Sample records for brine constituents water

  1. Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

  2. Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning Aerosol. Case Study of Water-Soluble Metal Containing Organic Constituents of Biomass Burning...

  3. Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines Zhenhao mineral solubility in H2S saturated brines. An example calculation for galena solubility is given. 1 gasification process.5,6 Sequestration of the gases into geological brine formation is one of the promising

  4. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine 2004; accepted 21 April 2004; published 1 July 2004. [1] Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation due to brine this period. The density increase terminated abruptly in late February, while the active brine rejection

  5. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  6. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  7. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

  8. PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehoshua, Kolodny

    PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Valley waters being mixtures of fresh water with saline brines. Ra is efficiently extracted from surrounding rocks into the brine end member. 228 Ra/226 Ra ratios are exceptionally low 0.07 to 0.9, mostly

  9. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  10. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  11. Problems #3, Math 204, Dr. M. Bohner. Sep 10, 2003. Due Sep 15, 11 am. 12. A tank has ten gallons of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with 1.5 pound of salt per gallon enters

  12. Brine contamination of ground water and streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report defines the extent of oil-field-brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area. The report is based largely on data collected during the period October 1984 through November 1985. Water samples were collected from streams and wells in the study area. Data from a previous study conducted in the vicinity of the nearby Tatum Salt Dome were used for background water-quality information. Natural surface-water quality was determined by sampling streamflow from a nearby basin having no oil field activities and from samples collected in an adjacent basin during a previous study.

  13. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

  14. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

  15. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water and the three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Nakamichi, Mikiyoshi; Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for methanol + ethanol + water and its three constituent binary systems methanol + ethanol, ethanol + water, and methanol + water were measured at 101.3 kPa using a liquid-vapor ebullition-type equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system methanol + ethanol + water was predicted by means of the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  16. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC), ????over 250 billion gallons of produced water is taken out of Texas Soil every year, and more than 35% of this water is not currently fit to use.?? Therefore, it can be assumed that domestically...

  17. Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

  18. Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:InformationCaseType Jump

  19. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  20. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow possible migration of Marcellus brine through naturally occurring pathways. The occurrences of saline water, because of natural hydraulic connections to deeper formations. formation water isotopes Marcellus Shale

  1. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myint, P C; Firoozabadi, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spy...

  2. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its constituent three binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tochigi, Katsumi; Akimoto, Kentarou; Ochi, Kenji [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry] [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Liu, Fangyhi; Kawase, Yasuhito [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Nippon Refine Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system water + 2-aminoethanol + dimethyl sulfoxide and its three constituent binary mixtures at 363.15 K. The apparatus used was a modified Rogalski-Malanoski equilibrium still. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  3. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  4. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  5. Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: Pore-scale studies in micromodels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accumulation of residual water in pendular structuresAfter drainage, the residual water remained as thick filmsdisplaced brine), the residual water was initially retained

  6. Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

  7. Biomass production from inland brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reach, C.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of utilizing inland saline waters to produce biomass through the application of marine aquaculture was investigated. From available data, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the crustacea Artemia salina were selected as the experimental marine organisms. The proposed diatom served to establish primary productivity and concurrently provide a food source for the herbivorus crustacea. The objective of the first phase research was to investigate the ability of P. tricornutum and A. salina to survive in the inland saline environment. Clarified activated sludge and anaerobic digester effluents were evaluated as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Experimental results indicated that diatom and crustacea growth in the inland brine was equivalent to control cultures utilizing seawater. Wastewater effluents were successful as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Bioassay experiments conducted with petroleum related brines yielded mixed results respect to the survival and growth of the P. tricornutum and A. salina organisms. A second series of experiments involved cholornaphthalene, chlorophenanthene, and chlorophenanthrene, and chloroanthracene as the experimental hydrocarbons. Results of the diatom studies show chloroanthracene to induce toxic effects at a concentration of 500 ug/L. Artemia studies showed no acutely toxic effects relative to the test hydrocarbons at 50 and 100 ug/L.

  8. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

  9. Cathodic protection in oilfield brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnipseed, S.P. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the use of cathodic protection (CP) to mitigate internal and corrosion-related failures that occur in the produced brine phase of oilfield tanks and production vessels is discussed. Unique considerations covered include brine properties, CP system selection, installation details, monitoring, and coatings.

  10. New Energy Efficient Method for Cleaning Oilfield Brines with Carbon Dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, C. T.; Seibert, A. F.; Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water contaminated with hydrocarbons often results during the production of oil. The polluted water, which may be naturally occurring or a result of water or steam flooding operations, must be cleaned before disposal or re-injection. These brines...

  11. A cost-effective statistical screening method to detect oilfield brine contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alyanak, N.; Grace, J.T.; Campbell, M.D. [United Resources International, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical screening method has been developed using Tolerance Limits for barium (Ba{sup +2}) to identify contamination of a fresh-water aquifer by oilfield brines. The method requires an understanding of the local hydrochemistry of oilfield brines, inexpensive, Publicly available hydrochemical data, a single sample analysis from the suspect well and the application of a simple statistical procedure. While this method may not provide absolute evidence of oilfield brine contamination of a fresh-water aquifer, it does identify conditions where brine contamination is a strong probability over other possible sources of chlorides.

  12. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online 23 December 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity Sea ice Brine Seawater Arctic UraniumConservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a, ,1 disequilibrium The conservative behavior of uranium (U) with respect to salinity in open ocean waters is widely

  13. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry of silica in Cerro Prieto brine may profitably be14 mg·l-1 AND SYNTHFTIC CERRO PRIETO BRINES High Ca We112Q.by the CFE Laboratory at Cerro Prieto and kindly provided to

  14. Brining studies at Pepper Products Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okoro, John Daniel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) A. B. Childers (Member) V. E. Sweat (Member) December 1988 Abstract Optimum brining conditions, causes of secondary fermentation, and salt fluctuation were investigated. Jalapeno peppers held in brine solution undergo lactic acid... fermentation, controlled by level of acidification and concentration of salt. Only brining at 7. 5% NaCl, with no added acetic acid, resulted in loss of all fermentable sugars. However, salt concentration fluctuated widely in this sample. Brining in 25...

  15. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  16. Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice-sealed'' east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice bed year-round. New ice-core analysis and tempera- ture data show that beneath 19 m of ice is a water°C. The ice cover thickens at both its base and surface, sealing concentrated brine beneath. The ice

  17. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Operations Hypersaline...

  18. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-10166 CERRO-PRIETO-12 XICAN-AMERICANCOOPERATIVE' PROGRAM T THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD ICHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES Oleh Weres Leon

  19. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-10166 CERRO-PRIETO-12 XICAN-AMERICANCOOPERATIVE' PROGRAM T THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD ICHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES Oleh Weres Leon

  20. THE MECHANISM OF INTRAGRANULAR MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machiels, A.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Brine Inclusions in a Salt Repository", ORM. -5526 (JulyOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT A.J. Machiels, S. Yagnik, D.R.OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by A.J. Machiels S. Yagnik D.R.

  1. Norm removal from frac water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, James Manio; Matis, Hope; Kostedt, IV, William Leonard

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating low barium frac water includes contacting a frac water stream with a radium selective complexing resin to produce a low radium stream, passing the low radium stream through a thermal brine concentrator to produce a concentrated brine; and passing the concentrated brine through a thermal crystallizer to yield road salt.

  2. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  3. NOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , eggs and spores of many taxa within the sediments and residual water of their ballast tanks (Niimi a voluntary "best management practices" approach for residual ballast water and sediment for NOBOB vesselsNOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals Primary

  4. Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  5. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were performed to quantify the penetration depth and width of the oil jet. The measured penetration depths were shallow, as predicted by penetration-depth models, in agreement with the assumption that the flow is buoyancy-dominated, rather than momentum-dominated. The turbulent penetration depth model overpredicted the measured values. Both the oil-brine and oil-sludge-brine systems produced plumes with hydrodynamic characteristics similar to the simulant liquids previously examined, except that the penetration depth was 5-10% longer for the crude oil. An unexpected observation was that centimeter-size oil 'bubbles' (thin oil shells completely filled with brine) were produced in large quantities during oil injection. The mixing experiments also used layers of oil, sludge, and brine from the SPR. Oil was injected at a scaled flow rate corresponding to the nominal SPR oil injection rates. Injection was performed for about 6 hours and was stopped when it was evident that brine was being ingested by the oil withdrawal pump. Sampling probes located throughout the oil, sludge, and brine layers were used to withdraw samples before, during, and after the run. The data show that strong mixing caused the water content in the oil layer to increase sharply during oil injection but that the water content in the oil dropped back to less than 0.5% within 16 hours after injection was terminated. On the other hand, the sediment content in the oil indicated that the sludge and oil appeared to be well mixed. The sediment settled slowly but the oil had not returned to the baseline, as-received, sediment values after approximately 2200 hours (3 months). Ash content analysis indicated that the sediment measured during oil analysis was primarily organic.

  6. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  7. THERMAL GRADIENT MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagnik, S.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT Suresh K. Yagnik February 1982 TOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by Suresh K. Yagnik Materialsb u i l t in future. The salt deposits, however, are known

  8. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  9. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteries from Brine March 31, 2014

  10. CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is capable of reducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases from coal or gas fired power plants or supercritical phase, as water-alternating gas cycles, or as carbonated brine. These result in different

  11. Water Treatment using Electrocoagulation Ritika Mohan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    important issue in this project was to treat brine coming out from the process called High Efficiency of brine amounting to almost 103 104 gal/day water. The difference between conventional Reverse Osmosis (RO) and HEROTM lies in the recovery. HEROTM can help achieve >95 % recovery (2) . Hence, the brine

  12. Electrochemical Flocculation and Chlorination for Domestic Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillion Jr., R. C.; Hiler, E. A.; Peters, J. L.

    Three electrochemical chlorinators were developed, tested and evaluated. The first used natural chlorides in the water to produce a chlorine residual; the second and third produced chlorine residuals by electrolysis of brine solution. Brine feed...

  13. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 2. Quantifying the transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    the rate of formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) due to brine rejection on the Okhotsk Sea northwestern- mediate water (NPIW) [Talley, 1991, 1993; Yasuda, 1997]. The initial overturn is driven by brine rejection ice formation and brine rejection into underlying waters. Newly formed DSW is advected by the large

  14. West Hackberry Brine Disposal Project pre-discharge characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C. (eds.) [eds.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical, chemical and biological attributes are described for: (1) a coastal marine environment centered about a Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) brine disposal site 11.4 km off the southwest coast of Louisiana; and (2) the lower Calcasieu and Sabine estuarine systems that provide leach waters for the SPR project. A three month sampling effort, February through April 1981, and previous investigations from the study area are integrated to establish baseline information for evaluation of impacts from brine disposal in the nearshore marine waters and from freshwater withdrawal from the coastal marsh of the Chenier Plain. January data are included for some tasks that sampled while testing and mobilizing their instruments prior to the February field effort. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, estuarine hydrology and hydrography, water and sediment quality, benthos, nekton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  15. PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

  16. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

  17. Nature and Chlorine Reactivity of Organic Constituents from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    degradation, N-acetyl amino sugars and proteins from bacterial activity, and natural fulvic acid, whereas DOM area. Two particular concerns are lack of characterization of organic constituents in reclaimed water

  18. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  19. Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective ofthis research is to provide quantitative data on the equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of aluminum minerals required to model changes in permeability and brine chemistry associated with fluid/rock interactions in the recharge, reservoir, and discharge zones of active geothermal systems. This requires a precise knowledge of the thermodynamics and speciation of aluminum in aqueous brines, spanning the temperature and fluid composition rangesencountered in active systems. The empirical and semi-empirical treatments of the solubility/hydrolysis experimental results on single aluminum mineral phases form the basis for the ultimate investigation of the behavior of complex aluminosilicate minerals. The principal objective in FY 1998 was to complete the solubility measurements on boehmite (AIOOH) inNaC1 media( 1 .O and 5.0 molal ionic strength, IOO-250°C). However, additional measurements were also made on boehmite solubility in pure NaOH solutions in order to bolster the database for fitting in-house isopiestic data on this system. Preliminary kinetic Measurements of the dissolution/precipitation of boehmite was also carried out, although these were also not planned in the earlier objective. The 1999 objectives are to incorporate these treatments into existing codes used by the geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

  20. Water vapor transport in the vicinity of imbibing saline plumes: Homogeneous and layered unsaturated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisbrod, Noam

    solutions (brines) were applied as point sources to the surface of homogenous packs of prewetted silica sand vapor transport from the residually saturated sand into the imbibing brine was observed in all sand grades and geometries. Pure water applied to sand prewetted with brine migrated into the surrounding

  1. The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spongberg, Martin Edward

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    feasibility. The methodology is utilized to make a preliminary evaluation of a proposed brine injection project in the Dove Creek area of King and Stonewall Counties, North Central Texas. Four known deep aquifers are modeled, using the SWIFT/486 software...

  2. acartia tonsa brine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also...

  3. Investigation of the character of and the constituents of slicks on water surfaces near power plants on Chesapeake Bay. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellama, J.M.; Zoller, W.H.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A slick occurring on the surface of the cooling canal at the Chalk Point Power Plant on the Patuxent River near Benedict, Maryland was found to contain organic material that appeared to originate both from anthropogenic sources and also from breakup of organisms and microorganisms naturally present in the water. Trace metal analysis showed enrichment from oceanic salt and from Sb, Ag, Zn, Se, Ba, W, and Cd, elements likely contributed from the power plant fly ash. Organometallic species were not detected; however, the presence of organosilicon species was observed.

  4. Water purification using organic salts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Water purification using organic salts. Feed water is mixed with at least one organic salt at a temperature sufficiently low to form organic salt hydrate crystals and brine. The crystals are separated from the brine, rinsed, and melted to form an aqueous solution of organic salt. Some of the water is removed from the aqueous organic salt solution. The purified water is collected, and the remaining more concentrated aqueous organic salt solution is reused.

  5. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  6. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  7. Determination of imidazoline and amido-amine type corrosion inhibitors in both crude oil and produced brine from oilfield production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matherly, R.M.; Jiao, J. [Baker Performance Chemicals, Houston, TX (United States); Blumer, D.J. [ARCO Alaska Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Ryman, J.S. [Baker Performance Chemicals, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical method for the determination of corrosion inhibitors in oilfield brines is the dye transfer method. Within this method are many variations which the analyst may use to determine the amount of corrosion inhibitor in either water or crude oil. These methods, however, suffer from many interferences which result in both false positive and negatives for corrosion inhibitor content. These methods essentially detect all amines as corrosion inhibitors. Improved high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been developed for the analysis of quaternary salt type corrosion inhibitors in brine waters, however, these methods do not appear to work in crude oil or for other forms of corrosion inhibitors such as the imidazolines, and amido-amines. This paper presents a method for the quantitative analysis of the imidazoline and amido-amine type corrosion inhibitors in both oilfield water and crude oil samples by HPLC. The corrosion inhibitor of interest is first separated from the matrix on a small column, then derivatized to form a product which is both sensitive and selective on a fluorescence detector. Detection limits for imidazolines are around 0.2 mg/L, amides and amines are similar. The advantage of this procedure is it can be used to determine the amount of corrosion inhibitor in both oil and brine water phases as well as on solid surfaces.

  8. Recovery of alkali metal constituents from catalytic coal conversion residues

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soung, Wen Y. (Houston, TX)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation (32) or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by contacting them (46, 53, 61, 69) with water or an aqueous solution to remove water-soluble alkali metal constituents and produce an aqueous solution enriched in said constituents. The aqueous solution thus produced is then contacted with carbon dioxide (63) to precipitate silicon constituents, the pH of the resultant solution is increased (81), preferably to a value in the range between about 12.5 and about 15.0, and the solution of increased pH is evaporated (84) to increase the alkali metal concentration. The concentrated aqueous solution is then recycled to the conversion process (86, 18, 17) where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Dense Water Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    .................................................................................................................... xix I. Direct Observations of Brine Rejection.1 Brine rejection

  10. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    1 Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone models. As a step toward this, network flow models were used to simulate the flow of CO2-saturated brine

  11. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  12. Gas Content of Gladys McCall Reservoir Brine A Topical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas t o brine ratio. This w i l l result i n cubic feet of methane, ethane, propane, etc. per barrel of brine, Then, the contributions from sample points are added until...

  13. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  14. Brine-in-crude-oil emulsions at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemer, Martin B.; Lord, David L.; MacDonald, Terry L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion formation could occur in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern if water were to flow into the crude-oil layer at a sufficient rate. Such a situation could arise during a drawdown from a cavern with a broken-hanging brine string. A high asphaltene content (> 1.5 wt %) of the crude oil provides the strongest predictor of whether a metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion will form. However there are many crude oils with an asphaltene content > 1.5 wt % that don't form stable emulsions, but few with a low asphaltene content that do form stable emulsions. Most of the oils that form stable emulsions are %E2%80%9Csour%E2%80%9D by SPR standards indicating they contain total sulfur > 0.50 wt %.

  15. Constraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    Constraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes Gisela November 2000 Abstract Brines from three depressions along the axis of the Red Sea, the Atlantis II II and the Discovery brines originating from locations in the central Red Sea show 4 He

  16. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines

  17. Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems Fabrice J. Fontaine1 and brine phases. Time series of vent temperature and salinity (chlorinity) show that some black-smoker vent below seawater for over a decade, which raises important questions concerning the fate of brines

  18. of brine heterogeneity in modern sedimentary basins (6) imply inefficiency of mixing and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    of brine heterogeneity in modern sedimentary basins (6) imply inefficiency of mixing and the potential for preservation of individual, metal- charged brine reservoirs that could be tapped at some later. The observation that the texturally later brines have higher metal contents is consistent with this model

  19. Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2 J. S. Wettlaufer,1,2,3 and S. A. Orszag2] It is well known that brine drainage from growing sea ice has a controlling influence on its mechanical oceans. When the ice has exceeded a critical thickness the drainage process is dominated by brine

  20. On the Reliability of Numerical Solutions of Brine Transport in Groundwater: Analysis of In ltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergamaschi, Luca

    On the Reliability of Numerical Solutions of Brine Transport in Groundwater: Analysis of In#12, brine transport List of symbols c normalized salt concentration c k l value of concentration on triangle:37; p.2 #12; Reliability of Numerical Simulations of Brine Transport in Groundwater 3 equivalent

  1. WERE AQUEOUS RIPPLES ON MARS FORMED BY FLOWING BRINES? MICHAEL P. LAMB, JOHN P. GROTZINGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WERE AQUEOUS RIPPLES ON MARS FORMED BY FLOWING BRINES? MICHAEL P. LAMB, JOHN P. GROTZINGER are not observed. Recent thermodynamic modeling indicates that these brines could have had higher densities (by up whether ripples could have been stable bed forms under flowing Martian brines. To this end, we compiled

  2. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

  3. Geochemistry of formation waters from the Lower Silurian Clinton Formation (Albion Sandstone), eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, L.L. (Illinois Univ., Chicago (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waters of the petroleum-bearing Clinton formation (Albion Sandstone) of eastern Ohio are highly concentrated brines with average total dissolved solids (TDS) of 250,000 ppm. Sodium, calcium, and chloride account for 97% of the TDS. Distribution of divalent metal chlorides (MCl{sub 2}) allows inference of an up-dip paleoflow direction, although present-day flow is probably down-dip paleoflow direction, although present-day flow is probably down-dip. Solute distribution may have been emplaced during early basin development; it thus provides a snapshot of paleoflow. Formation structure alone can not explain MCl{sub 2} trends; they probably also are controlled by regional variation in salt thickness. Major constituent data do not indicate that membrane filtration affected the waters. High bromide content (mean = 1,860 ppm) of the water indicates that they originated from evaporating seawater. They probably are related genetically to the Salina evaporite group. Calculations show that several subsequent diagenetic reactions can account for the observed major ion composition. Recrystallization of aragonite and dolomitization of calcite probably occurred as the waters moved through the big Lime and/or the Packer Shell carbonates. Cation exchange and chlorite formation probably altered water composition during interaction with shales of the Cabot Head formation and within the Clinton. Minor constituents of the waters appear to be controlled by reactions with clays.

  4. Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Suzanne Rene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution reduced the 41 120 100 0 0 80 E CL CL CV g 60 CL 40 20 ? ~ 0:23, CaCI2. NaCI ? ? & 5:18, Caclz. NaCI ? ? 0 8:15, CaCI2. NaCI 0 4 6 Days on Ice 10 Figure 13-Residual sulfur dioxide on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen... freezing for two trials. 34 13-Residual sulfur dioxide on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen in different brine immersion media 41 Figure 14- Black spot development on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen in different brine immersion media Page 42...

  5. Development of a flow injection analysis method for the determination of acrylamide copolymers in oilfield brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, K.C.; Burke, R.A.; Schramm, L.L. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for the determination of acrylamide polymers by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been developed and optimized for routine use. The method has been extensively tested for interferences common in oilfield brines. Potential interferences were examined from Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 3+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, sample coloration, and commonly used surfactants. The analysis is specific for amides, and the sensitivity to concentration of amide groups in the polymer was shown to be constant as the degree of polymer hydrolysis was varied. The range of the method is 0.1 to 100 mg/L. Sample throughput is 30 samples/h with triplicate analysis. Relative standard deviations of 0.2% are readily obtained from standard solutions and 0.5% from complex samples (at 50 mg/L). The method is applicable to the determination of aqueous, acrylamide-based polymers in process streams, surface waters and oilfield brines.

  6. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  7. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  8. 1. Constituents of rainwater 2. pH and pKa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Acid Rain Outline: 1. Constituents of rainwater 2. pH and pKa 3. Sources of acid rain 4. Adverse e#11;ects of acid rain 5. Controls 1: Constituents of rainwater #15; Gases are soluble in water: Henry. Strong acids formed upon dissolving: H 2 SO 4 and H 2 SO 3 . #12; Chemistry of Acid Rain #15; NO 2

  9. Analysis of anions in geological brines using ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.M.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion chromatographic procedures for the determination of the anions bromide, sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and iodide in brine samples have been developed and are described. The techniques have been applied to the analysis of natural brines, and geologic evaporites. Sample matrices varied over a range from 15,000 mg/L to 200,000 mg/L total halogens, nearly all of which is chloride. The analyzed anion concentrations ranged from less than 5 mg/L in the cases of nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate, to 20,000 mg/L in the case of sulfate. A technique for suppressing chloride and sulfate ions to facilitate the analysis of lower concentration anions is presented. Analysis times are typically less than 20 minutes for each procedure and the ion chromatographic results compare well with those obtained using more time consuming classical chemical analyses. 10 references, 14 figures.

  10. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE of imbibition or oil production rate, particularly after seven days or more aging time with oil. However in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine

  11. Water 2013, 5, 480-504; doi:10.3390/w5020480 ISSN 2073-4441

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to characterize geochemical processes in a complex coastal groundwater system and to provide constraints of native groundwater, intruded seawater, non-native injected water, and oil-field brine water. In some with oil-field brines. Groundwater 3 H above 1 tritium unit (TU) was observed only in a few select wells

  12. Apparatus and method for separating constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maronde, Carl P. (McMurray, PA); Killmeyer, Jr., Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A centrifugal separator apparatus and method for improving the efficiency of the separation of constituents in a fluid stream. A cyclone separator includes an assembly for separately discharging both constituents through the same end of the separator housing. A rotary separator includes a rotary housing having a baffle disposed therein for minimizing the differential rotational velocities of the constituents in the housing, thereby decreasing turbulence, and increasing efficiency. The intensity of the centrifugal force and the time which the constituents reside within the housing can be independently controlled to improve efficiency of separation.

  13. Foot-conditioned phonotactics and prosodic constituency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ryan Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituency by Ryan T. Bennett There has been a recurrentin LINGUISTICS by Ryan T. Bennett September 2012 TheDissertation of Ryan T. Bennett is approved: Professor Junko

  14. Implications of formation water movement based on isotopic data and elemental geochemistry, southwestern Ontario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frape, S.K.; Dollar, P.; Fritz, P.; Travail, R.A.; McNutt, R.H.; MacQueen, R.W.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation waters in Paleozoic sediments analyzed for /sup 2/H, /sup 18/O, /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr, tritium, and major/minor contents show the following. (1) The stable isotope contents are typical for formation brines, but have /sup 18/O and /sup 2/H values that group according to formation age, with waters in Cambrian strata being most depleted; and the most concentrated brines do not compare well to known Michigan basin brines. Many waters are Ca-Na-Cl brines similar to typical Canadian shield brines, although the origin of the various chemical species may be masked by intense rock-water interaction. (2) The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values for Cambrian brines range from 0.7095 to 0.7102. In one detailed study, the brine and calcite cement had the same value (0.7095), which is slightly higher than Cambrian seawater (0.7091-0.7092), and indicates that the cement precipitated from the brine during diagenesis. The reservoir rock has a /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr value of 0.7330, indicating little or no water/rock exchange. Sr isotopic values for Ordovician brines range from 0.7095 to 0.7103, which is higher than Ordovician seawater (0.7085). In contrast, the Silurian Salina Formation brines and Silurian seawater values are the same (0.7085-0.7087). Despite an active tectonic history, causing considerable faulting and movement within Paleozoic and Precambrian rock strata, the isotopic results for the Cambrian indicate isotopic equilibrium between brine and cement; therefore, these formation waters have not moved since the calcite formed.

  15. Pressure Buildup and Brine Migration During CO2 Storage in Multilayered Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    . Introduction Carbon dioxide capture combined with geologic stor- age (CCS) in suitable subsurface formations-6584.2012.00972.x potentially creating far-ranging pressure buildup and brine displacement in deep CO2 storage of resident brine caused by CCS operations require modeling/analysis tools of considerable complexity (Celia

  16. RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment project. Abstract. A mathematical model for the brine migration in rock salt around an infinite line heat source is set up. The tempera- ture field around the time dependent heat source is calculated by use

  17. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greminger, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coking (Wurm, 1968) • Phenols are also the principal organic constituents in con- densate waters formed during coal

  18. Validation of classical density-dependent solute transport theory for stable, high-concentration-gradient brine displacements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    -concentration-gradient brine displacements in coarse and medium sands S.J. Watson a,1 , D.A. Barry a,1 , R.J. Schotting b,*, S by a brine solution, under either constant head or constant volume flux conditions. The experimental data, significantly less ex- perimental research has been conducted to investigate high-concentration (e.g., brine

  19. PII S0016-7037(01)00901-2 Effect of light and brine shrimp on skeletal 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    PII S0016-7037(01)00901-2 Effect of light and brine shrimp on skeletal 13 C in the Hawaiian coral, or high concentrations of brine shrimp. Decreases in light from 100% resulted in significant decreases. Increases in brine shrimp concentrations resulted in increased skeletal 13 C levels. This unexpected outcome

  20. PII S0016-7037(01)00579-8 The origin and evolution of base metal mineralising brines and hydrothermal fluids,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    PII S0016-7037(01)00579-8 The origin and evolution of base metal mineralising brines are the source of the mineralising fluids. Cl and Br systematics suggest that the brines were formed either cation composition (Na, Ca, K, Mg) of the brines is not consistent solely with evaporation processes

  1. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  2. Probing the Constituent Structure of Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gruending; Stefan Hofmann; Sophia Müller; Tehseen Rug

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the cross section for scattering processes between graviton emitters on the near side of a Schwarzschild surface and absorbers on its far side, that is black hole constituents. We show that these scatterings allow to directly extract structural observables such as the momentum distribution of black hole constituents. For this we employ a quantum bound state description originally developed in quantum chromodynamics and recently applied to general relativity that allows to consider black holes in a relativistic Hartree like framework.

  3. Hazardous constituent source term. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has several facilities that either generate and/or store transuranic (TRU)-waste from weapons program research and production. Much of this waste also contains hazardous waste constituents as regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Toxicity characteristic metals in the waste principally include lead, occurring in leaded rubber gloves and shielding. Other RCRA metals may occur as contaminants in pyrochemical salt, soil, debris, and sludge and solidified liquids, as well as in equipment resulting from decontamination and decommissioning activities. Volatile organic compounds (VOCS) contaminate many waste forms as a residue adsorbed on surfaces or occur in sludge and solidified liquids. Due to the presence of these hazardous constituents, applicable disposal regulations include land disposal restrictions established by Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The DOE plans to dispose of TRU-mixed waste from the weapons program in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by demonstrating no-migration of hazardous constituents. This paper documents the current technical basis for methodologies proposed to develop a post-closure RCRA hazardous constituent source term. For the purposes of demonstrating no-migration, the hazardous constituent source term is defined as the quantities of hazardous constituents that are available for transport after repository closure. Development of the source term is only one of several activities that will be involved in the no-migration demonstration. The demonstration will also include uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of contaminant transport.

  4. Seizing a species : the story of the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wotipka, Samuel Alex

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1950s, C.C. "Sparkplug" Sanders began harvesting brine shrimp from Utah's Great Salt Lake. Sanders built up a small business selling their eggs, called "cysts, to aquarium stores across the country. During the ...

  5. Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin, Algerian. The chemical and mineralogical specificity of this hyperarid ecosystem has been compared to other areas under

  6. Behavior of type 304 and type 316 austenitic stainless in 55% lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Elias, O. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical tensile specimens of AISI type 304 (UNS S30400) and type 316 (UNS S31600) stainless steels (SS) were tested under constant-load conditions in 55% lithium bromide (LiBr) heavy brines at temperatures of 120 C and 140 C. Elongation and open-circuit potential (OCP) were recorded during the tensile test. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted, and the failed surface fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tested SS were subjected to stress corrosion under the test environments. Sensitivity was affected strongly by pH values. In LiBr brine of pH = 11.6, the passivation processes were more effective than in brine of pH = 6 [approximately] 8. Because of effective passivation behavior in brine of pH = 11.6, lower values of [delta]l[sub 0] were measured, indicating lower dislocation relaxation processes and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

  7. Pathogenicity of a pseudomonad bacterium to larvae of penaeid and brine shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chu-Liang

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology PATHOGENICITY OF A PSEUDOMONAD BACTERIUM TO LARVAE OF PENAEID AND BRINE SHRIMP A Thesis by CHU-LIANG HUANG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member...) (Member) (Head of Department) August 1982 ABSTRACT Pathogenicity of a Pseudomonad Bacterium to Larvae of Penaeid and Brine Shrimp (August 1982) Chu-Liang Huang, B. S , National Taiwan University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald H. Lewis A...

  8. Developing a Process for Commercial Silica Production from Geothermal Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourcier, W; Martin, S; Viani, B; Bruton, C

    2001-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Useful mineral by-products can be produced from geothermal brines. Although silica has many commercial uses, problems remain in producing a marketable product. We are conducting laboratory and modeling studies aimed at optimizing for rubber additive use, the properties of silica precipitates from Salton Sea and Coso-like geothermal fluids, Our goal is to develop a robust technique for producing silicas that have desirable physical and chemical properties for commercial use, while developing a generic understanding of silica precipitation that will allow extraction to be extended to additional fluid types, and to be easily modified to produce new types of marketable silica. Our experiments start with an acidified geothermal fluid similar to those treated by pH modification technology. Silica precipitation is induced by adding base and/or adding Mg or Ca salts to affect the nature of the precipitate. For the analog Salton Sea fluids, adding base alone caused silica to precipitate fairly rapidly. To date, we have characterized precipitates from experiments in which the final pH varied from 4 to 8, where NaOH and Na{sub 2}C0{sub 3} were added as bases, and CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} were added as salts. SEM photos of the silica precipitates from the Salton Sea and Cos0 fluids show that the silica particles are clusters of smaller silica particles down to the resolution of the SEM (about 80-100 nm in diameter). The particle sizes and surface areas of silicas from the Salton Sea and Coso analog brines are similar to the properties of the Degussa silica commonly used as a rubber additive. An evaluation of the strength of the silica-organic bond as tested by dispersion in oil (polybutadiene) was inconclusive. Neither the Degussa materials nor our laboratory precipitates dispersed readily in nor dispersed down to the fundamental particle size. Preliminary NMR data indicates that the Degussa silica has a smaller degree of silica polymerization (a slightly smaller average number of Si-0 bonds per silica tetrahedron) than the synthetic samples, but a comparable degree of hydrogen bonding of the surface silanol sites.

  9. Hard-bottom macrofauna of the East Flower Garden brine seep: impact of a long term, point-source brine discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gittings, Stephen Reed

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    canyon transect were sta- tions R6 and R7, both of which were on top of Cottonwick Rock, ap- proximately 2 m above the canyon floor. Figure 5 (p. 12) shows that salinity and sulfide at these stations were at normal marine levels. Though the total...HARD-BOT1'OM MACROFAUNA OF THE EAST FLOWER GARDEN BRINE SEEP: IMPACT OF A LONG TERM, POINT-SOURCE BRINE DISCHARGE A Thesis by STEPHEN REED GITTINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  10. airs water vapor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissertations Summary: ??Soils are complex environments comprising various biological (roots, water, air etc) and physical constituents (minerals, aggregates, etc). Synchrotron...

  11. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B, 9/9/2003 BaSO4 CaSO4.2H2O CaCO3 pH Figure 5.2. Saturation99% Rejection BaSO4 CaSO4.2H2O CaCO3 Recovery Figure 6.1.

  12. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and barium sulfate). The30,000 mg/L) contains calcium, carbonate and sulfate ions atCaSO 4. 2H 2 O), Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) and barite (

  13. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrode (Cole Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hill, IL)cartridge (Cole-Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills,cartridge (Cole-Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL)

  14. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 16 W ith rapid population growth and the memory of the worst drought in 50 years, cities and groups are promoting programs that educate their constituents about water quality, water conservation, and landscape management. Many... ] Many cities are promoting landscape management and water conservation practices with their citizens. This garden demonstrates the EARTH- KIND principles of environmentally tolerant, low water use ornamentals. tx H2O | pg. 18 and no adverse runoff...

  15. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water  management  options,  including:  geothermal  energy   extraction,  desalination,  salt  and  mineral   harvesting,  

  16. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winslow, C D

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -5/ M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week.

  17. Developing a process for commercial silica production from Salton Sea brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourcier, W; McCutcheon, M; Leif, R; Bruton, C

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this joint LLNL-CalEnergy project is to develop a method for precipitating marketable silica from spent Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brines. Many markets for silica exist. We have initially targeted production of silica as a rubber additive. Silica reinforced rubber gives tires less rolling resistance, greater tear strength, and better adhesion to steel belts. Previous silica precipitates produced by CalEnergy from Salton Sea brines were not suitable as rubber additives. They did not to disperse well in the rubber precursors and produced inferior rubber. CalEnergy currently minimizes silica scaling in some of their production facilities by acidifying the brine pH. The rate of silica precipitation slows down as the pH is lowered, so that energy extraction and brine reinfection are possible without unacceptable amounts of scaling even with more than 700 ppm SiO{sub 2} in solution. We are adding a step in which a small amount of base is added to the acidified brine to precipitate silica before reinfection. By carefully controlling the type, rate, and amount of base addition, we can optimize the properties of the precipitate to approach those of an ideal rubber additive.

  18. Estimation of interstitial water in porous medium by capillary pressure measurements at various temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Mahesh Chander

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water to remove the salt. Ten pore volumes of distilled water were flushed through each core and diaphragm. They were then dried in the oven overnight and oooled. Finally they were saturated with kerosene. Run V was made at 75 F with the cores... saturated with kerosene. In this run kerosene was the wetting fluid instead of brine. A standard Du Nouy Tensiometer was used to measure surface tension of the brine solution at 75'F, 150'F and 200'F. Surface tension of kerosene, and brine solution...

  19. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  20. Diagnosis of "fizz-gas" and gas reservoirs in deep-water environment De-hua Han, X RPL, Houston Unversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure (shallow depth gas modulus is much less than 0.1 GPa. Even few percent volume fraction are a result of complicated geological processes which form a reservoir. Introduction "Fizz-water" or "Fizz-gasMixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume

  1. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  2. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,we believe that carbon capture technology will improve over

  3. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  4. Repassivation of 13% Cr steel dependent on brine pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skogsberg, J.W.; Walker, M.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint laboratory project, involving an oil production and oil well service company, investigated repassivation of martensitic 13% Cr steel. The rate at which this alloy is repassivated after losing its protective passive oxide layer to hydrochloric acid (HCI) depended on the pH of the spent acid returns. Test samples of 13% Cr cut from oilfield tubing were subjected to a fluid sequence of (1) initial brine, (2) HCI, (3) spent acid, and (4) final brine. In 9 days, the samples regained their passive oxide layers. When spent acid was taken out of the fluid sequence, the samples regained passive oxide layers in 3 days.

  5. Brine transport studies in the bedded salt of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McTigue, D.F.; Nowak, E.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brine flow has been measured to unheated boreholes for periods of a few days and to heated holes for two years in the WIPP facility. It is suggested that Darcy flow may dominate the observed influx of brine. Exact solutions to a linearized model for one-dimensional, radial flow are evaluated for conditions approximating the field experiments. Flow rates of the correct order of magnitude are calculated for permeabilities in the range 10/sup -21/ to 10/sup -20/ m/sup 2/ (1 to 10 nanodarcy) for both the unheated and heated cases. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Enzymatic solubilization of nitrogenous constituents of carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, James Cannon

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971 Major Subject: Food Technology ENZYMATIC SOLUBILIZATION OF NITROGENOUS CONSTITUENTS OF CARROTS A Thesis by James Cannon Curry Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman o ittee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( Member) (Mem r) May... is extended to the Intensified Food Crop Produc- tion Group of the Nuplex Program at Texas ARM University for thei r assistance. Also, appreciation is expressed to Miles Laboratories, Inc. and Rohm and Haas, Inc. for thei r kindness i n providing...

  7. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.W. Thomas; R.D. Young

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore further the idea that the lattice QCD data for hadron properties in the region m[^2][_pi] > 0.2GeV^2 can be described by the constituent quark model. This leads to a natural explanation of the fact that nucleon excited states are generally stable for pion masses greater than their physical excitation energies. Finally, we apply these same ideas to the problem of how pentaquarks might behave in lattice QCD, with interesting conclusions.

  8. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient...

  9. Brine release based on structural calculations of damage around an excavation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Jensen, A.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeVries, K.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a large in situ experimntal circular room, brine inflow was measured over 5 years. After correcting for evaporation losses into mine ventilation air, the measurements gave data for a period of nearly 3 years. Predicted brine accumulation based on a mechanical ``snow plow`` model of the volume swept by creep-induced damage as calculated with the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model was found to agree with experiment. Calculation suggests the damage zone at 5 years effectively exends only some 0.7 m into the salt around the room. Also, because the mecahnical model of brine release gives an adequate explanation of the measured data, the hydrological process of brine flow appears to be rapid compared to the mechanical process of brine release.

  10. Instantons and Constituent Monopoles, nine years later Pierre van Baal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Baal, Pierre

    -called holon- omy) is non-trivial. They reveal more clearly the monopole constituent nature of these calorons

  11. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  12. PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas in revised form December 8, 1999) Abstract--Hydrothermal brines from the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea, have been depressions filled by highly saline brines (Hartmann et al., 1998a). The Atlantis II Deep, located

  13. Brine-assisted anatexis: Experimental melting in the system haplograniteH2ONaClKCl at deep-crustal conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Brine-assisted anatexis: Experimental melting in the system haplogranite­H2O­NaCl­KCl at deep2O ¼ 0:34 it is 0.55. This "brine trend" is similar to, but more pronounced than, the trend-rich granites. Minimum-melting curves in the presence of brines of constant XH2O have strongly positive d

  14. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  15. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

  16. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  17. Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Dema A

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate is one of the most problematic ions present in reject brine in desalination systems due to its high potential of scale formation and membrane fouling; making it an obstacle in the application of zero liquid discharge. The ultra-high lime...

  18. Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost Effectiveness Stephen J in Method? #12;Deicing and Anti-icing Treatments ·Sodium Chloride (NaCl) ·Cargill, NA Salt ·Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) w/additives ·Envirotech Serv., Scotwood Ind., NA Salt ·Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) ·Tiger

  19. air water two-phase: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissertations Summary: ??Soils are complex environments comprising various biological (roots, water, air etc) and physical constituents (minerals, aggregates, etc). Synchrotron...

  20. Groundwater chemistry and water-rock interactions at Stripa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordstrom, D.K.; Ball, J.W. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA)); Donahoe, R.J. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (USA)); Whittemore, D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground waters from near surface to a depth of 1,232 m in the Stripa granite have been sampled and analyzed for major and trace constituents. The groundwater composition consists of two general types: a typical recharge water of Ca-HCO{sub 3} type (<300 m depth) and a deeper Na-Ca-Cl type (>700 m depth) of high pH (8-10) that reaches a maximum of 1,250 mg/L in total dissolved solids (TDS). Intermediate depths show mixtures of the two types that are highly fracture-dependent rather than depth-dependent. Any borehole can vary significantly and erratically in TDS for either a horizontal or vertical direction. The general transition from Ca-HCO{sub 3} type to Na-Ca-Cl type correlates with the depth profile for hydraulic conductivity that drops from 10{sup {minus}8} m/s to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s or lower. Thermomechanical stress (from heater experiments) clearly shows an effect on the groundwater composition that could be caused by changing flow paths, leakage of fluid inclusions or both. Dissolution and precipitation of calcite, fluorite and barite, aluminosilicate hydrolysis, and addition of a saline source (possibly fluid inclusion leakage) play the major roles in defining the groundwater composition. The low permeability of the Stripa granite has produced a groundwater composition that appears intermediate between the dilute, shallow ground waters typical of recharge in a crystalline rock terrain and the saline waters and brines typical of cratonic shield areas at depth.

  1. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  2. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

  3. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greensite, Jeff

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a variational treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration and first application of this hybrid approach, we derive a variational estimate of the heavy quark potential for distances up to 2.5 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of four times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our variational approach, using for simplicity a single variational parameter, we can reduce this overshoot by nearly the factor required. The building blocks of our approach are Coulomb gauge propagators, and in this connection we present new lattice results for the ghost and transverse gluon propagators in position space.

  4. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Greensite; Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a variational treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration and first application of this hybrid approach, we derive a variational estimate of the heavy quark potential for distances up to 2.5 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of four times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our variational approach, using for simplicity a single variational parameter, we can reduce this overshoot by nearly the factor required. The building blocks of our approach are Coulomb gauge propagators, and in this connection we present new lattice results for the ghost and transverse gluon propagators in position space.

  5. Montana Water Resources Research Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    drinking water supplies, a Prairie County sugar beet grower contemplating the possible impacts of coal-bed, drying streams and falling reservoir levels were the norm throughout Montana in FY 2003. But drought methane brines on soil and water, or a Madison County fishing guide coping with the effects of whirling

  6. Chemistry of brines in salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico: a preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, C.L.; Krumhansl, J.L.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here analyses of macro- and microscopic (intracrystalline) brines observed within the WIPP facility and in the surrounding halite, with interpretations regarding the origin and history of these fluids and their potential effect(s) on long-term waste storage. During excavation, several large fluid inclusions were recovered from an area of highly recrystallized halite in a thick salt bed at the repository horizon (2150 ft below ground level). In addition, 52 samples of brine ''weeps'' were collected from walls of recently excavated drifts at the same stratigraphic horizon from which the fluid inclusion samples are assumed to have been taken. Analyses of these fluids show that they differ substantially in composition from the inclusion fluids and cannot be explained by mixing of the fluid inclusion populations. Finally, holes in the facility floor that filled with brine were sampled but with no stratographic control; therefore it is not possible to interpret the compositions of these brines with any accuracy, except insofar as they resemble the weep compositions but with greater variation in both K/Mg and Na/Cl ratios. However, the Ca and SO/sub 4/ values for the floor holes are relatively close to the gypsum saturation curve, suggesting that brines filling floor holes have been modified by the presence of gypsum or anhydrite, possibly even originating in one or more of the laterally continuous anhydrite units referred to in the WIPP literature as marker beds. In conclusion, the wide compositional variety of fluids found in the WIPP workings suggest that (1) an interconnected hydrologic system which could effectively transport radonuclides away from the repository does not exist; (2) brine migration studies and experiments must consider the mobility of intergranular fluids as well as those in inclusions; and (3) near- and far-field radionuclide migration testing programs need to consider a wide range of brine compositions rather than a few reference brines.

  7. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  8. Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Dema A

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    SULFATE REMOVAL FROM REJECT BRINED IN INLAND DESALINATION WITH ZERO LIQUID DISCHARGE A Thesis by DEMA ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... and help. I am thankful for my colleagues for their inspiration and assistance throughout the years in Texas A&M at Qatar. I am also grateful to my exceptional friends that were always there during my ups and downs. I am thankful for my irreplaceable...

  9. Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Paul Melóis; Miska Räikkönen; Martti Viljanen

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the first in a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we adopt an analytical method, called functional optimization, to find which design and operating conditions maximize the Coefficient Of Performance of the entire cooling system (brine pumps and cooling tower), which we call ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. This is addressed as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. By maximizing such function, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can thus be determined accurately and rigorously. We investigate the importance of pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia) for average-sized ice rinks. An optimal brine density is found, and we compute the weight of the electric consumption of the brine pumps on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our formulas are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the program COMSOL Multiphysics. The multivariable approach here discussed is general, and can be applied to the rigorous preliminary study of diverse situations in building physics and in many other areas of interest.

  10. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  11. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  12. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  13. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Interim Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aines, R D; Wolery, T J; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W L

    2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine would be reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction. This process provides additional storage space (capacity) in the aquifer, reduces operational risks by relieving overpressure in the aquifer, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations for brines typical of CCS sites. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. This progress report deals mainly with our geochemical modeling of high-salinity brines and covers the first six months of project execution (September, 2008 to March, 2009). Costs and implementation results will be presented in the annual report. The brines typical of sequestration sites can be several times more concentrated than seawater, requiring specialized modeling codes typical of those developed for nuclear waste disposal calculations. The osmotic pressure developed as the brines are concentrated is of particular concern, as are precipitates that can cause fouling of reverse osmosis membranes and other types of membranes (e.g., NF). We have now completed the development associated with tasks (1) and (2) of the work plan. We now have a contract with Perlorica, Inc., to provide support to the cost analysis and nanofiltration evaluation. We have also conducted several preliminary analyses of the pressure effect in the reservoir in order to confirm that reservoir pressure can indeed be used to drive the reverse osmosis process. Our initial conclusions from the work to date are encouraging: (1) The concept of aquifer-pressured RO to provide fresh water associated with carbon dioxide storage appears feasible. (2) Concentrated brines such as those found in Wyoming are amenable to RO treatment. We have looked at sodium chloride brines from the Nugget Formation in Sublette County. 20-25% removal with conventional methods is realistic; higher removal appears achievable with NF. The less concentrated sulfate-rich brines from the Tensleep Formation in Sublette County would support >80% removal with conventional RO. (3) Brines from other proposed sequestration sites can now be analyzed readily. An osmotic pressure curve appropriate to these brines can be used to evaluate cost and equipment specifications. (4) We have examined a range of subsurface brine compositions that is potentially pertinent to carbon sequestration and noted the principal compositional trends pertinent to evaluating the feasibility of freshwater extraction. We have proposed a general categorization for the feasibility of the process based on total dissolved solids (TDS). (5) Withdrawing pressurized brine can have a very beneficial effect on reservoir pressure and total available storage capacity. Brine must be extracted from a deeper location in the aquifer than the point of CO{sub 2} injection to prevent CO{sub 2} from migrating to the brine extraction well.

  14. Relating polymer matrix composite delamination behavior to constituent properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, Jeremy R. (Jeremy Ryan), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing predictive capabilities of composite material behavior from constituent properties is an important component of accelerating materials insertion. Many models exist that accomplish this objective for a range of ...

  15. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. O. Hitzman; A. K. Stepp; D. M. Dennis; L. R. Graumann

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program is directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal is to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work is underway. Microbial cultures have been isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters with cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Field pilot studies are underway.

  16. Fluid sampling and chemical modeling of geopressured brines containing methane. Final report, March 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudak, B.; Galbraith, R.; Hansen, L.; Sverjensky, D.; Weres, O.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a flowthrough sampler capable of obtaining fluid samples from geopressured wells at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/F and pressures up to 20,000 psi is described. The sampler has been designed, fabricated from MP35N alloy, laboratory tested, and used to obtain fluid samples from a geothermal well at The Geysers, California. However, it has not yet been used in a geopressured well. The design features, test results, and operation of this device are described. Alternative sampler designs are also discussed. Another activity was to review the chemistry and geochemistry of geopressured brines and reservoirs, and to evaluate the utility of available computer codes for modeling the chemistry of geopressured brines. The thermodynamic data bases for such codes are usually the limiting factor in their application to geopressured systems, but it was concluded that existing codes can be updated with reasonable effort and can usefully explain and predict the chemical characteristics of geopressured systems, given suitable input data.

  17. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  18. Barton, M.D.and Johnson, D.A., 2000 -Alternative Brine Sources for Fe-Oxide (-Cu-Au) Systems: Implications for Hydrothermal Alteration and Metals; in Porter, T.M. (Ed.),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    Barton, M.D.and Johnson, D.A., 2000 -Alternative Brine Sources for Fe-Oxide (-Cu-Au) Systems-Gold &Related Deposits: AGlobal Perspective, Australian Mineral Foundation, Adelaide, pp 43-60 ALTERNATIVE BRINE, and the broader geologic setting(s). Geologic and geochemical evidence show that the ore-forming fluids are brines

  19. Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea; Räikkönen, Miska; Viljanen, Martti

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the first of a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we outline an analytic method to predict in which design and operating conditions the COP of the entire cooling system (refrigerator and cooling tower) ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is maximum. ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is investigated as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. With this method, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can therefore be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also single out an optimal brine density and show the impact of the electric consumption of the pump on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our theoretical predictions are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the pr...

  20. Predicting PVT data for CO2brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Predicting PVT data for CO2­brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage efficiency of the black-oil approach promote application of black-oil simulation for large-scale geological into geological formations has been considered as a potential method to mitigate climate change. Accurate

  1. Macro-and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Macro- and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines N. Rezaei and A. Firoozabadi*,, Reservoir Engineering Research Institute, 595 Lytton Avenue, Palo ABSTRACT: We study the micro- and macroscale waterflooding performances of unusual crudes which naturally

  2. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

  3. Methods of using adsorption media for separating or removing constituents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of using an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises contacting an adsorption medium with a feed stream comprising at least one constituent and removing the at least one constituent from the feed stream. The adsorption medium comprises a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) matrix and at least one metal hydroxide homogenously dispersed therein. The adsorption medium may comprise from approximately 15 wt % to approximately 90 wt % of the PAN and from approximately 10 wt % to approximately 85 wt % of the at least one metal hydroxide. The at least one metal hydroxide may be selected from the group consisting of ferric hydroxide, zirconium hydroxide, lanthanum hydroxide, cerium hydroxide, titanium hydroxide, copper hydroxide, antimony hydroxide, and molybdenum hydroxide.

  4. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

  5. Unconventional gas sources. Executive summary. [Coal seams, Devonian shale, geopressured brines, tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long lead time required for conversion from oil or gas to coal and for development of a synthetic fuel industry dictates that oil and gas must continue to supply the United States with the majority of its energy requirements over the near term. In the interim period, the nation must seek a resource that can be developed quickly, incrementally, and with as few environmental concerns as possible. One option which could potentially fit these requirements is to explore for, drill, and produce unconventional gas: Devonian Shale gas, coal seam gas, gas dissolved in geopressured brines, and gas from tight reservoirs. This report addresses the significance of these sources and the economic and technical conditions under which they could be developed.

  6. Unnatural landscapes in ecology: Generating the spatial distribution of brine spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative tools are needed to evaluate the ecological effects of increasing petroleum production. In this article, we describe two stochastic models for simulating the spatial distribution of brine spills on a landscape. One model uses general assumptions about the spatial arrangement of spills and their sizes; the second model distributes spills by siting rectangular well complexes and conditioning spill probabilities on the configuration of pipes. We present maps of landscapes with spills produced by the two methods and compare the ability of the models to reproduce a specified spill area. A strength of the models presented here is their ability to extrapolate from the existing landscape to simulate landscapes with a higher (or lower) density of oil wells.

  7. Chemical, multi-isotopic (Li-B-Sr-U-H-O) and thermal characterization of Triassic formation waters from the Paris Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of around 45 to 50°C. The study of uranium activity ratios for these Triassic formation waters allows us with water essentially resulting from a seawater-derived brine endmember diluted by meteoric waters. The data, uranium isotopes, oxygen isotopes, hydrogen isotopes, geothermometry, Trias, Paris Basin 1 hal-00563924

  8. A Simple Mixture Theory for ? Newtonian and Generalized Newtonian Constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael Joseph

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ] based on the following notations L(?) = gradv?(x, t) D(?) = 1 2 ( L(?) + L T (?) ) q = ?? ?=1 q? Q = 1 ?m ?? ?=1 ??Q? ? = 1 ?m ?? ?=1 ????(x, t) pi = ?pi1 = pi2 (2.39) 13 In which q is heat flux, Q is heat supply, ? and ?? are entropy densities... of the mixture and the constituents. We begin with the entropy inequality ?m D? Dt + div (q ? ) ? ? Q ? ? 0 (2.40) We have assumed that entropy due to heat flux q? is q? ? where ? is the common temperature of the constituents and the entropy due to heat supply Q?...

  9. Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predicting saline mineral solubility, we generate likely brine compositions ranging from bicarbonate dominated to sulfatedominated and predict their saline mineralogy. For each brine composition, we, much of the anticipated variation in chemistry for likely Martian brines. These estimates allow

  10. Method for verification of constituents of a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a method for validating a process stream for the presence or absence of a substance of interest such as a chemical warfare agent; that is, for verifying that a chemical warfare agent is present in an input line for feeding the agent into a reaction vessel for destruction, or, in a facility for producing commercial chemical products, that a constituent of the chemical warfare agent has not been substituted for the proper chemical compound. The method includes the steps of transmitting light through a sensor positioned in the feed line just before the chemical constituent in the input line enters the reaction vessel, measuring an optical spectrum of the chemical constituent from the light beam transmitted through it, and comparing the measured spectrum to a reference spectrum of the chemical agent and preferable also reference spectra of surrogates. A signal is given if the chemical agent is not entering a reaction vessel for destruction, or if a constituent of a chemical agent is added to a feed line in substitution of the proper chemical compound.

  11. Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

  12. Removal of Radionuclides from Waste Water at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant: Desalination and Adsorption Methods - 13126

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kani, Yuko; Kamosida, Mamoru; Watanabe, Daisuke [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan)] [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 (Japan); Asano, Takashi; Tamata, Shin [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)] [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd. (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste water containing high levels of radionuclides due to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident, has been treated by the adsorption removal and reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination to allow water re-use for cooling the reactors. Radionuclides in the waste water are collected in the adsorbent medium and the RO concentrate (RO brine) in the water treatment system currently operated at the Fukushima Daiichi site. In this paper, we have studied the behavior of radionuclides in the presently applied RO desalination system and the removal of radionuclides in possible additional adsorption systems for the Fukushima Daiichi waste water treatment. Regarding the RO desalination system, decontamination factors (DFs) of the elements present in the waste water were obtained by lab-scale testing using an RO unit and simulated waste water with non-radioactive elements. The results of the lab-scale testing using representative elements showed that the DF for each element depended on its hydrated ionic radius: the larger the hydrated ionic radius of the element, the higher its DF is. Thus, the DF of each element in the waste water could be estimated based on its hydrated ionic radius. For the adsorption system to remove radionuclides more effectively, we studied adsorption behavior of typical elements, such as radioactive cesium and strontium, by various kinds of adsorbents using batch and column testing. We used batch testing to measure distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s) for cesium and strontium onto adsorbents under different brine concentrations that simulated waste water conditions at the Fukushima Daiichi site. For cesium adsorbents, K{sub d}s with different dependency on the brine concentration were observed based on the mechanism of cesium adsorption. As for strontium, K{sub d}s decreased as the brine concentration increased for any adsorbents which adsorbed strontium by intercalation and by ion exchange. The adsorbent titanium oxide had higher K{sub d}s and it was used for the column testing to obtain breakthrough curves under various conditions of pH and brine concentration. The breakthrough point had a dependency on pH and the brine concentration. We found that when the pH was higher or the brine concentration was lower, the longer it took to reach the breakthrough point. The inhibition of strontium adsorption by alkali earth metals would be diminished for conditions of higher pH and lower brine concentration. (authors)

  13. Effects of a sulfide system produced by a natural brine seep on sandy-bottom community structure at the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Edward Andrew

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30%. Videophotography and doppler-based rangefinder measurements were used to map the seep area. Current measurements of the brine stream were made using a Savonius rotor attached to the manipulator Analysis of data was carried out using...

  14. Benefits and costs of brine extraction for increasing injection efficiency in geologic CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additional wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).

  15. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Shah, N.; Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical objectives of this project are: (1) To define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail. (2) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (3) to develop, based on the information required in (1) and (2), a tractable process'' model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the nature and distribution of products. 26 refs., 151 figs., 51 tabs.

  16. Effect of debonded interfaces on corrosion of mild steel composites in supercritical CO2-saturated brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} is a proposed method to limit greenhouse gas emissions and has been the subject of many studies in the last decade. Wellbore systems achieve isolation of the storage reservoir through a combination of steel (generally carbon steel) and Portland cement. CO{sub 2} leakage along the steel-cement interface has the potential to accelerate corrosion. We conduct experiments to assess the corrosion risk at cement-steel interface under in situ wellbore conditions. Wellbore interfaces were simulated by assemblies constructed of J55 mild steel and Portland class G (Epoxy was used in this study to separate) cement and corrosion was investigated in supercritical CO{sub 2} saturated brines, (NaCl = 1 wt%) at T = 50 C, pCO{sub 2} = 1200 psi with interface gap size = 100 {micro}m and {infinity} (open surface). The experiments were carried out in a high-pressure, 1.8 L autoclave. The corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion scales were analyzed using secondary electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Corrosion rates decreased as time with or without interface gap. In this case corrosion rates are controlled by scale protectivity through the interface gap. Scaled steel corrosion rates were two orders of magnitude less compared with fresh steel. The corrosion scale is pseudo crystalline at the open interface. Well-crystallized scale was observed at interface gap sizes 100 {micro}m. All corrosion scales were composed of iron carbonates.

  17. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry; Minoura, Tsuyoshi [Mitui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  18. Calculation of size for bound-state constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislaw D. Glazek

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elements are given of a calculation that identifies the size of a proton in the Schroedinger equation for lepton-proton bound states, using the renormalization group procedure for effective particles (RGPEP) in quantum field theory, executed only up to the second order of expansion in powers of the coupling constant. Already in this crude approximation, the extraction of size of a proton from bound-state observables is found to depend on the lepton mass, so that the smaller the lepton mass the larger the proton size extracted from the same observable bound-state energy splitting. In comparison of Hydrogen and muon-proton bound-state dynamics, the crude calculation suggests that the difference between extracted proton sizes in these two cases can be a few percent. Such values would match the order of magnitude of currently discussed proton-size differences in leptonic atoms. Calculations using the RGPEP of higher order than second are required for a precise interpretation of the energy splittings in terms of the proton size in the Schroedinger equation. Such calculations should resolve the conceptual discrepancy between two conditions: that the renormalization group scale required for high accuracy calculations based on the Schroedinger equation is much smaller than the proton mass (on the order of a root of the product of reduced and average masses of constituents) and that the energy splittings due to the physical proton size can be interpreted ignoring corrections due to the effective nature of constituents in the Schr\\"odinger equation.

  19. Total Matrix Intercomparison: A Method for Determining the Geometry of Water-Mass Pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gebbie, Geoffrey

    Ocean tracer distributions have long been used to decompose the deep ocean into constituent water masses, but previous inverse methods have generally been limited to just a few water masses that have been defined by a ...

  20. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O'BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  1. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

  2. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) that use this process (minus the evaporation) to provide a brine solution for oilfield applications

  3. Calcite dissolution kinetics and solubility in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl brines of geologically relevant composition at 0.1 to 1 bar pCO2 and 25 to 80°C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    injection of CO2. This study measured calcite solubility and dissolution rates in geologically relevant Na-Ca-Mg-Cl synthetic brines (35 to 200 g L-1 TDS). In brines < 50 g L-1 TDS, the EQPITZER calculated calcium carbonate ion activity product (IAP...

  4. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

  5. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  6. The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burja, Edward Oscar

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding, " Producers Monthly, (1951), 15-16, 15. 6. Schilthuis, Ralph J. : "Connate Water in Oil and Gas Sands, " Trans. AIME. , (1938), 127, 199-214. 7. Bartell, F. E. : "Function of Water in the Production of Oil from Reservoirs?" Report, API...: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING 1953 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Summary . 2. Introduction 3. Review of Literature . 4. Description of Materials 16 Cores 16 Oil, Gas and Brine 18 Surface Active Chemicals 19 Crystals 22 5. Description of Procedure...

  7. Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boni, A.A.; Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (USA)); Flagan, R.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA)); Sarofim, A.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To (1) define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and (2) to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail; (b) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (c) To develop, based on the information required in a. and b. above, a tractable process model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the distribution and nature of products. This report represents work accomplished in the tenth quarter of performance on the contract. The authors specifically highlight work accomplished: at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) on developing and constructing a thermophoretic sampling probe, for submicron fume particle sampling; at MIT on (1) completion of the baseline ash particle size distribution measurements for seven program coals (five US and two Australian), and (2) analysis of the fragmentation model results in terms of a closed-form solution for a simplified case; at the University of Arizona, on obtaining detailed ash particle and submicron fume chemistry for four program coals; and at PSI Technology Company (PSIT) on concluding data analysis and describing mineral interaction trends observed during combustion of two program coals. Individual progress reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Client perceptions of university computing services from the faculty computing skills constituency perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claybourn, C. Kay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation matrix of constituencies and informal computer experience items. 71 xiv LIST OF TABLES (Continued) TABLE Page 21 Correlation matrix of constituencies and expectations of the work situation. . employees computing . . 74 fectiveness of 22... refer to the sociological definition of groups, two or more people who have a high degree of common identity and who interact on a regular basis (Macionis, 1 989). Computer users can be divided into groups, or constituencies (Connolly, Conlon...

  9. The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluable Constituents of Feedstuffs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rather, J. B. (James Burness)

    1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    586-914-10m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION BULLETIN NO. 169 SEPTEMBER, 19I4 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY The Total Fatty Acids and Other Ether-Soluble Constituents of Feedstuffs BY J. B. RATHER Assistant Chemist POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION............................................................................................................. 5 An Improved Method for the Determination of Total Fatty Acids and Other Constituents of Ether Extracts................................... 7 A New Method for the Extraction of Total Fatty Acids and Other Constituents of Feed Stuffs...

  10. Client perceptions of university computing services from the faculty computing skills constituency perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claybourn, C. Kay

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation matrix of constituencies and informal computer experience items. 71 xiv LIST OF TABLES (Continued) TABLE Page 21 Correlation matrix of constituencies and expectations of the work situation. . employees computing . . 74 fectiveness of 22... refer to the sociological definition of groups, two or more people who have a high degree of common identity and who interact on a regular basis (Macionis, 1 989). Computer users can be divided into groups, or constituencies (Connolly, Conlon...

  11. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  12. New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    , likely exceeding reserves of conventional oil and gas (Collett and Kuuskraa, 1998). In deep-ocean regionsNew constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep

  13. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  14. EGS rock reactions with Supercritical CO2 saturated with water and water saturated with Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Travis L. McLing; William Smith; Carl Palmer

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EGS using CO2 as a working fluid will likely involve hydro-shearing low-permeability hot rock reservoirs with a water solution. After that process, the fractures will be flushed with CO2 that is maintained under supercritical conditions (> 70 bars). Much of the injected water in the main fracture will be flushed out with the initial CO2 injection; however side fractures, micro fractures, and the lower portion of the fracture will contain connate water that will interact with the rock and the injected CO2. Dissolution/precipitation reactions in the resulting scCO2/brine/rock systems have the potential to significantly alter reservoir permeability, so it is important to understand where these precipitates form and how are they related to the evolving ‘free’ connate water in the system. To examine dissolution / precipitation behavior in such systems over time, we have conducted non-stirred batch experiments in the laboratory with pure minerals, sandstone, and basalt coupons with brine solution spiked with MnCl2 and scCO2. The coupons are exposed to liquid water saturated with scCO2 and extend above the water surface allowing the upper portion of the coupons to be exposed to scCO2 saturated with water. The coupons were subsequently analyzed using SEM to determine the location of reactions in both in and out of the liquid water. Results of these will be summarized with regard to significance for EGS with CO2 as a working fluid.

  15. Genetic and phenotypic parameters of egg production and some constituents of blood serum in Fayoumi layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Genetic and phenotypic parameters of egg production and some constituents of blood serum in Fayoumi (i) egg production beside the following blood serum constituents: (2) inorganic phosphorus, (3 the daughters of 40 sires and 241 dams. Blood serum analyses were done using the Sequential Multiple Auto

  16. How Likely are Constituent Quanta to Initiate Inflation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhiani, Lasha

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an intuitive framework for studying the problem of initial conditions in slow-roll inflation. In particular, we consider a universe at high, but sub-Planckian energy density and analyze the circumstances under which it is plausible for it to become dominated by inflated patches at late times, without appealing to the idea of self-reproduction. Our approach is based on defining a prior probability distribution for the constituent quanta of the pre-inflationary universe. To test the idea that inflation can begin under very generic circumstances, we make specific -- yet quite general and well grounded -- assumptions on the prior distribution. As a result, we are led to the conclusion that the probability for a given region to ignite inflation at sub-Planckian densities is extremely small. Furthermore, if one chooses to use the enormous volume factor that inflation yields as an appropriate measure, we find that the regions of the universe which started inflating at densities below the self-reproductive...

  17. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of active pumping, water extraction wells can also bescenarios in which water extraction wells operate as passivemanagement via extraction of native saline water has been

  18. The waste water free coke plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuepphaus, K.; Brink, N. [Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik GmbH, Bochum (Germany)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apart from coke which is the actual valuable material a coke oven plant also produces a substantial volume of waste water. These effluent water streams are burdened with organic components (e.g. phenols) and inorganic salts (e.g. NH{sub 4}Cl); due to the concentration of the constituents contained therein these effluent waters must be subjected to a specific treatment before they can be introduced into public waters. For some years a lot of separation tasks have been solved successfully by applying the membrane technology. It was especially the growing number of membrane facilities for cleaning of landfill leakage water whose composition can in fact be compared with that of coking plant waste waters (organic constituents, high salt fright, ammonium compounds) which gave Thyssen Still Otto Anlagentechnik the idea for developing a process for coke plant effluent treatment which contains the membrane technology as an essential component.

  19. Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    , crude oil from the Deepwater Hori- zon accident began washing onto northern Gulf of Mexico(GOM) sandy. This northern Gulf of Mexico beach community was heavily impacted by Deepwater Horizon-related oil (Hayworth stormwater discharge. Ó 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Starting in early June, 2010

  20. The effect of some dissolved constituents on the redox potential of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wales, Robert David

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aaaaeeaa ee ee eyaeeae aeeeal ?t eve kgrQa1'lanai saL Neekeafea1 Cliege eC Seaaa io yaASal fa1f%1leeat et the seyshwwete hler the Aegaeon ?t lSWSR 4P SCCNCR AaySAg 1/52 ~ S+$ecAs (Rea4etwg Se eche ehshee io cayenne his ~ syyeee4aNea eel Meaha...Laaielp am ~ eLLULLLccooccc c@d aa ?3aeiaoda Ilg%4484 yloyeeeha ccace pN!odi4ad ai e~eccLccai peaLILcNO io yeeaLI Leeoowe a4$eeiwada ccats L'ey7aaLahcsmh et iha ?ahchLea ccLIh docaca Ay aeaykLag peopoaaa geL ahcaca Ca a ~ LhcLol g LCoior ccaod Ae' Iha...

  1. Charge Mobility in Ice Brines and Ice-Silicate Mixtures Robert E. Grimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Robert E.

    of Chemistry and Geochemistry Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO Mark A. Bullock Department of Space Studies in shallow thin films of water imposed by locally available nutrients and/or aqueous advection or diffusion environments on Earth. Furthermore, most microbes are forced into long periods of maintenance or survival modes

  2. Geophysical (time domain electromagnetic model) delineation of a shallow brine beneath a freshwater lake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    groundwaters. It is hypothesized that salt transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in the central part streams entering the lake. This order of magnitude difference is a result of salt fluxes from two major cores and nineteen 0.5-m cores drilled to sediments within the lake basin (Figure 1). At the water

  3. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers with closed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buoyancy effects, residual water saturation, etc. ) (Bachu,CO 2 saturation Residual water saturation (a) Pressure (bar)

  4. Effect of Oxygen Co-Injected with Carbon Dioxide on Gothic Shale Caprock-CO2-Brine Interaction during Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2-brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~10 MPa and ~75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale-CO2-brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale-CO2-brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~8–14 ?g/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Oxygen in CO2-brine migrating away from the injection well will be continually consumed through the reactions with sulfide minerals in deep geologic formations.

  5. APPLIED PHYTO-REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES USING HALOPHYTES FOR OIL AND BRINE SPILL SCARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Korphage; Bruce G. Langhus; Scott Campbell

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced salt water from historical oil and gas production was often managed with inadequate care and unfortunate consequences. In Kansas, the production practices in the 1930's and 1940's--before statewide anti-pollution laws--were such that fluids were often produced to surface impoundments where the oil would segregate from the salt water. The oil was pumped off the pits and the salt water was able to infiltrate into the subsurface soil zones and underlying bedrock. Over the years, oil producing practices were changed so that segregation of fluids was accomplished in steel tanks and salt water was isolated from the natural environment. But before that could happen, significant areas of the state were scarred by salt water. These areas are now in need of economical remediation. Remediation of salt scarred land can be facilitated with soil amendments, land management, and selection of appropriate salt tolerant plants. Current research on the salt scars around the old Leon Waterflood, in Butler County, Kansas show the relative efficiency of remediation options. Based upon these research findings, it is possible to recommend cost efficient remediation techniques for slight, medium, and heavy salt water damaged soil. Slight salt damage includes soils with Electrical Conductivity (EC) values of 4.0 mS/cm or less. Operators can treat these soils with sufficient amounts of gypsum, install irrigation systems, and till the soil. Appropriate plants can be introduced via transplants or seeded. Medium salt damage includes soils with EC values between 4.0 and 16 mS/cm. Operators will add amendments of gypsum, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. Some particularly salt tolerant plants can be added but most planting ought to be reserved until the second season of remediation. Severe salt damage includes soil with EC values in excess of 16 mS/cm. Operators will add at least part of the gypsum required, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. The following seasons more gypsum will be added and as the soil EC is reduced, plants can be introduced. If rapid remediation is required, a sufficient volume of topsoil, or sand, or manure can be added to dilute the local salinity, the bulk amendments tilled into the surface with added gypsum, and appropriate plants added. In this case, irrigation will be particularly important. The expense of the more rapid remediation will be much higher.

  6. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common examples of saline formation waters. Therefore, they are expected to be representative of saline formation waters at actual and potential future CCS sites. We are using a produced waters database (Breit, 2002) covering most of the United States compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). In one instance to date, we have used this database to find a composition corresponding to the brine expected at an actual CCS site (Big Sky CSP, Nugget Formation, Sublette County, Wyoming). We have located other produced waters databases, which are usually of regional scope (e.g., NETL, 2005, Rocky Mountains basins).

  7. Texas County Extension Agents Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Using Facebook to Communicate with Constituents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Lacey

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , and perceptions using social media, Facebook in particular, to communicate with constituents. The participants in the study were a randomly selected group of Texas extension agents. A web-based questionnaire was used to measure the perceived level of confidence...

  8. Method and apparatus for the removal of bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing.

  9. Method and apparatus for the removal or bioconversion of constituents of organic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, T.; Scott, C.D.

    1994-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the removal or conversion of constituents from bulk organic liquids. A countercurrent biphasic bioreactor system is utilized to disperse and recoalesce a biocatalyst contained in the aqueous liquid phase into the organic liquid phase containing the constituent. Two transient, high-intensity electrical fields rupture the aqueous drops into a plurality of microdroplets and induce continuous coalescence and redispersion as the microdroplets travel through the organic phase, thus increasing surface area. As the aqueous microdroplets progress through the organic phase, the biocatalyst then reacts with the constituent to produce a product which is then removed from the bioreactor in the aqueous phase or retained in the organic phase. The organic liquid, now free of the original constituents, is ready for immediate use or further processing. 1 fig.

  10. Texas County Extension Agents Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Using Facebook to Communicate with Constituents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Lacey

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , and perceptions using social media, Facebook in particular, to communicate with constituents. The participants in the study were a randomly selected group of Texas extension agents. A web-based questionnaire was used to measure the perceived level of confidence...

  11. A model of reduced kinetics for alkane oxidation using constituents and species: Proof of concept for n-heptane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harstad, Kenneth; Bellan, Josette [4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S 125-109, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation is described and applied to n-heptane. The model is based on partitioning the species of the skeletal kinetic mechanism into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement in the species ensemble. For modeling purposes, the heavy species are mathematically decomposed into constituents, which are similar but not identical to groups in the group additivity theory. From analysis of the LLNL skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, it is shown that a similarity variable can be formed such that the appropriately scaled global constituent molar density exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures that is of interest for predicting n-heptane oxidation. Furthermore, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable. The light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species. The concept is tested by using tabular information from the LLNL skeletal mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II. The test reveals that the similarity concept is indeed justified and that the combustion temperature is well predicted, but that the ignition time is overpredicted. To palliate this deficiency, functional modeling is incorporated into our conceptual reduction. Due to the reduction process, models are also included for the global constituent molar density, the kinetics-induced enthalpy evolution of the heavy species, the contribution to the reaction rate of the unsteady lights from the heavies, the molar density evolution of oxygen and water, the mole fractions of the quasi-steady light species and the mean molar heat capacity of the heavy species. The model is compact in that there are only nine species-related progress variables. Results are presented comparing the performance of the model for predicting the temperature and species evolution with that of the skeletal mechanism. The model reproduces the ignition time over a wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressure and initial temperature. (author)

  12. Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Roger Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'involved an equi] ibrat. ion pro" e:!urc in conjunctior. with headspace sampling. Although the hot ?stets cooled con & derably from t1&e& r in si. '&, temperatu& e. upon ascent. from the depths, they were. stiJ 1 very warm at the time. of sa?&pl. !. ng... the amount in the head. . pace and water. The primary light hydrocarbon standard. used was an Air Products and Chemica1 s, Inc . cai ibrated standard ga nu xture w 'th 30 pps&v metiaane 0. 3 ppmv ethane snd 6. 2 ppmv propane. Duplicate analyses of methane...

  13. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  14. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

  15. Stability of SiC-Matrix Microencapsulated Fuel Constituents at Relevant LWR Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL] [ORNL; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Perez-Bergquist, Alex G [ORNL] [ORNL; Silva, Chinthaka M [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses certain key feasibility issues facing the application of SiC-matrix microencapsulated fuels for light water reactor application. Issues addressed are the irradiation stability of the SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix under LWR-relevant irradiation conditions, the presence or extent of reaction of the SiC matrix with zirconium-based cladding, the stability of the inner and outer pyrolytic graphite layers of the microencapsulated (TRISO) particle at this uncharacteristically low irradiation temperature, and the state of the particle-matrix interface following irradiation which could possibly effect thermal transport. In the process of determining these feasibility issues microstructural evolution and change in dimension and thermal conductivity was studied. As a general finding the SiC matrix was found to be quite stable with behavior similar to that of CVD SiC. In magnitude the irradiation-induced swelling of the matrix material was slightly higher and irradiation-degraded thermal conductivity was slightly lower as compared to CVD SiC. No significant reaction of this SiC-based nano-powder ceramic matrix material with Zircaloy was observed. Irradiation of the TRISO in the 320-360 C range to a maximum dose of 7.7 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV) did not have significant negative impact on the constituent layers of the TRISO fuel. At the highest dose studied layer structure and interface integrity remained essentially unchanged with good apparent thermal transport through the microsphere to the surrounding matrix.

  16. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, Joao E. (North Augusta, SC); Williams, Daniel W. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  17. Purge water management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

  18. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  20. Methods of removing a constituent from a feed stream using adsorption media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Rigby, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  1. Apparatus for the field determination of concentration of radioactive constituents in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, R.W.; Schilk, A.J.; Warner, R.A.; Wogman, N.A.

    1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention is an apparatus for determining the concentration of radioactive constituents in a test sample; such as surface soils, via rapid real-time analyses, and direct readout on location utilizing a probe made up of multiple layers of detection material used in combination with an analyzer and real-time readout unit. This is accomplished by comparing the signal received from the probe, which can discriminate between types of radiation and energies with stored patterns that are based upon experimental results. This comparison can be used in the calibration of a readout display that reads out in real-time the concentrations of constituents per given volume. For example, the concentration of constituents such as Cs-137, Sr-90, U-238 in the soil, and noble gas radionuclides such as Kr-85 in the atmosphere, can be measured in real-time, on location, without the need for laboratory analysis of samples. 14 figs.

  2. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  3. Constituent quark masses obtained from hadron masses with contributions of Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borka Jovanovic, V.; Borka, D. [Laboratory of Physics (010), Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Ignjatovic, S. R. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Banja Luka, Mladena Stojanovica 2, 78000 Banja Luka (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Jovanovic, P. [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the color-spin and flavor-spin interaction Hamiltonians with SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking to obtain meson and baryon mass formulas. Adjusting these masses with experimental masses we determine the constituent quark masses. We discuss the constituent quark masses obtained from meson and baryon mass fits. The results for constituent quark masses are very similar in the case of two different phenomenological models: Fermi-Breit and Glozman-Riska hyperfine interactions.

  4. Non-destructive method for determining neutron exposure and constituent concentrations of a body

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1984-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-destructive method for determination of neutron exposure and constituent concentrations in an object, such as a reactor pressure vessel, is based on the observation of characteristic gamma-rays emitted by activation products in the object by using a unique continuous gamma-ray spectrometer. The spectrometer views the object through appropriate collimators to determine the absolute emission rate of these characteristic gamma-rays, thereby ascertaining the absolute activity of given activation products in the object. These data can then be used to deduce the spatial and angular dependence of neutron exposure or the spatial constituent concentrations at regions of interest within the object.

  5. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water...

  6. Responses in Milk Constituents to Intravascular Administration of Two Mixtures of Amino Acids to Dairy Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bequette, Brian J.

    to inves- tigate the effects of intravascular infusions of AA mixtures on milk constituents. Cows were infusion, followed by a 5-djugular infusion of a mixture of AA. Two mixtures of AA were used in a crossover (total AA); this mixture was infused at 400 g of M d . The other mixture represented the essential AA

  7. Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Constituent Particle Break-up during Hot Rolling of AA 5182 Nicolas Moulin(1) , Estelle Parra hot reversible rolling of AA5182 alloy sheets has been analysed. The sizes and shapes of intermetallic particles in as-cast and industrially hot rolled AA5182 alloys sheets were characterized by 3D X ray

  8. Chemical Constituents of the New Endophytic Fungus Mycosphaerella sp. nov. and Their Anti-Parasitic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coley, Phyllis

    Chemical Constituents of the New Endophytic Fungus Mycosphaerella sp. nov. and Their Anti of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 Abstract Chemical investigation of a new endophytic fungus­6 were not active in these assays at a concentration of 10 g/mL. Keywords Endophytic fungus

  9. Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Rodney

    Air Pollution: History Air Pollution: Any atmospheric constituent present as a result, or materials. Before 1200 AD · Air pollution results from wood burning, tanning, decaying trash, smelting with carbon PbO + C -> Pb + CO Pollutants Produced: CO, SO2 ·Hong, et al., Greenland ice evidence

  10. Chemistry of fluid inclusions in halite from the Salina group of the Michigan basin: Implications for Late Silurian seawater and the origin of sedimentary brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, N.; Horita, J.; Holland, H.D. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid was extracted from 18 fluid inclusions in halite of the Late Silurian Salina Group exposed in the Crystal Mine on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Compared with modern seawater evaporated to the same degree, the inclusion fluids are severely depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, somewhat depleted in Na{sup +} and Mg{sup +2}, and greatly enriched in Ca{sup +2}. The composition of the inclusion fluids can be derived from Silurian seawater with a composition close to that of modern seawater, if it is assumed that the composition of the Silurian seawater was modified by dolomitizing CaCO{sub 3}-rich sediments and by albitizing silicate minerals during its evolution into evaporite brines. Since the evolution of the brines involved a number of chemical reactions, it is impossible to recover the initial concentration of all of the major ions in the parent Silurian seawater from the composition of the inclusion fluids alone. It is likely, however, that the m{sub K+}/m{sub Br-} ratio and the functions in Late Silurian seawater had values close to those of modern seawater. Measurements of the isotopic composition of sulfur and of Sr in anhydrite within and associated with the halite host of the fluid inclusions are consistent with previous measurements of {delta}{sup 34}S in Silurian marine anhydrites and with the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of Late Silurian marine carbonates.

  11. MODIFIED REVERSE OSMOSIS SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert L. Lee; Junghan Dong

    2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report of ''Modified Reverse Osmosis System for Treatment of Produced Water,'' DOE project No. DE-FC26-00BC15326 describes work performed in the third year of the project. Several good results were obtained, which are documented in this report. The compacted bentonite membranes were replaced by supported bentonite membranes, which exhibited the same salt rejection capability. Unfortunately, it also inherited the clay expansion problem due to water invasion into the interlayer spaces of the compacted bentonite membranes. We noted that the supported bentonite membrane developed in the project was the first of its kind reported in the literature. An {alpha}-alumina-supported MFI-type zeolite membrane synthesized by in-situ crystallization was fabricated and tested. Unlike the bentonite clay membranes, the zeolite membranes maintained stability and high salt rejection rate even for a highly saline solution. Actual produced brines from gas and oil fields were then tested. For gas fields producing brine, the 18,300 ppm TDS (total dissolved solids) in the produced brine was reduced to 3060 ppm, an 83.3% rejection rate of 15,240 ppm salt rejection. For oilfield brine, while the TDS was reduced from 181,600 ppm to 148,900 ppm, an 18% rejection rate of 32,700 ppm reduction, the zeolite membrane was stable. Preliminary results show the dissolved organics, mainly hydrocarbons, did not affect the salt rejection. However, the rejection of organics was inconclusive at this point. Finally, the by-product of this project, the {alpha}-alumina-supported Pt-Co/Na Y catalytic zeolite membrane was developed and demonstrated for overcoming the two-step limitation of nonoxidation methane (CH{sub 4}) conversion to higher hydrocarbons (C{sub 2+}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}). Detailed experiments to obtain quantitative results of H{sub 2} generation for various conditions are now being conducted. Technology transfer efforts included five manuscripts submitted to peer-reviewed journals and five conference presentations.

  12. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  13. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

  14. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  15. Supporting Nepal’s Peace Process: From Conflict to Constituent Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ian

    2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Supporting Nepal’s Peace Process: From Conflict to Constituent Assembly a special evening talk by Ian Martin chaired by Professor Surya Subedi, OBE 7-9pm, room B102 at SOAS Thursday, 18 March, 2010 Nepal’s political... FOCUSED MISSION: NOT SO LIMITED DURATION 4 complicated by persistent delays of the election as well as ambivalence surrounding the extent to which Nepali in- terlocutors required the technical assistance that UNMIN provided. Like UNMIN’s office of civil...

  16. Initial eccentricity and constituent quark number scaling of elliptic flow in ideal and viscous dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative hydrodynamics, we study the scaling properties elliptic flow in Au+Au collisions. Initial energy density of the fluid was fixed to reproduce STAR data on $\\phi$ meson multiplicity in 0-5% Au+Au collisions, such that irrespective of fluid viscosity, entropy at the freeze-out is similar in ideal or in viscous evolution. Initial eccentricity or constituent quark number scaling is only approximate in ideal or minimally viscous ($\\eta/s=1/4\\pi$) fluid. Eccentricity scaling become nearly exact in more viscous fluid ($\\eta/s \\geq$0.12). However, in more viscous fluid, constituent quark number scaled elliptic flow for mesons and baryons split into separate scaling functions. Simulated flows also do not exhibit 'universal scaling' i.e. elliptic flow scaled by the constituent quark number and charged particles $v_2$ is not a single function of transverse kinetic energy scaled by the quark number. From a study of violation of universal scaling, we obtain an estimate of QGP viscosity, $\\eta/s=0.12 \\pm 0.03$.

  17. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of CO 2 Storage for Full-Scale Deployment, Ground Water, 48(connect the storage formation with the ground surface. ToStorage Systems—Application of a New Analytical Solution, submitted to Ground

  18. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, M.W. [STIM-LAB, Inc., Duncan, OK (United States); Schraufnagel, R.A. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  19. Effects of fine particulate matter and its constituents on low birth weight among full-term infants in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basu, Rupa, E-mail: Rupa.Basu@oehha.ca.gov [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States); Harris, Maria [School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States)] [School of Public Health, Boston University, Boston, MA (United States); Sie, Lillian [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Malig, Brian; Broadwin, Rachel; Green, Rochelle [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)] [California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, Air Pollution Epidemiology Section, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Relationships between prenatal exposure to fine particles (PM{sub 2.5}) and birth weight have been observed previously. Few studies have investigated specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, which may identify sources and major contributors of risk. We examined the effects of trimester and full gestational prenatal exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and 23 PM{sub 2.5} constituents on birth weight among 646,296 term births in California between 2000 and 2006. We used linear and logistic regression models to assess associations between exposures and birth weight and risk of low birth weight (LBW; <2500 g), respectively. Models were adjusted for individual demographic characteristics, apparent temperature, month and year of birth, region, and socioeconomic indicators. Higher full gestational exposures to PM{sub 2.5} mass and several PM{sub 2.5} constituents were significantly associated with reductions in term birth weight. The largest reductions in birth weight were associated with exposure to vanadium, sulfur, sulfate, iron, elemental carbon, titanium, manganese, bromine, ammonium, zinc, and copper. Several of these PM{sub 2.5} constituents were associated with increased risk of term LBW. Reductions in birth weight were generally larger among younger mothers and varied by race/ethnicity. Exposure to specific constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, especially traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals, were associated with decreased birth weight in California. -- Highlights: • Examine full gestational and trimester fine particle and its constituents on term birth weight. • Fine particles and several of its constituents associated with birth weight reductions. • Largest reductions for traffic-related particles, sulfur constituents, and metals. • Greater birth weight reductions for younger mothers, and varied by race/ethnicity.

  20. Discharge indices for water quality loads Richard M. Vogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    : effective discharge, transport, sediment, constituents, rating curve, half-load Citation: Vogel, R. M., J. RDischarge indices for water quality loads Richard M. Vogel Department of Civil and Environmental load is ultimately the quantity of interest, we define a new index, the half-load discharge, which

  1. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharaka, Y.K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the same kinetic expression as that for dissolution.Kinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitation The general rate expression

  2. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharaka, Y.K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , Hua, W. , 2009. Petrology and isotopic geochemistry ofrock systems with varying petrology. For regular grids, the

  3. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  4. Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

  5. Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Quality Water Quality We protect water quality through stormwater control measures and an extensive network of monitoring wells and stations encompassing groundwater, surface...

  7. Characterization and fate of vapor-phase organic constituents from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustors (AFBC): East Stroudsburg University AFBC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Newton, G.J.; Henderson, T.R.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Very little research has been devoted to the characterization of vapor-phase organic compounds in gaseous streams. Because of the concerns that gaseous organic compounds from FBCs may include potentially toxic and/or mutagenic materials. We will measure vapor-phase hydrocarbon concentrations in the process streams of operating FBCs. This report describes our field sampling results on the atmospheric pressure fluidized bed combustor (AFBC) at the East Stroudsburg University during its normal operation for supplying heat and hot water to the campus. This AFBC has a bed size of 36 ft/sup 2/ and was burning anthracite culm. The culm consumption rates during the week of our sampling period were 1600 to 3000 lb/hr. Emphasis was placed on characterization of process stream effluents, including particles and vapor-phase organic constituents. Results indicated that the mass concentration (or loading) of particulate matter within the effluent stream was similar to other FBCs that have been studied. The particulate mass concentration measured after the baghouse location was 0.0048 g/m/sup 3/ (0.0047 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu). This was equivalent to a total of 35 g/hr of particulate emissions. The fraction of particulate material presented as organics (extractable fraction) was, on the average, less than 2% of total mass of particulate emissions. The vapor-phase organic contents indicated that the quantities of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were low, being less than 2.5 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ for any individual sample. Most of the PAHs detected were low boiling compounds such as naphthalene or phenanthrene, with trace amounts of pyrene. 22 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for benzene + cyclohexane + 1-propanol and for three constituent binary systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Uchiyama, Masanori; Kojima, Kazuo [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry] [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system of benzene + cyclohexane + 1-propanol and its constituent binary systems of benzene + cyclohexane, cyclohexane + 1-propanol, and benzene + 1-propanol at 323.15 and 333.15 K, using the apparatus proposed in a previous study. The experimental binary data were correlated using the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters. The average absolute percent deviations between the predicted and experimental ternary total pressures are 0.5% at 323.15 K and 0.4% at 333.15 K.

  9. 24/02/2012 12:49SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction -CO2/Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Page 1 of 1http://www.spe.org/ejournals/jsp/journalapp.jsp?pageType=Preview&jid=EFC&pdfChronicleId=090147628022501b&mid=SPE-12471

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    24/02/2012 12:49SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction - CO2/Brine Surface Dissolution of Petroleum Engineers SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction Volume 6, Number 1, March 2011, pp. 41-53 SPE

  10. Nonlinear Neural Network-Based Mixture Model for Estimating the Concentration of Nitrogen Salts in Turbid Inland Waters Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    of water constituents by training the MLP with ground spectra of nitrogen salts, which are commonly used which are commonly used for industrial purposes; mineral contaminants such as heavy metals, phosphorus in Turbid Inland Waters Using Hyperspectral Imagery Javier Plaza, Pablo Martínez, Rosa Pérez, Antonio Plaza

  11. ORIGINAL PAPER An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Great Salt Lake, Utah 810 Aquat Geochem (2011) 17:809­820 123 #12;more saline brine layer in the south arm, commonly referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is not subject to annual turnover and can

  12. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Michael A. (Scotia, NY); Sirinakis, George (Bronx, NY)

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  13. Turbid water Clear water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    : The submersible laser bathymetric (LBath) optical system is capable of simultaneously providing visual images- dynamical wing. This underwater package is pulled through the water by a single towed cable with fiber optic special high energy density optical fibers. A remote Pentium based PC also at the surface is used

  14. Water Intoxication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingampalli, Nithya

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008, May 14). Too much water raises seizure risk in babies.id=4844 9. Schoenly, Lorry. “Water Intoxication and Inmates:article/246650- overview>. 13. Water intoxication alert. (

  15. Method and apparatus for maintaining condensable constituents of a gas in a vapor phase during sample transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felix, Larry Gordon; Farthing, William Earl; Irvin, James Hodges; Snyder, Todd Robert

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for fluid transport at elevated temperatures having a conduit having a fluid inlet end and a fluid outlet end and at least one heating element disposed within the conduit providing direct heating of a fluid flowing through the conduit. The system is particularly suited for preventing condensable constituents of a high temperature fluid from condensing out of the fluid prior to analysis of the fluid. In addition, operation of the system so as to prevent the condensable constituents from condensing out of the fluid surprisingly does not alter the composition of the fluid.

  16. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of desalination research. The primary technological method of generating additional water supplies is through desalination and enhanced water reuse and recycling technologies....

  17. Water Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water Efficiency Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral, Florida WATER EFFICIENCY Federal Utility Partnership Working Group...

  18. The effect of freezing on the sulfate-chloride and density-chloride ratios of sea-water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhalter, Albert Charles

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the sulphate-chloride ratio would be expected to have a corresponi- ingly larger effect, on density than would one of the less abundant iona. CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW Evidence for Sulphate Enricl ment in Ice The sulphate-chloride ratio was studied... as early as 1907 vhen Ringer performed laboratory freezing experiments vith sea-vater in which he cooled sea-water until solid salts began to freeze out. of solution. l Portions of the ice and the brine below the ice vere collected and analyzed...

  19. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the temperature of the residual water encountered by theof hot water and the residual water might occur: (1) thehot water might drive the residual water through the piping

  20. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  1. Groupe de travail "Ecomateriaux" Amac/Mecamat, Lyon, 30.06.11 PHOTODEGRADATION DE COMPOSITES CONSTITUES DE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CONSTITUES DE POLYETHYLENE HAUTE DENSITE ET DE BAGASSE DELIGNIFIEE Peyvand DARABI1,2,3 , Marie, la bagasse, etc. Au cours des dernières décennies le bois composite a trouvé sa propre place dans les expliqué dans la littérature [2]. Dans cette étude, la bagasse et la bagasse délignifiée ont été utilisées

  2. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration,2 saturated brines. In 10th Carbon Capture and SequestrationIn: 9 th Annual Carbon Capture & Sequestration Meeting,

  3. {gamma}-Radiolysis of NaCl Brine in the Presence of UO{sub 2}(s): Effects of Hydrogen and Bromide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, Volker; Bohnert, Elke; Kelm, Manfred; Schild, Dieter; Kienzler, Bernhard [Institute for Radioactive Waste Disposal (FZK-INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe / Research Center Karlsruhe, Helmholtz-Platz, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, D-76344 (Germany); Reinhardt, Juergen; Buchmeiser, Michael R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, IOM, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig, D-04318 (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concentrated NaCl solution was {gamma}-irradiated in autoclaves under a pressure of 25 MPa. A set of experiments were conducted in 6 mol (kg H{sub 2}O){sup -1} NaCl solution in the presence of UO{sub 2}(s) pellets; in a second set of experiments, {gamma}-radiolysis of the NaCl brine was studied without UO{sub 2}(s). Hydrogen, oxygen and chlorate were formed as long-lived radiolysis products. Due to the high external pressure, all radiolysis products remained dissolved. H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} reached steady state concentrations in the range of 5.10{sup -3} to 6.10{sup -2} mol (kg H{sub 2}O){sup -1} corresponding to a partial gas pressure of {approx}2 to {approx}20 MPa. Radiolytic formation of hydrogen and oxygen increased with the concentration of bromide added to solution. Both, in the presence of bromide, resulting in a relatively high radiolytic yield, and in the absence of bromide surfaces of the UO{sub 2}(s) samples were oxidized, and concentration of dissolved uranium reached the solubility limit of the schoepite / NaUO{sub 2}O(OH)(cr) transition. At the end of the experiments, the pellets were covered by a surface layer of a secondary solid phase having a composition close to Na{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The experimental results demonstrate that bromide counteracts an H{sub 2} inhibition effect on radiolysis gas production, even at a concentration ratio of [H{sub 2}] / [Br{sup -}] > 100. The present observations are related to the competitive reactions of OH radicals with H{sub 2}, Br{sup -} and Cl{sup -}. A similar competition of hydrogen and bromide, controlling the yield of {gamma}-radiolysis products, is expected for solutions of lower Cl{sup -} concentration. (authors)

  4. An Innovative System for the Efficient and Effective Treatment of Non-Traditional Waters for Reuse in Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Rodgers; James Castle

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assessed opportunities for improving water quality associated with coal-fired power generation including the use of non-traditional waters for cooling, innovative technology for recovering and reusing water within power plants, novel approaches for the removal of trace inorganic compounds from ash pond effluents, and novel approaches for removing biocides from cooling tower blowdown. This research evaluated specifically designed pilot-scale constructed wetland systems for treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters for reuse in thermoelectric power generation and other purposes. The overall objective of this project was to decrease targeted constituents in non-traditional waters to achieve reuse criteria or discharge limitations established by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Clean Water Act (CWA). The six original project objectives were completed, and results are presented in this final technical report. These objectives included identification of targeted constituents for treatment in four non-traditional water sources, determination of reuse or discharge criteria for treatment, design of constructed wetland treatment systems for these non-traditional waters, and measurement of treatment of targeted constituents in non-traditional waters, as well as determination of the suitability of the treated non-traditional waters for reuse or discharge to receiving aquatic systems. The four non-traditional waters used to accomplish these objectives were ash basin water, cooling water, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) water, and produced water. The contaminants of concern identified in ash basin waters were arsenic, chromium, copper, mercury, selenium, and zinc. Contaminants of concern in cooling waters included free oxidants (chlorine, bromine, and peroxides), copper, lead, zinc, pH, and total dissolved solids. FGD waters contained contaminants of concern including arsenic, boron, chlorides, selenium, mercury, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and zinc. Similar to FGD waters, produced waters contained contaminants of concern that are predominantly inorganic (arsenic, cadmium, chlorides, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, sulfide, zinc, total dissolved solids), but also contained some organics (benzene, PAHs, toluene, total organic carbon, total suspended solids, and oil and grease). Constituents of concern that may cause chemical scaling, biofouling and corrosion, such as pH, hardness and ionic strength, and nutrients (P, K, and N) may also be found in all four non-traditional waters. NPDES permits were obtained for these non-traditional waters and these permit limits are summarized in tabular format within this report. These limits were used to establish treatment goals for this research along with toxicity values for Ceriodaphnia dubia, water quality criteria established by the US EPA, irrigation standards established by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), and reuse standards focused on minimization of damage to the power plant by treated waters. Constructed wetland treatment systems were designed for each non-traditional water source based on published literature reviews regarding remediation of the constituents of concern, biogeochemistry of the specific contaminants, and previous research. During this study, 4 non-traditional waters, which included ash basin water, cooling water, FGD water and produced water (PW) were obtained or simulated to measure constructed wetland treatment system performance. Based on data collected from FGD experiments, pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment systems can decrease aqueous concentrations of elements of concern (As, B, Hg, N, and Se). Percent removal was specific for each element, including ranges of 40.1% to 77.7% for As, 77.6% to 97.8% for Hg, 43.9% to 88.8% for N, and no measureable removal to 84.6% for Se. Other constituents of interest in final outflow samples should have aqueous characteristics sufficient for discharge, with the exception of chlorides (<2000 mg/L). Based on total dissolved solids, co-

  5. Apparent and inherent optical properties of turbid estuarine waters: measurements, empirical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    constituents). Such data could significantly limit the number of costly field campaigns necessary to estab zones that are directly affected by human activities (global warming, pollution, dredg- ing of at least several years).6 To develop an operational use of ocean color remote-sensing data in turbid waters

  6. Appendix A. ASA's WQMAP WQMAP (Water Quality Mapping and Analysis Program) is a proprietary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    -based personal computer. Color graphics and animation are used to display model prediction. The system-dimensional conservation of water mass, momentum, salt and energy equations on a spherical, non-orthogonal, boundary, energy, dissolved constituents, turbulent #12;294 kinetic energy, and turbulent dissipation. Implicit

  7. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  8. Higher twists in polarized DIS and the size of the constituent quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander Sidorov; Christian Weiss

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry implies the presence of a short-distance scale in the QCD vacuum, which phenomenologically may be associated with the ''size'' of the constituent quark, rho {approx} 0.3 fm. We discuss the role of this scale in the matrix elements of the twist-4 and 3 quark-gluon operators determining the leading power (1/Q{sup 2}-) corrections to the moments of the nucleon spin structure functions. We argue that the flavor-nonsinglet twist-4 matrix element, f{sub 2}{sup u-d}, has a sizable negative value of the order rho{sup -2}, due to the presence of sea quarks with virtualities {approx} rho{sup -2} in the proton wave function. The twist-3 matrix element, d{sub 2}, is not related to the scale rho{sup -2}. Our arguments support the results of previous calculations of the matrix elements in the instanton vacuum model. We show that this qualitative picture is in agreement with the phenomenological higher-twist correction extracted from an NLO QCD fit to the world data on g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n}, which include recent data from the Jefferson Lab Hall A and COMPASS experiments. We comment on the implications of the short-distance scale rho for quark-hadron duality and the x-dependence of higher-twist contributions.

  9. Chapter 3 -Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low-Flow Conditions, 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 3 - Basic Water Quality in the Boulder Creek Watershed, Colorado, During High-Flow and Low of the water quality of Boulder Creek, Colorado, during high-flow and low-flow conditions in the year 2000 constituents in Boulder Creek increased after the creek received wastewater effluent. INTRODUCTION Two programs

  10. Polymerization of styrene in microemulsions and water-in-oil-in-water emulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of emulsion polymerization media were studied in the formation of polystyrene: two O/W microemulsions and a WOW emulsion. The microemulsions and isolated polystyrene were studied using photon correlation spectroscopy and time-averaged light scattering. GPC verified the polymer's size distribution and FTIR determined the polymer's end groups. Photomicroscopy was used to size the WOW emulsion droplets. The effect of an oil-soluble, azoisobisbutyronitrile (AIBN), versus water-soluble, potassium persulfate (KPS), free-radical generator in the polymerization of styrene in microemulsions was investigated. The microemulsions contained styrene, brine, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and pentanol. Under the dilute conditions the microemulsions and lattices were stable and the droplets independent of each other. Both AIBN and KPS produced polystyrene containing two different size fractions; the molecular weight of the two fractions were of the order of magnitude of 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6}. End group analysis indicated that initiator fragments and alcohol fragments were present in the polystyrene. The WOW emulsions contained styrene, water, Tween 80, and Span 80. The multiple phase emulsion had a polydisperse droplet size distribution with globule diameters ranging from 1 {mu}m to 190 {mu}m. Both single and multiple phase globules were present in the emulsion due to < 100% yield. WOW emulsion polymerization was slower than microemulsion polymerization and the reaction never reached completion. The isolated polymer showed a wide size distribution with an average molecular weight of {approximately} 4.6 {times} 10{sup 5}.

  11. A model of reduced oxidation kinetics using constituents and species: Iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harstad, Kenneth; Bellan, Josette [California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S 125-109, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously described methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation and tested for n-heptane is here shown to be valid, in a slightly modified version, for iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane. The model is still based on partitioning the species into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement in the species ensemble, and mathematically decomposing the heavy species into constituents which are radicals. For the same similarity variable found from examining the n-heptane LLNL mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, the appropriately scaled total constituent molar density still exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures in the cold ignition regime. When extended to larger initial temperatures than for cold ignition, the self-similar behavior becomes initial temperature dependent, which indicates that rather than using functional fits for the enthalpy generation due to the heavy species' oxidation, an ideal model based on tabular information extracted from the complete LLNL kinetics should be used instead. Similarly to n-heptane, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable, but here their slope variation is no longer fitted and instead, their rate equations are used with the ideal model to calculate them. As in the original model, the light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species; the quasi-steady light species mole fractions are computed using the ideal model and the unsteady species are calculated as progress variables using rates extracted from the ideal model. Results are presented comparing the performance of the model with that of the LLNL mechanism using CHEMKIN II. The model reproduces excellently the temperature and species evolution versus time or versus the similarity variable, with the exception of very rich mixtures, where the predictions are still very good but the multivalued aspect of these functions at the end of oxidation is not captured in the reduction. The ignition time is predicted within percentages of the LLNL values over a wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures. (author)

  12. DUSEL Facility Cooling Water Scaling Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily, W D

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation (crystal growth) in supersaturated solutions is governed by both kenetic and thermodynamic processes. This is an important and evolving field of research, especially for the petroleum industry. There are several types of precipitates including sulfate compounds (ie. barium sulfate) and calcium compounds (ie. calcium carbonate). The chemical makeup of the mine water has relatively large concentrations of sulfate as compared to calcium, so we may expect that sulfate type reactions. The kinetics of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO4 {center_dot} 2H20, gypsum) scale formation on heat exchanger surfaces from aqueous solutions has been studied by a highly reproducible technique. It has been found that gypsum scale formation takes place directly on the surface of the heat exchanger without any bulk or spontaneous precipitation in the reaction cell. The kinetic data also indicate that the rate of scale formation is a function of surface area and the metallurgy of the heat exchanger. As we don't have detailed information about the heat exchanger, we can only infer that this will be an issue for us. Supersaturations of various compounds are affected differently by temperature, pressure and pH. Pressure has only a slight affect on the solubility, whereas temperature is a much more sensitive parameter (Figure 1). The affect of temperature is reversed for calcium carbonate and barium sulfate solubilities. As temperature increases, barium sulfate solubility concentrations increase and scaling decreases. For calcium carbonate, the scaling tendencies increase with increasing temperature. This is all relative, as the temperatures and pressures of the referenced experiments range from 122 to 356 F. Their pressures range from 200 to 4000 psi. Because the cooling water system isn't likely to see pressures above 200 psi, it's unclear if this pressure/scaling relationship will be significant or even apparent. The most common scale minerals found in the oilfield include calcium carbonates (CaCO3, mainly calcite) and alkaline-earth metal sulfates (barite BaSO4, celestite SrSO4, anhydrite CaSO4, hemihydrate CaSO4 1/2H2O, and gypsum CaSO4 2H2O or calcium sulfate). The cause of scaling can be difficult to identify in real oil and gas wells. However, pressure and temperature changes during the flow of fluids are primary reasons for the formation of carbonate scales, because the escape of CO2 and/or H2S gases out of the brine solution, as pressure is lowered, tends to elevate the pH of the brine and result in super-saturation with respect to carbonates. Concerning sulfate scales, the common cause is commingling of different sources of brines either due to breakthrough of injected incompatible waters or mixing of two different brines from different zones of the reservoir formation. A decrease in temperature tends to cause barite to precipitate, opposite of calcite. In addition, pressure drops tend to cause all scale minerals to precipitate due to the pressure dependence of the solubility product. And we can expect that there will be a pressure drop across the heat exchanger. Weather or not this will be offset by the rise in pressure remains to be seen. It's typically left to field testing to prove out. Progress has been made toward the control and treatment of the scale deposits, although most of the reaction mechanisms are still not well understood. Often the most efficient and economic treatment for scale formation is to apply threshold chemical inhibitors. Threshold scale inhibitors are like catalysts and have inhibition efficiency at very low concentrations (commonly less than a few mg/L), far below the stoichiometric concentrations of the crystal lattice ions in solution. There are many chemical classes of inhibitors and even more brands on the market. Based on the water chemistry it is anticipated that there is a high likelihood for sulfate compound precipitation and scaling. This may be dependent on the temperature and pressure, which vary throughout the system. Therefore, various types and amounts of scaling may occur at different

  13. Groundwater transport modeling of constituents originating from the Burial Grounds Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, P.F.; Shupe, M.G.; Spalding, C.P. [GeoTrans, Inc., Sterling, VA (US)

    1992-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS), operates a number of sites for the land disposal of various leachable radionuclide, organic, and inorganic wastes. Located within the General Separations Area (GSA) of SRS are the Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) and the Old Burial Ground (OBG). A portion of the LLRWDF has been designated as the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF). The OBG began receiving waste in 1952 and was closed in 1974. Various wastes, including transuranic, intermediate and low level beta-gamma, and solvents, were received during this period of operation. In 1969, prior to the closing of the OBG, a portion of the MWMF/LLRWDF (the MWMF) began receiving waste. GeoTrans, Inc. was contracted by WSRC to conduct a numerical modeling study to assess groundwater flow and contaminant transport in the vicinity of the MWMF in support of an Alternate Concentration Limits demonstration for the Part B permit. The project was divided into two phases: development of a groundwater flow model of the hydrogeologic system underlying the MWMF which includes the entire GSA, and development of a solute transport model to assess migration of 19 designated constituents of concern (COCs) over a period 30 years into the future. The first phase was completed in May of 1992 and the results documented in GeoTrans (1992). That report serves as the companion volume to the present contaminant transport modeling report. The transport study is intended to develop predictions of concentration and mass flux of the 19 COCs at downgradient exposure points over the 30 year period of interest. These results are to be used in human health and ecological risk assessments which are also being performed in support of the Part B permit.

  14. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (not brine) surface was based on direct MAX-DOAS atmospheric measurements above Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

  15. Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

  16. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ................ Sidney Area Deals with Drought 6................ Water and Electricity Are Inseparable 10's East Campus. "Consolidating administration,faculty and staff and facilities is costeffectiveandper or commercial products constitute endorsement by the U.S. Government. WATER CURRENT Water Center University

  17. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

  18. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  19. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS: Lutz J.D. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution

  20. Effect of humic constituents on the transformation of chlorinated phenols and anilines in the presence of oxidoreductive enzymes or birnessite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.W.; Dec, J.; Bollag, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); Kim, J.E. (Kyngpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Agricultural Chemistry)

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated phenols and anilines are transformed and detoxified in soil through oxidative coupling reactions mediated by enzymes or metal oxides. The reactions may be influences by humic constituents, such as syringaldehyde or catechol, that originate from lignin decomposition and are also subject to oxidative coupling. In this study, the effect of humic constituents on xenobiotic transformation was evaluated in vitro based on the determination of unreacted chlorophenols and chloroanilines. In experiments with peroxidase, laccase, and birnessite, the transformation of most chlorophenols was considerably enhanced by the addition of syringaldehyde. Less enhancement was observed using 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, and the addition of catechol resulted in a reduction of most transformations. The opposite was observed in experiments with tyrosinase, in which case catechol caused considerable enhancement of chlorophenol transformation. The varying effect of catechol can be explained by different transformation mechanisms involving either o-quinone coupling or free radical coupling. Regardless of the agent used to mediate the reactions, chloroanilines seemed to undergo nucleophilic addition to quinone oligomers, which resulted from coupling of the humic constituents. Catechol, which readily forms quinones and quinone oligomers, was most efficient in enhancing these reactions.

  1. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  2. It's The Fluids SEG Honorary Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .7 A #12;Water + Ions (usually NaCl) ClNa Dickerson et al., 1970 #12;Heavy Oil Water Wet silicaSilica Heavy information please visit: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil Gas TYPES of PORE FLUIDS = Porosity = Density sat = 0 (1- ) + f Density: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil

  3. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sources such as solar heated industrial waste heat, geothermal water, brines, and ocean thermal

  4. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sources such as solar heated water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal

  5. Computerized Waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - ing 2002?2005 and documented in TWRI?s Technical Report 284 released in January 2006, include: ? Capabilities for short-term reliability analyses based on current storage conditions (Or what is the likelihood of meeting water needs in the near... System Reference Manual. TWRI Technical Report 255, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Water Rights Analysis Package Modeling System Users Manual. TWRI Technical Report 256, Second Edition, April 2005. ? Fundamentals of Water Availability Modeling...

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which can lead to public health problems. * MtBE (Methyl tert Butyl Ether), a gasoline additive, has begun to contaminate ground water supplies. * Similarly, perchlorate has...

  7. UIC permitting process for class IID and Class III wells: Protection of drinking water in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillenbrand, C.J. [EPA, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region II, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Program regulates injection wells in the State of New York to protect drinking water; UIC regulations can be found under Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Parts 124, 144, 146 and 147. Operators of solution mining injection wells (UIC Class IIIG) and produced fluid disposal wells (UIC Class IID) are required to obtain an UIC permit for authorization to inject. The permitting process requires submittal of drinking water, geologic and proposed operational data in order to assure that pressure build-up within the injection zone will not compromise confining layers and allow vertical migration of fluid into Underground Sources of Drinking Water (USDW). Additional data is required within an Area of Review (AOR), defined as an area determined by the intersection of the adjusted potentiometric surface produced by injection and a depth 50 feet below the base of the lowermost USDW, or a radius of 1/4 mile around the injection well, whichever is greater. Locations of all wells in the AOR must be identified, and completion reports and plugging reports must be submitted. Requirements are set for maximum injection pressure and flow rates, monitoring of brine properties of the injection well and monitoring of water supply wells in the AOR for possible contamination. Any noncompliance with permit requirements constitutes a violation of the Safe Drinking Water Act and is grounds for enforcement action, including possible revocation of permit. Presently four Class IID wells are authorized under permit in New York State. The Queenston sandstone, Medina sandstone, Salina B, Akron dolomite and Oriskany sandstone have been used for brine disposal; the lower Ordovician-Cambrian section is currently being considered as an injection zone. Over one hundred Class IIIG wells are authorized under permit in New York State and all have been utilized for solution mining of the Syracuse salt.

  8. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  9. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  10. Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static carbon sequestration (GCS) has drawn increasing con- sideration as a promising method to mitigate

  11. Dynamics of a relativistic Rankine vortex for a two-constituent superfluid in a weak perturbation of cylindrical symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    From a recent study of a stationary cylindrical solution for a relativistic two-constituent superfluid at low temperature limit, we propose to specify this solution under the form of a relativistic generalisation of a Rankine vortex (Potential vortex whose the core has a solid body rotation).Then we establish the dynamics of the central line of this vortex by supposing that the deviation from the cylindrical configuration is weak in the neighbourhood of the core of the vortex. In "stiff" material the Nambu-Goto equations are obtained.

  12. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATERS USING A SURFACTANT MODIFIED ZEOLITE/VAPOR PHASE BIOREATOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LYNN E. KATZ; KERRY A. KINNEY; R.S. BOWMAN; E.J. SULLIVAN

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some of them must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. An efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed to remove these constituents. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. Our previous DOE research work (DE-AC26-99BC15221) demonstrated that SMZ could successfully remove BTEX compounds from the produced water. In addition, SMZ could be regenerated through a simple air sparging process. The primary goal of this project is to develop a robust SMZ/VPB treatment system to efficiently remove the organic constituents from produced water in a cost-effective manner. This report summarizes work of this project from March 2003 through September 2003. We have continued our investigation of SMZ regeneration from our previous DOE project. Ten saturation/stripping cycles have been completed for SMZ columns saturated with BTEX compounds. The results suggest that BTEX sorption capacity is not lost after ten saturation/regeneration cycles. The composition of produced water from a site operated by Crystal Solutions Ltd. in Wyoming has been characterized and was used to identify key semi-volatile components. Isotherms with selected semi-volatile components have been initiated and preliminary results have been obtained. The experimental vapor phase bioreactors for this project have been designed and assembled to treat the off-gas from the SMZ regeneration process. These columns will be used both in the laboratory and in the proposed field testing to be conducted next year. Innocula for the columns that degrade all of the BTEX columns have been developed.

  13. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Zhang, Changyong; Wang, Zheming; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host brine, some will remain as neat to water saturated super critical CO2 (scCO2) near the well bore and at the caprock, especially in the short-term life cycle of the sequestration site. Little is known about the reactivity of minerals with scCO2 containing variable concentrations of water. In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 hr reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. Higher water concentrations and higher temperatures led to greater brucite carbonation rates and larger extents of conversion to magnesium carbonate products. The only observed carbonation product at 35 °C was nesquehonite (MgCO3 • 3H2O). Mixtures of nesquehonite and magnesite (MgCO3) were detected at 50 °C, but magnesite was more prevalent with increasing water concentration. Both an amorphous hydrated magnesium carbonate solid and magnesite were detected at 70 °C, but magnesite predominated with increasing water concentration. The identity of the magnesium carbonate products appears strongly linked to magnesium water exchange kinetics through temperature and water availability effects.

  14. Water Resources Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

  15. Water Privatisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zölls, Elisa

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation deals with the policy issues of large-scale, urban water privatisation projects in the face of uncertainty and variability. The main objective is to evaluate whether a single policy approach, namely privatisation associated...

  16. EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER QUALITY Leadership Team Subcommittee: Mark Clark Karl Havens BJ Jarvis Kelly Morgan Ramesh Reddy #12;Water Quality ­ Situation (resources) Florida has extensive

  17. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  18. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    24 Figure 7. Comparison of Daily Water Heater28 Figure 8. Monitored Field Efficiency of Tankless Water28 Figure 9. Monitored Lab Efficiency of Tankless Water

  19. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step in developing a realistic degradation term for tankless water heatersstep (water draw event) in the simulation. Instantaneous Gas Water Heater

  20. Dolomitization by ground-water flow systems in carbonate platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dolomite occurs throughout the subsurface of modern carbonate platforms such as the Bahamas. Groundwater flow systems must be responsible for delivery of reactants needed for dolomitization. Reflux, freshwater lens flows, and thermal convection are large-scale flow systems that may be widespread in active platforms. The author has evaluated some aspects of the dynamics and characteristics of these processes with ground-water flow theory and by scaled sandbox experiments. Reflux is not restricted to hypersaline brines, but can occur with bankwaters of only slightly elevated salinity such as those found on the Bahama Banks today (42%). The lack of evaporites in a stratigraphic section, therefore, does not rule out the possibility that reflux may have operated. Flows associated with freshwater lenses include flow in the lens, in the mixing zone, and in the seawater beneath and offshore of the lens. Upward transfer of seawater through the platform margins occurs when surrounding cold ocean water migrates into the platform and is heated. This type of thermal convection (Kohout convection) has been studied by Francis Kohout in south Florida. The ranges of mass flux of magnesium in these processes are all comparable and are all sufficient to account for young dolomites beneath modern platforms. Each process yields dolomitized zones of characteristic shape and location and perhaps may be distinguishable in ancient rocks. The concepts presented here may have application to exploration for dolomite reservoirs in the Gulf Coast and elsewhere.

  1. Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by...

  2. Adsorption calorimetry of water-wet and oil-wet minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, L.A.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is a continuation of a research program designed to understand and model adsorption of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) chemical flooding material onto reservoir minerals. The understanding and modeling of adsorption will ultimately lead to an effective way to select EOR chemicals which are most cost effective. This report describes progress made from October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. It is divided into three parts: (1) modeling of adsorption, (2) adsorption of surfactants from solutions of brine and aqueous cosurfactant, and (3) proving the usefulness of titration calorimetry. In the first part, the surface described was water-wet; in the other parts, surfaces of different wettability were used in the investigations. The adsorption of cosurfactant from hydrocarbon onto silica is modeled by a Langmuir isotherm. This model indicates that the adsorption is driven by enthalpy, taking place with an unfavorable entropy change. It is physical adsorption and does not exceed monolayer coverage. Strong brine seems to have little effect on the adsorption of nonionic surfactant, except in the case of Florisil, a magnesia containing silica. In the presence of cosurfactant, the energy of adsorption is in general higher than that from pure water. All of these enthalpies of adsorption are negative, thus implying lower adsorption as temperature is raised. The titration calorimeter has proved to be a useful instrument for studying adsorption. The measurement of the interaction of nonionic surfactant with silica show satisfactory agreement with the results of the flow calorimeter. Adsorption on kaolin, bentonite, and sandstone can be measured with this instrument, whereas these solids are not amenable to flow calorimetry. 10 figs. 6 tabs.

  3. Arnold Schwarzenegger WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor WATER HEATERS AND HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS;#12;Appendices Appendix A. Multifamily Water Heating Construction Practices, Pricing and Availability Survey Report Appendix B. Multifamily Water Heating Controls Performance Field Report Appendix C. Pipe

  4. Physica B 394 (2007) 357362 Complex bounds and microstructural recovery from measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air, and salt inclusions. The polar sea ice. The sea ice is assumed to be a two phase composite of ice and brine with known constituent permittivities. The first set of bounds assumes only knowledge of the brine volume fraction or porosity, and the second set

  5. Ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site, January-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, C.S.; Rieger, J.T.; Raymond, J.R.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is designed to evaluate existing and potential pathways of exposure to radioactivity and hazardous chemicals from site operations. This document contains an evaluation of data collected during CY 1984. During 1984, 339 monitoring wells were sampled at various times for radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Two of these constituents, specifically, tritium and nitrate, have been selected for detailed discussion in this report. Tritium and nitrate in the primary plumes originating from the 200 Areas continue to move generally eastward toward the Columbia River in the direction of ground-water flow. The movement within these plumes is indicated by changes in trends within the analytical data from the monitoring wells. No discernible impact on ground water has yet been observed from the start-up of the PUREX plant in December 1983. The shape of the present tritium plume is similar to those described in previous ground-water monitoring reports, although slight changes on the outer edges have been noted. Radiological impacts from two potential pathways for radionuclide transport in ground water to the environment are discussed in this report. The pathways are: (1) human consumption of ground water from onsite wells, and (2) seepage of ground water into the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium in spring samples that were collected and analyzed in 1983, and in wells sampled adjacent to the Columbia River in 1984 confirmed that constituents in the ground water are entering the river via springs and subsurface flow. The primary areas where radionuclides enter the Columbia River via ground-water flow are the 100-N and 300 Areas and the shoreline adjacent to the Hanford Townsite. 44 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE AwardsDNitrateEnergyNews WaterWater

  7. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  8. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E. (eds.)

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 15 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period October 1 to December 31, 1989. This volume discusses the projects. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the samples aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality. 51 refs., 35 figs., 86 tabs.

  9. Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    n n g g : : M i i d d d d l l e e R R i i o o G G r r a a n n d d e e Middle Rio Grande Water Assembly Mid Region Council of Governments Sandia National Laboratories Utton...

  10. Investigating Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    substances. It covers most of the earth?s surface, sometimes to a depth of more than a mile. It exists as a colorless gas in the atmosphere. It caps the poles with ice and occurs in the snows of winter. Liquid water fills brooks, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds...

  11. Grabbing water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Reis; J. Hure; S. Jung; J. W. M. Bush; C. Clanet

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a novel technique for grabbing water with a flexible solid. This new passive pipetting mechanism was inspired by floating flowers and relies purely on the coupling of the elasticity of thin plates and the hydrodynamic forces at the liquid interface. Developing a theoretical model has enabled us to design petal-shaped objects with maximum grabbing capacity.

  12. Laboratory Report on Performance Evaluation of Key Constituents during Pre-Treatment of High Level Waste Direct Feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, Heinz J.

    2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical capabilities of the 222-S Laboratory are tested against the requirements for an optional start up scenario of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant on the Hanford Site. In this case, washed and in-tank leached sludge would be sent directly to the High Level Melter, bypassing Pretreatment. The sludge samples would need to be analyzed for certain key constituents in terms identifying melter-related issues and adjustment needs. The analyses on original tank waste as well as on washed and leached material were performed using five sludge samples from tanks 241-AY-102, 241-AZ-102, 241-AN-106, 241-AW-105, and 241-SY-102. Additionally, solid phase characterization was applied to determine the changes in mineralogy throughout the pre-treatment steps.

  13. Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlund, Andrew; Choy, Min L. Janny; Szeptycki, Leon

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faced with the imperative that water is vital to all life onChoy* and Leon Szeptycki Water in the West Keywords: climategreen infrastructure; water; water-energy; water governance;

  14. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of agricultural chemicals and the performance of hazardous waste land treatment facilities. This study used a bioassay directed chemical analysis protocol to monitor the environmental fate of mutagenic constituents from a simulated land treatment demonstration...THE MUTAGENIC POTENTIAL OF SOIL AND RUNOFF WATER FROM LAND TREATMENT OF THREE HAZARDOUS INDUSTRIAL WASTES A Thesis by PHEBE DAYOL Submitted to the Graduate College of Te xa s ASM Un i ver s i ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  15. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Newcomer, D.R.; Evans, J.C.; Webber, W.D.; Spane, F.A. Jr.; Raymond, R.G.; Opitz, B.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring activities were conducted to determine the distribution of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals present in ground water as a result of Hanford Site operations and, whenever possible, relate the distribution of these constituents to Site operations. A total of 720 wells were sampled during 1992 by all Hanford ground-water monitoring activities. The Ground-Water Surveillance Project prepared water-table maps of DOE`s Hanford Site for June 1992 from water-level elevations measured in 287 wells across the Hanford Site and outlying areas. These maps are used to infer ground-water flow directions and gradients for the interpretation of contaminant transport. Water levels beneath the 200 Areas decreased as much as 0.75 m (2.5 ft) between December 1991 and December 1992. Water levels in the Cold Creek Valley decreased approximately 0.5 m in that same period. The water table adjacent to the Columbia River along the Hanford Reach continues to respond significantly to fluctuations in river stage. These responses were observed in the 100 and 300 areas. The elevation of the ground-water mound beneath B Pond did not change significantly between December 1991 and December 1992. However, water levels from one well located at the center of the mound indicate a water-level rise of approximately 0.3 m (1 ft) during the last quarter of 1992. Water levels measured from unconfined aquifer wells north and east of the Columbia River in 1992 indicate that the primary source of recharge is from irrigation practices.

  16. Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification: A Water Quality Protection Tool for States and Tribes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. UNL WATER CENTER WATER CURRENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ........SPECIAL BUREAU OF RECLAMATION CENTENNIAL COVERAGE 14..............Water News Briefs 15 Keyes, Commissioner of Reclamation, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Several con- vention topics will focus afternoon NWRA board of director's meeting. Plains farmers survey their land in western Nebraska, probably

  18. Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

  19. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  1. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This risk assessment evaluates the potential for impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site caused by the burning of coal containing uranium to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities and not for those constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Because background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking, any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background. The incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination and disposing of the contaminated soils in an engineered disposal cell. The UMTRA Ground Water Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under the UMTRA Ground Water Project, results of this risk assessment will help determine what ground water compliance strategy may be applied at the site.

  2. Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environment Impacts of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

  3. Innovative Water Management Technology to Reduce Environmental Impacts of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castle, James; Rodgers, John; Alley, Bethany; Beebe, Alex; Coffey, Ruthanne; Jurinko, Kristen; Pardue, Michael; Ritter, Tina; Spacil, Michael

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Clemson University with Chevron as an industry partner developed and applied treatment technology using constructed wetland systems to decrease targeted constituents in simulated and actual produced waters to achieve reuse criteria and discharge limits. Pilot-scale and demonstration constructed wetland treatment system (CWTS) experiments led to design strategies for treating a variety of constituents of concern (COCs) in produced waters including divalent metals, metalloids, oil and grease, and ammonia. Targeted biogeochemical pathways for treatment of COCs in pilot-scale CWTS experiments included divalent metal sulfide precipitation through dissimilatory sulfate reduction, metal precipitation through oxidation, reduction of selenite to insoluble elemental selenium, aerobic biodegradation of oil, nitrification of ammonia to nitrate, denitrification of nitrate to nitrogen gas, separation of oil using an oilwater separator, and sorption of ammonia to zeolite. Treatment performance results indicated that CWTSs can be designed and built to promote specific environmental and geochemical conditions in order for targeted biogeochemical pathways to operate. The demonstration system successfully achieved consistent removal extents even while inflow concentrations of COCs in the produced water differed by orders of magnitude. Design strategies used in the pilot-scale and demonstration CWTSs to promote specific conditions that can be applied to designing full-scale CWTSs include plant and soil selection, water-depth selection, addition of amendments, and hydraulic retention time (HRT). These strategies allow conditions within a CWTS to be modified to achieve ranges necessary for the preferred biogeochemical treatment pathways. In the case of renovating a produced water containing COCs that require different biogeochemical pathways for treatment, a CWTS can be designed with sequential cells that promote different conditions. For example, the pilot-scale CWTS for post-reverse osmosis produced water was designed to promote oxidizing conditions within the first wetland cell for nitrification of ammonia, and the subsequent three cells were designed to promote reducing conditions for denitrification of nitrate. By incorporating multiple wetland cells in a CWTS, the conditions within each cell can be modified for removal of specific COCs. In addition, a CWTS designed with multiple cells allows for convenient sample collection points so that biogeochemical conditions of individual cells can be monitored and performance evaluated. Removal rate coefficients determined from the pilot-scale CWTS experiments and confirmed by the demonstration system can be used to calculate HRTs required to treat COCs in full-scale CWTSs. The calculated HRTs can then be used to determine the surface area or ?footprint? of a full-size CWTS for a given inflow rate of produced water.

  4. Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    occur globally every year due to a lack of clean water, inadequate sanitation, and improper hygiene (1CS232615A Cleaner, Safer Water through Water Safety Plans National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH) Global Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Team's Water Safety Plan Assistance 1.5 million deaths

  5. Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Ground water provides drinking water, irrigation for crops and water for indus- tries. It is also connected to surface waters, and maintains the flow of rivers and streams and the level of wetlands- tion of those along Lake Michigan, most communi- ties, farms and industries still rely on ground water

  6. Fractionation of NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 brines with a polyfunctional ion exchange resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Albert Byre

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ml. of 2 N. HC1 and 150 ml. of distilled water. The filtrate and wash solut1ons were analyzed for Ca++, Mg~, and Cl iona. Calcium and magnesium were deter- mined by a complexometric titration with a 0. 01 molar solution of the disodium salt... for various FIGURE 4 VARIATION OF SELECTIVITY COEFFICIENTS WITH FEED SOLUTION RATIO 30. 0 Ca Na 10. 0 3. 0 1. 0 Mg Na Ca 8 0. 3 0. 1 0. 01 0. 03 0. 10 0. 3 1. 0 3. 0 10. 0 Ratio of ? , ? , or ~ in Feed Ca Ca Na' Mg' Na total solution...

  7. Environmental effects of dredging: Naturally occurring levels of ammonia and sulfide in pore water: An assessment of the literature. Technical notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia and sulfide are natural constituents of sediment. Both are very toxic to aquatic organisms. Consequently, their presence may bias dredged material toxicity bioassays that are designed to evaluate the toxicity of persistent contaminants such as heavy metals and petroleum and chlorinated hydrocarbons. The purpose of this technical note is to summarize published information on sediment pore water ammonia and sulfide concentrations that occur in situ. In a subsequent technical note, this exposure information will be coupled with ammonia and sulfide toxicity data to estimate the potential influence of these constituents on dredged material toxicity bioassays.

  8. Water Permits (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Permits Division authorizes permits administered under the Water Quality Regulations. Louisiana's Water Quality Regulations require permits for the discharge of pollutants from any point...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Sandia Team Attends World Water Week in Stockholm On December 12, 2014, in Climate, Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Water...

  10. Water Management Act (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act regulates and registers water withdrawals in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to enable effective planning and management of water use and conservation. The Act establishes a Water...

  11. Efficient Water Use & Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Use Goal 4: Efficient Water Use & Management Aware of the arid climate of northern New Mexico, water reduction and conservation remains a primary concern at LANL. Energy...

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF LEACHXS/ORCHESTRA CAPABILITIES BY SIMULATING CONSTITUENT RELEASE FROM A CEMENTITIOUS WASTE FORM IN A REINFORCED CONCRETE VAULT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Meeussen, J.; Sloot, H.

    2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the work described in this report is to demonstrate the capabilities of the current version of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for simulating chemical behavior and constituent release processes in a range of applications that are relevant to the CBP. This report illustrates the use of LeachXS{trademark}/ORCHESTRA for the following applications: (1) Comparing model and experimental results for leaching tests for a range of cementitious materials including cement mortars, grout, stabilized waste, and concrete. The leaching test data includes liquid-solid partitioning as a function of pH and release rates based on laboratory column, monolith, and field testing. (2) Modeling chemical speciation of constituents in cementitious materials, including liquid-solid partitioning and release rates. (3) Evaluating uncertainty in model predictions based on uncertainty in underlying composition, thermodynamic, and transport characteristics. (4) Generating predominance diagrams to evaluate predicted chemical changes as a result of material aging using the example of exposure to atmospheric conditions. (5) Modeling coupled geochemical speciation and diffusion in a three layer system consisting of a layer of Saltstone, a concrete barrier, and a layer of soil in contact with air. The simulations show developing concentration fronts over a time period of 1000 years. (6) Modeling sulfate attack and cracking due to ettringite formation. A detailed example for this case is provided in a separate article by the authors (Sarkar et al. 2010). Finally, based on the computed results, the sensitive input parameters for this type of modeling are identified and discussed. The chemical speciation behavior of substances is calculated for a batch system and also in combination with transport and within a three layer system. This includes release from a barrier to the surrounding soil as a function of time. As input for the simulations, the physical and chemical properties of the materials are used. The test cases used in this demonstration are taken from Reference Cases for Use in the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (Langton et al. 2009). Before it is possible to model the release of substances from stabilized waste or radioactive grout through a cement barrier into the engineered soil barrier or natural soil, the relevant characteristics of such materials must be known. Additional chemical characteristics are needed for mechanistic modeling to be undertaken, not just the physical properties relevant for modeling of transport. The minimum required properties for modeling are given in Section 5.0, 'Modeling the chemical speciation of a material'.

  13. Utilization of geopressured resources in the oxidation of organic waste in supercritical water. Phase I, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, Alexander F.; Herzog, Howard J.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured resources are geothermal reservoirs containing dissolved methane in hot brine at pressures well in excess of their in situ hydrostatic pressure. In the US, geopressured resources are primarily located in the Gulf (of Mexico) Coast. The wells in this area are characterized by typical bottomhole temperatures of 120-180 C (250-360 F) (Negus-de Wys, 1991a) and bottomhole pressures of 675-1275 bar (9,800-18,500 psia) (Negus-de Wys, 1991b). Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the destruction of hazardous organic waste in which oxidation is carried out in a water medium above the critical point of pure water (374 C/705 F, 221 bar/3208 psia) (Tester et al., 1992). Geopressured resources are particularly suitable as an input stream to a SCWO waste treatment process due to the near critical conditions of their hot brine. By using a Rankine-type power cycle, electric power can be generated by capturing the available thermal and hydraulic energy from the geothermal resource and the chemical energy of the dissolved methane released by the oxidation process. In addition to oxidizing the methane to convert the chemical energy to thermal energy, auxiliary fuel in the form of an organic waste can be co-oxidized to increase the energy output to commercially sustainable levels. Coupling the treatment of geopressured brine with an organic waste in a SCWO process synergistically improves power production while providing a means for treating hazardous waste. The objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of using geopressured resources to simultaneously detoxify hazardous waste and generate electric power. Our ultimate aim is to develop conceptual process designs for above-ground and fully or modified in situ approaches to co-processing organic waste with geopressured brine in supercritical water. As a preparatory step for investigating in situ approaches, a realistic above-ground conceptual design was developed in this study. In that concept, the waste, brine and oxidant (air or oxygen) are introduced into the SCWO reactor at the system pressure of 234 bar (3400 psia). The heat of oxidation raises the temperature of the system to about 600 C (1100 F). Due to the low solubility of inorganic salts in supercritical water (about 200 ppm or less) (Armellini and Tester, 1990, 1991a, 1991b), solid salt forms and falls to the lower section of the reactor, where it is cooled and quenched with water, creating a concentrated (organic-free) brine that would be mixed with brackish water and reinjected back to the geopressured well. Power is generated by the expansion of the products of the SCWO process through a series of multi-stage turboexpanden. A processing capacity of 100,000 gallons per day (gpd) was initially taken as the design basis, following some investigations carried out at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (Propp et al., 1990). The process was modeled using the ASPEN PLUS{trademark} process flowsheet simulator and material and energy balances were determined. Both the cases of using air and oxygen as oxidant were investigated. Toluene was chosen as the model compound to represent the organic waste. Turbine design calculations based on the volumetric flowrates obtained for a 100,000 gpd capacity resulted in unrealistically high rotor rotational speeds and small wheel pitch diameters to achieve optimum efficiencies. Higher SCWO effluent flowrates would lower rotor rotational speeds and increase wheel pitch diameters to more practical levels. Thus, a 42-fold larger design capacity of 100,000 barrels per day (bpd) was adopted as the basis for an above-ground base case. The results for the material and energy balances for a processing capacity of 100,000 bpd using air and oxygen as oxidant scale up linearly from the results for the 100,000 gpd case. The best case flowsheet corresponding to a 100,000 bpi case using oxygen as oxidant is given in Figure 1. Our conceptual design study suggests that simultaneous detoxification of hazardous waste and production of power is possible by co-pr

  14. Drinking Water Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains the federal safety standards for drinking water provided by public water supply systems. It discusses the legal requirements for public water supplies, the maximum level allowed for contaminants in the water...

  15. ARM: Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cadeddu, Maria

    Microwave Radiometer data (MWR Profiles - QME), water vapor, temp, cloud liquid water, precip water retrievals

  16. Modeling CO{sub 2}-Brine-Rock Interaction Including Mercury and H{sub 2}S Impurities in the Context of CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spycher, N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses modeling and simulation approaches to investigate the impacts on injectivity of trace amounts of mercury (Hg) in a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stream injected for geologic carbon sequestration in a sandstone reservoir at ~2.5 km depth. At the range of Hg concentrations expected (7-190 ppbV, or ~ 0.06-1.6 mg/std.m{sup 3}CO{sub 2}), the total volumetric plugging that could occur due to complete condensation of Hg, or due to complete precipitation of Hg as cinnabar, results in a very small porosity change. In addition, Hg concentration much higher than the concentrations considered here would be required for Hg condensation to even occur. Concentration of aqueous Hg by water evaporation into CO{sub 2} is also unlikely because the higher volatility of Hg relative to H{sub 2}O at reservoir conditions prevents the Hg concentration from increasing in groundwater as dry CO{sub 2} sweeps through, volatilizing both H{sub 2}O and Hg. Using a model-derived aqueous solution to represent the formation water, batch reactive geochemical modeling show that the reaction of the formation water with the CO{sub 2}-Hg mixture causes the pH to drop to about 4.7 and then become buffered near 5.2 upon reaction with the sediments, with a negligible net volume change from mineral dissolution and precipitation. Cinnabar (HgS(s)) is found to be thermodynamically stable as soon as the Hg-bearing CO{sub 2} reacts with the formation water which contains small amounts of dissolved sulfide. Liquid mercury (Hg(l)) is not found to be thermodynamically stable at any point during the simulation. Two-dimensional radial reactive transport simulations of CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 14.8 kg/s into a 400 m-thick formation at isothermal conditions of 106°C and average pressure near 215 bar, with varying amounts of Hg and H{sub 2}S trace gases, show generally that porosity changes only by about ±0.05% (absolute, i.e., new porosity = initial porosity ±0.0005) with Hg predicted to readily precipitate from the CO{sub 2} as cinnabar in a zone mostly matching the single-phase CO{sub 2} plume. The precipitation of minerals other than cinnabar, however, dominates the evolution of porosity. Main reactions include the replacement of primarily Fe-chlorite by siderite, of calcite by dolomite, and of K-feldspar by muscovite. Chalcedony is also predicted to precipitate from the dissolution of feldspars and quartz. Although the range of predicted porosity change is quite small, the amount of dissolution and precipitation predicted for these individual minerals is not negligible. These reactive transport simulations assume that Hg gas behaves ideally. To examine effects of non-ideality on these simulations, approximate calculations of the fugacity coefficient of Hg in CO{sub 2} were made. Results suggest that Hg condensation could be significantly overestimated when assuming ideal gas behavior, making our simulation results conservative with respect to impacts on injectivity. The effect of pressure on Henry’s constant for Hg is estimated to yield Hg solubilities about 10% lower than when this effect is not considered, a change that is considered too small to affect the conclusions of this report. Although all results in this study are based on relatively mature data and modeling approaches, in the absence of experimental data and more detailed site-specific information, it is not possible to fully validate the results and conclusions.

  17. Elastic free-energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer based on the interactions of its constituent molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisam Asgari; Aisa Biria

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lipid-bilayers are the fundamental constituents of the walls of most living cells and lipid vesicles, giving them shape and compartment. The formation and growing of pores in a lipid bilayer have attracted considerable attention from an energetic point of view in recent years. Such pores permit targeted delivery of drugs and genes to the cell, and regulate the concentration of various molecules within the cell. The formation of such pores is caused by various reasons such as changes in cell environment, mechanical stress or thermal fluctuations. Understanding the energy and elastic behaviour of a lipid-bilayer edge is crucial for controlling the formation and growth of such pores. In the present work, the interactions in the molecular level are used to obtain the free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer. The resulted free-energy density includes terms associated with flexural and torsional energies of the edge, in addition to a line-tension contribution. The line tension, elastic moduli, and spontaneous normal and geodesic curvatures of the edge are obtained as functions of molecular distribution, molecular dimensions, cutoff distance, and the interaction strength. These parameters are further analyzed by implementing a soft-core interaction potential in the microphysical model. The dependence of the elastic free-energy of the edge to the size of the pore is reinvestigated through an illustrative example, and the results are found to be in agreement with the previous observations.

  18. Free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer based on the interactions of its constituent molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisam Asgari; Aisa Biria

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Lipid-bilayers are the fundamental constituents of the walls of most living cells and lipid vesicles, giving them shape and compartment. The formation and growing of pores in a lipid bilayer have attracted considerable attention from an energetic point of view in recent years. Such pores permit targeted delivery of drugs and genes to the cell, and regulate the concentration of various molecules within the cell. The formation of such pores is caused by various reasons such as changes in cell environment, mechanical stress or thermal fluctuations. Understanding the energy and elastic behaviour of a lipid-bilayer edge is crucial for controlling the formation and growth of such pores. In the present work, the interactions in the molecular level are used to obtain the free energy of the edge of an open lipid bilayer. The resulted free-energy density includes terms associated with flexural and torsional energies of the edge, in addition to a line-tension contribution. The line tension, elastic moduli, and spontaneous normal and geodesic curvatures of the edge are obtained as functions of molecular distribution, molecular dimensions, cutoff distance, and the interaction strength. These parameters are further analyzed by implementing a soft-core interaction potential in the microphysical model. The dependence of the elastic free-energy of the edge to the size of the pore is reinvestigated through an illustrative example, and the results are found to be in agreement with the previous observations.

  19. Mineralogical and physical considerations related to the separation and recovery of constituents from aluminum smelter by-products and wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plumpton, A.J.; Wilhelmy, J.F.; Blackburn, D.; Caouette, J.L. [Centre de Recherches Minerales, Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several by-products and waste products of aluminum smelting were characterized mineralogically and physically, in order to evaluate the potential for their decontamination or separation and recovery into valuable products using mineral processing techniques. The test samples were selected from among Bayer process red mud, bath-alumina mixture, cleaned anode butts, anode recycle residues, spent potlining, saltcake and fluorogypsum. Several of these materials were shown to be composed either of highly liberated, potentially separable mineral phases, or of locked minerals which could be partially liberated by grinding to smaller but practical particle sizes. An analysis of specific physical properties of the liberated constituent mineral phases was accompanied by preliminary experimental evaluation of their separability. An assessment was made of potential mineral processing techniques including size and form differentiation, gravitational and magnetic field separation, flotation, separation based on surface charging phenomena or work function, and pneumatic tabling. The results confirmed the suitability of low-cost physical separation techniques for the treatment of some by-products and wastes. This paper presents results of a preliminary evaluation of two smelter products. The conference paper will analyze and discuss in more detail the potential for the mineral processing of these and other smelter by-products and wastes.

  20. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, J.J.; Martin, S.J.; Mansure, A.J.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method are disclosed. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal microbalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recovery, transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products. 7 figs.

  1. Acoustic-wave sensor apparatus for analyzing a petroleum-based composition and sensing solidification of constituents therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spates, James J. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mansure, Arthur J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic-wave sensor apparatus and method. The apparatus for analyzing a normally liquid petroleum-based composition includes at least one acoustic-wave device in contact with the petroleum-based composition for sensing or detecting the presence of constituents (e.g. paraffins or petroleum waxes) therein which solidify upon cooling of the petroleum-based composition below a cloud-point temperature. The acoustic-wave device can be a thickness-shear-mode device (also termed a quartz crystal mircrobalance), a surface-acoustic-wave device, an acoustic-plate-mode device or a flexural plate-wave device. Embodiments of the present invention can be used for measuring a cloud point, a pour point and/or a freeze point of the petroleum-based composition, and for determining a temperature characteristic of each point. Furthermore, measurements with the acoustic-wave sensor apparatus can be made off-line by using a sample having a particular petroleum-based composition; or in-situ with the petroleum-based composition contained within a pipeline or storage tank. The acoustic-wave sensor apparatus has uses in many different petroleum technology areas, including the recover transport, storage, refining and use of petroleum and petroleum-based products.

  2. Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

  3. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid.

  4. Atomizing, continuous, water monitoring module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously analyzing volatile constituents of a liquid is described. The system contains a pump for continuously pumping the liquid to be tested at a predetermined flow rate into an extracting container through a liquid directing tube having an orifice at one end and positioned to direct the liquid into the extracting container at a flow rate sufficient to atomize the liquid within the extracting container. A continuous supply of helium carrier gas at a predetermined flow rate is directed through a tube into the extracting container and co-mingled with the atomized liquid to extract the volatile constituents contained within the atomized liquid. The helium containing the extracted volatile constituents flows out of the extracting container into a mass spectrometer for an analysis of the volatile constituents of the liquid. 3 figs.

  5. Comput Geosci DOI 10.1007/s10596-014-9415-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisch, Henrik

    carbon dioxide (CO2) with formation brine has been shown to be a signif- icant factor for the rate an upper region with CO2 and brine and the single-phase brine region beneath. However, due to interfacial stor- age potential [27]. Prior to injection, these formations are saturated with salty water (brine

  6. The significance of Rb-Sr glauconite ages, Bonneterre Formation, Missouri; Late Devonian-Early Mississippian brine migration in the midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, H.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Kish, S.A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rb-Sr mean model ages of 370 {plus minus} 10 Ma for glauconites from the Cambrian lower Bonneterre Formation in southern and central Missouri are in excellent agreement with a Rb-Sr isochron age of 359 {plus minus} 22 Ma for glauconites from the Magmont mine (Viburnum Trend) in the southeast Missouri lead district. The lower Bonneterre and Magmont mines ages probably reflect isotopic resetting, most likely associated with dolomitization and/or Mississippi Valley-type ore formation in the southeast Missouri lead district. The temporal relation between widespread dolomitization and ore formation in Missouri is unclear, but mounting evidence for two Devonian disturbances permits the following interpretation: (1) a Devonian timing (380-400 Ma) for widespread dolomitization, and (2) a Late Devonian-Early Mississippian timing (360-370 Ma) for ore formation in southeast Missouri. Late Devonian-Early Mississippian fluids associated with the earliest stages of collisional tectonics and metamorphism to the south and southeast may have been important in the formation of southeast Missouri ore deposits. These tectonically driven waters may themselves have been the Mississippi Valley-type ore fluids, entering Missouri by way of the Black Warrior basin and Reelfoot rift and/or the Arkoma basin. Alternatively, the movement of orogenic fluids hundreds of kilometers distant may have initiated and distally influenced the migration of more locally derived Mississippi Valley-type ore fluids. Broad regions of Missouri and adjacent areas experienced heating and crustal flexing in the Late Devonian, and consequently, preservation of elevated temperatures in Mississippi Valley-type fluids as they move great lateral distances may not be necessary for ore formation in southeast Missouri.

  7. Vapor-liquid equilibria of n-hexane + cyclohexane + n-heptane and the three constituent binary systems at 101. 0 kPa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan, D.S.; Shiau, H.Y.; Tsai, F.N. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the title ternary system and the three constituent binary systems have been measured at 101.0 kPa by using a dynamic equilibrium still. The binary data were tested for thermodynamic consistency and were correlated by the Wilson, NRTL, and UNIQUAC equations. Predictions for the ternary system by these equations have been compared with the experimental data.

  8. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

  9. Grains, Water Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Grains, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near the Shore Surf Induced Sand Dynamics Discussion Dry Granular Flows, Water Waves & Surf, Water & Wet Sand Onno Bokhove Introduction Dry Granular Chute Flows: Cantilever Water Waves: Bores Near

  10. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Chapter 14 Water Pollution #12;Factory-style hog farms in North Carolina Each pig produces, September 1999. #12;Hogs killed by flooding #12; Water pollution Common water pollutants Treating water pollution Wastewater treatment and renovation Learning Objectives #12; Water pollution refers

  11. KNOW YOUR WATER a consumer's guide to water sources, quality,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Pak Kin

    of common minerals and contaminants found in Arizona water sources. · Adescriptionofdrinkingwaterregulations...............................................15 2. Properties of Water 2.1 Minerals in Water...............................................23 2.2 Contaminants in Water......................................27 3. Water Quality and Regulations 3.1 Major Water

  12. Water Usage Law, Major Water Users (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any water user with the capability to withdraw or divert 100,000 gallons or more per day from any stream, river, lake, well, spring or other water source must register and file for a permit for...

  13. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

  14. The Role of Basis Set Superposition Error in Water Addition Reactions to Ln(III) Cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvamme, Brandon; Wander, Matthew C F.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal in this work was to characterize the importance of basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the reaction energetics of water addition to highly charged metal ions that exhibit strong ion-dipole interactions with water. The gas phase water addition reactions, M(H?O)³+N + H?O ? M(H?O)³+N ? ? [M = La(III), Lu(III); N = 0–8] have been studied, with a particular emphasis on a posteriori methods for calculating BSSE and its constituent energetic components as a function of M(H?O) ³+N cluster size and water basis set. Because of accumulation of BSSE within the subclusters in the reaction series, the successive reaction counterpoise method for determining the BSSE correction interaction energies is advocated.

  15. WATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of transportation, urban blight, agricultural practices, land use, etc. Water resources problems often result fromWATER RESOURCES ,'JEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING BUILDING formulate sound policy without a good deal of knowledge not presently available. Without adequate models

  16. Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Household Water Quality Home Water Quality Problems­ Causes and Treatments Blake Ross, Extension impurities can be corrected if they are a nuisance. Before beginning any treatment plan, have water tested select the most effective and economical treatment method. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications

  17. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    current pricing policies and legal structures. In analyzing energy-water relationships, wasteful may be obscured by others such as energy, environment, and quality of life, but in the long run of water to all major social issues is finally driven home. The energy crisis is a case in point. Water

  18. Water Use Permitting (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Withdrawers in the Great Lakes Basin who withdraw water in quantities that average 100,000 gallons per day or more in any 30-day period are required to get a water use permit. Two types of water...

  19. Reduction of Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, J.

    Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews...

  20. Water Rights (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality regulates the water rights for the state of Texas. Water and state water may be appropriated, stored, or diverted in the state of Texas for beneficial...

  1. Drinking Water Problems: Radionuclides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclides in drinking water can cause serious health problems for people. This publication explains what the sources of radionuclides in water are, where high levels have been found in Texas, how they affect health and how to treat water...

  2. Lawn Water Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  3. Water Quality Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Act establishes water conservation and protection, as well as the prevention, abatement, and control of water pollution, as the policy of the state of Montana. The Act establishes...

  4. Review: Globalization of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennant, Matthew Aaron

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’sAshok K. Globalization of Water: Sharing the Planet’s140) liters of virtual water (p. 15). This is one of the

  5. Lawn Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAfee, James

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is a limited resource in Texas. This booklet explains how homeowners can establish a water management program for a home lawn that both maintains a healthy sod and also conserves water. The publication discusses soil types, grass varieties...

  6. Saving Water Saves Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.; Whitehead, Camilla Dunham; Biermayer, Peter

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H. , Groves D. California Water 2030: An Efficient Future,Preemption of California’s Water Conservation Standards for2Epdf Biermayer P. Potential Water and Energy Savings from

  7. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power plants, water withdrawals for electricity generationelectricity generation in 2009 (33). Water used in thermal electric power plantsplant with CCS technologies requires roughly 1,000 gallons of water for every megawatt-hour of electricity generation (

  8. Water Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. Water Structure at Hematite-Water Interfaces. Abstract: The atomic-level structure of water at mineral surfaces is an important controlling...

  9. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 April, 2013. (4) 2010 Water Use Survey Summary Estimates –State Totals; Texas Water Development Board: Austin, TX,indicators for urban water systems. Urban Water. 2004, 4,

  10. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold water to the water heater and hot water from the waterinduced draft water heaters, water heaters with flue designsInput Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tank

  11. Report on Produced Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    purposes include water for hydraulic fracturing at oil and gas sites, water for power generation, dust control, and fire control. To initiate production Johnston et al....

  12. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requires water for land reclamation and revegetation (2).energy from coal. Land reclamation and coal burning tomain water uses are for land reclamation and revegetation.

  13. Drinking Water Problems: Copper 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  14. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm...

  15. Water Quality Standards (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the law that establishes the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency outlines the minimum water quality requirements for all surface waters of the state.

  16. Drinking Water Problems: Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of copper in drinking water can cause health problems. This publication explains the effects of copper in water and methods of removing it. 4 pp....

  17. Water Efficiency Goal Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) issued water efficiency goal guidance in Federal Agency Implementation of Water Efficiency and Management Provisions of Executive Order 13514. This...

  18. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  19. Effect of water in salt repositories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Gilpatrick, L.O.; Kitts, F.G.; Bronstein, H.R.; Shor, A.J.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional results confirm that during most of the consolidation of polycrystalline salt in brine, the previously proposed rate expression applies. The final consolidation, however, proceeds at a lower rate than predicted. The presence of clay hastens the consolidation process but does not greatly affect the previously observed relationship between permeability and void fraction. Studies of the migration of brine within polycrystalline salt specimens under stress indicate that the principal effect is the exclusion of brine as a result of consolidation, a process that evidently can proceed to completion. No clear effect of a temperature gradient could be identified. A previously reported linear increase with time of the reciprocal permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine was confirmed, though the rate of increase appears more nearly proportional to the product of sigma ..delta..P rather than sigma ..delta..P/sup 2/ (sigma is the uniaxial stress normal to the interface and ..delta..P is the hydraulic pressure drop). The new results suggest that a limiting permeability may be reached. A model for the permeability of salt-crystal interfaces to brine is developed that is reasonably consistent with the present results and may be used to predict the permeability of bedded salt. More measurements are needed, however, to choose between two limiting forms of the model.

  20. Sandia Energy - Water Infrastructure Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Security Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Decision Models for Integrating EnergyWater Water Infrastructure Security Water Infrastructure...

  1. Water-heating dehumidifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, John J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A water-heating dehumidifier includes a refrigerant loop including a compressor, at least one condenser, an expansion device and an evaporator including an evaporator fan. The condenser includes a water inlet and a water outlet for flowing water therethrough or proximate thereto, or is affixed to the tank or immersed into the tank to effect water heating without flowing water. The immersed condenser design includes a self-insulated capillary tube expansion device for simplicity and high efficiency. In a water heating mode air is drawn by the evaporator fan across the evaporator to produce cooled and dehumidified air and heat taken from the air is absorbed by the refrigerant at the evaporator and is pumped to the condenser, where water is heated. When the tank of water heater is full of hot water or a humidistat set point is reached, the water-heating dehumidifier can switch to run as a dehumidifier.

  2. 2010 Water & Aqueous Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dor Ben-Amotz

    2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Water covers more than two thirds of the surface of the Earth and about the same fraction of water forms the total mass of a human body. Since the early days of our civilization water has also been in the focus of technological developments, starting from converting it to wine to more modern achievements. The meeting will focus on recent advances in experimental, theoretical, and computational understanding of the behavior of the most important and fascinating liquid in a variety of situations and applications. The emphasis will be less on water properties per se than on water as a medium in which fundamental dynamic and reactive processes take place. In the following sessions, speakers will discuss the latest breakthroughs in unraveling these processes at the molecular level: Water in Solutions; Water in Motion I and II; Water in Biology I and II; Water in the Environment I and II; Water in Confined Geometries and Water in Discussion (keynote lecture and poster winners presentations).

  3. Modeling Interfacial Liquid Layers in Environmental Ices SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Symbol Quantity ice wf Fugacity of pure ice brine wf^ Fugacity of water in brine layer vap wf Fugacity of water in vapor space above ice wf Fugacity of pure liquid water wx Mole fraction of water in brine layer ice wH Enthalpy of ice at T, P 0,ice wH Enthalpy of ice at reference state brine wH Partial molar

  4. WaterSense Program: Methodology for National Water Savings Analysis Model Indoor Residential Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fixtures Market Overview: Water Savings Potential forNew Jersey. American Water Works Association ResearchResidential End Uses of Water (REUWS). 1999. American Water

  5. Irrigation Water Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Lemon, Robert G.; Stichler, Charles

    2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Irrigation water quality is determined by the total amounts of salts and the types of salts the water contains. In this publication you'll learn why well water can be salty, what problems salty water can cause, what tests should be done...

  6. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    table The water table itself may cross many layers. Extraction of water from confined and unconfinedTD 603 Water Resources Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni/ Lecture 5: Aquifer () August 16 above and below the ground, which affect the water balance. surface features affect infiltration

  7. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    , effectiveness of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This report is for continued water Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto- sampler and data sonde. The Portland site. Garret Bridge site. 2 #12;Figure 2 Portland site. METHODS The Garrett Bridge site is a full storm-water

  8. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    for the training of scientists in water resources. Through the years, projects have included irrigation, ground water modeling, non-point source pollution, quality of ground water and surface water, efficient septic heavy metals from pasture soil amended with varying rates of poultry litter Basic Information Title

  9. Water Waves Roger Grimshaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,2) provide a kinematic description of water waves, which to this point means that the conditionsWater Waves Roger Grimshaw May 7, 2003 Abstract A short review of the theory of weakly nonlinear water waves, prepared for the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Nonlinear Science 1 Introduction Water waves

  10. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beans Carrots Cucumbers Eggplant Peas Peppers Summer Squash Pumpkins Tomatoes Watermelon Winter Squash Water

  11. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of Water Use; (2) Nonpoint Source Pollution; (3) Meeting Water Requirements; (4) Energy-Water Relationships development. (2) Water Pollution and Water Quality Control - Nonpoint Source Pollution Definition: Degradation of water quality from nonpoint source pollution. (3) Water Use Efficiency Definition: Minimize water use

  12. Environmental assessment of ground water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming. Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is an environmental assessment of the Spook, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. It analyzes the impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed action for ground water compliance. The proposed action is to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for the UMTRA Project sites (40 CFR Part 192) by meeting supplemental standards based on the limited use ground water at the Spook site. This proposed action would not require site activities, including ground water monitoring, characterization, or institutional controls. Ground water in the uppermost aquifer was contaminated by uranium processing activities at the Spook site, which is in Converse County, approximately 48 miles (mi) (77 kilometers [km]) northeast of Casper, Wyoming. Constituents from the site infiltrated and migrated into the uppermost aquifer, forming a plume that extends approximately 2500 feet (ft) (800 meters [m]) downgradient from the site. The principal site-related hazardous constituents in this plume are uranium, selenium, and nitrate. Background ground water in the uppermost aquifer at the site is considered limited use. It is neither a current nor a potential source of drinking water because of widespread, ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using treatment methods reasonably employed in public water supply systems (40 CFR {section} 192.11 (e)). Background ground water quality also is poor due to first, naturally occurring conditions (natural uranium mineralization associated with an alteration front), and second, the effects of widespread human activity not related to uranium milling operations (uranium exploration and mining activities). There are no known exposure pathways to humans, animals, or plants from the contaminated ground water in the uppermost aquifer because it does not discharge to lower aquifers, to the surface, or to surface water.

  13. Halite depositional facies in a solar salt pond: A key to interpreting physical energy and water depth in ancient deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (USA))

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subaqueous deposits of aragonite, gypsum, and halite are accumulating in shallow solar salt ponds constructed in the Pekelmeer, a sea-level salina on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles. Several halite facies are deposited in the crystallizer ponds in response to difference in water depth and wave energy. Cumulate halite, which originates as floating rafts, is present only along the protected, upwind margins of ponds where low-energy conditions foster their formation and preservation. Cornet crystals with peculiar mushroom- and mortarboard-shaped caps precipitate in centimetre-deep brine sheets within a couple of metres of the upwind or low-energy margins. Downwind from these margins, cornet and chevron halite precipitate on the pond floors in water depths ranging from a few centimetres to {approximately} 60 cm. Halite pisoids with radial-concentric structure are precipitated in the swash zone along downwind high-energy shorelines where they form pebbly beaches. This study suggests that primary halite facies are energy and/or depth dependent and that some primary features, if preserved in ancient halite deposits, can be used to infer physical energy conditions, subenvironments such as low- to high-energy shorelines, and extremely shallow water depths in ancient evaporite basins.

  14. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  15. Be Water Smart 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W aterSmart, a water conservation program, uses a unique approach to protect and conserve water quality and quantity in upper Texas Gulf Coast urban landscapes. Part of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program (TCWP), WaterSmart is creating rain... gardens as just one method of demonstrating how water conservation can function in an attractive landscape. In December of 2005, the first demonstration WaterSmart rain garden was established at the Bay Area Courthouse Annex in Clear Lake City...

  16. Be Water Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swyden, Courtney

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W aterSmart, a water conservation program, uses a unique approach to protect and conserve water quality and quantity in upper Texas Gulf Coast urban landscapes. Part of the Texas Coastal Watershed Program (TCWP), WaterSmart is creating rain... gardens as just one method of demonstrating how water conservation can function in an attractive landscape. In December of 2005, the first demonstration WaterSmart rain garden was established at the Bay Area Courthouse Annex in Clear Lake City...

  17. The Separation of Tritiated Water Using Supported Polyphosphazene Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, James B. (CHEMMET LTD); Nelson, David A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboxylated poly(diaryloxy)phosphazene was examined as the active constituent of the composite membranes to separate tritiated water (HTO) from light water. These membranes were tested with water containing 10 800 pCi/l and 3 mu-Ci/l of tritiated water, respectively, under cross-flow filtration conditions. Reductions in the permeate of nearly 30% HTO were observed with these tritium concentrations. Low temperature (5 degrees C), low pressure (137.9-551.6 kPa), and high pH (near 10 or above) were required to obtain such reductions (rejection). Salt species (Na2SO4, CaCl2 and CaSO4) at various concentrations and pressures, within a 137.9-551.6 kPa range, did not appear to affect the HTO separation efficiency. Mass balances performed during these experiments indicate an unaccounted small amount of tritium (0.5-2.2%). Sorption experiments with the polyphosphazene suggest that the membrane does not operate by an ion exchange mechanism; that is, tritium accumulation within the membrane.

  18. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  19. Reactor water cleanup system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.; Taft, W.E.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor water cleanup system includes a reactor pressure vessel containing a reactor core submerged in reactor water. First and second parallel cleanup trains are provided for extracting portions of the reactor water from the pressure vessel, cleaning the extracted water, and returning the cleaned water to the pressure vessel. Each of the cleanup trains includes a heat exchanger for cooling the reactor water, and a cleaner for cleaning the cooled reactor water. A return line is disposed between the cleaner and the pressure vessel for channeling the cleaned water thereto in a first mode of operation. A portion of the cooled water is bypassed around the cleaner during a second mode of operation and returned through the pressure vessel for shutdown cooling. 1 figure.

  20. Questions About Your Cooling Water System That You Need To Ask

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J. V.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and corrode the system rapidly. HOW CAN I DETERMINE WHAT TREATMENT I NEED? First, you must have tests performed on the water. The chemical constituents must be identified. Your system must be defined in terms of its sca1 ing and foul ing tendencies by a...IANT TO TEST ONE OF THE NON-CHEMICAL TREATMENT OEVICES? Fine. Just recognize it may not be effective, and evaluate the risk involved. Try to be scientific in terms of taking measurements during a control period prior to the insertion of the device...

  1. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lfuen operated w:l.thout sludge recirculation, this pilotcould lead to problems with sludge accumulation there. Ifby recirculation of part of the sludge coming out of the

  2. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  3. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  4. 6, 70757091, 2006 precipitation in brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be produced on the frozen surface of sea ice (Adams et al., 2002), this source would quickly be exhausted in polar regions over recently formed sea ice, we can model successfully the transformation of inert sea of already activated bromine (Borken, 1996; Sander et al., 1997), or artificially acidified the model aerosol

  5. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRAM-04-07 Audit Report: OAS-M-04-07BUDGET DETAILS BOOKBarton V.Batteries

  6. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Type Termciting TypeCounty,

  7. Water resources data, Kentucky. Water year 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, D.L.; Byrd, F.D.; Brown, A.C.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Water resources data for the 1991 water year for Kentucky consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams and lakes; and water-levels of wells. This report includes daily discharge records for 115 stream-gaging stations. It also includes water-quality data for 38 stations sampled at regular intervals. Also published are 13 daily temperature and 8 specific conductance records, and 85 miscellaneous temperature and specific conductance determinations for the gaging stations. Suspended-sediment data for 12 stations (of which 5 are daily) are also published. Ground-water levels are published for 23 recording and 117 partial sites. Precipitation data at a regular interval is published for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurement and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System operated by the US Geological Survey and cooperation State and Federal agencies in Kentucky.

  8. Endothelial cell permeability to water and antipyrine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrick, R.A.

    1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The endothelium provides a structural barrier between plasma constituents and the tissues. The permeability characteristics of the the endothelial cells regulate the transcellular movement of materials across this barrier while other movement is paracellular. In this study the permeability of the endothelial cells to tritiated water (/sup 3/HHO) and /sup 14/C-labeled antipyrine (AP) was investigated. The cells were isolated non-enzymatically from calf pulmonary artery and were maintained in culture and used between the seventh and fifteenth passage. The cells were removed from the T-flasks with a rubber policeman, titurated with a 22g needle and centrifuged. The cells were mixed with an extracellular marker, drawn into polyethylene tubing and packed by centrifugation for use in the linear diffusion technique. All measurements were made at 37 C. The diffusion coefficients for /sup 3/HHO through the packed cells (D), the intracellular material (D/sub 2/), and the extracellular material (D/sub 1/) were 0.682, 0.932 and 2.45 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ and for AP were 0.273, 0.355 and 1.13 x 10/sup -5/ cm/sup 2/ s/sup -1/ respectively. The permeability coefficient calculated by the series-parallel pathway model for /sup 3/HHO was higher than that for AP and for both /sup 3/HHO and AP were lower than those calculated for isolated lung cells and erythrocytes.

  9. Calcifying Cyanobacteria - The potential of biomineralization for Carbon Capture and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, Christer G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water produced from petroleum production or geological CO 2production or CCS can be cultured in marine waters, saline drainage water, or brine from petroleum

  10. What's your water footprint? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower..., the time of day you run your sprinkler system, and how long the water runs while you brush your teeth. Conservation in such everyday tasks is important, but water experts have begun to use a more all-encompassing survey of water use by calculating...

  11. What's your water footprint?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower..., the time of day you run your sprinkler system, and how long the water runs while you brush your teeth. Conservation in such everyday tasks is important, but water experts have begun to use a more all-encompassing survey of water use by calculating...

  12. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  13. Water & Energy Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Poornima Group of Colleges, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India #12;Executive Summary This document for Poornima Group's conservation efforts over the next eight years. PGC currently maintains an unsustainable method of water use Environmental Crisis Poornima Group of Colleges Water

  14. A gathering of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Naomi Leah, 1970-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The act of immersion is a powerful catalyst for the affirmation or transformation of identity. How we place ourselves in water expresses cultural valuations of our bodies, water, and social relations, as well as categories ...

  15. General Water Quality (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this water quality rule is to protect, maintain and improve the quality of waters of the State. Any applicant for a federal license, permit or project to conduct any activity...

  16. Water Quality (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Act establishes cumulative remedies to prevent, abate and control the pollution of the waters of the state. The act establishes responsibilities of the Oklahoma Department of...

  17. State Water Quality (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the Commonwealth of Virginia to: (1) protect existing high quality state waters and restore the quality of all other state waters to permit all reasonable public uses and...

  18. Drinking Water Problems: Perchlorate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Porter, Dana; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Perchlorate is a potential contaminate of well water that can have harmful effects on human health. Methods of removing perchlorate from water are described and illustrated. There is information to help well owners select and maintain treatment...

  19. Water Pollution Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Water Pollution Control Board are tasked with the prevention of pollution in the waters of the state. The Board may adopt rules and...

  20. Drinking Water Problems: Arsenic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Dozier, Monty

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of arsenic in drinking water can poison and even kill people. This publication explains the symptoms of arsenic poisoning and common treatment methods for removing arsenic from your water supply....

  1. Federal Water Use Indices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides water use indices as a guide for Federal agencies. Note that each is a rough estimate of water usage at different types of sites. Your site may vary considerably.

  2. Water, Sun, Energy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water, Sun, Energy Water, Sun, Energy Released: March 20, 2012 Novel method yields highly reactive, highly hydroxylated TiO2 surface The team's new method is a two-step...

  3. Electrophoretic Clarification of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiler, E. A.; Lyle, W. M.

    There is an ever growing need for new and superior water treatment methods which will remove the alarming growth and variety of pollutants present in our waters. Suspended particulate matter such as clay, algae, and bacteria are troublesome...

  4. Indian Water 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Indian Water is a call to help plan a national water summit. This strategic session consist of a facilitated dialog with tribal leaders on important opportunities, challenges and tactics, which...

  5. Walking on water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W. M.

    The ingenious methods employed by insects and spiders to move across a water surface rely on microphysics that is of little use to larger water walkers but of considerable interest to the microfluidics community.

  6. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage. Power towers capture energy from the sun reflectedtower where water or molten salt is flowing to absorb the solar energy.towers or ponds). For liquid fuels, increased reliance on bioenergy will increase the correlation of water and energy

  7. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Needs breath. Adding compost to sandy soils helps thesoil retain water longer—the compost acts like a sponge,from applications of compost and other organic matter. For

  8. Drinking Water Problems: Benzene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Drinking water in Texas sometimes contains potentially harmful chemicals, including benzene. Well owners can learn how to treat their well water to remove these chemicals. 4 pages, 3 images...

  9. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  10. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 4.5 Water-Energy SustainabilityWater Distribution System Water-energy Sustainability ToolWastewater-energy Sustainability Tool v   Acknowledgements

  11. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    with WaterGAP 2.1, Universities of Frankfurt & Kassel 2007; Population data based on GPW - Version 3, Center

  12. Water Conservation Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Martha

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinach Beets Bush, Pole Beans Carrots Cucumbers Eggplant Peas Peppers Summer Squash Pumpkins Tomatoes Watermelon Winter Squash Water

  13. Water Management Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Energy Star Programs ? www.epa.gov/watersense www.energystar.gov ? Conserve Florida Water Clearinghouse ? http://www.conservefloridawater.org/ ? Arizona Department of Water Resources ? www.azwater.gov/conservation The True Cost of Water... Future Demands Municipal Manufacturing Mining Steam Electric Agriculture New Codes & Standards Green Certification& Labeling Programs ? Green Restaurants, Hotels, etc. ? Green Guide for Health Care ? LEED ? GBI ? EPA Water Sense ? EPA...

  14. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    -photosynthesis, energy transfer in animals, and so on. Life as we know it is water-centric (and organic carbon 20, 2012 6 / 17 #12;Water availability Total renewable (defined using the water cycle) per-capita, per year. Country cu. m. Congo 275,000 Canada 94,000 Brazil 48,000 Mongolia, Indonesia 13,000 Japan

  15. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  16. Energy-Water Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) energy and water are interconnected; (2) new energy sources will place increased demands on water supplies; (3) existing energy sources will be subjected to increasing restrictions on their water use; and (4) integrated decision support tools will need to be developed to help policy makers decide which policies and advanced technologies can address these issues.

  17. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    of best management practices and trends in water quality. SCOPE This project is a cooperative effort Bridge, AR and near Portland, AR. The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station with auto;METHODS The Garret Bridge site is a full storm-water sampling station. It uses an automatic sampler

  18. California's Water Energy Relationship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION California's Water ­ Energy Relationship Prepared in Support The California's Water-Energy Relationship report is the product of contributions by many California Energy, Lorraine White and Zhiqin Zhang. Staff would also like to thank the members of the Water-Energy Working

  19. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Frank S. (Farmersville, OH); Silver, Gary L. (Centerville, OH)

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  20. PROCEEDINGS Stockholm Water Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    -0127 The Joint Conference 7th Stockholm Water Symposium1 3rd InternationalConference a11 tlie Enviro~~mnent;~l Ma.A.G.M, a Systematic Approach to Lake Water Pollution Assessment, - Eindhoven: University of Technology, Eindhoven Assessment, Water Pollution in the Catchment of Lake Victoria, Dares Salaam, Tanzania, August, 1994

  1. Water treatment method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, F.S.; Silver, G.L.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for reducing the concentration of any undesirable metals dissolved in contaminated water, such as waste water. The method involves uniformly reacting the contaminated water with an excess amount of solid particulate calcium sulfite to insolubilize the undesirable metal ions, followed by removal thereof and of the unreacted calcium sulfite.

  2. Water Quality Control Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Water Quality Control Act (WQCA) establishes the water pollution control program. The WQCA identifies the responsibilities and extent of authority for the Commissioner of the Water Quality...

  3. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super recycled water: quenching computers Super recycled water: quenching computers New facility and methods support conserving water and creating recycled products. Using reverse...

  4. Planning Water Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenstein, William; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of Maryland Water Policy Collaborative, 2006.FURTH ER READ ING California Department of Water Resources.California Water Plan Update 2005: A Framework for Action.

  5. Ground Water Management Act (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Ground Water Management Act of 1992, Virginia manages ground water through a program regulating the withdrawals in certain areas called Ground Water Management Areas (GWMA). Currently,...

  6. Using solubility and Henry`s law constant data for ketones in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaws, C.L.; Sheth, S.D.; Han, M. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a chemical spill occurs in water, the extent of chemical contamination is determined by the chemical`s solubility in the water. If contaminated water comes into contact with air, such as in a pond or a storage vessel, the contaminant`s emissions into the air can be determined based upon Henry`s law constant for that particular constituent. A high Henry`s law constant value translates into a greater emissions level. The engineering design and operation of strippers to remove contaminants from water require data for both water solubility and Henry`s law constant. A new correlation developed by researchers at Lamar University provides reliable values down to very, very low concentrations for the solubility of ketones in water. The correlation is based on the boiling point temperature of the ketone and can be used for engineering studies involving health, safety and environmental considerations. Results for water solubility and Henry`s law constant are provided here for a wide variety of ketones. Representative values are about 249,000 parts per million (ppm) per weight (wt) for methyl ethyl ketone (C{sub 4}H{sub 8}O) and 360 ppm/wt for 5-nonanone (C{sub 9}H{sub 18}O).

  7. Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources” in Berkeley, June 1–2, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPA’s mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}–brine might occur.

  8. Water Quality and Quantity Concerns Population growth, increasing water demands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    systems, private water well screening, and soil nutrient management. Water conservation programs of Agri, efficient use, sustainable practices, watershed management and environmental stewardship. Through 660 and utilizing water-conservation practices will be essential to sustain the state's water supply

  9. The Relationship between Water and Energy: Optimizing Water and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley, T.; Fennessey, K.; Light, R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    understanding that the highest value opportunities for water conservation usually exist where there is the strongest interaction of water and energy. Steam management systems, process cooling, high quality water production and waste water treatment represent...

  10. Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 5: Public supply water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000. water withdrawals, 2000.

  11. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION WITH ANOZIE EBIGBO, ANDREAS BIELINSKI, ANDREAS KOPP, HOLGER CLASS, RAINER HELMIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    . It takes into account the two phases CO2 and brine and the components CO2 and water which can dissolve the conceptual model for a non-isothermal composi- tional CO2-water (brine) model based on the simulator MUFTE. MODEL For the description of the flow and transport processes of carbon dioxide and brine in a rock

  12. Profiling Float Observations of the Upper Ocean Under Sea Ice off the Wilkes Land Coast of Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    the water column is weakly stratified due to brine rejection and is therefore only marginally stable brine rejection associated with sea ice formation results in dense shelf waters, which mix, the salt in seawater is excluded. The expelled salt remains as pockets of brine in the ice until it slowly

  13. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  14. Geothermal Water Use: Life Cycle Water Consumption, Water Resource Assessment, and Water Policy Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Schroeder, Jenna N.

    This report examines life cycle water consumption for various geothermal technologies to better understand factors that affect water consumption across the life cycle (e.g., power plant cooling, belowground fluid losses) and to assess the potential water challenges that future geothermal power generation projects may face. Previous reports in this series quantified the life cycle freshwater requirements of geothermal power-generating systems, explored operational and environmental concerns related to the geochemical composition of geothermal fluids, and assessed future water demand by geothermal power plants according to growth projections for the industry. This report seeks to extend those analyses by including EGS flash, both as part of the life cycle analysis and water resource assessment. A regional water resource assessment based upon the life cycle results is also presented. Finally, the legal framework of water with respect to geothermal resources in the states with active geothermal development is also analyzed.

  15. Long Term Field Development of a Surfactant Modified Zeolite/Vapor Phase Bioreactor System for Treatment of Produced Waters for Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn Katz; Kerry Kinney; Robert Bowman; Enid Sullivan; Soondong Kwon; Elaine Darby; Li-Jung Chen; Craig Altare

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using a combined physicochemical/biological treatment system to remove the organic constituents present in saline produced water. In order to meet this objective, a physical/chemical adsorption process was developed and two separate biological treatment techniques were investigated. Two previous research projects focused on the development of the surfactant modified zeolite adsorption process (DE-AC26-99BC15221) and development of a vapor phase biofilter (VPB) to treat the regeneration off-gas from the surfactant modified zeolite (SMZ) adsorption system (DE-FC26-02NT15461). In this research, the SMZ/VPB was modified to more effectively attenuate peak loads and to maintain stable biodegradation of the BTEX constituents from the produced water. Specifically, a load equalization system was incorporated into the regeneration flow stream. In addition, a membrane bioreactor (MBR) system was tested for its ability to simultaneously remove the aromatic hydrocarbon and carboxylate components from produced water. The specific objectives related to these efforts included the following: (1) Optimize the performance VPBs treating the transient loading expected during SMZ regeneration: (a) Evaluate the impact of biofilter operating parameters on process performance under stable operating conditions. (b) Investigate how transient loads affect biofilter performance, and identify an appropriate technology to improve biological treatment performance during the transient regeneration period of an SMZ adsorption system. (c) Examine the merits of a load equalization technology to attenuate peak VOC loads prior to a VPB system. (d) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/VPB to remove BTEX from produced water in a field trial. (2) Investigate the feasibility of MBR treatment of produced water: (a) Evaluate the biodegradation of carboxylates and BTEX constituents from synthetic produced water in a laboratory-scale MBR. (b) Evaluate the capability of an SMZ/MBR system to remove carboxylates and BTEX from produced water in a field trial. Laboratory experiments were conducted to provide a better understanding of each component of the SMZ/VPB and SMZ/MBR process. Laboratory VPB studies were designed to address the issue of influent variability and periodic operation (see DE-FC26-02NT15461). These experiments examined multiple influent loading cycles and variable concentration loadings that simulate air sparging as the regeneration option for the SMZ system. Two pilot studies were conducted at a produced water processing facility near Farmington, New Mexico. The first field test evaluated SMZ adsorption, SMZ regeneration, VPB buffering, and VPB performance, and the second test focused on MBR and SMZ/MBR operation. The design of the field studies were based on the results from the previous field tests and laboratory studies. Both of the biological treatment systems were capable of removing the BTEX constituents in the laboratory and in the field over a range of operating conditions. For the VPB, separation of the BTEX constituents from the saline aqueous phase yielded high removal efficiencies. However, carboxylates remained in the aqueous phase and were not removed in the combined VPB/SMZ system. In contrast, the MBR was capable of directly treating the saline produced water and simultaneously removing the BTEX and carboxylate constituents. The major limitation of the MBR system is the potential for membrane fouling, particularly when the system is treating produced water under field conditions. The combined process was able to effectively pretreat water for reverse osmosis treatment and subsequent downstream reuse options including utilization in power generation facilities. The specific conclusions that can be drawn from this study are summarized.

  16. WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    103 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;Q:\\COMP\\WATER1\\WRPA December 29, 2000 #12;105 WATER RESOURCES PLANNING ACT [As Amended Through P.L. 106­580, Dec. 29, 2000 planning of water and related land resources, through the establishment of a water resources council

  17. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;' Our Mission The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse aims to advance the science and technology of sustainable water management through fundamental and applied research. Our Vision To be Australia's leading research centre for water reuse

  18. SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;2 The SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse was established in 2004 as a joint venture between the South Australian Water Corporation and the University of South Australia (UniSA), adding significant expertise to the water research capability in South

  19. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Input Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tankthe house. Supply pipe – this is the water heater inlet pipewith refills the water heater with cold water Note: The TANK

  20. Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

  1. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air. For a storage tank water heater, the greater the hotthe water heater with cold water Note: The TANK program usesof a natural draft tank type water heater can be without

  2. Calcite dissolution kinetics and solubility in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl brines of geologically relevant composition at 0.1 to 1 bar pCO2 and 25 to 80°C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in the following discussion is a brief description of the general distribution and diagenetic origin of the major elements that comprise subsurface waters. Much of this discussion is based on review papers by Hanor (1994a) and Kharaka and Hanor (2004). 1....5.1. Nomenclature In this dissertation I have adopted the terminology of Kharaka and Hanor (2004) when describing subsurface waters. This will include the use of salinity being synonymous with total dissolved solids (TDS), generally reported in milligrams per...

  3. Mitigation, Adaptation, Uncertainty -- Growing Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felsen, Martin; Dunn, Sarah

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system for harvesting and returning clean water to Lakeharvesting for landscape and species health, and surface water and

  4. Selecting a new water heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the types of water heaters available (storage water heaters, demand water heaters, heat pump water heaters, tankless coil and indirect water heaters, and solar water heaters). The criteria for selection are discussed. These are capacity, efficiency rating, and cost. A resource list is provided for further information.

  5. Arsenic removal from water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C. (Edgewood, NM); Anderson, D. Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for removing arsenic from water by addition of inexpensive and commonly available magnesium oxide, magnesium hydroxide, calcium oxide, or calcium hydroxide to the water. The hydroxide has a strong chemical affinity for arsenic and rapidly adsorbs arsenic, even in the presence of carbonate in the water. Simple and commercially available mechanical methods for removal of magnesium hydroxide particles with adsorbed arsenic from drinking water can be used, including filtration, dissolved air flotation, vortex separation, or centrifugal separation. A method for continuous removal of arsenic from water is provided. Also provided is a method for concentrating arsenic in a water sample to facilitate quantification of arsenic, by means of magnesium or calcium hydroxide adsorption.

  6. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  7. Technology in water conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  8. The Mystery of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsson, Anders

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is essential for our existence on this planet - critical to countless physical, biological, geological and chemical processes - it has defied scientific understanding. Exhibiting peculiar properties such as increased density upon melting and high surface tension, water is one of the most intriguing problems in condensed matter and chemical physics. Current research at SSRL, however, is illuminating the nature of H-bonding, presenting exciting new avenues of research and challenging existing models of water's structure.

  9. Water Pollution Fee (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Groundwater Program regulates discharge to groundwater under Part 31, Water Resources Protection, of the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act, 1994 PA 451 and Part 22 Rules....

  10. Water Pollution (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states regulations for water quality standards, effluent standards, monitoring and reporting methods, sewer discharge criteria and information about permits. It is the purpose of...

  11. Water Conservation Best Practices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal sites across the country are incorporating water efficiency measures as part of their overall comprehensive UESC projects. As it becomes more difficult to secure internal funding for...

  12. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation of 17,445 TWh (69). 4.2 Thermal Electric Powergeneration in 2009 (33). Water used in thermal electric

  13. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  14. What's In My Water?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .The salts in conductivity levels are conductivity levels. allow for too much water to evaporate water are not just table high, evaluate other from the surface, or where soils are salt, but are often a individual characteristics naturally high in salts...- tive safety margin. You can have your water analyzed by a government agency or a private company. 13 Salt: an organic or inorganic com- pound that is subject to dissociation when water is added, resulting in a dis- tinct increase in specific anions...

  15. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA: An Integrated Assessment Part 4. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, Allison M.; Brown, Robert A.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Srinivasan, Ragahvan; Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply a suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios that could occur over the next century as atmospheric CO2 concentrations reach double the pre-industrial level to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States. In Part 4 we examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the US as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The changes in water yield driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than +/-50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest US. Interannual variability is likely to increase with reduced water yield but decrease with wetter conditions.

  16. Effects of buoyancy source composition on multiphase plume behavior in stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments are performed where a dense multiphase plume is released vertically in a salinity stratified ambient. The constituent phase composition of the initial buoyancy flux can be dense brine, particles, or a mixture ...

  17. Tidal-Fluvial and Estuarine Processes in the Lower Columbia River: I. Along-channel Water Level Variations, Pacific Ocean to Bonneville Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay, D. A.; Leffler, K.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This two-part paper provides comprehensive time and frequency domain analyses and models of along-channel water level variations in the 234km-long Lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCRE) and documents the response of floodplain wetlands thereto. In Part I, power spectra, continuous wavelet transforms, and harmonic analyses are used to understand the influences of tides, river flow, upwelling and downwelling, and hydropower operations ("power-peaking") on the water level regime. Estuarine water levels are influenced primarily by astronomical tides and coastal processes, and secondarily by river flow. The importance of coastal and tidal influences decreases in the landward direction, and water levels are increasingly controlled by river flow variations at periods from ?1day to years. Water level records are only slightly non-stationary near the ocean, but become increasingly irregular upriver. Although astronomically forced tidal constituents decrease above the estuary, tidal fortnightly and overtide variations increase for 80-200km landward, both relative to major tidal constituents and in absolute terms.

  18. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  19. Effect of various solvents on core behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irby, Tom L

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Section of Core Holder with Core 12 6. Effect of Dri-Film on Sessile Drop Ratios of Kerosene on Silica Crystals in Brine 7. Bar Graph Showing Results of Water Flood Test 8. Plot of Resistivity vs. Brine Saturation for Tests No. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 14 27 9. Plot... Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations For Displacement of Brine with Kerosene 35 III. Electrical Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations for Displacement of Brine with East Texas Crude-Kerosene Mixture 36 ABSTRACT Recently...

  20. WATER RESOURCES NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    ) Grand Island, Chadron, Oconto, Valentine. NIOBRARA, NEBRASKA--nOVING The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is moving the small tovm of Niobrara, i4ebraska. The town is in danger of flooding by Gavins Point Dam in irrigation water on agriculture throughout Colorado River~s 1,400 mile long system was announced by Secretary

  1. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkansas Water Resources Center WATER RESOURCES ASPECTS OF COAL TRANSPORTATION BY SLURRY PIPELINE Electric Power Production with Transmission by EHV Power lines 8 Coal Slurry Pipelining versus Rail Shipment. 10 General Description of the Coal Slurry Pipelining Process. 14 History of Coal Slurry Pipelines

  2. Watering the Sun Corridor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Watering the Sun Corridor Managing Choices in Arizona's Megapolitan Area #12;#12;Managing ChoicesSored by Printing generously provided by SRP. Watering the Sun Corridor Tom Buschatzke, City of Phoenix Peter Culp i C y | 5 Introduction............................................7 I. The Sun Corridor

  3. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    states. Recycling of nutrients and organic matter is essential in reducing the need for fertilization closely with colleges, universities and other organizations in Arkansas to address the states water Descriptors: animal waste, feed additive, water quality, land application, non-point source pollution

  4. Drinking Water Problems: MTBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methyl tertiary-butyl ether, a gasoline additive commonly known as MTBE, can contaminate ground water and cause health problems for those exposed to it for a long time. However, filtering devices can remove this and other additives from well water...

  5. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  6. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    Arkan- sas in order to determine the effect of local manganese, phosphate, pyrite, lead-zinc and uranium manganese district. Hydrogeochemical exploration for these types of manganese deposits appears possible .,.:;, Water Quality. 18 Comparison of Water Chemistry. 27 Geochemical Exploration. 30 Four Minera 1i zed Areas

  7. Water Resources Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    . Agricultural, Industrial and Domestic 4 Annexure III: Water recycling technologies Wastewater and Industrial water re-treatment Tariff mechanism. 5 Annexure IV and V: Non-agricultural and agricultural tariffs. 6, accessibility, Quantity and timeliness. Agriculture Domestic Industry 21 % 23 % 56 % pg. 12: Principles, tariff

  8. Arkansas Water Resources Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soerens, Thomas

    officials on the new Phase II Storm Water NPDES regulations and Best Management Practices available requirements. In addition, they are typically unaware of Best Management Practices (BMPs) that are availableArkansas Water Resources Center STORMWATER POLLUTION PREVENTION BMP WORKSHOP, DEMONSTRATION

  9. Water Waves and Integrability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossen I. Ivanov

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Euler's equations describe the motion of inviscid fluid. In the case of shallow water, when a perturbative asymtotic expansion of the Euler's equations is taken (to a certain order of smallness of the scale parameters), relations to certain integrable equations emerge. Some recent results concerning the use of integrable equation in modeling the motion of shallow water waves are reviewed in this contribution.

  10. Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High levels of nitrates in drinking water can be harmful for very young infants and susceptible adults. This publication explains how people are exposed to nitrates, what health effects are caused by them in drinking water and how to remove them....

  11. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING . . . July 1973 The final report of the National Water Commission entitled Water Policies for the Future has been issued. Because its con- cluslons -a-rid -re-commend-atlOnsmay have far-reaching effects on water

  12. WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    WATER RESOURCES NEWS NEBRASKA WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 212 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING OF THE DIRECTOR . . . April 1973 NEBRASKA AND THE NATIONAL WATER COMMISSION REPORT The National Water Commission grew out of con t r-ovc rey over water resource deve lopment in the Colorado River Basin. Rp

  13. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  14. Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacAdam, Keith

    Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply · Approximately 49 inches

  15. The floating water bridge The floating water bridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podgornik, Rudolf

    The floating water bridge The floating water bridge Elmar C. Fuchs1 , Jakob Woisetschläger2 , Karl ____________________________________________ Abstract When high voltage is applied to distilled water filled into two glass beakers which are in contact, a stable water connection forms spontaneously, giving the impression of a floating water bridge. A detailed

  16. Hardness of water.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahul Oza

    This project is helpful to those people who live in the coastal based and they are suffering every year with problem of safe drinking water and not available throughout the year. It has given ideas, technology and economical way of solution for water crisis and it’s also solving problem of scare by use of different methods to development evelopment new water source in water scare area of Saurashtra and Kutch in Gujarat. Saurashtra land is containing of different types of minerals specially bauxite, calcite, fluoride so many mineral based industries are developed here and those who continuous nuous need this as raw materials and they used many mines and processes units. These minerals are creating problem to polluted ground water some are melting and increasing TDS more than 6000 mg/l and

  17. INEEL Source Water Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehlke, Gerald

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) covers approximately 890 mi2 and includes 12 public water systems that must be evaluated for Source water protection purposes under the Safe Drinking Water Act. Because of its size and location, six watersheds and five aquifers could potentially affect the INEEL’s drinking water sources. Based on a preliminary evaluation of the available information, it was determined that the Big Lost River, Birch Creek, and Little Lost River Watersheds and the eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer needed to be assessed. These watersheds were delineated using the United States Geologic Survey’s Hydrological Unit scheme. Well capture zones were originally estimated using the RESSQC module of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Well Head Protection Area model, and the initial modeling assumptions and results were checked by running several scenarios using Modflow modeling. After a technical review, the resulting capture zones were expanded to account for the uncertainties associated with changing groundwater flow directions, a thick vadose zone, and other data uncertainties. Finally, all well capture zones at a given facility were merged to a single wellhead protection area at each facility. A contaminant source inventory was conducted, and the results were integrated with the well capture zones, watershed and aquifer information, and facility information using geographic information system technology to complete the INEEL’s Source Water Assessment. Of the INEEL’s 12 public water systems, three systems rated as low susceptibility (EBR-I, Main Gate, and Gun Range), and the remainder rated as moderate susceptibility. No INEEL public water system rated as high susceptibility. We are using this information to develop a source water management plan from which we will subsequently implement an INEEL-wide source water management program. The results are a very robust set of wellhead protection areas that will protect the INEEL’s public water systems yet not too conservative to inhibit the INEEL from carrying out its missions.

  18. Mathematics 3C Summer 2009 Worksheet 5, August 20th, TA Grace Kennedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    at 5 liters per minute. The salt water mixes in with the fresh water and the brine exits by a funnel

  19. Math 1272 30 "PRACTICE" MIDTERM EXAM 2 6 March 2011 1.) Find the length of the curve.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliver, Robert

    of salt dissolved in 4000 L of water. Brine that contains 0.05 kg salt per liter of water enters the tank

  20. Research Portfolio Accomplishment Report Unconventional Oil ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of brines brings added regulatory scrutiny; therefore, achievement of even partial removal of salts from produced water-a process called demineralization-can improve water...