any moving parts. The elements of the array are broad bandwidth elements and efficient radiators, as well as detectors. 2) Digital-to-analog converters as the source signal generators allow virtually any radiated field to be created in the half-space in front of the array. 3) Preprocessing allows for corrections in the system, most notably in the response of the individual elements and in the ability to increase contrast and resolution of signal propagating through the medium under investigation. 4) Postprocessing allows the received broad bandwidth signals to be expanded in a process similar to analytic continuation. Used together, the system allows for compensation to create beams of any desired shape, control the wave fields generated to correct for medium differences, and improve contract and resolution in and through the medium.

  11. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  12. Time-dependent CET to address cavity flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dion, D.R. [Pacific Gas & Electric, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper addresses the issue of reactor cavity flooding as a possible part of the overall severe accident management program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR). It proposes the construction of a time-dependent containment event tree (CET) that is tailored for the issue at hand and in which the CET evolves in real time. Probabilities of containment failure are assessed at 12, 24, 36, and 48 hr after the start of an event. This is in contrast to the usual CET formulations where events are called {open_quotes}early{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}late{close_quotes} and where these adjectives are usually not precisely correlated with real time but to an event such as vessel failure. This analysis is performed for a four-loop Westinghouse reactor with a large dry containment. MAAP4 was run to support the quantification of the new CET.

  13. X-ray Crystallographic Studies of Substrate Binding to Aristolochene Synthase Suggest a Metal Ion Binding Sequence for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shishova,E.; Yu, F.; Miller, D.; Faraldos, J.; Zhao, Y.; Coates, R.; Allemann, R.; Cane, D.; Christianson, D.

    2008-01-01

    The universal sesquiterpene precursor, farnesyl diphosphate (FPP), is cyclized in an Mg2+-dependent reaction catalyzed by the tetrameric aristolochene synthase from Aspergillus terreus to form the bicyclic hydrocarbon aristolochene and a pyrophosphate anion (PPi) coproduct. The 2.1- Angstroms resolution crystal structure determined from crystals soaked with FPP reveals the binding of intact FPP to monomers A-C, and the binding of PPi and Mg2+B to monomer D. The 1.89- Angstroms resolution structure of the complex with 2-fluorofarnesyl diphosphate (2F-FPP) reveals 2F-FPP binding to all subunits of the tetramer, with Mg2+Baccompanying the binding of this analogue only in monomer D. All monomers adopt open activesite conformations in these complexes, but slight structural changes in monomers C and D of each complex reflect the very initial stages of a conformational transition to the closed state. Finally, the 2.4- Angstroms resolution structure of the complex with 12,13-difluorofarnesyl diphosphate (DF-FPP) reveals the binding of intact DF-FPP to monomers A-C in the open conformation and the binding of PPi, Mg2+B, and Mg2+C to monomer D in a predominantly closed conformation. Taken together, these structures provide 12 independent 'snapshots' of substrate or product complexes that suggest a possible sequence for metal ion binding and conformational changes required for catalysis.

  14. Software programs that address site-specific inventory characteristics issues.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dare, J. H.; Cournoyer, M. E.

    2001-01-01

    The proper characterization of Hazardous, Mixed Low-Level, and Mixed Transuranic waste enhances productivity and safety. Hazardous material criteria that need to be considered include physical and health hazards inherent to the waste stream. Other factors that may influence characterization include: particulate diameter, complexing or chelating agent properties, lead, and mercury content, pressurized containers, and P-listed wastes. To meet these requirements are only a simple matter of generating a database with the proper fields. Manufactures and institutional databases bank huge sources of information, such as, work control documents, substance identification, container types, components of mixtures, physical property data, and regulatory data. In this report, utilization of commercially available software programs to take advantage of these resources in addressing waste characterization issues are presented. The application of user-friendly programs eliminates part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of certifying to general waste acceptance criteria with minimal impact on programmatic work. In other words, tapping into manufacturer and institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of these resources in managing a cost effective waste certification program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program.

  15. Addressing the Need for Independence in the CSE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Ferragut, Erik M; Sheldon, Frederick T; Grimaila, Michael R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Information system security risk, defined as the product of the monetary losses associated with security incidents and the probability that they occur, is a suitable decision criterion when considering different information system architectures. Risk assessment is the widely accepted process used to understand, quantify, and document the effects of undesirable events on organizational objectives so that risk management, continuity of operations planning, and contingency planning can be performed. One technique, the Cyberspace Security Econometrics System (CSES), is a methodology for estimating security costs to stakeholders as a function of possible risk postures. In earlier works, we presented a computational infrastructure that allows an analyst to estimate the security of a system in terms of the loss that each stakeholder stands to sustain, as a result of security breakdowns. Additional work has applied CSES to specific business cases. The current state-of-the-art of CSES addresses independent events. In typical usage, analysts create matrices that capture their expert opinion, and then use those matrices to quantify costs to stakeholders. This expansion generalizes CSES to the common real-world case where events may be dependent.

  16. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought by the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.

  17. Hidden benefits of electric vehicles for addressing climate change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Canbing; Cao, Yijia; Zhang, Mi; Wang, Jianhui; Liu, Jianguo; Shi, Haiqing; Geng, Yinghui

    2015-03-19

    There is an increasingly hot debate on whether the replacement of conventional vehicles (CVs) by electric vehicles (EVs) should be delayed or accelerated since EVs require higher cost and cause more pollution than CVs in the manufacturing process. Here we reveal two hidden benefits of EVs for addressing climate change to support the imperative acceleration of replacing CVs with EVs. As EVs emit much less heat than CVs within the same mileage, the replacement can mitigate urban heat island effect (UHIE) to reduce the energy consumption of air conditioners, benefitting local and global climates. To demonstrate these effects brought bymore »the replacement of CVs by EVs, we take Beijing, China, as an example. EVs emit only 19.8% of the total heat emitted by CVs per mile. The replacement of CVs by EVs in 2012 could have mitigated the summer heat island intensity (HII) by about 0.94°C, reduced the amount of electricity consumed daily by air conditioners in buildings by 14.44 million kilowatt-hours (kWh), and reduced daily CO? emissions by 10,686 tonnes.« less

  18. Strategies to address transition costs in the electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1996-07-01

    Transition costs are the potential monetary losses that electric- utility shareholders, ratepayers, or other parties might experience because of structural changes in the electricity industry. Regulators, policy analysts, utilities, and consumer groups have proposed a number of strategies to address transition costs, such as immediately opening retail electricity markets or delaying retail competition. This report has 3 objectives: identify a wide range of strategies available to regulators and utilities; systematically examine effects of strategies; and identify potentially promising strategies that may provide benefits to more than one set of stakeholders. The many individual strategies are grouped into 6 major categories: market actions, depreciation options, rate-making actions, utility cost reductions, tax measures, and other options. Of the 34 individual strategies, retail ratepayers have primary or secondary responsibility for paying transition costs in 19 of the strategies, shareholders in 12, wheeling customers in 11, taxpayers in 8, and nonutility suppliers in 4. Most of the strategies shift costs among different segments of the economy, although utility cost reductions can be used to offset transition costs. Most of the strategies require cooperation of other parties, including regulators, to be implemented successfully; financial stakeholders must be engages in negotiations that hold the promise of shared benefits. Only by rejecting ``winner-take-all`` strategies will the transition-cost issue be expeditiously resolved.

  19. Addressing Energy Demand through Demand Response. International Experiences and Practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Bo; Ghatikar, Girish; Ni, Chun Chun; Dudley, Junqiao; Martin, Phil; Wikler, Greg

    2012-06-01

    Demand response (DR) is a load management tool which provides a cost-effective alternative to traditional supply-side solutions to address the growing demand during times of peak electrical load. According to the US Department of Energy (DOE), demand response reflects “changes in electric usage by end-use customers from their normal consumption patterns in response to changes in the price of electricity over time, or to incentive payments designed to induce lower electricity use at times of high wholesale market prices or when system reliability is jeopardized.” 1 The California Energy Commission (CEC) defines DR as “a reduction in customers’ electricity consumption over a given time interval relative to what would otherwise occur in response to a price signal, other financial incentives, or a reliability signal.” 2 This latter definition is perhaps most reflective of how DR is understood and implemented today in countries such as the US, Canada, and Australia where DR is primarily a dispatchable resource responding to signals from utilities, grid operators, and/or load aggregators (or DR providers).

  20. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. DOE PETC third quarterly report, February 25, 1994--May 24, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1995-12-31

    Environmental concerns are leading to the replacement of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasoline by high-octane-number branched paraffins and oxygenated compounds such as methyl t-butyl ether. The ether is produced from methanol and isobutylene, and the latter can be formed from n-butane by isomerization followed by dehydrogenation. Paraffin isomerization reactions are catalyzed by very strong acids such as aluminum chloride supported on alumina. The aluminum chloride-containing catalysts are corrosive, and their disposal is expensive. Alternatively, hydroisomerization is catalyzed by zeolite-supported metals at high temperatures, but high temperatures do not favor branched products at equilibrium. Thus there is a need for improved catalysts and processes for the isomerization of n-butane and other straight-chain paraffins. Consequently, researchers have sought for solid acids that are noncorrosive and active enough to catalyze isomerization of paraffins at low temperatures. For example, sulfated zirconia catalyzes isomerization of n-butane at temperatures as low as 25{degrees}C. The addition of iron and manganese promoters has been reported to increase the activity of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization by three orders of magnitude. Although the high activity of this catalyst is now established, the reaction network is not known, and the mechanism has not been investigated. The goal of this work is to investigate low-temperature reactions of light paraffins catalyzed by solid superacids of the sulfated zirconia type. The present report is concerned with catalysis of n-butane conversion catalyzed by the Fe- and Mn- promoted sulfated zirconia described in the previous report in this series.

  1. Structural Basis for Catalysis of a Tetrameric Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Ruskseree, Kamolchanok; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D. ((NSTDC)); ((UIC))

    2009-03-04

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), currently infects one-third of the world's population in its latent form. The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant strains has highlighted the need for new pharmacological targets within M. tuberculosis. The class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) enzyme from M. tuberculosis (MtFBA) has been proposed as one such target since it is upregulated in latent TB. Since the structure of MtFBA has not been determined and there is little information available on its reaction mechanism, we sought to determine the X-ray structure of MtFBA in complex with its substrates. By lowering the pH of the enzyme in the crystalline state, we were able to determine a series of high-resolution X-ray structures of MtFBA bound to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 1.5, 2.1, and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Through these structures, it was discovered that MtFBA belongs to a novel tetrameric class of type IIa FBAs. The molecular details at the interface of the tetramer revealed important information for better predictability of the quaternary structures among the FBAs based on their primary sequences. These X-ray structures also provide interesting and new details on the reaction mechanism of class II FBAs. Substrates and products were observed in geometries poised for catalysis; in addition, unexpectedly, the hydroxyl-enolate intermediate of dihydroxyacetone phosphate was also captured and resolved structurally. These concise new details offer a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms for FBAs in general and provide a structural basis for inhibitor design efforts aimed at this class of enzymes.

  2. Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahai, Rashmi; Shah, Nihar; Phadke, Amol

    2012-07-01

    Evaporative coolers (ECs) provide significant gains in energy efficiency compared to vapor compression air conditioners, but simultaneously have significant onsite water demand. This can be a major barrier to deployment in areas of the world with hot and arid climates. To address this concern, this study determined where in the world evaporative cooling is suitable, the water consumption of ECs in these cities, and the potential that greywater can be used reduce the consumption of potable water in ECs. ECs covered 69percent of the cities where room air conditioners are may be deployed, based on comfort conditions alone. The average water consumption due to ECs was found to be 400 L/household/day in the United States and Australia, with the potential for greywater to provide 50percent this amount. In the rest of the world, the average water consumption was 250 L/household/day, with the potential for greywater to supply 80percent of this amount. Home size was the main factor that contributed to this difference. In the Mediterranean, the Middle East, Northern India, and the Midwestern and Southwestern United States alkalinity levels are high and water used for bleeding will likely contribute significantly to EC water consumption. Although technically feasible, upfront costs for household GW systems are currently high. In both developed and developing parts of the world, however, a direct EC and GW system is cost competitive with conventional vapor compression air conditioners. Moreover, in regions of the world that face problems of water scarcity the benefits can substantially outweigh the costs.

  3. Regulatory approaches for addressing dissolved oxygen concerns at hydropower facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mark J.; Cada, Glenn F.; Sale, Michael J.; Eddlemon, Gerald K.

    2003-03-01

    Low dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations are a common water quality problem downstream of hydropower facilities. At some facilities, structural improvements (e.g. installation of weir dams or aerating turbines) or operational changes (e.g., spilling water over the dam) can be made to improve DO levels. In other cases, structural and operational approaches are too costly for the project to implement or are likely to be of limited effectiveness. Despite improvements in overall water quality below dams in recent years, many hydropower projects are unable to meet state water quality standards for DO. Regulatory agencies in the U.S. are considering or implementing dramatic changes in their approach to protecting the quality of the Nation’s waters. New policies and initiatives have emphasized flexibility, increased collaboration and shared responsibility among all parties, and market-based, economic incentives. The use of new regulatory approaches may now be a viable option for addressing the DO problem at some hydropower facilities. This report summarizes some of the regulatory-related options available to hydropower projects, including negotiation of site-specific water quality criteria, use of biological monitoring, watershed-based strategies for the management of water quality, and watershed-based trading. Key decision points center on the health of the local biological communities and whether there are contributing impacts (i.e., other sources of low DO effluents) in the watershed. If the biological communities downstream of the hydropower project are healthy, negotiation for site-specific water quality standards or biocriteria (discharge performance criteria based on characteristics of the aquatic biota) might be pursued. If there are other effluent dischargers in the watershed that contribute to low DO problems, watershed-scale strategies and effluent trading may be effective. This report examines the value of regulatory approaches by reviewing their use in other

  4. Bioinspired design of redox-active ligands for multielectron catalysis: Effects of positioning pyrazine reservoirs on cobalt for electro- and photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jurss, Jonah W.; Khnayzer, Rony S.; Panetier, Julien A.; El Roz, Karim A.; Nichols, Eva M.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Long, Jeffrey R.; Castellano, Felix N.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2015-06-09

    Mononuclear metalloenzymes in nature can function in cooperation with precisely positioned redox-active organic cofactors in order to carry out multielectron catalysis. Inspired by the finely tuned redox management of these bioinorganic systems, we present the design, synthesis, and experimental and theoretical characterization of a homologous series of cobalt complexes bearing redox-active pyrazines. These donor moieties are locked into key positions within a pentadentate ligand scaffold in order to evaluate the effects of positioning redox non-innocent ligands on hydrogen evolution catalysis. Both metal- and ligand-centered redox features are observed in organic as well as aqueous solutions over a range of pHmore »values, and comparison with analogs bearing redox-inactive zinc(II) allows for assignments of ligand-based redox events. Varying the geometric placement of redox non-innocent pyrazine donors on isostructural pentadentate ligand platforms results in marked effects on observed cobalt-catalyzed proton reduction activity. Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution from weak acids in acetonitrile solution, under diffusion-limited conditions, reveals that the pyrazine donor of axial isomer 1-Co behaves as an unproductive electron sink, resulting in high overpotentials for proton reduction, whereas the equatorial pyrazine isomer complex 2-Co is significantly more active for hydrogen generation at lower voltages. Addition of a second equatorial pyrazine in complex 3-Co further minimizes overpotentials required for catalysis. The equatorial derivative 2-Co is also superior to its axial 1-Co congener for electrocatalytic and visible-light photocatalytic hydrogen generation in biologically relevant, neutral pH aqueous media. Density functional theory calculations (B3LYP-D2) indicate that the first reduction of catalyst isomers 1-Co, 2-Co, and 3-Co is largely metal-centered while the second reduction occurs at pyrazine. Taken together, the data establish that proper positioning of non-innocent pyrazine ligands on a single cobalt center is indeed critical for promoting efficient hydrogen catalysis in aqueous media, akin to optimally positioned redox-active cofactors in metalloenzymes. In a broader sense, these findings highlight the significance of electronic structure considerations in the design of effective electron–hole reservoirs for multielectron transformations.« less

  5. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments...

  6. Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges In light of...

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Initiates New Outreach Efforts to Address...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Efforts to Address a Changing Wind Industry U.S. Department of Energy Initiates New Outreach Efforts to Address a Changing Wind Industry March 31, 2014 - 10:12am Addthis...

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Initiates New Outreach Efforts to Address...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy Initiates New Outreach Efforts to Address a Changing Wind Industry U.S. Department of Energy Initiates New Outreach Efforts to Address a Changing Wind...

  9. How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D How ATP3 is Addressing the Challenges of Scale-up in Algae Technology R&D Breakout Session 2-A: The Future...

  10. Addressing the Disproportionate Representation of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students in Special Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klingner, Janette K.; Artiles, Alfredo J.; Kozleski, Elizabeth B.; Harry, Beth; Zion, Shelley; Tate, William; Durá n, Grace Zamora; Riley, David

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we present a conceptual framework for addressing the disproportionate representation of culturally and linguistically diverse students in special education. The cornerstone of our approach to addressing ...

  11. OHSU Cytogenetics Research Service Laboratory Lab Shipping Address: 2525 SW 3rd Ave Ste. 350,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    OHSU Cytogenetics Research Service Laboratory Lab Shipping Address: 2525 SW 3rd Ave Ste. 350, Portland, OR 97201 Lab Mailing Address: 3181 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, Mailstop MP-350, Portland, OR, 97239

  12. Native language experience shapes neural basis of addressed and assembled phonologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    words in the addressed group; TW_ASSE = trained words inthe assembled group; UTW_ASSE = untrained words in the

  13. Expansion of the internet protocol address space with "minor" disruption of current hardware or software 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheatley, Philip Stephen

    1996-01-01

    Currently, the Internet suite of protocols uses a 32 bit network layer address and requires that each machine have a unique address. The problem: 32 bits only distinguishes 2 32 or 4,294,967,296 machines. Even with four billion addresses, experts...

  14. Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. DOE PETC seventh quarterly progress report, April 1, 1995--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, B.C.

    1996-02-01

    Iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is a catalyst for the conversion of propane, but the rate of conversion of propane is much less than the rate of conversion of butane. Whereas this catalyst appears to be a good candidate for practical, industrial conversion of butane, it appears to lack sufficient activity for practical conversion of propane. The propane conversion data reported here provide excellent insights into the chemistry of the catalytic conversion. Solid and catalysts, namely, sulfated zirconia, iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia, and USY zeolite, were tested for conversion of propane at 1 atm, 200-450{degrees}C, and propane partial pressures in the range of 0.01-0.05 atm. Both promoted and unpromoted sulfated zirconia were found to be active for conversion of propane into butanes, pentanes, methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene in the temperature range of 200-350{degrees}C, but catalyst deactivation was rapid. At the higher temperatures, only cracking and dehydrogenation products were observed. In contrast to the zirconia-supported catalysts, USY zeolite was observed to convert propane (into propylene, methane, and ethylene) only at temperatures {ge}400{degrees}C. The initial (5 min on stream) rates of propane conversion in the presence of iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia, sulfated zirconia, and USY zeolite at 450{degrees}C and 0.01 atm propane partial pressure were 3.3 x 10{sup -8}, 0.3 x 10{sup -8}, and 0.06 x 10{sup -8} mol/(s{center_dot}g), respectively. The product distributions in the temperature range 200-450{degrees}C are those of acid-base catalysis, being similar to what has been observed in superacid solution chemistry at temperatures <0{degrees}C. If propane conversion at 450{degrees}C can be considered as a probe of acid strength of the catalyst, the activity comparison suggests that the promoted sulfated zirconia is a stronger acid than sulfated zirconia, which is a stronger acid than USY zeolite.

  15. HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    synthesis gas by coal gasification is very expensive andin the cost of coal gasification would have a significantthe feed derived from coal gasi.fication. To establish the

  16. CATALYSIS, PERCEPTION, AND CONSCIOUSNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARPENTER, PATRICIA A.; DAVIA, CHRISTOPHER J.; VIMAL, RAM LAKHAN PANDEY

    2009-01-01

    Higher Cognitive Functions was provided by World Scientific.Access to World Scientific is possible through the

  17. HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    synthesis gas by coal gasification is very expensive andin the cost of coal gasification would have a significantas K co , to promote gasification would be beneficial s1nce

  18. Computational Catalysis and Electrocatalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermúdez, José Luis

    ;Applications from our research · Fuel cell electrocatalysts · Controlled growth of carbon nanostructures · Hydrogen storage · Photocatalysis #12;Fuel cell electrocatalysts Parallelism between bimetallics-- Another fuel cell challenge #12;Predictions and challenges Using molecular dynamics simulations we showed

  19. HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Coal Conversion Catalysts (Fred R. Brown) Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Propertiescoals. THE INFLUENCE f-ELECTRON CONFIGURATION ON CATALYTIC PROPERTIES

  20. HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    have been investigated: 1) catalytic oxidation of CO onPt and Pd1 2) catalytic oxidation of H2 on Pd; compet iveof the catalytic properties of oxides to specific oxidation

  1. ZEOLITE CATALYSIS - TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    in 1978 Catalytic Hydrocracking Catalyst Sales million lbs/to a lesser extent in hydrocracking. Table 1 presents somein hydrocrackring Hydrocracking is catalytic cracking in the

  2. Hydrocracking reactions and catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolbear, G.E. [G.E. Dolbear and Associates, Diamond Bar, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Hydrocracking processes convert aromatic gas oils into high quality gasoline, diesel, and turbine stocks. In doing this, they saturate aromatic rings, crack naphthenes and paraffins, and saturate olefins formed during cracking. The organic chemistry of these steps is well known. Catalysts for hydrocracking contain components for both the hydrogenation and cracking reactions. Hydrogenation activity is provided by Pd or promoted molybdenum or tungsten sulfides. Cracking takes place on strong acid sites in zeolites or amorphous silica aluminas. Specialty catalysts including narrow pore zeolites are used in dewaxing tube oil stocks. Basic nitrogen compounds such as quinoline can poison the acid sites. They are usually removed in a pretreating step, typically with a nickel/molybdenum sulfide catalyst that also removes sulfur.

  3. Metal Oxide Nanofiber Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noon, Daniel Patrick

    2015-01-01

    and Mechanism. Chemical Engineering Science, 1980. 35(6): p.Catalytic Combustor. Chemical Engineering Science, 1980. 35(Gas Shift Reaction. Chemical Engineering Science, 1981. 36(

  4. ZEOLITE CATALYSIS - TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    olefins and aromatics from coal derived methanol Again workCycloparaffins Aromatics XBL 805-1067 Fig. 8 Methanol

  5. Catalysis Without Precious Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, R. Morris

    2010-11-01

    Written for chemists in industry and academia, this ready reference and handbook summarizes recent progress in the development of new catalysts that do not require precious metals. The research thus presented points the way to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant the use of precious metals in some types of reactions, while highlighting the remaining challenges. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  6. ZEOLITE CATALYSIS - TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    and after Hydrodewaxing with 2SH-5 Virgin heavy gas oil MMDWprocessed heavy gas oil Properties Gravity, API Pour point,

  7. HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS RESEARCH MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    merits and disadvantages of LEED, Auger, photo- emissionelectron dif- fraction, (LEED), and the investigation of theof overlayer structures by LEED has concentrated on the

  8. ZEOLITE CATALYSIS - TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    palladium) tubular pore zeolite such as mordenite, while the Mobil process uses ZSM-5 zeolite. Hydrogen

  9. 2012 Catalysis Lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONe β+-DecayUpgrade P.July 31, 2012201222

  10. Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi-Cylinder Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ORNL and UW collaboration in evaluating and developing RCCI operation in fully built multi-cylinder engine to address hardware, aftertreatment, and control challenges

  11. RE-SCHEDULED FROM JAN 22 TO JAN 28 - COLLOQUIUM: Addressing Big...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Colloquia MBG Auditorium RE-SCHEDULED FROM JAN 22 TO JAN 28 - COLLOQUIUM: Addressing Big Data Challenges in Simulation-based Science Professor Manish Parashar Rutgers...

  12. The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic...

  13. Addressing the Challenges of RCCI Operation on a Light-Duty Multi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and developing RCCI operation in fully built multi-cylinder engine to address hardware, aftertreatment, and control challenges deer11wagner.pdf More Documents &...

  14. Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI 2010-23251: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Galvin Electricity Initiative DOE RFI DOE RFI...

  15. Genes and Genomics for Improving Energy Crops (Keynote Address - 2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Pennell, Roger

    2011-04-28

    Roger Pennell, Vice President of Trait Development at Ceres, Inc., delivers a keynote address at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting on March 25, 2010

  16. Address Assignment and Routing Schemes for ZigBee-Based Long-Thin Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    that the address assignment and thus the tree routing scheme defined in the original ZigBee specification may work Terms--address assignment, long-thin network, routing protocol, wireless sensor network, ZigBee. I [5]. For interoperability among different systems, standards such as ZigBee [17] have been developed

  17. AER EAR: A Matched Silicon Cochlea Pair with Address Event Representation Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Shih-Chii

    AER EAR: A Matched Silicon Cochlea Pair with Address Event Representation Interface André van, the Address Event Representation (AER) interface has become the standard interface protocol in recent years. The AER approach allows us to model biological systems using discrete level (spikes) and continuous

  18. Forms Of Address In The Popular Press: A Comparison of Spain, Mexico and the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callahan, Laura

    2000-01-01

    with each form of address. A comparison of forms of address in magazines and newspapers in Spain, Mexico, and the United States reveals certain correlations with speech patterns in those three countries, as well as with the products and services advertised....

  19. Targeting a Shared-Address-Space Version of the Seismic Benchmark Seis1.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padua, David

    Applications, Seismic Processing, Parallel Processing, Parallel Languages, Language Design, Shared AddressTargeting a Shared-Address-Space Version of the Seismic Benchmark Seis1.1 Bill Pottenger and Rudolf experiences retargeting the seismic processing message-passing application Seis1.1 11] to an SGI Challenge

  20. A Hybrid Adiabatic Content Addressable Memory for Ultra Low-Power Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tessier, Russell

    A Hybrid Adiabatic Content Addressable Memory for Ultra Low-Power Applications Aiyappan Natarajan/write operation. The adiabatic CAM is suitable for ultra low-power, low per- formance applications such as smart, Performance Keywords Ultra-low power, Energy recovery, adiabatic switching 1. INTRODUCTION Content Addressable

  1. Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty and managing risk. After

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment & Management This chapter presents the Council's approach to addressing uncertainty in this power plan require an analytical approach that addresses such rare but extreme events. Risk assessment favor going ahead. In this plan, the Council further integrates risk assessment and management into its

  2. Addressing the issues of target fabrication and injection for inertial fusion energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    survive injection into the target chamber without damage. An example of a recent direct drive IFE targetAddressing the issues of target fabrication and injection for inertial fusion energy D.T. Goodin a, CA 92024, USA Abstract Addressing the issues associated with target fabrication and injection

  3. Keynote address

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pena, F.

    1999-07-01

    The author discusses the role of energy in the world economy, structural changes in the ever changing US energy sector and responses of the capital markets, and electric deregulation, highlighting the challenges facing the gas processors. He encourages the natural gas processors to continue to be aware of global forces which can rapidly affect the industry.

  4. Keynote Address

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * The WVDP is currently storing three large vessels that were removed from the vitrification facility: the melter, the concentrator feed makeup tank (CFMT), and the melter...

  5. 5-address

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril351APPLICATION OF QUANTITATIVEatPolicy

  6. Materials Data on H4BrN (SG:129) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on H4BrN (SG:215) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Energy levels of the electrons localized over the surface of an inert film with address electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrin, A. B.

    2013-03-15

    The problem of searching for the potential energy and the energy spectrum of the electrons localized over the surface of a thin liquid or solid inert film due to address electrodes placed under the film is considered.

  9. Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-03-07

    AMO is developing advanced technologies that cut energy use and carbon emissions in some of the most energy-intensive processes within U.S. manufacturing. The brochure describes the AMO R&D projects that address these challenges.

  10. Dynamic Agent Based Modeling Using Bayesian Framework for Addressing Intelligence Adaptive Nuclear Nonproliferation Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Royal A

    2014-10-03

    Realistically, no two nuclear proliferating or defensive entities are exactly identical; Agent Based Modeling (ABM) is a computational methodology addressing the uniqueness of those facilitating or preventing nuclear proliferation. The modular...

  11. Oil and Gas Company Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu Dhabi National Oil Company Abu http www adnoc ae default aspx Al Furat Petroleum Company Al...

  12. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website Alabama Oil and Gas Board Alabama Oil and Gas Board Hackberry Lane Tuscaloosa Alabama http www gsa state al us ogb ogb html...

  13. A tractable optimization framework for Air Traffic Flow Management addressing fairness, collaboration and stochasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shubham, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    We propose a tractable optimization framework for network Air Traffic Flow Management (ATFM) with an eye towards the future. The thesis addresses two issues in ATFM research: a) fairness and collaboration amongst airlines; ...

  14. Flexibility in building design : a real options approach and valuation methodology to address risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greden, Lara V. (Lara Virginia), 1977-

    2005-01-01

    This research develops an approach to designing and valuing flexible systems subject to identified future uncertainties. The approach addresses two shortcomings of current design and decision-making practices that are ...

  15. DOE to Address Small Businesses Barriers in Government Contracting at Waste Management Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PHOENIX – EM and the DOE Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization (OSDBU) are working to address barriers that hinder small businesses from competing for prime contracts for work in the Cold War cleanup program.

  16. Addressing Practical Issues in Designing Weather Insurance Contracts for Risk Management Applications in Developing Countries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sá nchez Aragó n, Leonardo F

    2014-04-07

    In this dissertation we address practical issues in designing weather insurance contracts for risk management in developing countries in three different scenarios. First, we develop an innovative contract design strategy ...

  17. Duplicate diploma fee charged to BruinBill account E-mail address required below

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Gary A.

    country city state Zip/Postal code Province (canada only) Telephone e-mail Address Birthdate 9-Digit Ucl that the duplicate diploma will bear the signatures of the current officials of the state and the University. #12;

  18. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis: Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frenkel, A.I.; Hanson, J.; Wang, Q.; Marinkovic, N.; Chen, J.G.; Barrio, L.; Si, R.; Lopez Camara, A.; Estrella, A.M.; Rodriguez, J.A.

    2011-08-05

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  19. Combining X-ray Absorption and X-ray Diffraction Techniques for in Situ Studies of Chemical Transformations in Heterogeneous Catalysis:Advantages and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Frenkel; Q Wang; N Marinkovic; J Chen; L Barrio; R Si; A Lopez Camara; A Estella; J Rodriquez; J Hanson

    2011-12-31

    Recent advances in catalysis instrumentations include synchrotron-based facilities where time-resolved X-ray scattering and absorption techniques are combined in the same in situ or operando experiment to study catalysts at work. To evaluate the advances and limitations of this method, we performed a series of experiments at the new XAFS/XRD instrument in the National Synchrotron Light Source. Nearly simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure (XAFS) measurements of structure and kinetics of several catalysts under reducing or oxidizing conditions have been performed and carefully analyzed. For CuFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} under reducing conditions, the combined use of the two techniques allowed us to obtain accurate data on kinetics of nucleation and growth of metallic Cu. For the inverse catalyst CuO/CeO{sub 2} that underwent isothermal reduction (with CO) and oxidation (with O{sub 2}), the XAFS data measured in the same experiment with XRD revealed strongly disordered Cu species that went undetected by diffraction. These and other examples emphasize the unique sensitivity of these two complementary methods to follow catalytic processes in the broad ranges of length and time scales.

  20. Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Addressing Global Warming, Air Pollution Health Damage, and Long-Term Energy Needs Simultaneously information suggest that ethanol is neither clean nor has it been shown that it can slow global warming in the U.S. It will also divert resources from the primary practical solutions to global warming and air

  1. Addressing the Energy-Delay Tradeoff in Wireless Networks with Load-Proportional Energy Usage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikdar, Biplab

    Addressing the Energy-Delay Tradeoff in Wireless Networks with Load-Proportional Energy Usage Jie and achieve load-proportional energy usage. These techniques slow down the operation of the hardware and thus the energy-delay tradeoff while achieving load-proportional energy usage in wireless networks. The proposed

  2. Strategies to Address the Problem of Exiting Expertise in the Electric Power Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the responses into four approaches: 1. Human resource management: identification and evaluation of knowledge to address that challenge: managing available resources, outsourcing, automating, recording, and educating of ages in the utility workforce now, and in five and ten years in the future. The Nuclear Energy

  3. 136 HumanWildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    136 Human­Wildlife Conflicts 1(2) Berryman Institute addresses feral hog problems BRUCE D. LEOPOLD that is growing in importance throughout the southeastern United States: feral hogs. Being in Mississippi, I am in crops to corn for biofuels will greatly enhance our feral hog populations. In Mississippi alone

  4. Present performance & future directions in two-photon addressed volumetric optical disk storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esener, Sadik C.

    Present performance & future directions in two-photon addressed volumetric optical disk storage data storage is presented and future directions discussed. Influence of numerical aperture in a 3-D multi-layer optical data storage system is analyzed. Keywords: volumetric data storage, multi-layer data

  5. Paving the road to peace: John F. Kennedy's American University address 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Kelly J

    1997-01-01

    and the political rhetoric between the two nations. It was during the height of the Cold War that John F. Kennedy pursued a nuclear test ban treaty with the Soviet Union. Towards this end, he delivered a commencement address at American University on June 10, 1963...

  6. A Framework for Creating a Facetted Classification for Genres: Addressing Issues of Multidimensionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    communicative purpose and common aspects of form" (p. 543). Scholars in fields such as rhetoric and libraryA Framework for Creating a Facetted Classification for Genres: Addressing Issues aspects of genre that we recognize as fundamental: content, form, and purpose. A document's genre

  7. Remotely addressable magnetic composite micropumps{ Eric Diller, Shuhei Miyashita and Metin Sitti*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitti, Metin

    the creation of micron-scale permanent magnets for the application of forces and torques via externally-generated in an addressable manner. We propose micro-scale permanent magnet composites that can be remotely and reversibly, which pair switchable permanent magnets with electromagnets. In these devices, electromagnetic coils

  8. Offshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp-Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the next generation of offshore wind farms are designed. The aim of this paper is to discuss existingOffshore Wind Turbine Design: Addressing Uncertainty Drivers Sten Frandsen Niels Jacob Tarp@civil.auc.dk leje@elsam-eng.com Abstract: Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st

  9. CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissen-Meyer, Tarje

    CURRICULUM VITAE TARJE NISSEN-MEYER address: ETH Zurich, Institute of Geophysics Sonneggstrasse 5: ++41 (0) 44 633 3154 fax: ++41 (0) 44 633 1065 AUGUST 5, 2010 Education 2007 Ph.D. Geophysics in field geology, mathematics, seismology, geodynamics, geophysics 2001 Diplom Geophysics (M

  10. Multiple scales of diamond mining in Akwatia, Ghana: addressing environmental and human development impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    impact on environmental degradation, health, and the livelihood of artisanal miners. We concludeMultiple scales of diamond mining in Akwatia, Ghana: addressing environmental and human development impact Kaakpema Yelpaalaa,b , Saleem H. Alic,d, * a Yale University, School of Epidemiology and Public

  11. * Corresponding author. E-mail address: dengx@physics.utoledo.edu (X. Deng)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    * Corresponding author. E-mail address: dengx@physics.utoledo.edu (X. Deng) Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 62 (2000) 89}95 Amorphous silicon and silicon germanium materials for high-e$ciency triple-Si/a-SiGe/a-SiGe solar cells with 10.6% initial e$ciency. 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: a

  12. Irfan Ullah Chaudhary Address: 47-D New Muslim Town, Lahore 54600, Pakistan.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irfan Ullah Chaudhary Address: 47-D New Muslim Town, Lahore 54600, Pakistan. Phone: (9242) 586-Present Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering University of Engineering & Technology Lahore, Pakistan Visiting Faculty 2008-Present Dept. of Physics Lahore University of Management Sciences Lahore, Pakistan

  13. Better Technologies Key to Addressing Climate Change Energy Department official explains U.S. initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a multilateral effort to develop the next generation of economical and safe nuclear reactors, and the ITERBetter Technologies Key to Addressing Climate Change Energy Department official explains U.S. initiatives 17 December 2004 More energy-efficient technologies will be key to reducing greenhouse gas

  14. Rendering Adaptation to Address Communication and Computation Constraints in Cloud Mobile Gaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Rendering Adaptation to Address Communication and Computation Constraints in Cloud Mobile Gaming by the available server computing resource for each client, considering cloud server hosts numerous clients Shaoxuan Wang, Sujit Dey Mobile System Design Lab, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering University

  15. Operations Research Tools for Addressing Current Challenges in Emergency Medical Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Shane

    Operations Research Tools for Addressing Current Challenges in Emergency Medical Services Shane G of the key challenges and potential operations research based remedies, and to discuss in detail one for both operations research specialists and EMS professionals, although it is written primarily for EMS

  16. Leveraging XSEDE HPC resources to address computational challenges with high-resolution topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Leveraging XSEDE HPC resources to address computational challenges with high-resolution topography topography data. These web services make results from community software packages and other cyberinfrastructure-based applications available to the wider earth sciences community via the OpenTopography Facility

  17. Publications Mail agreeMent nuMber 40683196 return undeliverable canadian addresses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    canadian addresses to: college of engineering, university of saskatchewan, dean's office, 57 caMPus drive College of Engineering. Use of the University of Saskatchewan logo is regulated by the University logo is property of the University of Saskatchewan College of Engineering. Reproduction of this logo

  18. DOE NSF Partnership to Address Critical Challenges in Hydrogen Production from Solar Water Splitting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE and the National Science Foundation (NSF) announce a funding opportunity in the area of renewable hydrogen technology research and development, specifically addressing discovery and development of advanced materials systems and chemical proceesses for direct photochemical and/or thermochemical water splitting for application in the solar production of hydrogen fuel.

  19. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 2

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  20. NNSA Administrator Addresses the Next Generation of Nuclear Security Professionals: Part 1

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Thomas D'Agostino

    2010-09-01

    Administrator Thomas DAgostino of the National Nuclear Security Administration addressed the next generation of nuclear security professionals during the opening session of todays 2009 Department of Energy (DOE) Computational Science Graduate Fellowship Annual Conference. Administrator DAgostino discussed NNSAs role in implementing President Obamas nuclear security agenda and encouraged the computing science fellows to consider careers in nuclear security.

  1. Error Tolerant Address Configuration for Data Center Networks with Malfunctioning Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yan

    Error Tolerant Address Configuration for Data Center Networks with Malfunctioning Devices Xingyu Ma to correct malfunctions and it can cause substantial operation delay of the whole data center. In this paper benefits because in most cases malfunctions in data centers only account for a very small portion

  2. Exploring the Microscopic Textual Characteristics of Japanese Prime Ministers' Diet Addresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , attitudes and thoughts of political actors (Axelrod, 1976). Among such speeches, prime ministers' Diet political phenomena: (a) the difference between the two types of Diet addresses delivered by Japanese prime of political science, the content of political speeches is regarded as important for analyzing the policies

  3. Presidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction events on land in Russia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    Presidential Address 2007: The end-Permian mass extinction ­ events on land in Russia Michael J. Benton BENTON, M. J. 2008. The end-Permian mass extinction ­ events on land in Russia. Proceedings dioxide ­ a greenhouse gas ­ as well as acid rain, which killed plants and led to stripping of soils

  4. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PLAN FOR ADDRESSING THE AREAS FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PLAN FOR ADDRESSING THE AREAS FOR IMPROVEMENT IDENTIFIED BY THE U 14, 2014, a radiological release occurred in the underground of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE the following areas as identified by the EPA: · Update the Ambient Environmental Monitoring Network Improve

  5. Addressing the Energy Crisis in Mobile Computing with Developing Power Aware Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krintz, Chandra

    Addressing the Energy Crisis in Mobile Computing with Developing Power Aware Software Selim Gurun, we first articulate the problem and describe the state­of­the­art in energy­aware hardware features performance adjustments and computation o#­loading. We investigate various applications in terms of energy e

  6. University of Alberta Assisted migration to address climate change: recommendations for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    University of Alberta Assisted migration to address climate change: recommendations Biology and Management Department of Renewable Resources © Laura Kelsey Gray Fall 2011 Edmonton, Alberta Permission is hereby granted to the University of Alberta Libraries to reproduce single copies of this thesis

  7. Abstract--This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS) which involve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS-inverter. The goal of control is to maximize wind energy extraction and this needs letting the wind turbine rotor wind energy extraction) only for one wind speed value depending on the considered value of turbine

  8. Addressing the Challenges of Synchronization/Communication and Debugging Support in Hardware/Software Cosimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Tim

    Addressing the Challenges of Synchronization/Communication and Debugging Support in Hardware component of ESL tools to simulate the hardware designs and software models concurrently. It helps of RTL memory from a software perspective. While cosimulation is fast compared to a complete hardware

  9. THERE IS NO PLUME UNDER ICELAND an address to the Royal Astronomical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    THERE IS NO PLUME UNDER ICELAND an address to the Royal Astronomical Society London, 10th May, 2002 where he suggested that major volcanic areas on Earth such as Iceland, Yellowstone and Hawaii, which talk I am going to challenge the plume hypothesis in the case of Iceland, which is probably the best

  10. Addressing the Needs of Students Living in Poverty through Comprehensive School Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Addressing the Needs of Students Living in Poverty through Comprehensive School Reform Joseph John had 100% of their students qualifying for FRL. Nationally, Comprehensive School Reform efforts, which proposes a Full Service Community Schools model for Comprehensive School Reform, and (b) AB 448

  11. HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    HW Componentizing Kernel: A New Approach to address the Mega Complexity of Future Automotive CPS of CPS (Cyber Physical System). However, current software development process in the automotive industry automotive software devel- opment process in the perspective of CPS and proposes a new kernel-based approach

  12. Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Site Technologies to Address Leachate from the On-Site Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    LBNL-51387 Technical Assistance to Ohio Closure Site Technologies to Address Leachate from the On Management Project ­ On-Site Disposal Facility Leachate Treatment Final Report, October 7, 2002 Disclaimer.1.1 Leachate Recirculation (with air injection as an option)........................... 4 3.1.2 Reverse Osmosis

  13. J2.5 ADDRESSING WIND DIRECTION UNCERTAINTY IN SOURCE ESTIMATION THROUGH DYNAMIC TIME WARPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jessica

    J2.5 ADDRESSING WIND DIRECTION UNCERTAINTY IN SOURCE ESTIMATION THROUGH DYNAMIC TIME WARPING G score. The correct wind direction is paramount to source estimation problems. It was observed that errors in wind direction of only a few degrees drastically worsen the source estimation. Even when

  14. Introduction This Guidance Note provides advice and information on how to address historic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and other sources of information at the end of this Guidance Note.) As outlined above, historic environmentIntroduction This Guidance Note provides advice and information on how to address historic of whether or not a particular project requires formal planning permission. Key documents are: n England

  15. NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety stan- dards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice--and sometimes maintain separate product

  16. Visible-Light Photoredox Catalysis: Selective Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide by a Nickel N-Heterocyclic Carbene-Isoquinoline Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoi, VanSara; Kornienko, Nick; Margarit, C; Yang, Peidong; Chang, Christopher

    2013-06-07

    The solar-driven reduction of carbon dioxide to value-added chemical fuels is a longstanding challenge in the fields of catalysis, energy science, and green chemistry. In order to develop effective CO2 fixation, several key considerations must be balanced, including (1) catalyst selectivity for promoting CO2 reduction over competing hydrogen generation from proton reduction, (2) visible-light harvesting that matches the solar spectrum, and (3) the use of cheap and earth-abundant catalytic components. In this report, we present the synthesis and characterization of a new family of earth-abundant nickel complexes supported by N-heterocyclic carbene amine ligands that exhibit high selectivity and activity for the electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversion of CO2 to CO. Systematic changes in the carbene and amine donors of the ligand have been surveyed, and [Ni(Prbimiq1)]2+ (1c, where Prbimiq1 = bis(3-(imidazolyl)isoquinolinyl)propane) emerges as a catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 with the lowest cathodic onset potential (Ecat = 1.2 V vs SCE). Using this earth-abundant catalyst with Ir(ppy)3 (where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine) and an electron donor, we have developed a visible-light photoredox system for the catalytic conversion of CO2 to CO that proceeds with high selectivity and activity and achieves turnover numbers and turnover frequencies reaching 98,000 and 3.9 s1, respectively. Further studies reveal that the overall efficiency of this solar-to-fuel cycle may be limited by the formation of the active Ni catalyst and/or the chemical reduction of CO2 to CO at the reduced nickel center and provide a starting point for improved photoredox systems for sustainable carbon-neutral energy conversion.

  17. Addressing the Manufacturing Issues Associated with the use of Ceramic Materials for Diesel Engine Components.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McSpadden, SB

    2001-09-12

    This CRADA supports the objective of selecting appropriate ceramic materials for manufacturing several diesel engine components and addressing critical manufacturing issues associated with these components. Materials that were evaluated included several varieties of silicon nitride and stabilized zirconia. The critical manufacturing issues that were addressed included evaluation of the effect of grain size and the effect of the grinding process on mechanical properties, mechanical performance, reliability, and expected service life. The CRADA comprised four tasks: (1) Machining of Zirconia and Silicon Nitride Materials; (2) Mechanical Properties Characterization and Performance Testing; (3) Tribological Studies; and (4) Residual Stress Studies. Using instrumented equipment at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) Machining and Inspection Research User Center (MIRUC), zirconia and silicon nitride materials were ground into simulated component geometries. These components were subsequently evaluated for mechanical properties, wear, and residual stress characteristics in tasks two, three, and four.

  18. Scalable Transparent Checkpoint-Restart of Global Address Space Applications on Virtual Machines over Infiniband

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nieplocha, Jaroslaw; Brown, David ML

    2009-05-18

    Checkpoint-Restart is one of the most used software approaches to achieve fault-tolerance in high-end clusters. While standard techniques typically focus on user-level solutions, the advent of virtualization software has enabled efficient and transparent system-level approaches. In this paper, we present a scalable transparent system-level solution to address fault-tolerance for applications based on global address space (GAS) programming models on Infiniband clusters. In addition to handling communication, the solution addresses transparent checkpoint of user-generated files. We exploit the support for the Infiniband network in the Xen virtual machine environment. We have developed a version of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) one-sided communication library capable of suspending and resuming applications. We present efficient and scalable mechanisms to distribute checkpoint requests and to backup virtual machines memory images and file systems. We tested our approach in the context of NWChem, a popular computational chemistry suite. We demonstrated that NWChem can be executed, without any modification to the source code, on a virtualized 8-node cluster with very little overhead (below 3%). We observe that the total checkpoint time is limited by disk I/O. Finally, we measured system-size depended components of the checkpoint time on up to 1024 cores (128 nodes), demonstrating the scalability of our approach in medium/large-scale systems.

  19. Addressing trend-related changes within cumulative effects studies in water resources planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canter, L.W., E-mail: envimptr@aol.com [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma and President, Canter Associates, Inc., Horseshoe Bay, TX (United States); Chawla, M.K. [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States)] [ERDC-CERL, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Champaign, IL (United States); Swor, C.T. [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)] [Canter Associates, Inc., Frankewing, TN (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Summarized herein are 28 case studies wherein trend-related causative physical, social, or institutional changes were connected to consequential changes in runoff, water quality, and riparian and aquatic ecological features. The reviewed cases were systematically evaluated relative to their identified environmental effects; usage of analytical frameworks, and appropriate models, methods, and technologies; and the attention given to mitigation and/or management of the resultant causative and consequential changes. These changes also represent important considerations in project design and operation, and in cumulative effects studies associated therewith. The cases were grouped into five categories: institutional changes associated with legislation and policies (seven cases); physical changes from land use changes in urbanizing watersheds (eight cases); physical changes from land use changes and development projects in watersheds (four cases); physical, institutional, and social changes from land use and related policy changes in river basins (three cases); and multiple changes within a comprehensive study of land use and policy changes in the Willamette River Basin in Oregon (six cases). A tabulation of 110 models, methods and technologies used in the studies is also presented. General observations from this review were that the features were unique for each case; the consequential changes were logically based on the causative changes; the analytical frameworks provided relevant structures for the studies, and the identified methods and technologies were pertinent for addressing both the causative and consequential changes. One key lesson was that the cases provide useful, “real-world” illustrations of the importance of addressing trend-related changes in cumulative effects studies within water resources planning. Accordingly, they could be used as an “initial tool kit” for addressing trend-related changes.

  20. SOFTWARE TOOLS THAT ADDRESS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL ISSUES DURING NUCLEAR FACILITY D and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. COURNOYER; R. GRUNDEMANN

    2001-03-01

    The 49-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is where analytical chemistry and metallurgical studies on samples of plutonium and nuclear materials are conduct in support of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons program. The CMR Facility is expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) over the next ten to twenty years. Over the decades, several hazardous material issues have developed that need to be address. Unstable chemicals must be properly reassigned or disposed of from the workspace during D and D operation. Materials that have critical effects that are primarily chronic in nature, carcinogens, reproductive toxin, and materials that exhibit high chronic toxicity, have unique decontamination requirements, including the decontrolling of areas where these chemicals were used. Certain types of equipment and materials that contain mercury, asbestos, lead, and polychlorinated biphenyls have special provisions that must be addressed. Utilization of commercially available software programs for addressing hazardous material issues during D and D operations such as legacy chemicals and documentation are presented. These user-friendly programs eliminate part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of legacy hazardous materials. A key element of this approach is having a program that inventories and tracks all hazardous materials. Without an inventory of chemicals stored in a particular location, many important questions pertinent to D and D operations can be difficult to answer. On the other hand, a well-managed inventory system can address unstable and highly toxic chemicals and hazardous material records concerns before they become an issue. Tapping into the institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of the institution in managing a cost effective D and D program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program. Using laboratory requirements as a logic flow diagram, quality and cost effective methods are used to provide necessary information of programmatic, quality, and safety issues concerns. In summary, by seamlessly managing non-programmatic issues, chemical software programs allow scientists in nuclear research facilities more time to concentrate on their technical areas of interest.

  1. Addressing a single spin in diamond with a macroscopic dielectric microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Floch, J.-M.; Tobar, M. E.; Bradac, C.; Nand, N.; Volz, T.; Castelletto, S.

    2014-09-29

    We present a technique for addressing single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center spins in diamond over macroscopic distances using a tunable dielectric microwave cavity. We demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for a single negatively charged NV center (NV{sup –}) in a nanodiamond (ND) located directly under the macroscopic microwave cavity. By moving the cavity relative to the ND, we record the ODMR signal as a function of position, mapping out the distribution of the cavity magnetic field along one axis. In addition, we argue that our system could be used to determine the orientation of the NV{sup –} major axis in a straightforward manner.

  2. Addressing a single NV$^{-}$ spin with a macroscopic dielectric microwave cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -M. Le Floch; C. Bradac; N. Nand; S. Castelletto; M. E. Tobar; T. Volz

    2014-12-29

    We present a technique for addressing single NV$^{-}$ center spins in diamond over macroscopic distances using a tunable dielectric microwave cavity. We demonstrate optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) for a single NV$^{-}$ center in a nanodiamond (ND) located directly under the macroscopic microwave cavity. By moving the cavity relative to the ND, we record the ODMR signal as a function of position, mapping out the distribution of the cavity magnetic field along one axis. In addition, we argue that our system could be used to determine the orientation of the NV$^{-}$ major axis in a straightforward manner.

  3. Assessing strategies to address transition costs in a restructuring electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, L.; Hadley, S.; Hirst, E.

    1996-08-01

    Restructuring the US electricity industry has become the nation`s central energy issue for the 1990s. Restructuring proposals at the federal and state levels focus on more competitive market structures for generation and the integration of transmission within those structures. The proposed move to more competitive generation markets will expose utility costs that are above those experienced by alternative suppliers. Debate about these above-market, or transition, costs (e.g., their size,who will pay for them and how) has played a prominent role in restructuring proceedings. This paper presents results from a project to systematically assess strategies to address transition costs exposed by restructuring the electricity industry.

  4. Characterization of fundamental catalytic properties of MoS2/WS2 nanotubes and nanoclusters for desulfurization catalysis - a surface temperature study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Burghaus

    2012-07-05

    The prior project consisted of two main project lines. First, characterization of novel nanomaterials for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) applications. Second, studying more traditional model systems for HDS such as vapor-deposited silica-supported Mo and MoSx clusters. In the first subproject, we studied WS2 and MoS2 fullerene-like nanoparticles as well as WS2 nanotubes. Thiophene (C4H4S) was used as the probe molecule. Interestingly, metallic and sulfur-like adsorption sites could be identified on the silica-supported fullerene-particles system. Similar structures are seen for the traditional system (vapor-deposited clusters). Thus, this may be a kinetics fingerprint feature of modern HDS model systems. In addition, kinetics data allowed characterization of the different adsorption sites for thiophene on and inside WS2 nanotube bundles. The latter is a unique feature of nanotubes that has not been reported before for any inorganic nanotube system; however, examples are known for carbon nanotubes, including prior work of the PI. Although HDS has been studied for decades, utilizing nanotubes as nanosized HDS reactors has never been tried before, as far as we know. This is of interest from a fundamental perspective. Unfortunately, the HDS activity of the nanocatalysts at ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions was close to the detection limit of our techniques. Therefore, we propose to run experiments at ambient pressure on related nanopowder samples as part of the renewal application utilizing a now-available GC (gas chromatograph) setup. In addition, Ni and Co doped nanocatalyts are proposed for study. These dopants will boost the catalytic activity. In the second subproject of the prior grant, we studied HDS-related chemistry on more traditional supported cluster catalysts. Mo clusters supported by physical vapor deposition (PVD) on silica have been characterized. Two reaction pathways are evident when adsorbing thiophene on Mo and MoSx clusters: molecular adsorption and dissociation. PVD Mo clusters turned out to be very reactive toward thiophene bond activation. Sulfur and carbon residuals form, which poison the catalyst and sulfide the Mo clusters. Sulfided silica-supported MoSx samples are not reactive toward thiophene bond activation. In addition to S and C deposits, H2, H2S, and small organic molecules were detected in the gas phase. Catalyst reactivation procedures, including O2 and atomic hydrogen treatments, have been tested. Cluster size effects have been seen: thiophene adsorbs molecularly with larger binding energies on smaller clusters. However, larger clusters have smaller activation energy for C4H4S bond activation than smaller clusters. The latter is consistent with early catalysis studies. Kinetics and dynamics parameters have been determined quantitatively. We spent a significant amount of time on upgrades of our equipment. A 2nd-hand refurbished X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) has been integrated into the existing molecular beam scattering system and is already operational (supported by the DoE supplemental grant available in October 2009). We also added a time of flight (TOF) system to the beam scattering apparatus and improved on the accessible impact energy range (new nozzle heater and gas mixing manifold) for the beam scattering experiments. In addition, a GC-based powder atmospheric flow reactor for studies on powder samples is now operational. Furthermore, a 2nd UHV kinetics system has been upgraded as well. In summary, mostly single crystal systems have so far been considered in basic science studies about HDS. Industrial catalysts, however, can be better approximated with the supported cluster systems that we studied in this project. Furthermore, an entirely new class of HDS systems, namely fullerene-like particles and inorganic nanotubes, has been included. Studying new materials and systems has the potential to impact science and technology. The systems investigated are closely related to energy and environmental-related surface science/catalysis. This prior project, conducted at NDSU by a sma

  5. A Study Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English Language Learners on High Stakes Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Linda; Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Galloway, Martha M.; Irby, Beverly J.

    2010-10-22

    Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs U.S. Department of Education Field-Initiated Research Report AERA, April 2002 A Study Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English... ........................................................... 25 IV. RECOMMENDATIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE ............................................................................... 133 A Study Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English Language...

  6. Internet Domain Name and Addressing Standard (v1.1) 3/4/2014 6:58 PM 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Internet Domain Name and Addressing Standard (v1.1) 3/4/2014 6:58 PM at Austin to possess an effective presence on the Internet, and to operate, secure use of Internet names and addresses assigned to the campus inter

  7. Performance Characterization of Global Address Space Applications: A Case Study with NWChem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, Jeffrey R.; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Shende, Sameer; Romero, Nichols A.; Malony, Allen D.

    2012-02-01

    The use of global address space languages and one-sided communication for complex applications is gaining attention in the parallel computing community. However, lack of good evaluative methods to observe multiple levels of performance makes it difficult to isolate the cause of performance deficiencies and to understand the fundamental limitations of system and application design for future improvement. NWChem is a popular computational chemistry package which depends on the Global Arrays/ ARMCI suite for partitioned global address space functionality to deliver high-end molecular modeling capabilities. A workload characterization methodology was developed to support NWChem performance engineering on large-scale parallel platforms. The research involved both the integration of performance instrumentation and measurement in the NWChem software, as well as the analysis of one-sided communication performance in the context of NWChem workloads. Scaling studies were conducted for NWChem on Blue Gene/P and on two large-scale clusters using different generation Infiniband interconnects and x86 processors. The performance analysis and results show how subtle changes in the runtime parameters related to the communication subsystem could have significant impact on performance behavior. The tool has successfully identified several algorithmic bottlenecks which are already being tackled by computational chemists to improve NWChem performance.

  8. Enabling a Highly-Scalable Global Address Space Model for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apra, Edoardo; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Yu, Weikuan

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, the trajectory to the petascale has been built on increased complexity and scale of the underlying parallel architectures. Meanwhile, software de- velopers have struggled to provide tools that maintain the productivity of computational science teams using these new systems. In this regard, Global Address Space (GAS) programming models provide a straightforward and easy to use addressing model, which can lead to improved produc- tivity. However, the scalability of GAS depends directly on the design and implementation of the runtime system on the target petascale distributed-memory architecture. In this paper, we describe the design, implementation, and optimization of the Aggregate Remote Memory Copy Interface (ARMCI) runtime library on the Cray XT5 2.3 PetaFLOPs computer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We optimized our implementation with the flow intimation technique that we have introduced in this paper. Our optimized ARMCI implementation improves scalability of both the Global Arrays (GA) programming model and a real-world chemistry application NWChem from small jobs up through 180,000 cores.

  9. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS TO ADDRESS PU-FE EUTECTICISSUE IN 3013 STORAGE VESSEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N; Allen Smith, A

    2007-03-06

    On November 22, 2005, the Manager of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in Richland, WA issued an Occurrence Report involving a potential Pu-Fe eutectic failure mechanism for the stainless steel (SS) 3013 cans containing plutonium (Pu) metal. Four additional reports addressed nuclear safety concerns about the integrity of stainless steel containers holding plutonium during fire scenarios. The reports expressed a belief that the probability and consequences of container failure due to the formation of a plutonium-iron eutectic alloy had been overlooked. Simplified thermal model to address the Pu-Fe eutectic concerns using axisymmetric model similar to the models used in the 9975 SARP were performed. The model uses Rocky Flats configuration with 2 stacked Pu buttons inside a 3013 assembly. The assembly has an outer can, an inner can, and a convenience can, all stainless steel. The boundary conditions are similar to the regulatory 30 minutes HAC fire analyses. Computer simulations of the HAC fire transients lasting 4 hours of burn time show that the interface between the primary containment vessel and the Pu metal in the 9975 package will not reach Pu-Fe eutectic temperature of 400 C.

  10. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    Part VI. Hydrogenolysis of Ethane, Propane, n-Butane andiso-Butane over Supported Platinum Catalysts. J. Catal. 176,

  11. Reaction Selectivity in Heterogeneous Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-01-01

    G. A. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical SocietyG. A. Abstracts of Papers of the American Chemical Society

  12. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    Part VI. Hydrogenolysis of Ethane, Propane, n-Butane andactivation energy for ethane hydrogenolysis over platinum-such as propanol or ethane was less than the detection

  13. "Nanocrystal bilayer for tandem catalysis"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamada, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogenolysis of Ethane, Propane, n-Butane and iso-Butanethe Hydroformylation of Propane over Silica-supported Groupproduct and small amount of propane, which is likely to be

  14. Electrochemistry: Catalysis at the boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-04-09

    Renewable energy provides an opportunity to power society without the potential impacts from the use of fossil fuels, but a major limitation of sources such as solar and wind is their intermittent availability. Efficient storage of energy from these renewable sources is critical in developing their widespread utilization. One approach to the storage of renewable energy is the production of fuels, such as ethanol, from water and carbon dioxide. Unlike traditional centralized fuel production, electrochemical systems can operate under mild pressures and temperatures in dispersed, small-scale reactors. Renewable sources of energy are inherently dispersed, and therefore are well matched with the production of fuels electrochemically. However, the development of efficient catalysts is essential for the intended chemical transformations.

  15. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2015 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Baton Rouge, LA 70817 jnovak@PIDC.com Lin Luo The Dow Chemical Company 2301 Brazosport Blvd., B-251 University Chair #12;3 3 2015 PROGRAM All talks & breaks will be held in Melcher Hall, Room 150 7:30 AM Registration ­ Victor Johnston, Treasurer (& helpers) 8:25 AM Welcoming Remarks ­ Dan Shantz, Chair 8:30 AM Bob

  16. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Daniel Shantz Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 979-845-3492 shantz.chandler@trinity.edu Lin Luo Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. B-251 Freeport, TX 77541 979-238-3204 LLuo2@dow Chair #12;2012 PROGRAM 7:30 AM Registration ­ John Novak, Treasurer Duncan Hall All talks will be held

  17. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2012 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Daniel Shantz Chemical Engineering Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 979-845-3492 shantz.chandler@trinity.edu Lin Luo Dow Chemical Co. 2301 Brazosport Blvd. B-251 Freeport, TX 77541 979-238-3204 LLuo2@dow #12;2012 PROGRAM 7:30 AM Registration ­ John Novak, Treasurer Duncan Hall All talks will be held in Mc

  18. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS 2010 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    :35 AM Prof. Kerry Dooley (LSU, Baton Rouge, LA) "Perspectives on Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization" 9' Nanocatalysts for Electrochemical Energy Conversion: The Challenges for Synthesis and Characterization" 1:45 PM Hall ­ McMurtry Auditorium 4:00 PM Adjourn #12;Perspectives on Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization

  19. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; et al

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently undermore »review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.« less

  20. Strategies to Address Identified Education Gaps in the Preparation of a National Security Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2008-06-30

    This report will discuss strategies available to address identified gaps and weaknesses in education efforts aimed at the preparation of a skilled and properly trained national security workforce.The need to adequately train and educate a national security workforce is at a critical juncture. Even though there are an increasing number of college graduates in the appropriate fields, many of these graduates choose to work in the private sector because of more desirable salary and benefit packages. This is contributing to an inability to fill vacant positions at NNSA resulting from high personnel turnover from the large number of retirements. Further, many of the retirees are practically irreplaceable because they are Cold War scientists that have experience and expertise with nuclear weapons.

  1. In Situ Airborne Instrumentation: Addressing and Solving Measurement Problems in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Kok, Greg; Avallone, L.; Bansemer, A.; Borrmann, S.; Brown, P.; Bundke, U.; Chuang, P. Y.; Cziczo, D.; Field, P.; Gallagher, M.; Gayet, J. -F.; Korolev, A.; Kraemer, M.; McFarquhar, G.; Mertes, S.; Moehler, O.; Lance, S.; Lawson, P.; Petters, M. D.; Pratt, K.; Roberts, G.; Rogers, D.; Stetzer, O.; Stith, J.; Strapp, W.; Twohy, C.; Wendisch, M.

    2012-02-01

    A meeting of 31 international experts on in situ measurements from aircraft was held to identify unresolved questions concerning ice formation and evolution in ice clouds, assess the current state of instrumentation that can address these problems, introduce emerging technology that may overcome current measurement issues and recommend future courses of action that can improve our understanding of ice cloud microphysical processes and their impact on the environment. The meeting proceedings and outcome has been described in detail in a manuscript submitted to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society (BAMS) on March 24, 2011. This paper is currently under review. The remainder of this summary, in the following pages, is the text of the BAMS article. A technical note that will be published by the National Center for Atmospheric Research is currently underway and is expected to be published before the end of the year.

  2. The necessity for a practical approach to address organic emissions from cement kilns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonley, C.; Schreiber, B.; Kellerman, S.; Kellett, C.

    1998-12-31

    There is an inherent difficulty in monitoring organic emissions from hazardous waste combustion in the cement process. Data gathered by the EPA and the industry indicate that organic emissions at the main stack of cement kilns are principally from process characteristics and/or the desorption of organic constituents contained in the raw materials. Organic emissions are primarily based on the facility design and origin of the raw materials. One would generally conclude that organic emissions from fuels are essentially non-existent. To understand alternatives for monitoring organic emissions, this paper reviews some of the historical background behind the issue and reviews trends of characteristic organic emissions data. Based on this discussion and review, some approaches are presented to address organic emissions testing and monitoring when utilizing hazardous waste fuel in a cement kiln.

  3. Gas turbine based cogeneration facilities: Key issues to be addressed at an early design stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandesteene, J.L.; De Backer, J.

    1998-07-01

    The basic design of a cogeneration facility implies much more than looking for a gas turbine generating set that matches the steam host heat demand, and making an economical evaluation of the project. Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) has designed, built and commissioned since the early nineties 350 MW of cogeneration facilities, mainly producing electricity and steam with natural gas fired gas turbines, which is the present most common option for industrial combined heat and power production. A standardized cogeneration design does not exist. Each facility has to be carefully adapted to the steam host's particular situation, and important technical issues have to be addressed at an early stage of plant design. Unexpected problems, expensive modifications, delays during execution of the project and possible long term operational limitations or drawbacks may result if these questions are left unanswered. This paper comments the most frequent questions on design values, required flexibility of the HRSG, reliability and backup, control system, connection to the grid

  4. Exchange of Terms of Address: Nicknaming Practices among University Students in Taiwan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hsiao-ching

    in different communities of practice where members are well-acquainted enough to nickname each other based on personal names (internal variations) or personal features (external variations). The research is conducted in two universities in Taiwan: Tamkang...In this study, the framework of community of practice is adopted in recruiting the subjects and addressing issues regarding gender. With this social theory, we are able to look at how nicknaming practices reveal identity issues of membership in a community of practice. From a sociolinguistic point of view, nicknaming represents a process of constructing individual identities within a group (Thornborrow 2004) and it is also the outcome of social interaction and learning. Membership of a community of practice is indexed by being able to recognise each other’s nicknames as well as other linguistic conventions. The results show that each community of practice has its own in-group knowledge that is exclusively understood by the members....

  5. The Challenges and Potential of Nuclear Energy for Addressing Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Edmonds, James A.

    2007-10-24

    The response to climate change and the stabilization of atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations has major implications for the global energy system. Stabilization of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations requires a peak and an indefinite decline of global CO2 emissions. Nuclear energy, along with other technologies, has the potential to contribute to the growing demand for energy without emitting CO2. Nuclear energy is of particular interest because of its global prevalence and its current significant contribution, nearly 20%, to the world’s electricity supply. We have investigated the value of nuclear energy in addressing climate change, and have explored the potential challenges for the rapid and large-scale expansion of nuclear energy as a response to climate change. The scope of this study is long-term and the modeling time frame extends out a century because the nature of nuclear energy and climate change dictate that perspective. Our results indicate that the value of the nuclear technology option for addressing climate change is denominated in trillions of dollars. Several-fold increases to the value of the nuclear option can be expected if there is limited availability of competing carbon-free technologies, particularly fossil-fuel based technologies that can capture and sequester carbon. Challenges for the expanded global use of nuclear energy include the global capacity for nuclear construction, proliferation, uranium availability, and waste disposal. While the economic costs of nuclear fuel and power are important, non-economic issues transcend the issues of costs. In this regard, advanced nuclear technologies and new vision for the global use of nuclear energy are important considerations for the future of nuclear power and climate change.

  6. State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State of Practice Approaches in Geomorphology, Geochronology and Probabilistic Analyses for Addressing Fault Capability at Nuclear Facilities Rizzo Associates Presentation to Department of Energy Natural Phenomena Hazards Meeting October 21-22, 2014

  7. A Study Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English Language Learners on High Stakes Assessment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kujawa, Nadine; Cavazos, Gloria; Meyer, Doris; Rodriguez, Linda; Lara-Alecio, Rafael; Galloway, Martha; Irby, Beverly J.

    2010-10-22

    Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Language Affairs U.S. Department of Education Field-Initiated Research Report August, 2001 A Study Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English Language... Addressing Three Components of the National Bilingual Research Agenda for English Language Learners on High Stakes Assessment i FIELD-INITIATED RESEARCH REPORT August, 2001 SECTION I INTRODUCTION The Title VII OBEMLA-sponsored field...

  8. Addressing Facility Needs for Concrete Assessment Using Ultrasonic Testing: Mid-year Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Timothy J. II; Payan, Cedric; Roberts, Peter M.

    2012-03-28

    The UFD Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel (June 30, 2011) emphasizes the need for the development of monitoring techniques and technologies for dry storage cask materials. A high priority is given to the development of 'systems for early detection of confinement boundary degradation.' This requires both new techniques for monitoring and inspection, as well as new measurable parameters to quantify mechanical degradation. The use of Nonlinear Elastic Wave Spectroscopy (NEWS) has been shown to provide sensitive parameters correlating to mechanical degradation in a wide variety of materials. Herein we report upon recent research performed to address the high priority of concrete degradation using a selection of these techniques and compare to a ASTM standard ultrasonic technique. Also reported are the near term plans to continue this research in the remaining FY and into the coming years. This research was conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in the Acoustics Lab of the Geophysics group in the Earth and Environmental Sciences division, and in collaboration with the Laboratory for Nondestructive Evaluation at the University of the Mediterranean (Aix en Provence, France) and the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI). The objective of this research project was to determine the feasibility of using an NDE technique based on non-linear ultrasound for determining the depth and degree of microcracking in the near surface of concrete and to assess the degree of sensitivity of such technique. This objective is reached by the means of combining linear and nonlinear measurements, associated with numerical simulation. We first study the global effect of thermal damage on concrete's linear and nonlinear properties by resonance inspection techniques. We show that standard pulse wave speed techniques are not relevant to extract mechanical properties of concrete. The high sensitivity of measured nonlinearity is shown and serves as a validation tool for the rest of the study, i.e., probing the material nonlinearity at various depths through the use of Time Reversal Elastic Nonlinearity Diagnostic (TREND). The basic idea of probing the material nonlinearity at various depths by changing the frequency is validated by exhibiting a similar trend as nonlinear resonance measurements. We address at the end of this report, the potentialities of applying these procedures to real concrete structures.

  9. Architectural Framework for Addressing Legacy Waste from the Cold War - 13611

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Gregory A.; Glazner, Christopher G.; Steckley, Sam [The MITRE Corporation, 7515 Colshire Drive, McLean, VA 22102 (United States)] [The MITRE Corporation, 7515 Colshire Drive, McLean, VA 22102 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present an architectural framework for the use of a hybrid simulation model of enterprise-wide operations used to develop system-level insight into the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) environmental cleanup of legacy nuclear waste at the Savannah River Site. We use this framework for quickly exploring policy and architectural options, analyzing plans, addressing management challenges and developing mitigation strategies for DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM). The socio-technical complexity of EM's mission compels the use of a qualitative approach to complement a more a quantitative discrete event modeling effort. We use this model-based analysis to pinpoint pressure and leverage points and develop a shared conceptual understanding of the problem space and platform for communication among stakeholders across the enterprise in a timely manner. This approach affords the opportunity to discuss problems using a unified conceptual perspective and is also general enough that it applies to a broad range of capital investment/production operations problems. (authors)

  10. Addressing Barriers to Wind Energy by Creating Consensus through Information Dissemination and Outreach: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Perchlik

    2003-02-28

    OAK B188 The sixteen month project to address barriers to the development of VT wind energy was successful. The project built consensus on wind energy siting issues through four stakeholder workshops and engaged Vermonters on wind energy issues with a wind energy information dissemination and outreach campaign. There is still a great need for more outreach and accurate wind energy information dissemination on the local level where informed discussion on the cost and benefits of wind energy projects needs to be held. The stakeholder workshop framework and outreach tools that were created by this project will be helpful tools as state agencies, wind developers, non-profit organizations and concerned citizens (in Vermont and around the country) continue to discuss wind energy projects and the role of wind energy in comprehensive energy plans. Given the success of this project it is recommended that other states replicate this project as a way to help overcome the barriers to win d energy development. This report provides: an overview of the project accomplishments, detailed quarter by quarter descriptions of the project activities, activities spawned by the project, conclusions, and copies of all the documents created during the project as attachments (No.1-8).

  11. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad range of subjects, including nuclear material accountancy principles, legal definitions and the regulatory base and inspection tools and techniques. This 60% core part is given by representatives from regulatory bodies (The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, Directorate General for Nuclear Energy and Transport), industry (AREVA, British Nuclear Group), and research (Stockholm University, Hamburg University, Joint Research Centre-Institute of Transuranic Elements, and Joint Research Centre-Institute for the Protection of the Citizen). The remaining part is completed with topical lectures addressed by invited lecturers, such as from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the IAEA addressing topics of physical protection, illicit trafficking, the Iraq case study, exercises, including satellite imagery interpretation etc. With this structure of a stable core plus a variable set of invited lectures, the course will remain sustainable and up-to-date. A syllabus provides the students a homogeneous set of information material in nuclear safeguards and nonproliferation matters at the European and international level. In this way, the ESARDA TKMWG aims to contribute to a two-fold scientific-technical and political-juridical education and training.

  12. Progress in Addressing DNFSB Recommendation 2002-1 Issues: Improving Accident Analysis Software Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VINCENT, ANDREW

    2005-04-25

    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2002-1 (''Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software'') identified a number of quality assurance issues on the use of software in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for analyzing hazards, and designing and operating controls to prevent or mitigate potential accidents. Over the last year, DOE has begun several processes and programs as part of the Implementation Plan commitments, and in particular, has made significant progress in addressing several sets of issues particularly important in the application of software for performing hazard and accident analysis. The work discussed here demonstrates that through these actions, Software Quality Assurance (SQA) guidance and software tools are available that can be used to improve resulting safety analysis. Specifically, five of the primary actions corresponding to the commitments made in the Implementation Plan to Recommendation 2002-1 are identified and discussed in this paper. Included are the web-based DOE SQA Knowledge Portal and the Central Registry, guidance and gap analysis reports, electronic bulletin board and discussion forum, and a DOE safety software guide. These SQA products can benefit DOE safety contractors in the development of hazard and accident analysis by precluding inappropriate software applications and utilizing best practices when incorporating software results to safety basis documentation. The improvement actions discussed here mark a beginning to establishing stronger, standard-compliant programs, practices, and processes in SQA among safety software users, managers, and reviewers throughout the DOE Complex. Additional effort is needed, however, particularly in: (1) processes to add new software applications to the DOE Safety Software Toolbox; (2) improving the effectiveness of software issue communication; and (3) promoting a safety software quality assurance culture.

  13. PHYSICAL ADDRESS: JOSEPH MONTOYA BUILDING, 1100 S ST. FRANCIS DRIVE, ROOM 2073, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 87505 MAILING ADDRESS: PO BOX 6850, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 87502-6850

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    MEXICO 87505 MAILING ADDRESS: PO BOX 6850, SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO 87502-6850 TO: UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO) at UNM Date: January 20, 2010 In 2007, the state of New Mexico enacted the Governmental Dispute to promoting ADR, and other requirements to support the growth and use of ADR. The University of New Mexico

  14. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund is a unique funding source that allows the NIH to address wide-ranging opportunities and challenges other entities would unlikely address.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    of a "roadmap"--a far-reaching plan to transform key areas of biomedical research.This novel approach would iden or Centers (ICs) could or should conduct on its own, but that the NIH as a whole must address.The NIH Roadmap of research from the laboratory to the patient's bedside. The NIH Roadmap was launched in 2004 and became

  15. Jeffrey S. Lodge Work Address Home Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    @rit.edu EDUCATION 1982: PhD in Microbiology , University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS. Emphasis bacteria (including gasoline, oil, diesel, crude oil) from soils and water sediments in Western New York

  16. KIRSTEN S. HOFMOCKEL CURRENT ADDRESS PERMANENT ADDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA Major: Environmental resource management. Concentration Performed phosphorus fractionation on Everglade peat samples. Used ArcInfo, Arcview, Erdas Imagine of American Water Resources Association 1997-1998 Attended International Association for Landscape Ecology

  17. Addressing Invitations When hand-addressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    the second line for the city and the third for the state and zip code. Do not use abbreviations for Street sending to an elected official (i.e. Legislators, Judges, Board of Trustees, etc.): The Honorable William;If both are elected officials: The Honorable Helen C. Harvey and The Honorable W. Brantley Harvey

  18. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of SFG spectra of ice-like structure we conclude that surface hydroxides are formed and no liquid water is present on the surface. Other than model catalysis, gas phase anion photoelectron spectroscopy of the Cl + H{sub 2} van der Waals well, silicon clusters, germanium clusters, aluminum oxide clusters and indium phosphide clusters were studied. The spectra help to map out the neutral potential energy surfaces of the clusters. For aluminum oxide, the structures of the anions and neutrals were explored and for silicon, germanium and indium phosphide the electronic structure of larger clusters was mapped out.

  19. Portfolio Analysis & Recommended Plan Chapter 6 described how the Plan addresses cost and risk, and introduces the ideas of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portfolio Analysis & Recommended Plan Chapter 6 described how the Plan addresses cost and risk for thinking about risk management. For a simple financial instrument, such as an insurance policy, they might impacts, and risks associated with the feasibility of developing the technologies in sufficient quantity

  20. Name Address Use Location Description A 981 Madison Drive F/S Main Campus near Wilson Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    Name Address Use Location Description A 981 Madison Drive F/S Main Campus near Wilson Hall A2 156 Bluestone Drive F/S Main Campus near Gibbons A3 851 University Boulevard Aux Main Campus Convo B 810 Madison Drive Student Main Campus near Burruss Hall B2 885 University Boulevard Aux Main Campus Convo C 897

  1. Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Addressing Uncertainties in Design Inputs: A Case Study of Probabilistic Settlement Evaluations for Soft Zone Collapse at SWPF Tom Houston, Greg Mertz, Carl Costantino, Michael Costantino, Andrew Maham Carl J. Costantino & Associates DOE NPH Conference Germantown, Maryland October 25-26 2011

  2. Celebration of DOE's 35th Anniversary and the Secretary of Energy's Honor Awards, Keynote Address: Energy Secretary, Dr. Steven Chu

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven (U.S. Energy Secretary)

    2012-10-18

    Dr. Steven Chu gives a keynote address marking the thirty-fifth anniversary of the Department of Energy (DOE). He highlights outstanding achievements of the Department and its scientists. Several of the Department's many Nobel Prize winners over the years are mentioned.

  3. Simple Passive Valves for Addressable Pneumatic Actuation Nils Napp, Brandon Araki+, Michael T. Tolley, Radhika Nagpal, Robert J. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Simple Passive Valves for Addressable Pneumatic Actuation Nils Napp, Brandon Araki+, Michael T simple passive devices that behave like leaky check valves. We present the theory of operation and design, and demonstrate the approach by building prototype valves and using them to control serially connected soft

  4. MICL researchers are addressing energy at various levels of com-puting, from data centers (through near-threshold computing)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    vehicles, wind energy, and kinetic energy stor- age. A particular focus of research is energy har- vesting with chal- lenges in low-power sensing inter- faces and energy-efficient on-sensor signal processing. AlsoEnergy MICL researchers are addressing energy at various levels of com- puting, from data centers

  5. Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven technological, economic, environmental, and societal barriers associated with wind energy and needs and have the capabilities required to conceptualize, develop and evaluate wind energy systems

  6. IP ADDRESS HOSTNAME MACHINE TYPE 129.252.130.106 canopus.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    IP ADDRESS HOSTNAME MACHINE TYPE 129.252.130.106 canopus.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.107 deneb.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.108 glensh.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.111 menkar.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.112 nunki.cse.sc.edu # SUN Ultra10 129.252.130.113 pollux.cse.sc.edu # SUN

  7. Electrostatically focused addressable field emission array chips (AFEA's) for high-speed massively parallel maskless digital E-beam direct write lithography and scanning electron microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Farragut, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Paulus, Michael J. (Knoxville, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, John C. (Clinton, TN); Wilgen, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-12-24

    Systems and methods are described for addressable field emission array (AFEA) chips. A method of operating an addressable field-emission array, includes: generating a plurality of electron beams from a pluralitly of emitters that compose the addressable field-emission array; and focusing at least one of the plurality of electron beams with an on-chip electrostatic focusing stack. The systems and methods provide advantages including the avoidance of space-charge blow-up.

  8. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, N.

    2010-01-01

    DATES COVERED (From - To) Renewable Energy and EfficiencyModels Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy PenetrationWood (OnLocation) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617

  9. Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal ofNational NuclearSite Office Contracting Officer E-mail address

  10. Tight Cocone : A Water-tight Surface Reconstructor 1. Briefly summarize the paper's contributions. Does it address a new problem? Does it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    . Does it address a new problem? Does it present a new approach? Does it show new types of results? [AS representation given a set of sample points. The existing approach, called COCONE, does not handle undersamping, in contrast to previous ones, does not introduce new points and is interpolative. [JD] The paper addresses

  11. iSAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validation Jelena Mirkovic, Zhiguo Xu, Jun Li, Matthew Schnaider, Peter Reiher, and Lixia Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    iSAVE: Incrementally Deployable Source Address Validation Jelena Mirkovi´c, Zhiguo Xu, Jun Li of packets with spoofed source addresses. The SAVE protocol makes this information available at every router, although, in the absence of full deployment, it is difficult for SAVE to maintain either correct

  12. Electrically actuatable doped polymer flakes and electrically addressable optical devices using suspensions of doped polymer flakes in a fluid host

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trajkovska-Petkoska, Anka; Jacobs, Stephen D.; Marshall, Kenneth L.; Kosc, Tanya Z.

    2010-05-11

    Doped electrically actuatable (electrically addressable or switchable) polymer flakes have enhanced and controllable electric field induced motion by virtue of doping a polymer material that functions as the base flake matrix with either a distribution of insoluble dopant particles or a dopant material that is completely soluble in the base flake matrix. The base flake matrix may be a polymer liquid crystal material, and the dopants generally have higher dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity than the electrically actuatable polymer base flake matrix. The dopant distribution within the base flake matrix may be either homogeneous or non-homogeneous. In the latter case, the non-homogeneous distribution of dopant provides a dielectric permittivity and/or conductivity gradient within the body of the flakes. The dopant can also be a carbon-containing material (either soluble or insoluble in the base flake matrix) that absorbs light so as to reduce the unpolarized scattered light component reflected from the flakes, thereby enhancing the effective intensity of circularly polarized light reflected from the flakes when the flakes are oriented into a light reflecting state. Electro-optic devices contain these doped flakes suspended in a host fluid can be addressed with an applied electric field, thus controlling the orientation of the flakes between a bright reflecting state and a non-reflecting dark state.

  13. Addressing Genetics Delivering Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    century in the Human Genome Project (HGP) underlined recognition throughout research and clinical the HGP, however, are challenging these boundaries and health professionals throughout the health service

  14. DAILY WEEKLY email address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    skeptics and the IPCC: "Well, it's in the nature of truth that sometimes you hate it." Scientists speaking) Energy policy (564) The what, when and where of global greenhouse gas emissions: A visual summary of the IPCC's climate mitigation report This week's top six rebuttals to David Rose's "warming has stopped

  15. Current address: Samuel Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Samuel

    . #12;Submitted work 1. The meaning of niche: Cause or consequence of food-web structure?, S. Johnson, V, Physical Review E 79, 050104(R) (2009) 8. Functional optimization in complex excitable networks, S. Johnson

  16. CURRICULUM VITAE Mailing Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    University (ETSU), Johnson City, TN. 05/2003 ­ 08/2005 Visiting Professor, Biostatistics, VU, Nashville, TN, Nashville, TN. 08/1999 ­ 07/2003 Associate Professor, Department of Math, ETSU, Johnson City, TN. 09/1996 ­07/1999 Assistant Professor, Mathematics, ETSU, Johnson City, TN. 09/1994 ­ 08/1996 Instructor

  17. CURRICULUM VITAE Mailing Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    University (ETSU), Johnson City, TN 05/2003 ­ 08/2005 Visiting Professor, Biostatistics College of Medicine of Mathematics Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN. 08/1999 ­ 07/2003 Associate Professor, Mathematics, ETSU, Johnson City, TN 09/1996 ­ 07/1999 Assistant Professor, Mathematics, ETSU, Johnson City, TN 09/1993 - 08

  18. Person #1 ________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in South Strafford, Vermont. Brook Road Catering will cater a full meal including). To make a tax deductible contribution to the Lucy J. Young Scholarship Fund

  19. Person #1 ________________________________________________________________________________ Address _________________________________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " with your tax deductible donation. Come to the Ball Registration Instructions: Fill out Vermont. Brook Road Catering will cater a full meal including dessert. Note your

  20. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geophysical and geochemical technologies quantitatively inferring subsurface evolution under current and future engineered conditions finding viable, low-risk resources...

  1. ADDRESS SERVICE REQUESTED AGRICULTURAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much of the state's manufacturing, shipping and tourism offerings. Water is necessary for life -- every Endowed Chair in Water Research, said that access to safe drinking water is one of the most serious public is a vital component of so many industries -- agriculture, manufac- turing and tourism, just to name a few

  2. University President Homepage Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ,192 $6,960 $20,242 $7,794 $21,096 Potomac State College 1,540 WVU Institute of Technology 1,261 Campus-Main Professional 1,611 Total 31,976 Main Tech PSC Potomac State College 314 23.8 21.3 19.3 WVU Institute of Technology 129 3.42 3.21 2.83 WVU-Main Bachelor 4,268 2,630 177 304 WVU-Main Master 1,533 2,238 87 335 WVU

  3. Addressing Big Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden DocumentationAccommodationsRegister / Vol. 72, No.Resources

  4. change_address_111609

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAboutXu Named| Princeton PlasmaZhihong LinTheCarylcf * * *

  5. ARM - People Address Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMergedProductsVaisala CL51

  6. Safety and licensing issues that are being addressed by the Power Burst Facility test programs. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCardell, R.K.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results of the experimental program being conducted in the Power Burst Facility and the relationship of these results to certain safety and licensing issues. The safety issues that were addressed by the Power-Cooling-Mismatch, Reactivity Initiated Accident, and Loss of Coolant Accident tests, which comprised the original test program in the Power Burst Facility, are discussed. The resolution of these safety issues based on the results of the thirty-six tests performed to date, is presented. The future resolution of safety issues identified in the new Power Burst Facility test program which consists of tests which simulate BWR and PWR operational transients, anticipated transients without scram, and severe fuel damage accidents, is described.

  7. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Cyd E.

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  8. Outlook Web App User Guide Frequently contacted individuals can be saved in an address book in Outlook known as a Contact Card. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Contacts Outlook Web App User Guide Frequently contacted individuals can be saved in an address book in Outlook known as a Contact Card. The following instructions will aid you in creating

  9. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, N.

    2010-01-01

    to estimate market potential of renewable energy in the U.S.examine potential future scenarios for renewable energy andpotential question (or questions) to be addressed through the project. In late 2006, increasing renewable energy

  10. About UPI | UPI en Espaol | My Account Free News Update: Enter Your Email Address Sign up Search: Stories Go Advertise on UPI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    About UPI | UPI en Espańol | My Account Free News Update: Enter Your Email Address Sign up Search | Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Advertise Online | Contact Us Sponsored Links: Auto Dealers

  11. Technical Study Addresses a Key Challenge to Harmonizing U.S. and International PV Module Standards (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL builds community and industry support by addressing concerns voiced by key standards organizations. Photovoltaic (PV) manufacturers in the United States test the safety of their products using standards developed through consensus processes. Because U.S. PV module safety standards are not aligned with international standards, manufacturers must test their modules twice - and sometimes maintain separate product lines. By meeting with standards organizations such as the Solar ABCs and Underwriters Laboratories (UL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) leaders have worked to identify different stakeholders priorities and concerns. UL, specifically, has expressed concern that the international standards do not address all possible risks. For example, new encapsulant materials could soften at high temperatures and frameless modules could slide apart, exposing live electrical parts or allowing glass to fall on a person below. The deformation of a solid material under the influence of mechanical stresses is known as 'creep.' Current module qualification tests are limited to 85 C, whereas modules can, for short times, reach 105 C outdoors. In response to UL's concern, NREL designed and executed an experiment to compare on-sun and accelerated rates of creep for modules fabricated with various encapsulants, including some that have low melting points. Objectives were to (1) evaluate the potential for creep in outdoor exposure, (2) provide guidance on the risks and design needs with thermoplastic materials, and (3) provide a basis for modifying standards to account for materials with potential to creep. The study tested experimental materials with eight representative encapsulants in both outdoor and indoor (chamber) exposure. The study found that modules with materials that were expected to creep did so in the indoor exposure, but not in most outdoor environments and mounting configurations. The results provide a basis for defining an accelerated test needed to give confidence that the modules will not slide apart on hot days. The proposal for IEC 61730 Part 1 exposes modules for 200 hours to a temperature between 105 C and 110 C. NREL is collaborating with UL representatives, and U.S. and international standards appear to be closer to harmonization.

  12. Energy Frontier Research Centers: Helping Win the Energy Innovation Race (2011 EFRC Summit Keynote Address, Secretary of Energy Chu)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven (DOE Secretary of Energy)

    2012-03-14

    Secretary of Energy Steven Chu gave the keynote address at the 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum. In his talk, Secretary Chu highlighted the need to "unleash America's science and research community" to achieve energy breakthroughs. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  13. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Gasification In coal gasification there are two worthwhiledemonstrated. Many coal gasification plants are in operationCatalytic Coal Liquefaction and Gasification a) Liquefaction

  14. Nanoscale Advances in Catalysis and Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    Gratzel,  M. ,   Solar  energy  conversion  by  dye-­8,  51]   Solar  Energy  Conversion   Solar  energy   for  solar  energy   conversion.   Journal  of  

  15. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Control XIII Cata XIV Fuel Cell XV The Profession of XVIanode and cathode of a fuel celL Hydrogen has been the mostindustrial applications Fuel cells were used in the Gemini

  16. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    process technology is far greater in chemical and petrochemicalprocesses such as hydrotreating and hydrocrack.ing, and for petrochemical

  17. Method for producing catalysis from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

  18. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Dealkylation Catalytic Coal Liquefaction and Gasification a)Liquefaction Gasification c) IX Methanation Heterogeneous~IQUEFACTION AND GASIFICATION a) Liquefaction Production of

  19. Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

    1983-07-21

    In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

  20. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    there were supplies of n-butane which could be isomerized.as a catalytic liquid n~butane gas was passed; in the other,and ts: butadiene, 2) 1) butane lbenzene dehydro~~ genation

  1. Consequences of Confinement in Zeolite Acid Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounder, Rajamani Pachayappan

    2011-01-01

    diameters of propane and n-butane. Scheme 3.5. MOR crystaldehydrogenation of propane, n-butane and isobutane. CHAPTERkJ mol -1 ] Propane n n-Butane n-P Pentane n-H Hexane Figure

  2. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  3. Biochemical Conversion: Using Hydrolysis, Fermentation, and Catalysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hydrolyze the cellulose and hemicellulose in biomass to free the sugars for conversion. The program is working to identify the most productive, naturally occurring...

  4. A microreactor sample environment for catalysis research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    opportunity for industrial researchers to develop new, challenging materials for energy, chemistry materials. In many cases, exploring the relationship between the structure of a new material and its thereby aiding the development of new materials. For further information please contact the Diamond

  5. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Oil and Esso, are more severe; pressures range up to 2000 psig are as lowOil Phase Isomeration Process" (MVPI) and tn 1978 the "Mobil Low Pressure

  6. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    b) Isomerization Hydrocracking v VI VII VIII Hydrogenationinto zeolite~cracking hydrocracking catalysts will besome paraffins and also hydrocracking some paraffins. The

  7. N-heterocyclic carbene catalysis: expansion of 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogle, James William

    2009-05-15

    Scheme 1.3. Feringa?s total synthesis of Lardolure????????????? 8 Scheme 1.4. Synthesis of some 1,2-dialkyl fragments???????????? 9 Scheme 1.5. Asymmetric hydrogenation of ?-trocotrienyl acetate by Pfaltz???. 12 Scheme 2.1. Monoene... electrophiles, which tended to give the 1,4-syn product as the predominant stereoisomer (Diagram 1.2). Also, his development and use of lithium ammonium borate (LAB) as a reducing agent for amides to alcohols gave a protocol to generate either stereocenter...

  8. Consequences of Confinement in Zeolite Acid Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounder, Rajamani Pachayappan

    2011-01-01

    of monomolecular propane cracking-to- dehydrogenation rate3.4. Kinetic diameters of propane and n-butane. Scheme 3.5.Intrinsic rate constant for propane cracking, k int on H-

  9. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    of gasoline from a barrel of crude oil and results in theestimated that savings of crude oil alone by this improvedtheir yield-per-barrel of crude oil. In both cases, the pour

  10. Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with heretofore unprecedented detail. Examples of new computational methods include optimization of structures determined experimentally by diffraction scattering based on...

  11. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    R. H. , and Boyer, R. F. Styrene. Reinhold Publishing co. ,AMMOXIDATION) LO STYRENE { DEHYDROGENATION) HYDROGENATIONSlbenzene dehydro~~ genation to styrene monomero Butane

  12. Consequences of Confinement in Zeolite Acid Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounder, Rajamani Pachayappan

    2011-01-01

    sta ate stabilizat tion energie es (E stab ) (S Scheme 3.1bmeasured activ vation energie s (E meas ) and e entropies (?Measured acti ivation energie es (E meas ) for monomolecular

  13. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2008 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    for registration (membership due included). Group registration can be accommodated on-site; the group, Micromeritics) 10:05 AM Gary Gildert (Custom Catalytic Solution Inc., La Porte, TX) The Seven Steps

  14. Nanomaterials Engineering and Applications in Catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qiao

    2012-01-01

    75 Although direct photocatalysis utilizing such plasmoniclittle investigated. In photocatalysis research, anatase TiOthe perspective of photocatalysis, there are also several

  15. The impact of nanoscience on heterogeneous catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.

    2003-03-03

    Most catalysts consist of nanometer-sized particles dispersed on a high-surface area support. Advances in characterization methods have led to a molecular level understanding of the relationships between nanoparticle properties and catalytic performance. Together with novel approaches to nanoparticle synthesis, this knowledge is contributing to the design and development of new catalysts.

  16. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2005 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    of Carbides and Nitrides" 9:35 AM Dr. Ed Sughrue, ConocoPhillips, Bartsville, OK "Chemistry-Aided Design of Future Clean Fuels" 10:05 AM Coffee Break (Micromeritics Inc., GA) 10:15 AM Professor Wayne Goodman

  17. BERKELEY CATALYSIS CENTER March 29, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    /microchannel plates or microchannel cermets. For a given fuel (natural gas, isooctane, decane, gasoline) and a type), the composition of the active component and support properties are tuned. At operation temperatures in the range of 800-1100 oC and short contact times, catalysts ensure the equilibrium composition of reformate being

  18. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    from methane, naphtha, heavy oil, and coal has achievedare suspended in a heavy oil. High-per-pass conversions (95%the catalytic cracking of heavy gas oils can be saturated,

  19. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    this by ion exchanging rare earth metals for alkali meta lChlorides of rare earths and alkali metals often serve as

  20. BERKELEY CATALYSIS CENTER Distinguished Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    to Commercialization and Back ABSTRACT: The November 2002 start-up of a 1.4-MW Kawasaki gas turbine with a Xonon-M1A-13X engine contains two foil monoliths coated with supported palladium oxide catalyst downstream exhibit many phenomena that are of academic interest and that represent practical engineering challenges

  1. A BRIEF HISTORY OF INDUSTRIAL CATALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Aniline Cyclohexane BUTADIENE rr:ABLE C MAJOE AI:'PLICA!and acetylenes, such as butadiene, , and removed 'These mustto butenes and ts: butadiene, 2) 1) butane lbenzene dehydro~

  2. BERKELEY CATALYSIS CENTER November 11, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and nitric oxides emitted from the gasoline internal combustion engine has in fuel cells and hydrogen generation research. Most major automobile companies are demonstrating fuel

  3. BERKELEY CATALYSIS CENTER Distinguished Lecture Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    is a subject of great practical importance in the chemical and petrochemical industry. Porous materials propane (CHA) and carbon dioxide from methane (DDR). These separations are of great practical importance

  4. SOUTHWEST CATALYSIS SOCIETY 2006 SPRING SYMPOSIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    XIAO TOTAL PETROCHEMICALS USA, INC. RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Deer Park, TX 77536 (281) 884 in Methane Reactions Catalyzed by Supported Metal Clusters" 8:50 AM Dr. Jon G. McCarty, Catalytica Energy

  5. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0PhotosPresentations Workshop

  6. Catalysis Working Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCarib Energy (USA)civilEnergy Watertimeplan proposes

  7. Addressing the Federal-State-Local Interface Issues During a Catastrophic Event Such as an Anthrax Attack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Upton, Jaki F.

    2010-02-01

    On October 9, 2008, federal, state and local policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and public health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Addressing the Federal-State-Local Interface Issues During a Catastrophic Event Such as an Anthrax Attack. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about recovery and restoration through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems. The Principal Federal Official (PFO) provided an overview of the role of the PFO in a catastrophic event. A high-level summary of an anthrax scenario was presented. The remainder of the day was focused on interactive discussions among federal, state and local emergency management experts in the areas of: • Decision-making, prioritization, and command and control • Public health/medical services • Community resiliency and continuity of government. Key topics and issues that resulted from discussions included: • Local representation in the Joint Field Office (JFO) • JFO transition to the Long-Term Recovery Office • Process for prioritization of needs • Process for regional coordination • Prioritization - process and federal/military intervention • Allocation of limited resources • Re-entry decision and consistency • Importance of maintaining a healthy hospital system • Need for a process to establish a consensus on when it is safe to re-enter. This needs to be across all jurisdictions including the military. • Insurance coverage for both private businesses and individuals • Interaction between the government and industry. The symposium was sponsored by the Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstration, a collaborative regional program jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the U.S. Department of Defense. To aid the program’s efforts and inform the development of blueprint for recovery from a biological incident, this report presents the key issues identified at the symposium.

  8. Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    Addressing Energy Costs of Current Separation Processes with Advanced Materials and Processes Large scale purification and separation processes transform low value resources into more useful fuels, basic chemicals, food and clean water; however, they also consume considerable energy. With growing global

  9. *Corresponding author. Address for correspondence: Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA 16802-2111, USA, e-mail: kundu@stat.psu.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    *Corresponding author. Address for correspondence: Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State is supported by a grant No. (SR/O˝/M -- 06/93) of the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India of Atomic Energy, Government of India. Presently at the Reserve Bank of India. Signal Processing 72 (1999

  10. Name and Address form for Employee Data This for should be used for you ON-SITE and HOME information. The information that you provide will update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Name and Address form for Employee Data This for should be used for you ON-SITE and HOME published and online version of the Fermilab Telephone Directory. COMPLETE YOUR NAME, ID, AND OTHER INFORMATION BELOW BADGE/ID NUMBER: ________________ EMPLOYEE NAME

  11. * Corresponding author. Tel.: 1-217-333-0417; fax: 1-217-244-1631. E-mail address: arockett@sta!.uiuc.edu (A. Rockett)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockett, Angus

    . present address: Global Solar Energy, 5575 South Houghton Rd., Tucson, AZ 85747, USA. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 59 (1999) 255}264 Na incorporation in Mo and CuInSe from production processes A)-based solar cells and modules requires a reproducible deposition process yielding high-quality material

  12. * Corresponding author. Tel.: 734-647-2505; fax: 734-647-3170. E-mail address: artkuo@umich.edu (A.D. Kuo).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catherine E. Bauby, Arthur D. Kuo* Department of Mechanical Engineering & Applied Mechanics, University* Corresponding author. Tel.: 734-647-2505; fax: 734-647-3170. E-mail address: artkuo@umich.edu (A.D, and in fact the support leg can do little to alter this motion (Winter, 1991). Townsend (1985) demon- strated

  13. Abstract-This paper addresses boost converter circuits that are built for very low input voltages, i.e. less than 1 V. Such circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimball, Jonathan W.

    Abstract- This paper addresses boost converter circuits that are built for very low input voltages-VOLTAGE BOOST CONVERTER EFFICIENCY Efficiency of the basic power converter circuits such as buck, boost, etc input voltages. I. INTRODUCTION Power converters driven from low input voltage (

  14. Authors' Note: Address correspondence to John Byrne, Center for Energy & Environmental Policy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-7301; e-mail: jbbyrne@udel.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    , University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716-7301; e-mail: jbbyrne@udel.edu. In an October, 2008 New York Times81 Authors' Note: Address correspondence to John Byrne, Center for Energy & Environmental Policy article, journalist John Tierney argued that recent discus- sions about energy futures ". . . have

  15. GaSb-based Type-I QW LEDs and addressable arrays operated at wavelengths up to 3.66 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sb-based quantum wells (QW) light emitting diodes (LED) and LED arrays operating at room temperature at wavelengths. Kipshidze, D.Westerfeld, D. Snyder, M.Johnson, G. Belenky, "GaSb-Based Type I Quantum Well Light Emitting Diode Addressable Array Operated at Wavelengths up to 3.66 µm", IEEE Photonics Technol. Lett. 21, 1087

  16. ISRAEL JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol. 52, 2006, pp. 263279 *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: dbarash@cs.bgu.ac.il

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barash, Danny

    should be addressed. E-mail: dbarash@cs.bgu.ac.il Accepted February 2007. AdAptive MutAtions in Rn rearrangement. We would like to check whether such mutations could be adaptive mutations that may have on both slopes. We expect that further results will shed light on the mutational differences of TPP

  17. Measuring and mapping the relationships between urban environment and urban health : how New York City's Active Design policies can be targeted to address the obesity epidemic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drummond, Jocelyn Pak

    2013-01-01

    The fields of urban planning and public health both emerged in the 19th century and were united in an effort to address poor health conditions that were linked to the urban environment of cities. By the end of the 20th ...

  18. Guidelines for CO2 Euthanasia of Poultry and Young Swine The AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition does not specifically address the best

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Deming

    1 Guidelines for CO2 Euthanasia of Poultry and Young Swine The AVMA Guidelines for the Euthanasia of Animals: 2013 Edition does not specifically address the best practices for CO2 euthanasia of swine of poultry and swine with CO2 are appropriate. It is standard practice in all cases to assure that adequate

  19. Procedure for SFU personnel borrowing equipment Below is a list of questions that the equipment contract should address between SFU and the lender,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    contract should address between SFU and the lender, and that need to be answered for SFU to assess whether is the duration of the loan period? 4) What is the agreement if the lender does not want the equipment returned will the equipment be transported between the lender and SFU? 7) Who is responsible for shipping costs? 8) Who

  20. What Problems can be Encountered when Efficiency Upgrades are Made to Fans and what Should the Approach be to Address Those Problems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, V.

    2015-01-01

    : What Problems May be encountered? What Approach Best Addresses Them? Presented by Vern Martin, P.Eng. FLOWCARE Engineering Inc. IETC 2015 June 2 - 4 New Orleans, LA ESL-IE-15-06-39 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology... Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Site performance testing to rigorous standards is required to establish fan efficiency. Causes of Poor Fan Efficiency Issues to investigate: • Was the fan efficiency overstated? • Was there a better choice...

  1. ORISE: Contact Us - phone numbers, email addresses, shipping addresses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEP Power ConditioningClimate andOak

  2. MARTIN NICHOLS WYBOURNE WORK ADDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , New Hampshire. 2004 ­ Member (Ex Officio), Board of Overseers, Dartmouth Medical School. 2004 ­ Member of Physics, University of Oregon 1981 ­ 1986 Phonon Physics Research Team Leader, General Electric Company of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Oregon State University. 1994 Co-founder Advanced Microbotics Inc

  3. Presidential address Geomycology: biogeochemical transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Corresponding Editor: David L. Hawksworth Keywords: Carbonates Clay minerals Environmental biotechnology Lichens, and it is hoped that this review will serve to catalyse further research, as well as stimulate interest in an area of mycology of global significance. Ş 2007 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Owner/Agent Name: _________________________________________________ Address: __________________________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Artyom

    Express, Discover, Visa or MasterCard by filling out the attached form. 6. Label each tube with the same to avoid contamination of blood samples ­ do not open blood tubes. 8. Carefully wrap and package the tubes

  5. CLOSING ADDRESS: SAWMA SYMPOSIUM 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretoria, University of

    and ecotourism. I learnt of landscape ecology as a platform for conservation research and the importance control officer. He uses a net made of a stretched stocking to kill tsetse flies in and around every car

  6. Addressing Mechanisms and Persistent Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cockshott, P.; Proceedings of the Data Types and Persistence Workshop, Appin, August 1985 pp 363-383 Springer [More Details

    Cockshott,P. Proceedings of the Data Types and Persistence Workshop, Appin, August 1985 pp 363-383 Springer

  7. Akbar Siami Namin Business Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Analysis Energy-aware Software Engineering Cyber Security and Secure Programming Empirical Software ­ 05 / 06 National Research Council Canada (NRC) 05 / 05 ­ 05 / 06 Visiting Researcher Education 01, TX, USA, 79414 (325) 260 - 5882 Research Interests Software Engineering Software Testing and Program

  8. NAME: Vladimir Novotny OFFICE ADDRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Nexus- towards Zero Pollution and GHG Emission Effect of Future (Eco) cities, International MEMBERSHIP Member of the International Steering Committee on "Cities of the Future", International Water, Subcommittee for the Jones Island Treatment Plant, Milwaukee Water Pollution Abatement Plan, 1978- 1980 #12

  9. Scott Edwin Dubowsky School Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    ball lightning. Teaching Assistant University of Illinois September 2013­Present · CHEM 315 Studies of a Low-Temperature Atmospheric Plasmoid Analogous to Ball Lightning". The 69th Annual-temperature, atmospheric-pressure plasma ball discharges. Currently uti- lizing spectroscopic methods to gain

  10. Addressing PMI Science and PFC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    possible (accelerated lifetime tests), like that of ITER, FNSF, DEMO · Well controlled continuous plasma) Vacuum vessel 70cm (permanent) Cost of electricity is proportional to (1/A)0.6 #12;3 Managed by UT to create and test plasma-reformed surfaces #12;6 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy

  11. Matthew H. Green Lab Address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacIver, Malcolm A.

    neurophysiology and behavior · Presently working to build virtual reality systems for integrative behavioral cell recordings · Developed an automated tracking algorithm for analysis of behavior using high in larval zebrafish. Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, Charleston, SC. [Poster] Green, M. H

  12. 2013 Director's New Year Address

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril 30, 2013 9:30 am - 2:003 Audit3

  13. Keynote Address | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting Takeaways from 2014

  14. Keynote Address | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIALU.S. DepartmentJeanKey Meeting Takeaways from 201440PM to 2:05PM

  15. Keynote Address | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA Public CommentInverted253.16582104)

  16. Name * First Last Address Street Address Address Line 2 City State ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, North Korea, South Korea, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho ...

  17. Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Place Based STEM: Leveraging Local Resources to Engage K-12 Teachers in Teaching Integrated STEM and for Addressing the Local STEM Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Louis Nadelson; Anne Louise Seifert; Meagan McKinney

    2014-06-01

    Business, industry, parks, nature settings, government infrastructure, and people, can be invaluable resources for connecting STEM curriculum within context which results in conditions ideal for promoting purposeful learning of authentic STEM content. Thus, community-based STEM resources offer ideal context for teaching STEM content. A benefit of focusing teacher attention on these contextual, content aligned resources is that they are in every community; making place-based STEM education a possibility, regardless of the location of STEM teaching and learning. Further, associating STEM teaching and learning with local resources addresses workforce development and the STEM pipeline by exposing students to STEM careers and applications in their local communities. The desire to align STEM teaching and learning with local STEM related resources guided the design of our week-long integrated STEM K-12 teacher professional development (PD) program, i-STEM. We have completed four years of our i-STEM PD program and have made place-based STEM a major emphasis of our curriculum. This report focuses on the data collected in the fourth year of our program. Our week-long i-STEM PD served over 425 educators last summer (2013), providing them with in depth theme-based integrated STEM short courses which were limited to an average of 15 participants and whole group plenary sessions focused around placed based integrated STEM, inquiry, engineering design, standards and practices of Common Core and 21st Century skills. This state wide PD was distributed in five Idaho community colleges and took place over two weeks. The STEM short courses included topics on engineering for sustainability, using engineering to spark interest in STEM, municipal water systems, health, agriculture, food safety, mining, forestry, energy, and others. Integral to these short courses were field trips designed to connect the K-12 educators to the resources in their local communities that could be leveraged for teaching integrated STEM and provide a relevant context for teaching STEM content. Workplace presentations made by place-based STEM experts and provided teachers field trips to place-base STEM industries and business such as manufacturing plants, waste water treatment systems, mines, nature parks, food processing plants, research, hospitals, and laboratory facilities. We researched the 425 participants’ conceptions of place-based STEM prior to and after their taking part in the summer institutes, which included fieldtrips. Our findings revealed substantial increase in our participants’ knowledge, interest, and plans to use place-based resources for teaching integrated STEM. We detail the data analysis and provide a theoretical foundation and justification for the importance of place-based STEM to address the STEM pipeline for the future workforce.

  19. Submission : 13594 Thesis proposal CSC 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenave, Charles

    alternatives in homogeneous catalysis Thesis supervisor: Guy Lavigne and Dmitry Valyaev E-mail address: guy, S.; Valyaev, D. A.; Brousses, R.; César, V.; Sortais, J.-B.; Darcel, C.; Lugan, N.; Lavigne, G. Adv

  20. A history of the working group to address Los Alamos community health concerns - A case study of community involvement and risk communication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Otway; Jon Johnson

    2000-01-01

    In May 1991, at a Department of Energy (DOE) public hearing at Los Alamos, New Mexico, a local artist claimed there had been a recent brain tumor cluster in a small Los Alamos neighborhood. He suggested the cause was radiation from past operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Data from the Laboratory's extensive environmental monitoring program gave no reason to believe this charge to be true but also could not prove it false. These allegations, reported in the local and regional media, alarmed the community and revealed an unsuspected lack of trust in the Laboratory. Having no immediate and definitive response, the Laboratory offered to collaborate with the community to address this concern. The Los Alamos community accepted this offer and a joint Community-Laboratory Working Group met for the first time 29 days later. The working group set as its primary goal the search for possible carcinogens in the local environment. Meanwhile, the DOE announced its intention to fund the New Mexico Department of Health to perform a separate and independent epidemiological study of all Los Alamos cancer rates. In early 1994, after commissioning 17 environmental studies and meeting 34 times, the working group decided that the public health concerns had been resolved to the satisfaction of the community and voted to disband. This paper tells the story of the artist and the working group, and how the media covered their story. It summarizes the environmental studies directed by the working group and briefly reviews the main findings of the epidemiology study. An epilogue records the present-day recollections of some of the key players in this environmental drama.