Sample records for brine brine string

  1. Cathodic protection in oilfield brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turnipseed, S.P. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc., Houston, TX (US))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the use of cathodic protection (CP) to mitigate internal and corrosion-related failures that occur in the produced brine phase of oilfield tanks and production vessels is discussed. Unique considerations covered include brine properties, CP system selection, installation details, monitoring, and coatings.

  2. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chemistry of silica in Cerro Prieto brine may profitably be14 mg·l-1 AND SYNTHFTIC CERRO PRIETO BRINES High Ca We112Q.by the CFE Laboratory at Cerro Prieto and kindly provided to

  3. Brining studies at Pepper Products Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okoro, John Daniel

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Department) A. B. Childers (Member) V. E. Sweat (Member) December 1988 Abstract Optimum brining conditions, causes of secondary fermentation, and salt fluctuation were investigated. Jalapeno peppers held in brine solution undergo lactic acid... fermentation, controlled by level of acidification and concentration of salt. Only brining at 7. 5% NaCl, with no added acetic acid, resulted in loss of all fermentable sugars. However, salt concentration fluctuated widely in this sample. Brining in 25...

  4. Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman; (U of Wyoming)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

  5. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial County, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Development Operations Hypersaline...

  6. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-10166 CERRO-PRIETO-12 XICAN-AMERICANCOOPERATIVE' PROGRAM T THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD ICHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES Oleh Weres Leon

  7. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-10166 CERRO-PRIETO-12 XICAN-AMERICANCOOPERATIVE' PROGRAM T THE CERRO PRIETO GEOTHERMAL FIELD ICHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES Oleh Weres Leon

  8. THE MECHANISM OF INTRAGRANULAR MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machiels, A.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Brine Inclusions in a Salt Repository", ORM. -5526 (JulyOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT A.J. Machiels, S. Yagnik, D.R.OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by A.J. Machiels S. Yagnik D.R.

  9. Biomass production from inland brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reach, C.D. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of utilizing inland saline waters to produce biomass through the application of marine aquaculture was investigated. From available data, the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and the crustacea Artemia salina were selected as the experimental marine organisms. The proposed diatom served to establish primary productivity and concurrently provide a food source for the herbivorus crustacea. The objective of the first phase research was to investigate the ability of P. tricornutum and A. salina to survive in the inland saline environment. Clarified activated sludge and anaerobic digester effluents were evaluated as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Experimental results indicated that diatom and crustacea growth in the inland brine was equivalent to control cultures utilizing seawater. Wastewater effluents were successful as nutrient sources for the diatom cultures. Bioassay experiments conducted with petroleum related brines yielded mixed results respect to the survival and growth of the P. tricornutum and A. salina organisms. A second series of experiments involved cholornaphthalene, chlorophenanthene, and chlorophenanthrene, and chloroanthracene as the experimental hydrocarbons. Results of the diatom studies show chloroanthracene to induce toxic effects at a concentration of 500 ug/L. Artemia studies showed no acutely toxic effects relative to the test hydrocarbons at 50 and 100 ug/L.

  10. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  11. THERMAL GRADIENT MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagnik, S.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT Suresh K. Yagnik February 1982 TOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by Suresh K. Yagnik Materialsb u i l t in future. The salt deposits, however, are known

  12. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

    2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  13. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments fromofBatteries from Brine Batteries from Brine March 31, 2014

  14. Biochemical processes for geothermal brine treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M.; Joshi-Tope, G.; Zhou, W.; Shelenkova, L.; Wilke, R.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL`s Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines, (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  15. BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES FOR GEOTHERMAL BRINE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREMUZIC,E.T.; LIN,M.S.; BOHENEK,M.; JOSHI-TOPE,G.; ZHOU,W.; SHELENKOVA,L.; WILKE,R.

    1998-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the DOE Geothermal Energy Program, BNL's Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) project is aimed at the development of cost-efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the disposal of geothermal wastes. Extensive chemical studies of high and low salinity brines and precipitates have indicated that in addition to trace quantities of regulated substances, e.g., toxic metals such as arsenic and mercury, there are significant concentrations of valuable metals, including gold, silver and platinum. Further chemical and physical studies of the silica product have also shown that the produced silica is a valuable material with commercial potential. A combined biochemical and chemical technology is being developed which (1) solubilizes, separates, and removes environmentally regulated constituents in geothermal precipitates and brines (2) generates an amorphous silica product which may be used as feedstock for the production of revenue generating materials, (3) recover economically valuable trace metals and salts. Geothermal power resources which utilize low salinity brines and use the Stretford process for hydrogen sulfide abatement generate a contaminated sulfur cake. Combined technology converts such sulfur to a commercial grade sulfur, suitable for agricultural use. The R and D activities at BNL are conducted jointly with industrial parties in an effort focused on field applications.

  16. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  17. Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective ofthis research is to provide quantitative data on the equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of aluminum minerals required to model changes in permeability and brine chemistry associated with fluid/rock interactions in the recharge, reservoir, and discharge zones of active geothermal systems. This requires a precise knowledge of the thermodynamics and speciation of aluminum in aqueous brines, spanning the temperature and fluid composition rangesencountered in active systems. The empirical and semi-empirical treatments of the solubility/hydrolysis experimental results on single aluminum mineral phases form the basis for the ultimate investigation of the behavior of complex aluminosilicate minerals. The principal objective in FY 1998 was to complete the solubility measurements on boehmite (AIOOH) inNaC1 media( 1 .O and 5.0 molal ionic strength, IOO-250°C). However, additional measurements were also made on boehmite solubility in pure NaOH solutions in order to bolster the database for fitting in-house isopiestic data on this system. Preliminary kinetic Measurements of the dissolution/precipitation of boehmite was also carried out, although these were also not planned in the earlier objective. The 1999 objectives are to incorporate these treatments into existing codes used by the geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

  18. Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

  19. The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spongberg, Martin Edward

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    feasibility. The methodology is utilized to make a preliminary evaluation of a proposed brine injection project in the Dove Creek area of King and Stonewall Counties, North Central Texas. Four known deep aquifers are modeled, using the SWIFT/486 software...

  20. acartia tonsa brine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also...

  1. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    1 Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone models. As a step toward this, network flow models were used to simulate the flow of CO2-saturated brine

  2. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential August 21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1...

  3. Gas Content of Gladys McCall Reservoir Brine A Topical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gas t o brine ratio. This w i l l result i n cubic feet of methane, ethane, propane, etc. per barrel of brine, Then, the contributions from sample points are added until...

  4. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow possible migration of Marcellus brine through naturally occurring pathways. The occurrences of saline water, because of natural hydraulic connections to deeper formations. formation water isotopes Marcellus Shale

  5. Constraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    Constraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes Gisela November 2000 Abstract Brines from three depressions along the axis of the Red Sea, the Atlantis II II and the Discovery brines originating from locations in the central Red Sea show 4 He

  6. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake lineae (RSL), thought to represent seasonal brines, has sparked interest in analogous environments watershed and show that this, together with small amounts of meltwater, are capable of generating brines

  7. Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems Fabrice J. Fontaine1 and brine phases. Time series of vent temperature and salinity (chlorinity) show that some black-smoker vent below seawater for over a decade, which raises important questions concerning the fate of brines

  8. of brine heterogeneity in modern sedimentary basins (6) imply inefficiency of mixing and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyce, C. Kevin

    of brine heterogeneity in modern sedimentary basins (6) imply inefficiency of mixing and the potential for preservation of individual, metal- charged brine reservoirs that could be tapped at some later. The observation that the texturally later brines have higher metal contents is consistent with this model

  9. Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    Brine fluxes from growing sea ice A. J. Wells,1,2 J. S. Wettlaufer,1,2,3 and S. A. Orszag2] It is well known that brine drainage from growing sea ice has a controlling influence on its mechanical oceans. When the ice has exceeded a critical thickness the drainage process is dominated by brine

  10. On the Reliability of Numerical Solutions of Brine Transport in Groundwater: Analysis of In ltration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergamaschi, Luca

    On the Reliability of Numerical Solutions of Brine Transport in Groundwater: Analysis of In#12, brine transport List of symbols c normalized salt concentration c k l value of concentration on triangle:37; p.2 #12; Reliability of Numerical Simulations of Brine Transport in Groundwater 3 equivalent

  11. Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    Accurate Thermodynamic Model for the Calculation of H2S Solubility in Pure Water and Brines Zhenhao mineral solubility in H2S saturated brines. An example calculation for galena solubility is given. 1 gasification process.5,6 Sequestration of the gases into geological brine formation is one of the promising

  12. WERE AQUEOUS RIPPLES ON MARS FORMED BY FLOWING BRINES? MICHAEL P. LAMB, JOHN P. GROTZINGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WERE AQUEOUS RIPPLES ON MARS FORMED BY FLOWING BRINES? MICHAEL P. LAMB, JOHN P. GROTZINGER are not observed. Recent thermodynamic modeling indicates that these brines could have had higher densities (by up whether ripples could have been stable bed forms under flowing Martian brines. To this end, we compiled

  13. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines: Current developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Bohenek, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Energy Science and Technology Div.; Bajsarowicz, V. [CET Environmental Services, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States); McCloud, M. [C.E. Holt/California Energy, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1997-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) which deals with the development and application of processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges has led to the identification and design of cost-efficient and environmentally friendly treatment methodology. Initially the primary goal of the processing was to convert geothermal wastes into disposable materials whose chemical composition would satisfy environmental regulations. An expansion of the r and D effort identified a combination of biochemical and chemical processes which became the basis for the development of a technology for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges. The new technology satisfies environmental regulatory requirements and concurrently converts the geothermal brines and sludges into commercially promising products. Because the chemical composition of geothermal wastes depends on the type of the resource, the emerging technology has to be flexible so that it can be readily modified to suit the needs of a particular type of resource. Recent conceptional designs for the processing of hypersaline and low salinity brines and sludges will be discussed.

  14. Oil production enhancement through a standardized brine treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, A.; Watson, R.; Tian, S.; Safargar, S.; Heckman, S.; Drielinger, I.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to permit the environmentally safe discharge of brines produced from oil wells in Pennsylvania to the surface waters of the Commonwealth and to rapidly brings as many wells as possible into compliance with the law, the Pennsylvania Oil and Gas Association (POGAM) approached the Pennsylvania State University to develop a program designed to demonstrate that a treatment process to meet acceptable discharge conditions and effluent limitations can be standardized for all potential stripper wells brine discharge. After the initial studies, the first phase of this project was initiated. A bench-scale prototype model was developed for conducting experiments in laboratory conditions. The experiments pursued in the laboratory conditions were focused on the removal of ferrous iron from synthetically made brine. Iron was selected as the primary heavy metals for studying the efficiency of the treatment process. The results of a number of experiments in the lab were indicative of the capability of the proposed brine treatment process in the removal of iron. Concurrent with the laboratory experiments, a comprehensive and extensive kinetic study was initiated. This study was necessary to provide the required data base for process modeling. This study included the investigation of the critical pH as well as the rate and order of reactions of the studied elements: aluminum, lead, zinc, and copper. In the second phase of this project, a field-based prototype was developed to evaluate and demonstrate the treatment process effectiveness. These experiments were conducted under various conditions and included the testing on five brines from different locations with various dissolved constituents. The outcome of this research has been a software package, currently based on iron`s reactivity, to be used for design purposes. The developed computer program was refined as far as possible using the results from laboratory and field experiments.

  15. Proper use of sodium bisulfite with minimal salt penetration during brine immersion freezing of shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Suzanne Rene

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solution reduced the 41 120 100 0 0 80 E CL CL CV g 60 CL 40 20 ? ~ 0:23, CaCI2. NaCI ? ? & 5:18, Caclz. NaCI ? ? 0 8:15, CaCI2. NaCI 0 4 6 Days on Ice 10 Figure 13-Residual sulfur dioxide on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen... freezing for two trials. 34 13-Residual sulfur dioxide on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen in different brine immersion media 41 Figure 14- Black spot development on thawed brine frozen shrimp frozen in different brine immersion media Page 42...

  16. Analysis of anions in geological brines using ion chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, R.M.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion chromatographic procedures for the determination of the anions bromide, sulfate, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate, and iodide in brine samples have been developed and are described. The techniques have been applied to the analysis of natural brines, and geologic evaporites. Sample matrices varied over a range from 15,000 mg/L to 200,000 mg/L total halogens, nearly all of which is chloride. The analyzed anion concentrations ranged from less than 5 mg/L in the cases of nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate, to 20,000 mg/L in the case of sulfate. A technique for suppressing chloride and sulfate ions to facilitate the analysis of lower concentration anions is presented. Analysis times are typically less than 20 minutes for each procedure and the ion chromatographic results compare well with those obtained using more time consuming classical chemical analyses. 10 references, 14 figures.

  17. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE of imbibition or oil production rate, particularly after seven days or more aging time with oil. However in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine

  18. A cost-effective statistical screening method to detect oilfield brine contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alyanak, N.; Grace, J.T.; Campbell, M.D. [United Resources International, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistical screening method has been developed using Tolerance Limits for barium (Ba{sup +2}) to identify contamination of a fresh-water aquifer by oilfield brines. The method requires an understanding of the local hydrochemistry of oilfield brines, inexpensive, Publicly available hydrochemical data, a single sample analysis from the suspect well and the application of a simple statistical procedure. While this method may not provide absolute evidence of oilfield brine contamination of a fresh-water aquifer, it does identify conditions where brine contamination is a strong probability over other possible sources of chlorides.

  19. Pressure Buildup and Brine Migration During CO2 Storage in Multilayered Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    . Introduction Carbon dioxide capture combined with geologic stor- age (CCS) in suitable subsurface formations-6584.2012.00972.x potentially creating far-ranging pressure buildup and brine displacement in deep CO2 storage of resident brine caused by CCS operations require modeling/analysis tools of considerable complexity (Celia

  20. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Available online 23 December 2011 Keywords: Uranium Salinity Sea ice Brine Seawater Arctic UraniumConservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a, ,1 disequilibrium The conservative behavior of uranium (U) with respect to salinity in open ocean waters is widely

  1. RIS-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RISØ-M-2260 HEAT GRADIENT INDUCED MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN ROCK SALT Mathematical treatment project. Abstract. A mathematical model for the brine migration in rock salt around an infinite line heat source is set up. The tempera- ture field around the time dependent heat source is calculated by use

  2. Validation of classical density-dependent solute transport theory for stable, high-concentration-gradient brine displacements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    -concentration-gradient brine displacements in coarse and medium sands S.J. Watson a,1 , D.A. Barry a,1 , R.J. Schotting b,*, S by a brine solution, under either constant head or constant volume flux conditions. The experimental data, significantly less ex- perimental research has been conducted to investigate high-concentration (e.g., brine

  3. PII S0016-7037(01)00901-2 Effect of light and brine shrimp on skeletal 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    PII S0016-7037(01)00901-2 Effect of light and brine shrimp on skeletal 13 C in the Hawaiian coral, or high concentrations of brine shrimp. Decreases in light from 100% resulted in significant decreases. Increases in brine shrimp concentrations resulted in increased skeletal 13 C levels. This unexpected outcome

  4. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine 2004; accepted 21 April 2004; published 1 July 2004. [1] Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation due to brine this period. The density increase terminated abruptly in late February, while the active brine rejection

  5. PII S0016-7037(01)00579-8 The origin and evolution of base metal mineralising brines and hydrothermal fluids,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    PII S0016-7037(01)00579-8 The origin and evolution of base metal mineralising brines are the source of the mineralising fluids. Cl and Br systematics suggest that the brines were formed either cation composition (Na, Ca, K, Mg) of the brines is not consistent solely with evaporation processes

  6. Seizing a species : the story of the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wotipka, Samuel Alex

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1950s, C.C. "Sparkplug" Sanders began harvesting brine shrimp from Utah's Great Salt Lake. Sanders built up a small business selling their eggs, called "cysts, to aquarium stores across the country. During the ...

  7. Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soils and Brine Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Hyperarid Desert Playa, Ouargla Basin, Algerian. The chemical and mineralogical specificity of this hyperarid ecosystem has been compared to other areas under

  8. Behavior of type 304 and type 316 austenitic stainless in 55% lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Elias, O. (Ben-Gurion Univ., Beer-Sheva (Israel). Dept. of Materials Engineering)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical tensile specimens of AISI type 304 (UNS S30400) and type 316 (UNS S31600) stainless steels (SS) were tested under constant-load conditions in 55% lithium bromide (LiBr) heavy brines at temperatures of 120 C and 140 C. Elongation and open-circuit potential (OCP) were recorded during the tensile test. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements were conducted, and the failed surface fractures were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The tested SS were subjected to stress corrosion under the test environments. Sensitivity was affected strongly by pH values. In LiBr brine of pH = 11.6, the passivation processes were more effective than in brine of pH = 6 [approximately] 8. Because of effective passivation behavior in brine of pH = 11.6, lower values of [delta]l[sub 0] were measured, indicating lower dislocation relaxation processes and high resistance to stress corrosion cracking.

  9. New Energy Efficient Method for Cleaning Oilfield Brines with Carbon Dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, C. T.; Seibert, A. F.; Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water contaminated with hydrocarbons often results during the production of oil. The polluted water, which may be naturally occurring or a result of water or steam flooding operations, must be cleaned before disposal or re-injection. These brines...

  10. Pathogenicity of a pseudomonad bacterium to larvae of penaeid and brine shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Chu-Liang

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1982 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology PATHOGENICITY OF A PSEUDOMONAD BACTERIUM TO LARVAE OF PENAEID AND BRINE SHRIMP A Thesis by CHU-LIANG HUANG Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member...) (Member) (Head of Department) August 1982 ABSTRACT Pathogenicity of a Pseudomonad Bacterium to Larvae of Penaeid and Brine Shrimp (August 1982) Chu-Liang Huang, B. S , National Taiwan University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald H. Lewis A...

  11. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  12. Developing a Process for Commercial Silica Production from Geothermal Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourcier, W; Martin, S; Viani, B; Bruton, C

    2001-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Useful mineral by-products can be produced from geothermal brines. Although silica has many commercial uses, problems remain in producing a marketable product. We are conducting laboratory and modeling studies aimed at optimizing for rubber additive use, the properties of silica precipitates from Salton Sea and Coso-like geothermal fluids, Our goal is to develop a robust technique for producing silicas that have desirable physical and chemical properties for commercial use, while developing a generic understanding of silica precipitation that will allow extraction to be extended to additional fluid types, and to be easily modified to produce new types of marketable silica. Our experiments start with an acidified geothermal fluid similar to those treated by pH modification technology. Silica precipitation is induced by adding base and/or adding Mg or Ca salts to affect the nature of the precipitate. For the analog Salton Sea fluids, adding base alone caused silica to precipitate fairly rapidly. To date, we have characterized precipitates from experiments in which the final pH varied from 4 to 8, where NaOH and Na{sub 2}C0{sub 3} were added as bases, and CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} were added as salts. SEM photos of the silica precipitates from the Salton Sea and Cos0 fluids show that the silica particles are clusters of smaller silica particles down to the resolution of the SEM (about 80-100 nm in diameter). The particle sizes and surface areas of silicas from the Salton Sea and Coso analog brines are similar to the properties of the Degussa silica commonly used as a rubber additive. An evaluation of the strength of the silica-organic bond as tested by dispersion in oil (polybutadiene) was inconclusive. Neither the Degussa materials nor our laboratory precipitates dispersed readily in nor dispersed down to the fundamental particle size. Preliminary NMR data indicates that the Degussa silica has a smaller degree of silica polymerization (a slightly smaller average number of Si-0 bonds per silica tetrahedron) than the synthetic samples, but a comparable degree of hydrogen bonding of the surface silanol sites.

  13. Hard-bottom macrofauna of the East Flower Garden brine seep: impact of a long term, point-source brine discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gittings, Stephen Reed

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    canyon transect were sta- tions R6 and R7, both of which were on top of Cottonwick Rock, ap- proximately 2 m above the canyon floor. Figure 5 (p. 12) shows that salinity and sulfide at these stations were at normal marine levels. Though the total...HARD-BOT1'OM MACROFAUNA OF THE EAST FLOWER GARDEN BRINE SEEP: IMPACT OF A LONG TERM, POINT-SOURCE BRINE DISCHARGE A Thesis by STEPHEN REED GITTINGS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  14. Brine-in-crude-oil emulsions at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemer, Martin B.; Lord, David L.; MacDonald, Terry L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion formation could occur in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern if water were to flow into the crude-oil layer at a sufficient rate. Such a situation could arise during a drawdown from a cavern with a broken-hanging brine string. A high asphaltene content (> 1.5 wt %) of the crude oil provides the strongest predictor of whether a metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion will form. However there are many crude oils with an asphaltene content > 1.5 wt % that don't form stable emulsions, but few with a low asphaltene content that do form stable emulsions. Most of the oils that form stable emulsions are %E2%80%9Csour%E2%80%9D by SPR standards indicating they contain total sulfur > 0.50 wt %.

  15. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  16. Numerical simulations of lab-scale brine-water mixing experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalil, Imane; Webb, Stephen Walter

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory-scale experiments simulating the injection of fresh water into brine in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern were performed at Sandia National Laboratories for various conditions of injection rate and small and large injection tube diameters. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code FLUENT was used to simulate these experiments to evaluate the predictive capability of FLUENT for brine-water mixing in an SPR cavern. The data-model comparisons show that FLUENT simulations predict the mixing plume depth reasonably well. Predictions of the near-wall brine concentrations compare very well with the experimental data. The simulated time for the mixing plume to reach the vessel wall was underpredicted for the small injection tubes but reasonable for the large injection tubes. The difference in the time to reach the wall is probably due to the three-dimensional nature of the mixing plume as it spreads out at the air-brine or oil-brine interface. The depth of the mixing plume as it spreads out along the interface was within a factor of 2 of the experimental data. The FLUENT simulation results predict the plume mixing accurately, especially the water concentration when the mixing plume reaches the wall. This parameter value is the most significant feature of the mixing process because it will determine the amount of enhanced leaching at the oil-brine interface.

  17. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume III. Biological oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began discharging brine into the Gulf of Mexico from its West Hackberry site near Cameron, Louisiana in May 1981. The brine originates from underground salt domes being leached with water from the Intracoastal Waterway, making available vast underground storage caverns for crude oil. The effects of brine discharge on aquatic organisms are presented in this volume. The topics covered are: benthos; nekton; phytoplankton; zooplankton; and data management.

  18. Sorption of cesium and strontium from concentrated brines by backfill barrier materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winslow, C D

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sorption of radionuclides from potentially intruding groundwater at a nuclear waste repository is a major chemical function of backfill barriers. In this study, various materials (including clays, zeolites and an inorganic ion exchanger) were screened for the sorption of the fission products cesium and strontium in concentrated brines. Representative brines A and B for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed radioactive waste repository and test facility in bedded salt were used. Sorption properties were quantified using empirical distribution coefficients, k/sub d/. Of the materials examined, sodium titanate had the highest k/sub d/ for the sorption of Sr(II) in both brine A (k/sub d/ = 125 ml/g) and brine B(k/sub d/ = 500 to 600 ml/g). A mordenite-type zeolite was the most effective getter for Cs(I) in brine A (k/sub d = 27 ml/g), while illite yielded the highest k/sub d/ for Cs(I) in brine B (k/sub d/ = 115 ml/g). The relative merit of these k/sub d/ values is evaluated in terms of calculated estimates of breakthrough times for a backfill barrier containing the getter. Results show that a backfill mixture containing these getters is potentially an effective barrier to the migration of Sr(II) and Cs(I), although further study (especially for the sorption of cesium from brine A) is recommended. Initial mechanistic studies revealed competing ion effects which would support an ion exchange mechanism. K/sub d/'s were constant over a Sr(II) concentration range of 10/sup -11/ to 10/sup -5/ M and a Cs(I) concentration range of 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -5/ M, supporting the choice of a linear sorption isotherm as a model for the results. Constant batch composition was shown to be attained within one week.

  19. Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: Pore-scale studies in micromodels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accumulation of residual water in pendular structuresAfter drainage, the residual water remained as thick filmsdisplaced brine), the residual water was initially retained

  20. Developing a process for commercial silica production from Salton Sea brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourcier, W; McCutcheon, M; Leif, R; Bruton, C

    2000-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this joint LLNL-CalEnergy project is to develop a method for precipitating marketable silica from spent Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF) brines. Many markets for silica exist. We have initially targeted production of silica as a rubber additive. Silica reinforced rubber gives tires less rolling resistance, greater tear strength, and better adhesion to steel belts. Previous silica precipitates produced by CalEnergy from Salton Sea brines were not suitable as rubber additives. They did not to disperse well in the rubber precursors and produced inferior rubber. CalEnergy currently minimizes silica scaling in some of their production facilities by acidifying the brine pH. The rate of silica precipitation slows down as the pH is lowered, so that energy extraction and brine reinfection are possible without unacceptable amounts of scaling even with more than 700 ppm SiO{sub 2} in solution. We are adding a step in which a small amount of base is added to the acidified brine to precipitate silica before reinfection. By carefully controlling the type, rate, and amount of base addition, we can optimize the properties of the precipitate to approach those of an ideal rubber additive.

  1. Modeling gas and brine migration for assessing compliance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Helton, J. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Swift, P. [Tech. Reps., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the WIPP Project Integration Office (WPIO) of the DOE, the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has completed preliminary uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration away from the undisturbed repository. This paper contains descriptions of the numerical model and simulations, including model geometries and parameter values, and a summary of major conclusions from sensitivity analyses. Because significant transport of contaminants can only occur in a fluid (gas or brine) medium, two-phase flow modeling can provide an estimate of the distance to which contaminants can migrate. Migration of gas or brine beyond the RCRA ``disposal-unit boundary`` or the Standard`s accessible environment constitutes a potential, but not certain, violation and may require additional evaluations of contaminant concentrations.

  2. Exposure and effects of oilfield brine discharges on western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J. [National Biological Survey, Laurel, MD (United States); Capizzi, J.L. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); King, K.A. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Phoenix, AZ (United States); LeCaptain, L.J. [Fish and Wildlife Service, Spokane, WA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge of oilfield brines into fresh and estuarine waters is a common disposal practice in Texas. Petroleum crude oil (PCO) extraction from underground stores includes the removal of a significant amount of water along with the oil. Several methods may be used to separate the oil and water fractions, including tank batteries, heat separation, and skimming ponds. Disposal of the resultant produced water (oilfield brine) may be accomplished by deep-well injection or discharge to surface waters. In Texas, an estimated 766,000 barrels of oilfield brine were discharged daily into tidal waters in 1979. The maximum concentration for oil and grease in these discharges permitted by the Texas Railroad Commission is 25 ppm. Several studies have shown that oilfield brines are toxic to a wide range of marine life, yet little is known about their effects on birds and mammals. Exposure to petroleum in oilfield wastes could evoke toxicological effects in some waterbird species. Avian responses to PCO exposure are highly variable, including cessation of growth, osmoregulatory impairment, endocrine dysfunction, hemolytic anemia, altered blood chemistry, cytochrome P450 induction, reduced reproductive success, and mortality. Oilfield brine discharges may soon be the largest and most pervasive source of contaminants entering Texas estuaries. Migratory and resident birds feeding in the vicinity of discharge sites may be ingesting food items contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, heavy metals and salts in sufficient quantities to evoke toxicity. The present study of wintering western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) that feed and roost near discharge sites sought to examine oilfield brine exposure and effects through quantification of contaminant burdens, morphological characteristics, and cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenase activities. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice-sealed'' east

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Formation and character of an ancient 19-m ice cover and underlying trapped brine in an ``ice bed year-round. New ice-core analysis and tempera- ture data show that beneath 19 m of ice is a water°C. The ice cover thickens at both its base and surface, sealing concentrated brine beneath. The ice

  4. Repassivation of 13% Cr steel dependent on brine pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skogsberg, J.W.; Walker, M.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint laboratory project, involving an oil production and oil well service company, investigated repassivation of martensitic 13% Cr steel. The rate at which this alloy is repassivated after losing its protective passive oxide layer to hydrochloric acid (HCI) depended on the pH of the spent acid returns. Test samples of 13% Cr cut from oilfield tubing were subjected to a fluid sequence of (1) initial brine, (2) HCI, (3) spent acid, and (4) final brine. In 9 days, the samples regained their passive oxide layers. When spent acid was taken out of the fluid sequence, the samples regained passive oxide layers in 3 days.

  5. Brine transport studies in the bedded salt of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McTigue, D.F.; Nowak, E.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brine flow has been measured to unheated boreholes for periods of a few days and to heated holes for two years in the WIPP facility. It is suggested that Darcy flow may dominate the observed influx of brine. Exact solutions to a linearized model for one-dimensional, radial flow are evaluated for conditions approximating the field experiments. Flow rates of the correct order of magnitude are calculated for permeabilities in the range 10/sup -21/ to 10/sup -20/ m/sup 2/ (1 to 10 nanodarcy) for both the unheated and heated cases. 20 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Brine release based on structural calculations of damage around an excavation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munson, D.E.; Jensen, A.L.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); DeVries, K.L. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a large in situ experimntal circular room, brine inflow was measured over 5 years. After correcting for evaporation losses into mine ventilation air, the measurements gave data for a period of nearly 3 years. Predicted brine accumulation based on a mechanical ``snow plow`` model of the volume swept by creep-induced damage as calculated with the Multimechanism Deformation Coupled Fracture model was found to agree with experiment. Calculation suggests the damage zone at 5 years effectively exends only some 0.7 m into the salt around the room. Also, because the mecahnical model of brine release gives an adequate explanation of the measured data, the hydrological process of brine flow appears to be rapid compared to the mechanical process of brine release.

  7. PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehoshua, Kolodny

    PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Valley waters being mixtures of fresh water with saline brines. Ra is efficiently extracted from surrounding rocks into the brine end member. 228 Ra/226 Ra ratios are exceptionally low 0.07 to 0.9, mostly

  8. PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    PII S0016-7037(99)00441-X Sub sea floor boiling of Red Sea Brines: New indication from noble gas in revised form December 8, 1999) Abstract--Hydrothermal brines from the Atlantis II Deep, Red Sea, have been depressions filled by highly saline brines (Hartmann et al., 1998a). The Atlantis II Deep, located

  9. Brine-assisted anatexis: Experimental melting in the system haplograniteH2ONaClKCl at deep-crustal conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Brine-assisted anatexis: Experimental melting in the system haplogranite­H2O­NaCl­KCl at deep2O ¼ 0:34 it is 0.55. This "brine trend" is similar to, but more pronounced than, the trend-rich granites. Minimum-melting curves in the presence of brines of constant XH2O have strongly positive d

  10. NOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , eggs and spores of many taxa within the sediments and residual water of their ballast tanks (Niimi a voluntary "best management practices" approach for residual ballast water and sediment for NOBOB vesselsNOBOB-S: Salinity/Brine Exposure as a Biocide for Application to NOBOB Residuals Primary

  11. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice M.J. McGuinness \\Lambda , H a programme recently set up to directly measure the thermal conductivity of young sea ice. An array of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted

  12. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp Production Radomir Schmidt,, Prapakorn Tantoyotai, Sirine C. Fakra, Matthew A, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2, Canada United States Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, SJVASC

  13. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

  14. Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Dema A

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfate is one of the most problematic ions present in reject brine in desalination systems due to its high potential of scale formation and membrane fouling; making it an obstacle in the application of zero liquid discharge. The ultra-high lime...

  15. Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Salt Brine Blending to Optimize Deicing and Anti-icing Performance and Cost Effectiveness Stephen J in Method? #12;Deicing and Anti-icing Treatments ·Sodium Chloride (NaCl) ·Cargill, NA Salt ·Magnesium Chloride (MgCl2) w/additives ·Envirotech Serv., Scotwood Ind., NA Salt ·Calcium Chloride (CaCl2) ·Tiger

  16. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were performed to quantify the penetration depth and width of the oil jet. The measured penetration depths were shallow, as predicted by penetration-depth models, in agreement with the assumption that the flow is buoyancy-dominated, rather than momentum-dominated. The turbulent penetration depth model overpredicted the measured values. Both the oil-brine and oil-sludge-brine systems produced plumes with hydrodynamic characteristics similar to the simulant liquids previously examined, except that the penetration depth was 5-10% longer for the crude oil. An unexpected observation was that centimeter-size oil 'bubbles' (thin oil shells completely filled with brine) were produced in large quantities during oil injection. The mixing experiments also used layers of oil, sludge, and brine from the SPR. Oil was injected at a scaled flow rate corresponding to the nominal SPR oil injection rates. Injection was performed for about 6 hours and was stopped when it was evident that brine was being ingested by the oil withdrawal pump. Sampling probes located throughout the oil, sludge, and brine layers were used to withdraw samples before, during, and after the run. The data show that strong mixing caused the water content in the oil layer to increase sharply during oil injection but that the water content in the oil dropped back to less than 0.5% within 16 hours after injection was terminated. On the other hand, the sediment content in the oil indicated that the sludge and oil appeared to be well mixed. The sediment settled slowly but the oil had not returned to the baseline, as-received, sediment values after approximately 2200 hours (3 months). Ash content analysis indicated that the sediment measured during oil analysis was primarily organic.

  17. Chemistry of brines in salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), southeastern New Mexico: a preliminary investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, C.L.; Krumhansl, J.L.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present here analyses of macro- and microscopic (intracrystalline) brines observed within the WIPP facility and in the surrounding halite, with interpretations regarding the origin and history of these fluids and their potential effect(s) on long-term waste storage. During excavation, several large fluid inclusions were recovered from an area of highly recrystallized halite in a thick salt bed at the repository horizon (2150 ft below ground level). In addition, 52 samples of brine ''weeps'' were collected from walls of recently excavated drifts at the same stratigraphic horizon from which the fluid inclusion samples are assumed to have been taken. Analyses of these fluids show that they differ substantially in composition from the inclusion fluids and cannot be explained by mixing of the fluid inclusion populations. Finally, holes in the facility floor that filled with brine were sampled but with no stratographic control; therefore it is not possible to interpret the compositions of these brines with any accuracy, except insofar as they resemble the weep compositions but with greater variation in both K/Mg and Na/Cl ratios. However, the Ca and SO/sub 4/ values for the floor holes are relatively close to the gypsum saturation curve, suggesting that brines filling floor holes have been modified by the presence of gypsum or anhydrite, possibly even originating in one or more of the laterally continuous anhydrite units referred to in the WIPP literature as marker beds. In conclusion, the wide compositional variety of fluids found in the WIPP workings suggest that (1) an interconnected hydrologic system which could effectively transport radonuclides away from the repository does not exist; (2) brine migration studies and experiments must consider the mobility of intergranular fluids as well as those in inclusions; and (3) near- and far-field radionuclide migration testing programs need to consider a wide range of brine compositions rather than a few reference brines.

  18. West Hackberry Brine Disposal Project pre-discharge characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C. (eds.) [eds.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical, chemical and biological attributes are described for: (1) a coastal marine environment centered about a Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) brine disposal site 11.4 km off the southwest coast of Louisiana; and (2) the lower Calcasieu and Sabine estuarine systems that provide leach waters for the SPR project. A three month sampling effort, February through April 1981, and previous investigations from the study area are integrated to establish baseline information for evaluation of impacts from brine disposal in the nearshore marine waters and from freshwater withdrawal from the coastal marsh of the Chenier Plain. January data are included for some tasks that sampled while testing and mobilizing their instruments prior to the February field effort. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, estuarine hydrology and hydrography, water and sediment quality, benthos, nekton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  19. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  20. Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

  1. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

  2. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

  3. Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Dema A

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    SULFATE REMOVAL FROM REJECT BRINED IN INLAND DESALINATION WITH ZERO LIQUID DISCHARGE A Thesis by DEMA ALMASRI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... and help. I am thankful for my colleagues for their inspiration and assistance throughout the years in Texas A&M at Qatar. I am also grateful to my exceptional friends that were always there during my ups and downs. I am thankful for my irreplaceable...

  4. Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Paul Melóis; Miska Räikkönen; Martti Viljanen

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the first in a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we adopt an analytical method, called functional optimization, to find which design and operating conditions maximize the Coefficient Of Performance of the entire cooling system (brine pumps and cooling tower), which we call ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. This is addressed as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. By maximizing such function, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can thus be determined accurately and rigorously. We investigate the importance of pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia) for average-sized ice rinks. An optimal brine density is found, and we compute the weight of the electric consumption of the brine pumps on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our formulas are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the program COMSOL Multiphysics. The multivariable approach here discussed is general, and can be applied to the rigorous preliminary study of diverse situations in building physics and in many other areas of interest.

  5. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  6. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  7. PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

  8. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  9. Development of a flow injection analysis method for the determination of acrylamide copolymers in oilfield brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, K.C.; Burke, R.A.; Schramm, L.L. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for the determination of acrylamide polymers by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been developed and optimized for routine use. The method has been extensively tested for interferences common in oilfield brines. Potential interferences were examined from Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 3+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, sample coloration, and commonly used surfactants. The analysis is specific for amides, and the sensitivity to concentration of amide groups in the polymer was shown to be constant as the degree of polymer hydrolysis was varied. The range of the method is 0.1 to 100 mg/L. Sample throughput is 30 samples/h with triplicate analysis. Relative standard deviations of 0.2% are readily obtained from standard solutions and 0.5% from complex samples (at 50 mg/L). The method is applicable to the determination of aqueous, acrylamide-based polymers in process streams, surface waters and oilfield brines.

  10. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  11. Fluid sampling and chemical modeling of geopressured brines containing methane. Final report, March 1980-February 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudak, B.; Galbraith, R.; Hansen, L.; Sverjensky, D.; Weres, O.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a flowthrough sampler capable of obtaining fluid samples from geopressured wells at temperatures up to 400/sup 0/F and pressures up to 20,000 psi is described. The sampler has been designed, fabricated from MP35N alloy, laboratory tested, and used to obtain fluid samples from a geothermal well at The Geysers, California. However, it has not yet been used in a geopressured well. The design features, test results, and operation of this device are described. Alternative sampler designs are also discussed. Another activity was to review the chemistry and geochemistry of geopressured brines and reservoirs, and to evaluate the utility of available computer codes for modeling the chemistry of geopressured brines. The thermodynamic data bases for such codes are usually the limiting factor in their application to geopressured systems, but it was concluded that existing codes can be updated with reasonable effort and can usefully explain and predict the chemical characteristics of geopressured systems, given suitable input data.

  12. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  13. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  14. Barton, M.D.and Johnson, D.A., 2000 -Alternative Brine Sources for Fe-Oxide (-Cu-Au) Systems: Implications for Hydrothermal Alteration and Metals; in Porter, T.M. (Ed.),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Mark D.

    Barton, M.D.and Johnson, D.A., 2000 -Alternative Brine Sources for Fe-Oxide (-Cu-Au) Systems-Gold &Related Deposits: AGlobal Perspective, Australian Mineral Foundation, Adelaide, pp 43-60 ALTERNATIVE BRINE, and the broader geologic setting(s). Geologic and geochemical evidence show that the ore-forming fluids are brines

  15. Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea; Räikkönen, Miska; Viljanen, Martti

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the first of a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we outline an analytic method to predict in which design and operating conditions the COP of the entire cooling system (refrigerator and cooling tower) ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is maximum. ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$ is investigated as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. With this method, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can therefore be determined in advance. We estimate the optimal design of an average-sized ice rink, including pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia). We also single out an optimal brine density and show the impact of the electric consumption of the pump on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our theoretical predictions are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the pr...

  16. Predicting PVT data for CO2brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    Predicting PVT data for CO2­brine mixtures for black-oil simulation of CO2 geological storage efficiency of the black-oil approach promote application of black-oil simulation for large-scale geological into geological formations has been considered as a potential method to mitigate climate change. Accurate

  17. Macro-and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Macro- and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines N. Rezaei and A. Firoozabadi*,, Reservoir Engineering Research Institute, 595 Lytton Avenue, Palo ABSTRACT: We study the micro- and macroscale waterflooding performances of unusual crudes which naturally

  18. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

  19. Unconventional gas sources. Executive summary. [Coal seams, Devonian shale, geopressured brines, tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long lead time required for conversion from oil or gas to coal and for development of a synthetic fuel industry dictates that oil and gas must continue to supply the United States with the majority of its energy requirements over the near term. In the interim period, the nation must seek a resource that can be developed quickly, incrementally, and with as few environmental concerns as possible. One option which could potentially fit these requirements is to explore for, drill, and produce unconventional gas: Devonian Shale gas, coal seam gas, gas dissolved in geopressured brines, and gas from tight reservoirs. This report addresses the significance of these sources and the economic and technical conditions under which they could be developed.

  20. Unnatural landscapes in ecology: Generating the spatial distribution of brine spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative tools are needed to evaluate the ecological effects of increasing petroleum production. In this article, we describe two stochastic models for simulating the spatial distribution of brine spills on a landscape. One model uses general assumptions about the spatial arrangement of spills and their sizes; the second model distributes spills by siting rectangular well complexes and conditioning spill probabilities on the configuration of pipes. We present maps of landscapes with spills produced by the two methods and compare the ability of the models to reproduce a specified spill area. A strength of the models presented here is their ability to extrapolate from the existing landscape to simulate landscapes with a higher (or lower) density of oil wells.

  1. CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) is capable of reducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases from coal or gas fired power plants or supercritical phase, as water-alternating gas cycles, or as carbonated brine. These result in different

  2. Effects of a sulfide system produced by a natural brine seep on sandy-bottom community structure at the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Edward Andrew

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    30%. Videophotography and doppler-based rangefinder measurements were used to map the seep area. Current measurements of the brine stream were made using a Savonius rotor attached to the manipulator Analysis of data was carried out using...

  3. Benefits and costs of brine extraction for increasing injection efficiency in geologic CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additional wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).

  4. Determination of imidazoline and amido-amine type corrosion inhibitors in both crude oil and produced brine from oilfield production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matherly, R.M.; Jiao, J. [Baker Performance Chemicals, Houston, TX (United States); Blumer, D.J. [ARCO Alaska Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Ryman, J.S. [Baker Performance Chemicals, Anchorage, AK (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical method for the determination of corrosion inhibitors in oilfield brines is the dye transfer method. Within this method are many variations which the analyst may use to determine the amount of corrosion inhibitor in either water or crude oil. These methods, however, suffer from many interferences which result in both false positive and negatives for corrosion inhibitor content. These methods essentially detect all amines as corrosion inhibitors. Improved high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been developed for the analysis of quaternary salt type corrosion inhibitors in brine waters, however, these methods do not appear to work in crude oil or for other forms of corrosion inhibitors such as the imidazolines, and amido-amines. This paper presents a method for the quantitative analysis of the imidazoline and amido-amine type corrosion inhibitors in both oilfield water and crude oil samples by HPLC. The corrosion inhibitor of interest is first separated from the matrix on a small column, then derivatized to form a product which is both sensitive and selective on a fluorescence detector. Detection limits for imidazolines are around 0.2 mg/L, amides and amines are similar. The advantage of this procedure is it can be used to determine the amount of corrosion inhibitor in both oil and brine water phases as well as on solid surfaces.

  5. Problems #3, Math 204, Dr. M. Bohner. Sep 10, 2003. Due Sep 15, 11 am. 12. A tank has ten gallons of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    of water in which two pounds of salt has been dissolved. Brine with 1.5 pound of salt per gallon enters

  6. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  7. Effect of debonded interfaces on corrosion of mild steel composites in supercritical CO2-saturated brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Han [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carey, James W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, Jinsuo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} is a proposed method to limit greenhouse gas emissions and has been the subject of many studies in the last decade. Wellbore systems achieve isolation of the storage reservoir through a combination of steel (generally carbon steel) and Portland cement. CO{sub 2} leakage along the steel-cement interface has the potential to accelerate corrosion. We conduct experiments to assess the corrosion risk at cement-steel interface under in situ wellbore conditions. Wellbore interfaces were simulated by assemblies constructed of J55 mild steel and Portland class G (Epoxy was used in this study to separate) cement and corrosion was investigated in supercritical CO{sub 2} saturated brines, (NaCl = 1 wt%) at T = 50 C, pCO{sub 2} = 1200 psi with interface gap size = 100 {micro}m and {infinity} (open surface). The experiments were carried out in a high-pressure, 1.8 L autoclave. The corrosion kinetics were measured employing electrochemical techniques including linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The corrosion scales were analyzed using secondary electron microscopy, back scattering electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Corrosion rates decreased as time with or without interface gap. In this case corrosion rates are controlled by scale protectivity through the interface gap. Scaled steel corrosion rates were two orders of magnitude less compared with fresh steel. The corrosion scale is pseudo crystalline at the open interface. Well-crystallized scale was observed at interface gap sizes 100 {micro}m. All corrosion scales were composed of iron carbonates.

  8. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  9. Direct releases to the surface and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessments for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Direct brine release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STOELZEL,D.M.; O'BRIEN,D.G.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SCOTT,L.N.

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics related to the treatment of direct brine releases to the surface environment in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty, and (4) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results for CCDFs. The presented analyses indicate that direct brine releases do not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, the CCDFs for direct brine releases fall substantially to the left of the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (4O CFR 191.40 CFR 194).

  10. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

  11. Calcite dissolution kinetics and solubility in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl brines of geologically relevant composition at 0.1 to 1 bar pCO2 and 25 to 80°C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    injection of CO2. This study measured calcite solubility and dissolution rates in geologically relevant Na-Ca-Mg-Cl synthetic brines (35 to 200 g L-1 TDS). In brines < 50 g L-1 TDS, the EQPITZER calculated calcium carbonate ion activity product (IAP...

  12. EVALUATIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OF URANIUM, THORIUM, AND RADIUM ASSOCIATED WITH PRODUCED FLUIDS, PRECIPITATES, AND SLUDGES FROM OIL, GAS, AND OILFIELD BRINE INJECTION WELLS IN MISSISSIPPI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Swann; John Matthews; Rick Ericksen; Joel Kuszmaul

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are known to be produced as a byproduct of hydrocarbon production in Mississippi. The presence of NORM has resulted in financial losses to the industry and continues to be a liability as the NORM-enriched scales and scale encrusted equipment is typically stored rather than disposed of. Although the NORM problem is well known, there is little publically available data characterizing the hazard. This investigation has produced base line data to fill this informational gap. A total of 329 NORM-related samples were collected with 275 of these samples consisting of brine samples. The samples were derived from 37 oil and gas reservoirs from all major producing areas of the state. The analyses of these data indicate that two isotopes of radium ({sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra) are the ultimate source of the radiation. The radium contained in these co-produced brines is low and so the radiation hazard posed by the brines is also low. Existing regulations dictate the manner in which these salt-enriched brines may be disposed of and proper implementation of the rules will also protect the environment from the brine radiation hazard. Geostatistical analyses of the brine components suggest relationships between the concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra, between the Cl concentration and {sup 226}Ra content, and relationships exist between total dissolved solids, BaSO{sub 4} saturation and concentration of the Cl ion. Principal component analysis points to geological controls on brine chemistry, but the nature of the geologic controls could not be determined. The NORM-enriched barite (BaSO{sub 4}) scales are significantly more radioactive than the brines. Leaching studies suggest that the barite scales, which were thought to be nearly insoluble in the natural environment, can be acted on by soil microorganisms and the enclosed radium can become bioavailable. This result suggests that the landspreading means of scale disposal should be reviewed. This investigation also suggests 23 specific components of best practice which are designed to provide a guide to safe handling of NORM in the hydrocarbon industry. The components of best practice include both worker safety and suggestions to maintain waste isolation from the environment.

  13. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  14. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  15. Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Semi-analytical model of brine and CO2 leakage through an abandoned plugged well. Applications for determining an Area of Review and CO2 leakage rate Arnaud Réveillère, Jérémy Rohmer, Frédéric Wertz / contact the leak, and of CO2,g as a first approach. Compared to the state of the art, it adds the possibility

  16. New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    , likely exceeding reserves of conventional oil and gas (Collett and Kuuskraa, 1998). In deep-ocean regionsNew constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico Keywords: Methane flux Mass spectrometer Brine pool Methane oxidation Gulf of Mexico a b s t r a c t Deep

  17. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. The mine's production capacity was expanded in 2012, and a new lithium hydroxide plant opened in North

  18. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

  19. Effect of Oxygen Co-Injected with Carbon Dioxide on Gothic Shale Caprock-CO2-Brine Interaction during Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2-brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~10 MPa and ~75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale-CO2-brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale-CO2-brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~8–14 ?g/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Oxygen in CO2-brine migrating away from the injection well will be continually consumed through the reactions with sulfide minerals in deep geologic formations.

  20. Using a multiphase flow code to model the coupled effects of repository consolidation and multiphase brine and gas flow at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeze, G.A. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Larson, K.W.; Davies, P.B.; Webb, S.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term repository assessment must consider the processes of (1) gas generation, (2) room closure and expansions due to salt creep, and (3) multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the complex coupling between these three processes. The mechanical creep closure code SANCHO was used to simulate the closure of a single, perfectly sealed disposal room filled with water and backfill. SANCHO uses constitutive models to describe salt creep, waste consolidation, and backfill consolidation, Five different gas-generation rate histories were simulated, differentiated by a rate multiplier, f, which ranged from 0.0 (no gas generation) to 1.0 (expected gas generation under brine-dominated conditions). The results of the SANCHO f-series simulations provide a relationship between gas generation, room closure, and room pressure for a perfectly sealed room. Several methods for coupling this relationship with multiphase fluid flow into and out of a room were examined. Two of the methods are described.

  1. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  2. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

  3. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  4. Brine contamination of ground water and streams in the Baxterville Oil Field Area, Lamar and Marion Counties, Mississippi. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalkhoff, S.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The report defines the extent of oil-field-brine contamination in ground water and streams in the Baxterville oil field area. The report is based largely on data collected during the period October 1984 through November 1985. Water samples were collected from streams and wells in the study area. Data from a previous study conducted in the vicinity of the nearby Tatum Salt Dome were used for background water-quality information. Natural surface-water quality was determined by sampling streamflow from a nearby basin having no oil field activities and from samples collected in an adjacent basin during a previous study.

  5. Evaluations of Radionuclides of Uranium, Thorium, and Radium Associated with Produced Fluids, Precipitates, and Sludges from Oil, Gas, and Oilfield Brine Injection Wells in Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericksen, R.L.

    1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an unsurpassed lack of scientific data with respect to the concentrations and isotopic compositions of uranium, thorium, and radium in the produced formation fluids (brine), precipitates, and sludges generated with the operation of oil and gas wells in Mississippi. These radioactive elements when contained in the formation fluids have been given the term NORM, which is an acronym for naturally occurring radioactive materials. When they are technologically enhanced during oil and gas production activities resulting in the formation of scale (precipitates) and sludges they are termed TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive materials). As used in this document, NORM and TENORM will be considered equivalent terms and the occurrence of NORM in the oilfield will be considered the result of production operations. As a result of the lack of data no scientifically sound theses may be developed concerning the presence of these radionuclides in the fluid brine, precipitate (scale), or sludge phases. Over the period of just one year, 1997 for example, Mississippi produced over 39,372,963,584 liters (10,402,368,186 gallons or 247,675,433 barrels) of formation water associated with hydrocarbon production from 41 counties across the state.

  6. Chemistry of fluid inclusions in halite from the Salina group of the Michigan basin: Implications for Late Silurian seawater and the origin of sedimentary brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, N.; Horita, J.; Holland, H.D. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid was extracted from 18 fluid inclusions in halite of the Late Silurian Salina Group exposed in the Crystal Mine on the outskirts of Detroit, Michigan. Compared with modern seawater evaporated to the same degree, the inclusion fluids are severely depleted in SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}2}, somewhat depleted in Na{sup +} and Mg{sup +2}, and greatly enriched in Ca{sup +2}. The composition of the inclusion fluids can be derived from Silurian seawater with a composition close to that of modern seawater, if it is assumed that the composition of the Silurian seawater was modified by dolomitizing CaCO{sub 3}-rich sediments and by albitizing silicate minerals during its evolution into evaporite brines. Since the evolution of the brines involved a number of chemical reactions, it is impossible to recover the initial concentration of all of the major ions in the parent Silurian seawater from the composition of the inclusion fluids alone. It is likely, however, that the m{sub K+}/m{sub Br-} ratio and the functions in Late Silurian seawater had values close to those of modern seawater. Measurements of the isotopic composition of sulfur and of Sr in anhydrite within and associated with the halite host of the fluid inclusions are consistent with previous measurements of {delta}{sup 34}S in Silurian marine anhydrites and with the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratios of Late Silurian marine carbonates.

  7. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  8. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  9. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

  10. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only active lithium carbonate plant in the United States was a brine operation in Nevada. Two companies produced a large array of downstream lithium compounds in the United States from domestic or South

  11. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  12. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myint, P C; Firoozabadi, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spy...

  13. 24/02/2012 12:49SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction -CO2/Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Page 1 of 1http://www.spe.org/ejournals/jsp/journalapp.jsp?pageType=Preview&jid=EFC&pdfChronicleId=090147628022501b&mid=SPE-12471

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    24/02/2012 12:49SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction - CO2/Brine Surface Dissolution of Petroleum Engineers SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction Volume 6, Number 1, March 2011, pp. 41-53 SPE

  14. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  15. Use of data obtained from core tests in the design and operation of spent brine injection wells in geopressured or geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, R.M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of formation characteristics on injection well performance are reviewed. Use of data acquired from cores taken from injection horizons to predict injectivity is described. And methods for utilizing data from bench scale testing of brine and core samples to optimize injection well design are presented. Currently available methods and equipment provide data which enable the optimum design of injection wells through analysis of cores taken from injection zones. These methods also provide a means of identifying and correcting well injection problems. Methods described in this report are: bulk density measurement; porosity measurement; pore size distribution analysis; permeability measurement; formation grain size distribution analysis; core description (lithology) and composition; amount, type and distribution of clays and shales; connate water analysis; consolidatability of friable reservoir rocks; grain and pore characterization by scanning electron microscopy; grain and pore characterization by thin section analysis; permeability damage and enhancement tests; distribution of water-borne particles in porous media; and reservoir matrix acidizing effectiveness. The precise methods of obtaining this information are described, and their use in the engineering of injection wells is illustrated by examples, where applicable. (MHR)

  16. {gamma}-Radiolysis of NaCl Brine in the Presence of UO{sub 2}(s): Effects of Hydrogen and Bromide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, Volker; Bohnert, Elke; Kelm, Manfred; Schild, Dieter; Kienzler, Bernhard [Institute for Radioactive Waste Disposal (FZK-INE), Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe / Research Center Karlsruhe, Helmholtz-Platz, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, D-76344 (Germany); Reinhardt, Juergen; Buchmeiser, Michael R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, IOM, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig, D-04318 (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A concentrated NaCl solution was {gamma}-irradiated in autoclaves under a pressure of 25 MPa. A set of experiments were conducted in 6 mol (kg H{sub 2}O){sup -1} NaCl solution in the presence of UO{sub 2}(s) pellets; in a second set of experiments, {gamma}-radiolysis of the NaCl brine was studied without UO{sub 2}(s). Hydrogen, oxygen and chlorate were formed as long-lived radiolysis products. Due to the high external pressure, all radiolysis products remained dissolved. H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} reached steady state concentrations in the range of 5.10{sup -3} to 6.10{sup -2} mol (kg H{sub 2}O){sup -1} corresponding to a partial gas pressure of {approx}2 to {approx}20 MPa. Radiolytic formation of hydrogen and oxygen increased with the concentration of bromide added to solution. Both, in the presence of bromide, resulting in a relatively high radiolytic yield, and in the absence of bromide surfaces of the UO{sub 2}(s) samples were oxidized, and concentration of dissolved uranium reached the solubility limit of the schoepite / NaUO{sub 2}O(OH)(cr) transition. At the end of the experiments, the pellets were covered by a surface layer of a secondary solid phase having a composition close to Na{sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The experimental results demonstrate that bromide counteracts an H{sub 2} inhibition effect on radiolysis gas production, even at a concentration ratio of [H{sub 2}] / [Br{sup -}] > 100. The present observations are related to the competitive reactions of OH radicals with H{sub 2}, Br{sup -} and Cl{sup -}. A similar competition of hydrogen and bromide, controlling the yield of {gamma}-radiolysis products, is expected for solutions of lower Cl{sup -} concentration. (authors)

  17. Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static carbon sequestration (GCS) has drawn increasing con- sideration as a promising method to mitigate

  18. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lfuen operated w:l.thout sludge recirculation, this pilotcould lead to problems with sludge accumulation there. Ifby recirculation of part of the sludge coming out of the

  19. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  20. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  1. 6, 70757091, 2006 precipitation in brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    be produced on the frozen surface of sea ice (Adams et al., 2002), this source would quickly be exhausted in polar regions over recently formed sea ice, we can model successfully the transformation of inert sea of already activated bromine (Borken, 1996; Sander et al., 1997), or artificially acidified the model aerosol

  2. Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to:InformationCaseType Jump

  3. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRAM-04-07 Audit Report: OAS-M-04-07BUDGET DETAILS BOOKBarton V.Batteries

  4. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Type Termciting TypeCounty,

  5. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Dense Water Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    .................................................................................................................... xix I. Direct Observations of Brine Rejection.1 Brine rejection

  6. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the same kinetic expression as for dissolution. Forparameters used for the kinetic rate expression are given inunder kinetic conditions. A general form of rate expression

  7. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water  management  options,  including:  geothermal  energy   extraction,  desalination,  salt  and  mineral   harvesting,  

  8. CO2 - brine behavior using a Black - oil model + geomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematical Model. The governing equations of coupled rock deformation and fluid flow are derived from mass conservation and momentum balance for both ...

  9. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

  10. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  11. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sequestration  (CCS)  has  the  potential  to  play  a  CCS  and   prior  research  has  focused  on  its  potential  of  CCS.  In  order  to  maximize  this   potential,  

  12. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solutions, Journal of nuclear technology 2008, 164:180– 35.Modeling and Analysis. Nuclear Technology 1993, 104: 418- 2.

  13. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in  power   plant  energy  demand.     where   ! !" !  is  to  incorporate  the   energy  demand  of  pumping  and  and  Power Cumulative  Energy  Demand Disinfection  By-­?

  14. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prediction and interpretation of seismic property changesmodel for improved interpretation of seismic monitoring data

  15. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoring dataprediction and interpretation of seismic property changes

  16. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,we believe that carbon capture technology will improve over

  17. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    in a High Level Waste Repository in Salt Establishing the Technical Basis for Disposal of Heat-generating Waste in Salt Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of...

  18. THERMAL GRADIENT MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagnik, S.K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced by the heat generating waste. The enhanced porosityimposed by the heat generating nuclear waste w i l l

  19. Risk division Semi-analytical model of brine leakage through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Canada: 508 wells in a 30km x 30 km area. from Bachu and Celia, 2009 hal-00658780,version1-18Jun2012 #12. (Pruess, 2006, for geothermal wells) · = > Thermal equilibrium (Oldenburg & Rinaldi 2011) > 8 Mt/y for 50 years > D=6.7 km from the injection to the abandonned well > Cement plug: 10 m high, weak

  20. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not attempt to predict rock properties ab initio fromrecent refinements of our rock property formulation, boundsused to predict the properties of rocks partially saturated

  1. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis Preliminary calculations assuming pure CaCl 2 solutions were carried out to investigate relationships between salt concentration, HCl gas fugacity (? partial pressure), and condensate

  2. Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP: ChallengesEnergy For PersonsBrightEnergy

  3. HIGH-PRESSURE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METHANE FROM GEOPRESSURED BRINES:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451DOE/SC0002390dVandHEATING DISTRIBUTIONS

  4. Detecting fractal power-law long-range dependence in pre-sliced cooked pork ham surface intensity patterns using Detrended Fluctuation Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drakakis, Konstantinos

    and processing conditions, which includes injection of brine, tumbling and cooking. The brine injection level

  5. CARD No. 32 Scope of Performance Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as secondary oil recovery methods (waterflooding), disposal of natural brine, solution mining to extract brine

  6. Charge Mobility in Ice Brines and Ice-Silicate Mixtures Robert E. Grimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimm, Robert E.

    of Chemistry and Geochemistry Colorado School of Mines Golden, CO Mark A. Bullock Department of Space Studies in shallow thin films of water imposed by locally available nutrients and/or aqueous advection or diffusion environments on Earth. Furthermore, most microbes are forced into long periods of maintenance or survival modes

  7. Exploratory Research on Simulation of CO2-Brine-Mineral Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Zhu; Shiao hung Chiang

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of many carbon sequestration strategies requires knowledge of thermodynamic properties for the extremely complex chemical system of CO{sub 2}-SO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl-CaCl{sub 2}-MgCl{sub 2}. This University Coal Research Phase I program has been successful and highly productive in exploring an approach to develop an equation of state (EOS) to describe thermodynamic properties in the above chemical system. We have compiled available laboratory experimental data and thermodynamic models, and evaluated their appropriateness for the carbon sequestration process. Based on this literature review, we provided an improved CO{sub 2} solubility model for the CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl system, which incorporates newly available experimental measurements funded by DOE, and is valid in temperature range from 273 to 533 K, pressure from 0 to 2000 bar, and salinity from 0 to 4.5 molality of NaCl equivalent. The improved model also greatly improves the computational efficiency of CO{sub 2} solubility calculations and thus is better suited to be incorporated into large computer simulation models (e.g., reservoir simulation models). The literature review and model development provided insights of the data needs and directions for future work. Synergetic collaboration with DOE scientists has resulted in simulations of injected CO{sub 2} fate in sandstone aquifer with a one-dimensional numerical coupled reactive transport model. We evaluated over 100 references on CO{sub 2} solubility and submitted two manuscripts to peer-reviewed journals. One paper has been accepted for publication in ''Environmental Geosciences''.

  8. Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea Lynne D. Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    ventilation occurs in only a very few regions, generally in confined patches associated with local cyclonic (Figure 1) to these small groups of deep convection sites and regions withdeep``ventilation

  9. APPLIED PHYTO-REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES USING HALOPHYTES FOR OIL AND BRINE SPILL SCARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Korphage; Bruce G. Langhus; Scott Campbell

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced salt water from historical oil and gas production was often managed with inadequate care and unfortunate consequences. In Kansas, the production practices in the 1930's and 1940's--before statewide anti-pollution laws--were such that fluids were often produced to surface impoundments where the oil would segregate from the salt water. The oil was pumped off the pits and the salt water was able to infiltrate into the subsurface soil zones and underlying bedrock. Over the years, oil producing practices were changed so that segregation of fluids was accomplished in steel tanks and salt water was isolated from the natural environment. But before that could happen, significant areas of the state were scarred by salt water. These areas are now in need of economical remediation. Remediation of salt scarred land can be facilitated with soil amendments, land management, and selection of appropriate salt tolerant plants. Current research on the salt scars around the old Leon Waterflood, in Butler County, Kansas show the relative efficiency of remediation options. Based upon these research findings, it is possible to recommend cost efficient remediation techniques for slight, medium, and heavy salt water damaged soil. Slight salt damage includes soils with Electrical Conductivity (EC) values of 4.0 mS/cm or less. Operators can treat these soils with sufficient amounts of gypsum, install irrigation systems, and till the soil. Appropriate plants can be introduced via transplants or seeded. Medium salt damage includes soils with EC values between 4.0 and 16 mS/cm. Operators will add amendments of gypsum, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. Some particularly salt tolerant plants can be added but most planting ought to be reserved until the second season of remediation. Severe salt damage includes soil with EC values in excess of 16 mS/cm. Operators will add at least part of the gypsum required, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. The following seasons more gypsum will be added and as the soil EC is reduced, plants can be introduced. If rapid remediation is required, a sufficient volume of topsoil, or sand, or manure can be added to dilute the local salinity, the bulk amendments tilled into the surface with added gypsum, and appropriate plants added. In this case, irrigation will be particularly important. The expense of the more rapid remediation will be much higher.

  10. Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Roger Allen

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'involved an equi] ibrat. ion pro" e:!urc in conjunctior. with headspace sampling. Although the hot ?stets cooled con & derably from t1&e& r in si. '&, temperatu& e. upon ascent. from the depths, they were. stiJ 1 very warm at the time. of sa?&pl. !. ng... the amount in the head. . pace and water. The primary light hydrocarbon standard. used was an Air Products and Chemica1 s, Inc . cai ibrated standard ga nu xture w 'th 30 pps&v metiaane 0. 3 ppmv ethane snd 6. 2 ppmv propane. Duplicate analyses of methane...

  11. New Energy Efficient Method for Cleaning Oilfield Brines with Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, C. T.; Seibert, A. F.; Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    pressure. The important discoveries of this study and an economic comparison of the carbon dioxide treatment process with other potential processes are presented in this paper. INTRODUCTION During the operation of producing petroleum from subsurface... studies (1,2,3). The most comprehensive work regarding the environmental effects of these aqueous effluents was studied by Middleditch and coworkers (4,5). The current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency limits for organics in aqueous discharges...

  12. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Geophysical (time domain electromagnetic model) delineation of a shallow brine beneath a freshwater lake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    groundwaters. It is hypothesized that salt transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in the central part streams entering the lake. This order of magnitude difference is a result of salt fluxes from two major cores and nineteen 0.5-m cores drilled to sediments within the lake basin (Figure 1). At the water

  14. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    reservoir scenario. 1. INTRODUCTION Recent investigations of underground carbon dioxide storage for the simulation of carbon dioxide injection into geological formations is currently an intensive field of research

  15. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    B, 9/9/2003 BaSO4 CaSO4.2H2O CaCO3 pH Figure 5.2. Saturation99% Rejection BaSO4 CaSO4.2H2O CaCO3 Recovery Figure 6.1.

  16. Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Oyewande

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

  17. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC), ????over 250 billion gallons of produced water is taken out of Texas Soil every year, and more than 35% of this water is not currently fit to use.?? Therefore, it can be assumed that domestically...

  18. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and barium sulfate). The30,000 mg/L) contains calcium, carbonate and sulfate ions atCaSO 4. 2H 2 O), Calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ) and barite (

  19. Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERPRETATION The injection of CO 2 causes a decrease in seismicseismic monitoring during injection. Although quantitative interpretation

  20. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT-STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA; LOCKREM LL

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the effort to sequester technetium by the use of getters, reductants (tin(II) apatite and ferrous sulfate), sorbents (A530E and A532E ion exchange resins), and cementitious waste form. The pertechnetate form of technetium is highly soluble and mobile in aerobic (oxidizing) environments.

  1. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial confinement effects of aqueous NaCl brines in nanoporous carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wander, M. C.F.; Shuford, K. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, studies of aqueous electrolyte solutions in contact with a family of porous carbon geometries using classical molecular dynamics simulations are presented. These simulations provide an atomic scale depiction of ion transport dynamics in different environments to elucidate power of aqueous electrolyte supercapacitors. The electrolyte contains alkali metal and halide ions, which allow for the examination of size trends within specific geometries as well as trends in concentration. The electrode pores are modeled as planar graphite sheets and carbon nanotubes with interstices ranging from one to four nanometers. Ordered layers form parallel to the carbon surface, which facilitates focused ion motion under slightly confining conditions. As a result, the ion’s diffusivities are enhanced in the direction of the slit or pore. Further confining the system leads to decreased ion diffusivities. The ions are fully hydrated in all but the smallest slits and pores with those sizes showing increased ion pairing. There is strong evidence of charge separation perpendicular to the surface at all size scales, concentrations, and ion types, providing a useful baseline for examining differential capacitance behavior and future studies on energy storage. These systems show promise as high-power electrical energy storage devices.

  2. Author's personal copy Fossil brines preserved in the St-Lawrence Lowlands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    temperatures higher than 250 °C, allowing for thermal maturation of local gas-prone source rocks (Utica shales degassing, are identical to their production ratios in rocks. The source of salinity (halite dissolution al., 2003). However, metamorphic and magmatic rocks are not a good source of halogens. Most scholars

  3. Effect of Brine on Hydrate Antiagglomeration J. Dalton York and Abbas Firoozabadi*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    . There is less CO2 produced from burning natural gas than other fossil fuels. Furthermore, produced CO2 can by guest molecules such as methane, propane, etc., under high pressures and temperatures in the range heating. A change of bulk-phase properties through thermodynamic inhibition with methanol (Me

  4. Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Oyewande

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

  5. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrode (Cole Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hill, IL)cartridge (Cole-Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills,cartridge (Cole-Parmer Instrument Company, Vernon Hills, IL)

  6. Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: Congestion StudyForecasting.Energy In September

  7. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellenceGuidanceS EM Pr ETRMay 30,

  8. Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, searchEnergy

  9. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagementFacilityExcellence |Successful Tribal

  10. Gas Content of Gladys McCall Reservoir Brine A Topical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451DOE/SC0002390dV DOE/m/10412 - 6

  11. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan -Department ofDepartmentDepartment ofDepartment

  12. String primer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachas, C.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an elementary introduction to the classical and quantum mechanics of a single bosonic string, and to some aspects of its supersymmetric and heterotic extensions. 22 refs.

  13. INFLUENCE OF CAPILLARY PRESSURE ON CO2 STORAGE AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    volume - 1 + + = + - 1 + = : 2 solubility in brine : 2 formation volume factor : brine formation volume factor The Black-Oil formulation = - - = - - Darcy's Empirical Law + = 1 - = : capillary pressure brine brine CO2 CO2 #12;· The numerical solution was obtained

  14. A MANUAL FOR CATALOGING and INDEXING DOCUMENTS FOR DATABASE ACQUISITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, S.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    · INJECTION ~LLS·LEGAL ASPECTS·OILFIELD BRINES·PERMEABILITY·ASPECTS; DE.14 = OILFIELD BRINES; DE.15 = PERMEABILITY;

  15. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 66, NO. 1 (JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2001); P. 283293, 11 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Amplitude variations with offset of pressure-seal reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    of the wet- ting phase (brine), a pressure seal restricts both hydrocar- bon and brine flow. Here, I consider

  16. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of CO 2 Storage for Full-Scale Deployment, Ground Water, 48(connect the storage formation with the ground surface. ToStorage Systems—Application of a New Analytical Solution, submitted to Ground

  17. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Coal Fuels, The authors wish to thank two anonymous reviewers as well as Lehua Pan of Lawrence National Energy Technology

  18. The effect of surface active agents on the relative permeability of brine and gas in porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conway, M.W. [STIM-LAB, Inc., Duncan, OK (United States); Schraufnagel, R.A. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Smith, K.; Thomas, T.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All oil and gas producing wells produce hydrocarbon at some residual water saturation. Therefore, the relative permeability to the hydrocarbon at the effective water saturation dictates performance and not the absolute permeability of the formation. Surface active agents are included in most aqueous treating fluids to improve the compatibility of aqueous fluids with the hydrocarbon containing reservoir. A review of the literature indicates very little core flow data to describe the effects to be expected. Traditionally, it is believed that the reduced surface tension will reduce capillary pressure and enhance the recovery of water after the treatment. The reduced water saturation is then believed to result in higher effective gas saturation and higher relative permeability to gas after the treatment. The principal emphasis of this study has been the development of non-damaging stimulation fluids to improve the production of methane from coalbed methane and other low permeability gas reservoirs.

  19. Alteration Behavior of High Burnup Spent Fuel in Salt Brine Under Hydrogen Overpressure and in Presence of Bromide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loida, Andreas; Metz, Volker; Kienzler, Bernhard [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O.Box 3640, Karlsruhe, D- 76021 (Germany)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that in the presence of H2 overpressure, which forms due to the corrosion of the Fe based container, the dissolution rate of the spent fuel matrix is slowed down by a factor of about 10, associated with a distinct decrease of concentrations of important radionuclides. However, in a natural salt environment as well as in geological formations with chloride rich groundwater the presence of radiation chemically active impurities such as bromide must be taken in consideration. Bromide is known to react with {beta}/{gamma} radiolysis products, thus counteracting the protective H{sub 2} effect. In the present experiments using high burnup spent fuel, it is observed that during 212 days the matrix dissolution rate was enhanced by a factor of about 10 in the presence of up to 10{sup -3} M bromide and 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. However, concentrations of matrix bound actinides were found at the same level or below as found under identical conditions, but in the absence of bromide. In the long-term it is expected that the effect of bromide becomes less important, because the decrease of {beta}/{gamma}-activity results in a decrease of oxidative radicals, which react with bromide, while a-activity will dominate the radiation field. (authors)

  20. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers with closed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    buoyancy effects, residual water saturation, etc. ) (Bachu,CO 2 saturation Residual water saturation (a) Pressure (bar)

  1. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage of carbon dioxide: comparison of hysteretic and non-hysteretic characteristic curves, Energy

  2. STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Higman, and Siebenaler, 1952; Osterhaug, 1957; Cohen and Peters, 1962; Peters and Dassow, 1965; Roach et the growth of spoilage bacteria in fish stored in refrigerated seawater also presents a problem (Roach et al

  3. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of active pumping, water extraction wells can also bescenarios in which water extraction wells operate as passivemanagement via extraction of native saline water has been

  4. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water...

  5. Dewetting of silica surfaces upon reactions with supercritical CO2 and brine: Pore-scale studies in micromodels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO 2 injected into depleted oil reservoirs may have faster2 sequestration in depleted oil and gas reservoirs - caprocksaline aquifers, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable

  6. Manual for the thermal and hydraulic design of direct contact spray columns for use in extracting heat from geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, H.R.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the current methods being used in the thermal and hydraulic design of spray column type, direct contact heat exchangers. It provides appropriate referenced equations for both preliminary design and detailed performance. The design methods are primarily empirical and are applicable for us in the design of such units for geothermal application and for application with solar ponds. Methods for design, for both preheater and boiler sections of the primary heat exchangers, for direct contact binary powers plants are included. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Soultz fractured reservoir. Proceedings EHDRAthrough a deep fractured reservoir. Different studies (Hot Fractured Rock system: comparison of two reservoirs at

  8. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CASSM monitoring data with the reservoir model to obtain anof CASSM data and updating the Reservoir Model Using thedata and, when the match is unsatisfactory, the initial reservoir

  9. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    than 80 % oil removal efficiency were obtained in all these tests. Process train (pre-treatment and membrane) performance was monitored by chemical analysis of permeate and models fitting experimental data for the process. From the results, hydrocarbon...

  10. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL, and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellenceGuidanceS EM Pr ETRMay

  11. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  12. Modelling Sea Ice Growth Mark J. McGuinness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    salinity. The saltier the brine, the lower the freezing point. When salinity is above the critical value is rejected by growing ice as a dense brine, but the brine cannot escape as rapidly as heat at the ice, trapping brine in the ice-brine mixture. This constitutional supercooling causes the ice-ocean interface

  13. String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This elementary introduction to string field theory highlights the features and the limitations of this approach to quantum gravity as it is currently understood. String field theory is a formulation of string theory as a field theory in space-time with an infinite number of massive fields. Although existing constructions of string field theory require expanding around a fixed choice of space-time background, the theory is in principle background-independent, in the sense that different backgrounds can be realized as different field configurations in the theory. String field theory is the only string formalism developed so far which, in principle, has the potential to systematically address questions involving multiple asymptotically distinct string backgrounds. Thus, although it is not yet well defined as a quantum theory, string field theory may eventually be helpful for understanding questions related to cosmology in string theory.

  14. Nonsingular static global string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    2000-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new solution for the spacetime outside the core of a U(1) static global string has been presented which is nonsingular. This is the first example of a nonsingular spacetime around a static global string.}}

  15. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1993-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  16. Kinky D-Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil. D. Lambert; David Tong

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study two-dimensional SQED viewed as the world-volume theory of a D-string in the presence of D5-branes with non-zero background fields that induce attractive forces between the branes. In various approximations, the low-energy dynamics is given by a hyperKahler, or hyperKahler with torsion, massive sigma-model. We demonstrate the existence of kink solutions corresponding to the string interpolating between different D5-branes. Bound states of the D-string with fundamental strings are identified with Q-kinks which, in turn, are identified with dyonic instanton strings on the D5-brane world-volume.

  17. Universal Scaling in Transient Creep Dag Kristian Dysthe,* Yuri Podladchikov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    brine. The brine is sealed in the sample holders by hexadecane. Sodium chloride has for many years been by a piston against the sample surface in the presence of a few microliters of saturated brine. A capacitor

  18. Numerical modeling of seawater intrusion into endorheic hydrological systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    concentration to brine through evaporation, the dense brine starts to flow below the encroaching seawater body. Below it an interface is recognized between the encroaching seawater body and a brine body underneath

  19. Are large Trojan asteroids salty? An observational, theoretical, and experimental study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glotch, Timothy D.

    volatiles and a possibly global sill of frozen brine was formed beneath the cold primitive crust. The frozen brine layer was likely to be evacuated by impact erosions and evaporation of the exposed brines

  20. Universitt Stuttgart Institut fr Wasserbau, Lehrstuhl fr Hydromechanik und Hydrosystemmodellierung "Numerical Simulation of CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations", CMWR Copenhagen, June 20, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ", CMWR Copenhagen, June 20, 2006 Model Assumptions Two fluid phases in a rigid rock matrix: CO2 and brine Salinity influences brine fluid properties but does not change with time Diffusion only in the brine phase

  1. The Canadian Mineralogist Vol. 46, pp. 000 (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soja, Constance M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -phase brine inclusions lacking daughter crystals, brine inclusions "packed" with daughter crystals, and vapor that the native lead formed by precipitation from low- temperature (270­300°C) brines in a near-surface, low

  2. Physicochemical properties of concentrated Martian surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predicting saline mineral solubility, we generate likely brine compositions ranging from bicarbonate dominated to sulfatedominated and predict their saline mineralogy. For each brine composition, we, much of the anticipated variation in chemistry for likely Martian brines. These estimates allow

  3. String Amplitudes from Moyal String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bars; I. Kishimoto; Y. Matsuo

    2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We illustrate a basic framework for analytic computations of Feynman graphs using the Moyal star formulation of string field theory. We present efficient methods of computation based on (a) the monoid algebra in noncommutative space and (b) the conventional Feynman rules in Fourier space. The methods apply equally well to perturbative string states or nonperturbative string states involving D-branes. The ghost sector is formulated using Moyal products with fermionic (b,c) ghosts. We also provide a short account on how the purely cubic theory and/or VSFT proposals may receive some clarification of their midpoint structures in our regularized framework.

  4. SAND2010-6876C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Solids from Pressure Release) Spallings (Solids from Pressure Release) Direct Brine Release (DBR) (Brine from Pressure Release) Long-Term Release Mechanisms g...

  5. Ormat Nevada, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will convert underground heat into electrical energy by utilizing heated fluid, or brine, which is extracted from deep within the Earth's crust. Brine, heated around 330F,...

  6. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharaka, Y.K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the same kinetic expression as that for dissolution.Kinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitation The general rate expression

  7. Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Tabitha Michele

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5.32 Ma when the final deluge of the Atlantic filled therunoff before the final deluge of the Atlantic. The westernthe latest Messinian deluge (Hsu et al. 1977). Resumption to

  8. This is a partial list of items you may consider brining to campus. Coordinate with your roommate to avoid over-crowding your room.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clothes hangers Dress clothes Fall clothing (badger gear) Undergarments Warm coat Winter accessories

  9. Fractionation of NaCl, MgCl2, and CaCl2 brines with a polyfunctional ion exchange resin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Albert Byre

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ml. of 2 N. HC1 and 150 ml. of distilled water. The filtrate and wash solut1ons were analyzed for Ca++, Mg~, and Cl iona. Calcium and magnesium were deter- mined by a complexometric titration with a 0. 01 molar solution of the disodium salt... for various FIGURE 4 VARIATION OF SELECTIVITY COEFFICIENTS WITH FEED SOLUTION RATIO 30. 0 Ca Na 10. 0 3. 0 1. 0 Mg Na Ca 8 0. 3 0. 1 0. 01 0. 03 0. 10 0. 3 1. 0 3. 0 10. 0 Ratio of ? , ? , or ~ in Feed Ca Ca Na' Mg' Na total solution...

  10. The significance of Rb-Sr glauconite ages, Bonneterre Formation, Missouri; Late Devonian-Early Mississippian brine migration in the midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, H.J. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA)); Kish, S.A. (Florida State Univ., Tallahassee (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rb-Sr mean model ages of 370 {plus minus} 10 Ma for glauconites from the Cambrian lower Bonneterre Formation in southern and central Missouri are in excellent agreement with a Rb-Sr isochron age of 359 {plus minus} 22 Ma for glauconites from the Magmont mine (Viburnum Trend) in the southeast Missouri lead district. The lower Bonneterre and Magmont mines ages probably reflect isotopic resetting, most likely associated with dolomitization and/or Mississippi Valley-type ore formation in the southeast Missouri lead district. The temporal relation between widespread dolomitization and ore formation in Missouri is unclear, but mounting evidence for two Devonian disturbances permits the following interpretation: (1) a Devonian timing (380-400 Ma) for widespread dolomitization, and (2) a Late Devonian-Early Mississippian timing (360-370 Ma) for ore formation in southeast Missouri. Late Devonian-Early Mississippian fluids associated with the earliest stages of collisional tectonics and metamorphism to the south and southeast may have been important in the formation of southeast Missouri ore deposits. These tectonically driven waters may themselves have been the Mississippi Valley-type ore fluids, entering Missouri by way of the Black Warrior basin and Reelfoot rift and/or the Arkoma basin. Alternatively, the movement of orogenic fluids hundreds of kilometers distant may have initiated and distally influenced the migration of more locally derived Mississippi Valley-type ore fluids. Broad regions of Missouri and adjacent areas experienced heating and crustal flexing in the Late Devonian, and consequently, preservation of elevated temperatures in Mississippi Valley-type fluids as they move great lateral distances may not be necessary for ore formation in southeast Missouri.

  11. Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Tabitha Michele

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purpose of drilling into the Late Messinian salts. DSDP LegsOcean Drilling Program drilled through Messinian salts while

  12. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingThe Future of Geothermal Energy. (Massachusetts Institute ofa renewed interest in geothermal energy, and particularly in

  13. Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Tabitha Michele

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equal input of calcium and carbonate. Although much debated,and accumulation of calcium carbonate in the ocean: budgetor anhydrite (CaSO 4 ) and calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 ). For

  14. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for ?ve-spot fractured reservoir Formation Thicknesswell pattern), and a fractured reservoir represented by twotransport in fractured geothermal reservoirs. Geother- mics

  15. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizinga renewed interest in geothermal energy, and particularly inThe Future of Geothermal Energy. (Massachusetts Institute of

  16. Modeling CO{sub 2}-Brine-Rock Interaction Including Mercury and H{sub 2}S Impurities in the Context of CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spycher, N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses modeling and simulation approaches to investigate the impacts on injectivity of trace amounts of mercury (Hg) in a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stream injected for geologic carbon sequestration in a sandstone reservoir at ~2.5 km depth. At the range of Hg concentrations expected (7-190 ppbV, or ~ 0.06-1.6 mg/std.m{sup 3}CO{sub 2}), the total volumetric plugging that could occur due to complete condensation of Hg, or due to complete precipitation of Hg as cinnabar, results in a very small porosity change. In addition, Hg concentration much higher than the concentrations considered here would be required for Hg condensation to even occur. Concentration of aqueous Hg by water evaporation into CO{sub 2} is also unlikely because the higher volatility of Hg relative to H{sub 2}O at reservoir conditions prevents the Hg concentration from increasing in groundwater as dry CO{sub 2} sweeps through, volatilizing both H{sub 2}O and Hg. Using a model-derived aqueous solution to represent the formation water, batch reactive geochemical modeling show that the reaction of the formation water with the CO{sub 2}-Hg mixture causes the pH to drop to about 4.7 and then become buffered near 5.2 upon reaction with the sediments, with a negligible net volume change from mineral dissolution and precipitation. Cinnabar (HgS(s)) is found to be thermodynamically stable as soon as the Hg-bearing CO{sub 2} reacts with the formation water which contains small amounts of dissolved sulfide. Liquid mercury (Hg(l)) is not found to be thermodynamically stable at any point during the simulation. Two-dimensional radial reactive transport simulations of CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 14.8 kg/s into a 400 m-thick formation at isothermal conditions of 106°C and average pressure near 215 bar, with varying amounts of Hg and H{sub 2}S trace gases, show generally that porosity changes only by about ±0.05% (absolute, i.e., new porosity = initial porosity ±0.0005) with Hg predicted to readily precipitate from the CO{sub 2} as cinnabar in a zone mostly matching the single-phase CO{sub 2} plume. The precipitation of minerals other than cinnabar, however, dominates the evolution of porosity. Main reactions include the replacement of primarily Fe-chlorite by siderite, of calcite by dolomite, and of K-feldspar by muscovite. Chalcedony is also predicted to precipitate from the dissolution of feldspars and quartz. Although the range of predicted porosity change is quite small, the amount of dissolution and precipitation predicted for these individual minerals is not negligible. These reactive transport simulations assume that Hg gas behaves ideally. To examine effects of non-ideality on these simulations, approximate calculations of the fugacity coefficient of Hg in CO{sub 2} were made. Results suggest that Hg condensation could be significantly overestimated when assuming ideal gas behavior, making our simulation results conservative with respect to impacts on injectivity. The effect of pressure on Henry’s constant for Hg is estimated to yield Hg solubilities about 10% lower than when this effect is not considered, a change that is considered too small to affect the conclusions of this report. Although all results in this study are based on relatively mature data and modeling approaches, in the absence of experimental data and more detailed site-specific information, it is not possible to fully validate the results and conclusions.

  17. Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Tabitha Michele

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beginnings of experimental petrology. Science 173 pp. 481-F. 1978. Sedimentary petrology and structures of MessinianJournal of Sedimentary Petrology 46 pp. 273-279 Krijgsman,

  18. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharaka, Y.K

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L. , Hua, W. , 2009. Petrology and isotopic geochemistry ofrock systems with varying petrology. For regular grids, the

  19. Early detection of brine and CO2 leakage through abandoned wells using pressure and surface-deformation monitoring data: Concept and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    and surface-deformation modeling tools to estimate the location and permeability of leaky features by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction The ability to detect CO2 leakage is a key component of risk assessment storage for- mation to shallower groundwater aquifers, ultimately to the atmosphere, through abandoned

  20. Extreme Cosmic String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

    1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the geometry of supermassive cosmic strings. We have used an approach that enforces the spacetime of cosmic strings to also satisfy the conservation laws of a cylindric gravitational topological defect, that is a spacetime kink. In the simplest case of kink number unity, the entire energy range of supermassive strings becomes then quantized so that only cylindrical defects with linear energy density $G\\mu=1/4$ (critical string) and $G\\mu=1/2$ (extreme string) are allowed to occur in this range. It has been seen that the internal spherical coordinate $\\theta$ of the string metric embedded in an Euclidean three-space also evolves on imaginary values, leading to the creation of a covering shell of broken phase that protects the core with trapped energy, even for $G\\mu=1/2$. Then the conical singularity becomes a removable horizaon singularity. We re-express the extreme string metric in the Finkelstein- McCollum standard form and remove the geodesic incompleteness by using the Kruskal technique. The z=const. sections of the resulting metric are the same as the hemispherical section of the metric of a De Sitter kink. Some physical consequences from these results, including the possibility that the extreme string drives inflation and thermal effects in its core, are also discussed.

  1. Reheating and Cosmic String Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xian Gao; Miao Li; Wei Song; Yushu Song

    2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the string production rate at the end of inflation, using the string spectrum obtained in \\lss in a near-de Sitter space. Our result shows that highly excited strings are hardly produced, thus the simple slow-roll inflation alone does not offer a cosmic string production mechanism.

  2. Twistor Strings and Supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abou-Zeid, Mohab [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Einstein gravity can be formulated in such a way that it leads to a perturbation theory about an asymmetric weak coupling limit that treats positive and negative helicities differently. The power counting rules for scattering amplitudes then suggest an interpretation in terms of a twistor string theory for gravity, with amplitudes supported on holomorphic curves in twistor space. After reviewing this formulation, I survey the recent construction of a family of new twistor string theories h are free from world-sheet anomalies and give the space-time spectra of Einstein supergravities, with second order field equations instead of the higher derivative conformal supergravities that arose from earlier twistor strings.

  3. Strings at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

    1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

  4. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) that use this process (minus the evaporation) to provide a brine solution for oilfield applications

  5. Desalination processes of sea ice revisited Dirk Notz1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    are the initial fractionation of salt at the ice-ocean interface, brine diffusion, brine expulsion, gravity in interstitial liquid brine. During all stages of its formation, growth and decay, sea ice remains a mixture of solid freshwater ice and liquid salty brine [e.g., Eicken, 2003, and references therein]. Since many

  6. Author's personal copy Physica D 239 (2010) 18551866

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through the introduction of brine solutions. The success of such techniques relies on the accurate prediction of the location of the brine during the remediation stages as well as eventual brine recovery, such as those occurring during remediation of contaminated soils using brine solutions and during the geological

  7. Pore space percolation in sea ice single crystals D. J. Pringle,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    from 2 to 12% and we found arrays of near-parallel intracrystalline brine layers whose connectivity threshold in the brine microstructure of sea ice. In previous works this critical behavior has been inferred at higher brine volumes by the formation of thin necks between the brine layers. We relate these results

  8. GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 57, NO. 11 (NOVEMBER 1992); P. 13961408, 17 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Seismic properties of pore fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    theseimportant seis- mic properties of hydrocarbon gasesand oils and of brines. Estimates of in-situ conditions. Brine modulus, density, and viscosities increase with in- creasing salt content and pressure. Brine be absorbedby brines than by light oils. As a result, gasin solution in oils can drive their modulus sofar below

  9. Hydration reactions associated with eclogite-facies metamor-phism of granulites in the Norwegian Caledonides led to the formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    in the Norwegian Caledonides led to the formation of saline brines with exceptional compositions. Primary omphacite a plethora of solid phases.A total of 18 different minerals have been identified in multiphase brines, and 12 granulite by the increasingly saline brine during K-feldspar breakdown. INTRODUCTION Primary brine fluid

  10. Comput Geosci DOI 10.1007/s10596-014-9415-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalisch, Henrik

    carbon dioxide (CO2) with formation brine has been shown to be a signif- icant factor for the rate an upper region with CO2 and brine and the single-phase brine region beneath. However, due to interfacial stor- age potential [27]. Prior to injection, these formations are saturated with salty water (brine

  11. A numerical procedure to model and monitor CO2 sequestration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    area of research. o We present a methodology integrating numerical simulation of CO2 -brine o The simultaneous flow of brine and CO2 is described by the well-known Black in the brine but the brine is not allowed to vaporize into the CO2 phase. o This formulation uses

  12. Phase separation and convection in heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    permeability fields. In mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems, a dense brine phase and a coexisting vapor phase permeabilities can act as a store for brines and facilitate the formation of much thicker brine layers than separates into a dense brine phase and a coexisting low-salinity vapor phase at elevated temperatures

  13. Potash Crystallization Lynn Batten1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsatsomeros, Michael

    fertilizer and industrial chemical, from saturated brines. Typically, hot brine at about 100 C is cooled, knowledge of the spatial distribution of the chemical supersaturation state of the brine would help to improve the process control objectives: · Define conditions for crystal growth · Minimize occluded brine

  14. (3-0-0; 3-0-0) Linear Algebra MATH-111 This is a standard first year linear algebra course, parallel to MATH-110, with emphasis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offin, Dan

    , dynamical systems. 3. Applications to structured populations, brine tanks, currency systems. 4. Markov

  15. Chapter 5 -Linear Systems Math 267, Ordinary differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1). #12;Chapter 5 - Linear Systems Spring-mass-spring-mass, Brine tanks I Example 1 Two carts;Chapter 5 - Linear Systems Spring-mass-spring-mass, Brine tanks II computed. Brine (saltwater) goes from 1 at 20 gal/min and brine flows out of tank 2 at 20 gal/min. This can be written as x = - 3 10 x + 1

  16. Life Cycle of Sea-Ice Frazil, or grease ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    of Sea Ice away from surface, long crystals as congelation ice (frozen on from below) Brine Channels within the ice (~width of human hair) Brine rejected from ice (4-10psu), but concentrates in brine from AWI #12;Brine Volume and Salinity From Thomas and Dieckmann 2002, Science .... adapted from papers

  17. It's The Fluids SEG Honorary Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .7 A #12;Water + Ions (usually NaCl) ClNa Dickerson et al., 1970 #12;Heavy Oil Water Wet silicaSilica Heavy information please visit: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil Gas TYPES of PORE FLUIDS = Porosity = Density sat = 0 (1- ) + f Density: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil

  18. Kinetics of Silica Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geothermal brines:’ Avoidance or minimization of silica supersaturation Supersaturation can be avoided by preventing cooling

  19. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM. CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sources such as solar heated industrial waste heat, geothermal water, brines, and ocean thermal

  20. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sources such as solar heated water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal

  1. What is Decidable about Strings?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesh, Vijay

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove several decidability and undecidability results for the satisfiability/validity problem of formulas over a language of finite-length strings and integers (interpreted as lengths of strings). The atomic formulas ...

  2. Witten Index and Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. K. Oikonomou

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yukawa interaction sector of superstring inspired models that give superconducting strings, can be described in terms of a supersymmetric quantum mechanics algebra. We relate the Witten index of susy quantum mechanics with an index characteristic to superconducting string models.

  3. Probing the String Landscape

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keith Dienes

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We are currently in the throes of a potentially huge paradigm shift in physics. Motivated by recent developments in string theory and the discovery of the so-called "string landscape", physicists are beginning to question the uniqueness of fundamental theories of physics and the methods by which such theories might be understood and investigated. In this colloquium, I will give a non-technical introduction to the nature of this paradigm shift and how it developed. I will also discuss some of the questions to which it has led, and the nature of the controversies it has spawned.

  4. Current balancing for battery strings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, James H. (New Baltimore, MI)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

  5. Exotic nonrelativistic string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio [Department of Physics, University of Florence, INFN, Florence (Italy) and Galileo Galilei Institute for Theoretical Physics, Florence (Italy); PH-TH Division, CERN, CH -1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland) and Departament d'Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Facultat de Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Florence and INFN, Florence (Italy)

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a classical nonrelativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the noncommutative structure of the model. Under double-dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic nonrelativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  6. Universitt Stuttgart Institut fr Wasserbau, Lehrstuhl fr Hydromechanik und Hydrosystemmodellierung Workshop on Leakage Modeling, Princeton, November 1/2, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    /2, 2005 Solubility of CO2 in Brine XCO2 brine = f(p, T, XS brine) (Duan & Sun, 2003) dissolved CO2 influences brine density and enthalpy pressure [bar] massfractionCO2inbrine[-] 50 100 150 200 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.04 0.05 T = 20°C T = 30°C T = 40°C X = 0.1brine S . ­ p.9/25 #12;Universität Stuttgart Institut

  7. Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; Witten, Edward; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of string theory, axions appear to provide the most plausible solution of the strong CP problem. However, as has been known for a long time, in many string-based models, the axion coupling parameter Fa is several orders of magnitude higher than the standard cosmological bounds. We re-examine this problem in a variety of models, showing that Fa is close to the GUT scale or above in many models that have GUT-like phenomenology, as well as some that do not. On the other hand, in some models with Standard Model gauge fields supported on vanishing cycles, it is possible for Fa to be well below the GUT scale.

  8. Nonabelian Strings and Axion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gorsky; M. Shifman; A. Yung

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We address two distinct but related issues: (i) the impact of (two-dimensional) axions in a two-dimensional theory known to model confinement, the CP(N-1) model; (ii) bulk axions in four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory supporting non-Abelian strings. In the first case n, \\bar n kinks play the role of "quarks." They are known to be confined. We show that introduction of axions leads to deconfinement (at very large distances). This is akin to the phenomenon of wall liberation in four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory. In the second case we demonstrate that the bulk axion does not liberate confined (anti)monopoles, in contradistinction with the two-dimensional model. A novel physical effect which we observe is the axion radiation caused by monopole-antimonopole pairs attached to the non-Abelian strings.

  9. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  10. Classical string in curved backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilic, Milovan; Vojinovic, Marko [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mathisson-Papapetrou method is originally used for derivation of the particle world line equation from the covariant conservation of its stress-energy tensor. We generalize this method to extended objects, such as a string. Without specifying the type of matter the string is made of, we obtain both the equations of motion and boundary conditions of the string. The world sheet equations turn out to be more general than the familiar minimal surface equations. In particular, they depend on the internal structure of the string. The relevant cases are classified by examining canonical forms of the effective 2-dimensional stress-energy tensor. The case of homogeneously distributed matter with the tension that equals its mass density is shown to define the familiar Nambu-Goto dynamics. The other three cases include physically relevant massive and massless strings, and unphysical tachyonic strings.

  11. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  12. RHIC | String Theory Predicts an Experimental Result

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that originally appeared in the online publication symmetry breaking. A first: String theory predicts an experimental result One of the biggest criticisms of string theory is that...

  13. Twist Field as Three String Interaction Vertex in Light Cone String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isao Kishimoto; Sanefumi Moriyama; Shunsuke Teraguchi

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that matrix string theory and light-cone string field theory are closely related. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the twist field, which represents string interactions in matrix string theory, and the three-string interaction vertex in light-cone string field theory carefully. We find that the three-string interaction vertex can reproduce some of the most important OPEs satisfied by the twist field.

  14. Split string field theory I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe projection operators in the matter sector of Witten's cubic string field theory using modes on the right and left halves of the string. These projection operators represent a step towards an analytic solution of the equations of motion of the full string field theory, and can be used to construct Dp-brane solutions of the string field theory when the BRST operator Q is taken to be pure ghost, as suggested in the recent conjecture by Rastelli, Sen and Zwiebach. We show that a family of solutions related to the sliver state are rank one projection operators on the appropriate space of half-string functionals, and we construct higher rank projection operators corresponding to configurations of multiple D-branes.

  15. Split string field theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the ghost sector of cubic string field theory in terms of degrees of freedom on the two halves of a split string. In particular, we represent a class of pure ghost BRST operators as operators on the space of half-string functionals. These BRST operators were postulated by Rastelli, Sen, and Zwiebach to give a description of cubic string field theory in the closed string vacuum arising from condensation of a D25-brane in the original tachyonic theory. We find a class of solutions for the ghost equations of motion using the pure ghost BRST operators. We find a vanishing action for these solutions, and discuss possible interpretations of this result. The form of the solutions we find in the pure ghost theory suggests an analogous class of solutions in the original theory on the D25-brane with BRST operator Q_B coupling the matter and ghost sectors.

  16. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  17. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  18. String bit models for superstring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, O.; Thorn, C.B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors extend the model of string as a polymer of string bits to the case of superstring. They mainly concentrate on type II-B superstring, with some discussion of the obstacles presented by not II-B superstring, together with possible strategies for surmounting them. As with previous work on bosonic string work within the light-cone gauge. The bit model possesses a good deal less symmetry than the continuous string theory. For one thing, the bit model is formulated as a Galilei invariant theory in (D {minus} 2) + 1 dimensional space-time. This means that Poincare invariance is reduced to the Galilei subgroup in D {minus} 2 space dimensions. Naturally the supersymmetry present in the bit model is likewise dramatically reduced. Continuous string can arise in the bit models with the formation of infinitely long polymers of string bits. Under the right circumstances (at the critical dimension) these polymers can behave as string moving in D dimensional space-time enjoying the full N = 2 Poincare supersymmetric dynamics of type II-B superstring.

  19. Radio bursts from superconducting strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radio bursts from cusps on superconducting strings are linearly polarized, thus, providing a signature that can be used to distinguish them from astrophysical sources. We write the event rate of string-generated radio transients in terms of observational variables, namely, the event duration and flux. Assuming a canonical set of observational parameters, we find that the burst event rate can be quite reasonable, e.g., order ten a year for Grand Unified strings with 100 TeV currents, and a lack of observed radio bursts can potentially place strong constraints on particle physics models.

  20. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  1. Geometry, topology, and string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varadarajan, Uday

    2003-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of scenarios are considered which shed light upon the uses and limitations of classical geometric and topological notions in string theory. The primary focus is on situations in which D-brane or string probes of a given classical space-time see the geometry quite differently than one might naively expect. In particular, situations in which extra dimensions, non-commutative geometries as well as other non-local structures emerge are explored in detail. Further, a preliminary exploration of such issues in Lorentzian space-times with non-trivial causal structures within string theory is initiated.

  2. String-Organized Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lam

    1994-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy string theory should reduce to an ordinary quantum field theory, but in reality the structures of the two are so different as to make the equivalence obscure. The string formalism is more symmetrical between the spacetime and the internal degrees of freedom, thus resulting in considerable simplification in practical calculations and novel insights in theoretical understandings. We review here how tree or multiloop field-theoretical diagrams can be organized in a string-like manner to take advantage of this computational and conceptual simplicity.

  3. M-strings, Elliptic Genera and N=4 String Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hohenegger; Amer Iqbal

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study mass-deformed N=2 gauge theories from various points of view. Their partition functions can be computed via three dual approaches: firstly, (p,q)-brane webs in type II string theory using Nekrasov's instanton calculus, secondly, the (refined) topological string using the topological vertex formalism and thirdly, M theory via the elliptic genus of certain M-strings configurations. We argue for a large class of theories that these approaches yield the same gauge theory partition function which we study in detail. To make their modular properties more tangible, we consider a fourth approach by connecting the partition function to the equivariant elliptic genus of R^4 through a (singular) theta-transform. This form appears naturally as a specific class of one-loop scattering amplitudes in type II string theory on T^2, which we calculate explicitly.

  4. Effect of various solvents on core behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irby, Tom L

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Section of Core Holder with Core 12 6. Effect of Dri-Film on Sessile Drop Ratios of Kerosene on Silica Crystals in Brine 7. Bar Graph Showing Results of Water Flood Test 8. Plot of Resistivity vs. Brine Saturation for Tests No. 1, 4, 7, 9 and 14 27 9. Plot... Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations For Displacement of Brine with Kerosene 35 III. Electrical Resistance Measurements at Various Brine Saturations for Displacement of Brine with East Texas Crude-Kerosene Mixture 36 ABSTRACT Recently...

  5. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  6. Finite Temperature Gases of Fermionic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in the absence of a Ramond-Ramond sector both the type IIA and type IIB free string gases have a thermal instability due to low temperature tachyon modes. The gas of free IIA strings undergoes a thermal duality transition into a gas of free IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. The free heterotic string gas is a tachyon-free ensemble with gauge symmetry SO(16)$\\times$SO(16) in the presence of a timelike Wilson line background. It exhibits a holographic duality relation undergoing a self-dual phase transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat. The type IB open and closed string ensemble is related by thermal duality to the type I' string ensemble. We identify the order parameter for the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition from a low temperature gas of short open strings to a high temperature long string phase at or below T_C. Note Added (Sep 2005).

  7. Quadratic superconducting cosmic strings revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustapha Azreg-Aïnou

    2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that 5-dimensional general relativity action extended by appropriate quadratic terms admits a singular superconducting cosmic string solution. We search for cosmic strings endowed with similar and extended physical properties by directly integrating the non-linear matrix field equations thus avoiding the perturbative approach by which we constructed the above-mentioned \\textsl{exact} solution. The most general superconducting cosmic string, subject to some constraints, will be derived and shown to be mathematically \\textsl{unique} up to linear coordinate transformations mixing its Killing vectors. The most general solution, however, is not globally equivalent to the old one due to the existence of Killing vectors with closed orbits.

  8. Introduction to the theory of strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lectures present, from an introductory perspective, some basic aspects of the quantum theory of strings. They treat (1) the kinematics, spectrum, and scattering amplitude of the bosonic string, (2) the spectrum and supersymmetry of Green-Schwarz superstring, and (3) the identification of the underlying gauge invariances of the string theory. 43 refs.

  9. p-Adic Strings and Their Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, Peter G. O. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of p-adic strings is reviewed along with some of their applications, foremost among them to the tachyon condensation problem in string theory. Some open problems are discussed, in particular that of the superstring in 10 dimensions as the end-stage of the 26-dimensional closed bosonic string's tachyon condensation.

  10. Non-Abelian Strings and Axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shifman, M. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion-like fields can have a strong impact on non-Abelian strings. I discuss axion connection to such strings and its implications in two cases: (i) axion localized on the strings, and (ii) axions propagating in the four-dimensional bulk.

  11. String Theory at Snowmass Michael Dine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    String Theory at Snowmass Michael Dine Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Dated: September 23, 2002) This is the summary talk for the String Theory interested in string theory, quantum gravity, and related issues met to discuss the questions: which future

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Great Salt Lake, Utah 810 Aquat Geochem (2011) 17:809­820 123 #12;more saline brine layer in the south arm, commonly referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is not subject to annual turnover and can

  13. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2012, v. 82, 9911005 Research Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    the Mediterranean Sea into a giant brine pool, external climate forcings, regulated by solar­ lunar cycles in the transformation of the Mediterranean Sea into a giant brine pool where a dramatic hydrological and biological

  14. 1 Mathematical Model The mass consevation equations are for wetting phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Juan

    la wetting phase (brine, digamos). Menos aun para un gas, o sea si el CO2 no estuviera en estado se tiene en cuenta la compresibilidad del CO2, y ademas de la solubilidad en brine, pero eso es

  15. CX-010401: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Brine Disposal System Header to West Hackberry Brine Tanks CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/22/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 86, NO. C9, PAGES 8107-8116, SEPTEMBER 20, 1981 Modeling of AnisotropicElectromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    RegionsResearchandEngineeringLaboratory,Hanover,New Hampshire03755 The contributionof brine layers to observedreflectiveanisotropyof sea ice at 100 MHz is quan. A fundamentalproblem with this theory is the lack of evi- dencefor tl·e existenceof brine celis

  17. CX-009211: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Brine Disposal System Header to Bryan Mound Brine Tank CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/28/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  18. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    profile. Using measurements of brine volume fraction for 10 cm sections of ice cores taken at the Wenner array site, and various models relating brine volume fraction to conductivity, we compare the predicted

  19. CX-009718: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Brine Disposal System Header to Bryan Mound Brine Tank, GFE CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 12/11/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  20. CX-010404: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Replace Brine Disposal System Header to West Hackberry Brine Tanks, Government Furnished Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 04/22/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

  1. LITHIUM--2002 46.1 By Joyce A. Ober

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    domestic producer of lithium carbonate from brine is Chemetall Foote's operation in Nevada. Nevada brines enriched in lithium chloride, which averaged about 300 parts per million (ppm) when Foote Mineral Co. (the

  2. From jcarcione@inogs.it Thu Nov 1 05:42:53 2012 Date: Thu, 01 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenes una idea? > Tambien hay disolucion de CO2 en brine, pero no de brine en CO2, > alli aparece la termodinamica. > Yo no tengo nada d eeso, no se aqui

  3. Journal of Computational Acoustics, FREQUENCY DOMAIN WAVE PROPAGATION MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheen, Dongwoo

    #11;ect de gas, brine or oil and gas-brine or gas-oil pore uids on seismic velocities. NumericalJournal of Computational Acoustics, f c IMACS FREQUENCY DOMAIN WAVE PROPAGATION MODELLING

  4. Geochemical engineering reference manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owen, L.B.; Michels, D.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following topics are included in this manual: physical and chemical properties of geothermal brine and steam, scale and solids control, processing spent brine for reinjection, control of noncondensable gas emissions, and goethermal mineral recovery. (MHR)

  5. Electrochemical Flocculation and Chlorination for Domestic Water Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillion Jr., R. C.; Hiler, E. A.; Peters, J. L.

    Three electrochemical chlorinators were developed, tested and evaluated. The first used natural chlorides in the water to produce a chlorine residual; the second and third produced chlorine residuals by electrolysis of brine solution. Brine feed...

  6. Ultraviolet Limit of Open String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We confirm the intuition that a string theory which is perturbatively infrared finite is automatically perturbatively ultraviolet finite. Our derivation based on the asymptotics of the Selberg trace formula for the Greens function on a Riemann surface holds for both open and closed string amplitudes and is independent of modular invariance and supersymmetry. The mass scale for the open strings stretched between Dbranes suggests a natural world-sheet ultraviolet regulator in the string path integral, preserving both T-duality and open-closed string world-sheet duality. Note added (Jan 2005): Comments and related references added.

  7. Superconducting Hair on Charged Black String Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukasz Nakonieczny; Marek Rogatko

    2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Behaviour of Dirac fermions in the background of a charged black string penetrated by an Abelian Higgs vortex is elaborated. One finds the evidence that the system under consideration can support fermion fields acting like a superconducting cosmic string in the sence that a nontrivial Dirac fermion field can be carried by the system in question. The case of nonextremal and extremal black string vortex systems were considered. The influence of electric and Higgs charge, the winding number and the fermion mass on the fermion localization near the black string event horizon was studied. It turned out that the extreme charged black string expelled fermion fields more violently comparing to the nonextremal one.

  8. Research and development of a 3 MW power plant from the design, development, and demonstration of a 100 KW power system utilizing the direct contact heat exchanger concept for geothermal brine recovery project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, A.W.; Wall, D.A.; Herlacher, T.L.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design phase for the 100 KW unit consumed the months of May through November 1978, with the final design selected as having a direct contact boiler and condenser, a single-stage radial inflow induction turbine-generator using isopentane as the working fluid, and a single cell ejector-type cooling tower. The unit was constructed on two, forty-foot flatbed trailers between the months of October 1978 and June 1979. Systems start-up testing, in-field modifications, unit operation, and performance testing were performed between July and December 1979. AP and L (Arkansas Power and Light) personnel assumed responsibility of the unit at that time and conducted further maintenance, operations, and testing through August 1980.

  9. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    04 -0.111454E-06 0.257202E-09 CaCO3(aq) 0.00 L 7.0223E-0703 0.466424E-06 -0.666853E-09 CaCO3(aq) 0.750075E+01 -AQUEOUS COMPLEXES' 'al+3' 'caco3(aq)' 'cahco3+' 'caso4(

  10. Calcite dissolution kinetics and solubility in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl brines of geologically relevant composition at 0.1 to 1 bar pCO2 and 25 to 80°C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in the following discussion is a brief description of the general distribution and diagenetic origin of the major elements that comprise subsurface waters. Much of this discussion is based on review papers by Hanor (1994a) and Kharaka and Hanor (2004). 1....5.1. Nomenclature In this dissertation I have adopted the terminology of Kharaka and Hanor (2004) when describing subsurface waters. This will include the use of salinity being synonymous with total dissolved solids (TDS), generally reported in milligrams per...

  11. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Soultz fractured reservoir. Proceedings EHDRAcirculation within a fractured reservoir can modify its rockfluid through a deep fractured reservoir. The Soultz-sous-

  12. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies A! CJ M H z

  13. String Universality in Six Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijay Kumar; Washington Taylor

    2009-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In six dimensions, cancellation of gauge, gravitational, and mixed anomalies strongly constrains the set of quantum field theories which can be coupled consistently to gravity. We show that for some classes of six-dimensional supersymmetric gauge theories coupled to gravity, the anomaly cancellation conditions are equivalent to tadpole cancellation and other constraints on the matter content of heterotic/type I compactifications on K3. In these cases, all consistent 6D supergravity theories have a realization in string theory. We find one example which may arise from a novel string compactification, and we identify a new infinite family of models satisfying anomaly factorization. We find, however, that this infinite family of models, as well as other infinite families of models previously identified by Schwarz are pathological. We suggest that it may be feasible to demonstrate that there is a string theoretic realization of all consistent six-dimensional supergravity theories which have Lagrangian descriptions with arbitrary gauge and matter content. We attempt to frame this hypothesis of string universality as a concrete conjecture.

  14. N=2 Quantum String Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers; Olaf Lechtenfeld; Bernd Niemeyer

    2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the genus-one three- and four-point amplitudes in the 2+2 dimensional closed N=(2,2) worldsheet supersymmetric string within the RNS formulation. Vertex operators are redefined with the incorporation of spinor helicity techniques, and the quantum scattering is shown to be manifestly gauge and Lorentz invariant after normalizing the string states. The continuous spin structure summation over the monodromies of the worldsheet fermions is carried out explicitly, and the field-theory limit is extracted. The amplitude in this limit is shown to be the maximally helicity violating amplitude in pure gravity evaluated in a two-dimensional setting, which vanishes, unlike the four-dimensional result. The vanishing of the genus-one N=2 closed string amplitude is related to the absence of one-loop divergences in dimensionally regulated IIB supergravity. Comparisons and contrasts between self-dual field theory and the N=2 string theory are made at the quantum level; they have different S-matrices. Finally, we point to further relations with self-dual field theory and two-dimensional models.

  15. String universality in ten dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan Adams; Oliver DeWolfe; Washington Taylor

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the ${\\cal N}=1$ supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups $U(1)^{496}$ and $E_8 \\times U(1)^{248}$ are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  16. Practice for Exam 1 Math 3400 -Intro to Differential Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cascaval, Radu C.

    contains 100 gal of brine containing 50 lb of salt. Brine containing 1 lb of salt per gallon enters the tank at a rate of 5 gals/s, and the well mixed brine in the tank flows out at a rate of 3 gal/s. How much salt will be the tank contain when it is full of brine? Problem 5. [Population model] Consider

  17. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2013 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    Questions: 6 pts. 1) For your brine shrimp experiment, you had a tube with nothing added to it and another

  18. Limnol. Oceanogr., 47(3), 2002, 646655 2002, by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - and 88-d-old juvenile striped bass, Morone saxatilis, from crustacean food. Brine shrimp nauplii, Artemia

  19. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (not brine) surface was based on direct MAX-DOAS atmospheric measurements above Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

  20. Modeling Interfacial Liquid Layers in Environmental Ices SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Symbol Quantity ice wf Fugacity of pure ice brine wf^ Fugacity of water in brine layer vap wf Fugacity of water in vapor space above ice wf Fugacity of pure liquid water wx Mole fraction of water in brine layer ice wH Enthalpy of ice at T, P 0,ice wH Enthalpy of ice at reference state brine wH Partial molar

  1. A Review of Multidimensional, Multifluid Intermediate-scale Experiment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    surfactant flushing, alcohol flushing, surfactantalcohol combinations, dense brine barrier strategies, oil recovery through pumping, soil vapor extraction, air sparging,...

  2. EA-1482: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations, Frio Formation, Liberty County, Texas

  3. American Mineralogist, Volume 87, pages 359363, 2002 0003-004X/02/0203359$05.00 359

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    is abundant enough to lead to the formation of a third liquid phase (hydrous molten salt or brine) during

  4. Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gasperikova, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an oil reservoir, (2) a brine formation, and (3) a depletedoil-bearing formations or depleted coalbed methane reservoirs.

  5. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research hasas brine formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. The

  6. DOCKET: A-98-49 Item: II-B1-25

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..........................................................................................................................1 2.0 Geologic Setting, Salado Formation Mineralogy, and Brine Chemistry.......................................................................................................3 2.2 Salado Mineralogy

  7. Southern California Channel Islands Bibliography, through 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydraulic version of the Biphase reaction turbine can recover reverse-osmosis reject-brine pressure energy with efficiency

  8. Proceedings of the TOUGH Symposium 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oil recovery by waterflood- ing, SPE Reservoir EngineeringWaterflood performance by injection of brine with different salinity of reservoir

  9. Comput Geosci DOI 10.1007/s10596-012-9282-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    from that of the injected brine. The changing ionic composition can enhance recovery [2, 29, 65], or the mixing of the two different brines leads to the precipitation of minerals and formation of scale [41, 58-aqueous phase liquids, chemical floods are designed where understanding the brine composition is crucial, since

  10. A unified approach to understanding permeability in sea ice Solving the mystery of booming sand dunes Entering into the "greenhouse century": A case study from Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    and associated ecosystems respond to climate change. However, studies of k and its dependence on brine porosity f and field data. X-ray computed tomography provides an unprecedented look at the brine phase and its and microstructural character- istics. Brine transport facilitates sea ice production from freezing of flooded ice

  11. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 100, NO. C7, PAGES 13,699-13,711, JULY 15, 1995 Boundson the complexpermittivity of seaice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    .The boundingmethoddevelopedhere,whichdoes not assumeany specificgeometryfor the brine inclusions,offersan alternativeto pure ice with brine and air inclusions. The details of the mi- crostructure,namelythe geometryand(pureice)containingspher- ical or ellipsoidalinclusions(brine or air). Variousef- fectivemedium theories

  12. 0361-0128/01/3386/1397-15 $6.00 1397 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    water-rock interactions. Brines formed by dissolution of evaporites and by seawater evaporation have in the resid- ual brine, as it cannot be accommodated in the halite crystal lattice. Conversely, when halite is dissolved, the resulting brine will have low Br concentration and the Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios

  13. SIMULACINNUMRICADEINCLUSIONESFLUIDASENHALITA Simulacin numrica de inclusiones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Temperature = T0 Time = t0 brine Evaporation h2o Radiation (W) #12;SIMULACIÓNNUMÉRICADEINCLUSIONESFLUIDASENHALITA Fluid inclusion (brine) Evaporation h2o Temperature = T1 = T0 Time = t1 Radiation (W) halite halite Fluid inclusion (brine)halite Presentación del problema #12

  14. Electrochemical Processes for Removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    ) concentrates or brine solutions produced from ion exchange, are generally discharged to the sanitary sewer of ion exchange media produces large quantities of brine. For example, a single regeneration cycle can produce anywhere from 80 to 320 kg of concentrated brine solution per cubic meter of ion exchange media

  15. Numerical Analysis of a Mixed Finite Element Method for a FlowTransport Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, So-Hsiang

    element method for the brine, radionuclides, and heat combined with a mixed finite element method dissolves to create a brine, radioactive elements decay to generate heat, and radionuclides are transported), the viscosity of the fluid is dependent on â?? c, the concentration of the brine in the fluid. Here and below

  16. Brian R. Strazisar $ National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    of basin-scale migration and long-term fate. The dissolution of the injected CO2 into brine causes a sharp drop in pH, and consequently, the acidic brine ag- gressively reacts with aquifer minerals. Our model with respect to the flow of the brine itself, and a significant amount of injected CO2 is immobilized because

  17. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, July 2003, p. 42824284 Vol. 69, No. 7 0099-2240/03/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.69.7.42824284.2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    the three- dimensional network of brine inclusions in the ice (10). Such in situ observations have suggested of the brine inclusions themselves and that asso- ciation with surfaces is important for sustained activity salt solutions). How the more extreme conditions of sea ice brines (subzero temperatures, high salt

  18. U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in cooperation with the Office of the New York State Attorney General Brine Migration from a Flooded Salt Mine 1998 through September 2006 with model A and model B. #12;Brine Migration from a Flooded Salt Mine.D., and Parkhurst, D.L., 2009, Brine migration from a flooded salt mine in the Genesee Valley, Livingston County

  19. Water vapor transport in the vicinity of imbibing saline plumes: Homogeneous and layered unsaturated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisbrod, Noam

    solutions (brines) were applied as point sources to the surface of homogenous packs of prewetted silica sand vapor transport from the residually saturated sand into the imbibing brine was observed in all sand grades and geometries. Pure water applied to sand prewetted with brine migrated into the surrounding

  20. A network model for fluid transport through sea ice A. JABINI,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    randomly from distributions describing measured cross-sectional areas of brine inclusions in sea ice. At this stage, the model reflects only the most general features of brine microstructure and its evolution observed values. This finding provides evidence that the brine network becomes more disconnected with lower

  1. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Navajo SandstonebrineCO2 interaction: implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Navajo Sandstone­brine­CO2 interaction: implications for geological carbon to the injected CO2 is largely unknown. Experiments involving the reac- tion of Navajo Sandstone with acidic brine experiment examined sandstone interaction with CO2-impregnated brine; the second experiment examined

  2. Earthquake-induced barium anomalies in the Lisan Formation, Dead Sea Rift valley, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    . The concentration of Ba2+ in DSB Ca-chloride brines is mostly lesser than that in the DSB Lake, ruling out sediment layers in the DSB Lake were shaken and re- suspended into the overlying brine. The larger, faster crystallites on their surfaces from the surrounding brine before reaching the bottom. The lag of Ba trapping

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Geochemical Evolution of Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , USA, is the largest saline lake in North America, and its brines are some of the most concentrated and mirabilite, have periodically modified lake-brine chemistry through density stratifi- cation in the north. These and other conditions have created brine differentiation, mixing, and fractional

  4. Curriculum Vitae Linda Luquot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    quantification from pore scale to darcy scale of reactive processes induce by CO2 rich-brine injection through characterization during CO2 rich-brine injection under in situ conditions. - study of leakage through fractured/rocks reactions characterization during CO2 rich-brine injection under in situ conditions. - Characterization

  5. In Situ Measurement of Magnesium Carbonate Formation from CO2 Using Static High-Pressure and -Temperature 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skemer, Philip

    ,6 stratigraphic (physically trapped CO2), solubility (CO2 dissolved in the geological brine), hydrodynamic (dissolved CO2 trapped due to slow flow of geological brine), residual (CO2 trapped in pore spaces quantities of these cations in the brine solution and in the minerals present, which are released when the p

  6. Sci. Dril., 16, 3343, 2013 www.sci-dril.net/16/33/2013/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    CO2 into reservoir brine will likely form an important mechanism for stabilizing the CO2 the acidified CO2-charged brine and reservoir minerals might enhance the long-term storage of CO2 and acidic CO2-charged brine. Whilst it is expected that a well-sited CO2 storage fa- cility will not leak

  7. Instruments and Methods A non-destructive method for measuring the salinity and solid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worster, M. Grae

    rejected into the underlying ocean or remains within highly saline brine in the interstices between the pure, fresh-water ice crystals. It is the volume fraction of this brine, the so-called liquid fraction and others, 2000). A first-principles predictive model of the brine volume evolution is therefore required

  8. Natural Convection, Solute Trapping, and Channel Formation during Solidification of M. G. Worster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wettlaufer, John S.

    of sea ice. These show, in particular, that brine initially remains trapped in the interstices of the sea brine drainage occurs, which is tested against the experimental results. When ice grows from water to elucidate the experimental observations. These demonstrate how and why the interstitial brine initially

  9. Void bounds for fluid transport in sea ice K.M. Golden a,*, A.L. Heaton a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air and salt inclusions whose microstructure varies and biological processes. Yet little is known, for example, about bulk flow of brine or diffusive transport dynamics in sea ice: estimating the effective fluid permeability tensor k(/) and its dependence on brine

  10. CO2 Percolation Experiment Through Chlorite/Zeolite-Rich Sandstones 1 Gosciences Montpellier, Universit Montpellier -CNRS, Montpellier, France,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    based on two CO2-rich brine percolation lab-scale experiments reproducing in situ reservoir conditions is a rock-equilibrated brine subsequently enriched in CO2 up to partial pressure of 6 MPa. We observe-scale characterisation of the rock before and after each experiment using ESEM and TEM. Chemistry of the percolated brine

  11. cene Palaeoecology and Palaeohydrology, B. E. Ber-glund, Ed. (Wiley, Toronto, 1986), pp. 407422.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    at a critical brine volume fraction pc of about 5 percent, or temperature Tc of about ­5°C for salinity of 5 parts per thousand. For temperatures warmer than Tc, brine carrying heat and nutrients can move through consisting of pure ice with brine and air inclusions, whose size and geometry depend on the ice crystal

  12. Water Treatment using Electrocoagulation Ritika Mohan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    important issue in this project was to treat brine coming out from the process called High Efficiency of brine amounting to almost 103 104 gal/day water. The difference between conventional Reverse Osmosis (RO) and HEROTM lies in the recovery. HEROTM can help achieve >95 % recovery (2) . Hence, the brine

  13. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice, which incorporates statistical measurements of the brine microstructure. The numerical of the electrical properties of the ice. Since sea ice is a composite of pure ice with brine inclusions [21 conductivity of pure ice is negligible for most purposes, the electrical conductivity of brine can

  14. Gassmann's fluid substitution and shear modulus variability in carbonates at laboratory seismic and ultrasonic frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boise State University

    frequencies. Samples are measured dry humidi- fied and saturated with liquid butane and brine. Our carbon- ate rock shear-modulus change from dry to brine saturation conditions, and we investigate several rock velocities for either oil- or brine-saturated samples, al- though for some samples, Gassmann's theory

  15. The Oceans, Coastal Processes, and Landforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    .5%, the seawater is brine. ! If salinity is less than 3.5%, the seawater is brackish. #12;Salinity by Latitude #12;Annual Mean Salinity at Surface 2011 #12;Salinity by Latitude ITCZ #12;Brackish and Brine ! Brackish.g., the Baltic Sea. ! Brine (salinity >3.5%) is associated with high evaporation rates in a nearly enclosed basin

  16. 0361-0128/01/3361/933-22 $6.00 933 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    -Pb deposits of Mississippi Valley type is thought to be related to brine mi- gration within sedimentary basins that generation and circu- lation of the ore-forming brines in the Maestrat basin took Geochemistry of the Fluids by the mixing of two distinct fluids: fluid A, a high salinity brine, with salinity greater than 26 wt percent

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage in brine pockets often fail to reduce the energy required for surface ablation in proportion leads to reduced heat conduction, less internal brine­pocket melting, and more surface ablation. 1

  18. Sea Ice Ridging and Rafting Structures: Is the microstructural controlled transition from Ductile to Brittle Behavior on Earth also seen on Mars? S.F. Ackley, P. Wagner, H. Xie,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    , and liquid brine contained within lamellae of a pure ice matrix in a closely interlocked structure. The relative amount of brine, ice and solid salts is controlled by the thermodynamics of the phase equilibrium]. At higher brine volumes, sea ice behaves as a ductile material, meaning that it can undergo large strain

  19. Effect of Dissolved CO2 on a Shallow Groundwater System: A Controlled Release Field Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    underground in depleted oil and natural gas reservoirs, or rock formations containing brine too salty to drink, increases fluid pressure gradients, which can potentially push brine and CO2 out of a storage reservoir through leakage pathways if they exist. Migration of brine into potable groundwater has the potential

  20. Large-scale flow of geofluids at the Dead Sea Rift H. Gvirtzmana,*, E. Stanislavskyb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    that has caused large-scale migration of brine and hydrocarbons at the Dead Sea Rift. Numerical simulations flow directions. The first is a density-driven migration of brine through deep aquifers from the rift reserved. Keywords: Groundwater; Brine; Hydrocarbons; Rift; Dead Sea; Modeling 1. The Dead Sea Rift

  1. Spatial delineation of groundwater salinity using deep time domain electromagnetic geophysical measurements: A feasibility study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    , as well as brine, beneath the Judea Desert, Israel. We used the deep time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) is characterized by 5­15 W m, saline groundwater (104 brine, saline and brine) exist in the subsurface within the exploration depth interval of the applied TDEM

  2. Seismic wave attenuation in carbonates L. Adam,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boise State University

    butane or brine. This observation holds for four out of five samples at seismic (10­1000 Hz, attenuation increases by 250% when brine substitutes a light hydrocarbon in these carbonate rocks. For some of the samples. The rocks are measured dry and fully saturated with a light hydrocarbon and with a brine

  3. Universitat Stuttgart Technischer Bericht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    fluid and brine through pathways of technically induced or natural occurring fractures or faults has numerical model, which is able to illustrate the conceptual flow behavior of brine and HF fluid over long migration of fracturing fluids and brine. These articles point out several sh

  4. A DIRECT TRACKING METHOD FOR A GROUNDED CONDUCTOR INSIDE A PIPELINE FROM CAPACITANCE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the oil industry where brine is often mixed with oil in a pipeline. If the size of the body of brine potential in the region of brine is close to zero. This model leads to the inverse problem of identifying

  5. Physica B 394 (2007) 357362 Complex bounds and microstructural recovery from measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sea ice is a porous composite of pure ice with brine, air, and salt inclusions. The polar sea ice. The sea ice is assumed to be a two phase composite of ice and brine with known constituent permittivities. The first set of bounds assumes only knowledge of the brine volume fraction or porosity, and the second set

  6. On Gravity Currents in Heterogeneous Porous Media Daniel M. Andersona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel M.

    methods based upon the injection of a dense brine, which is used to restrict the movement of dense non-aqueous phase liquids and aid remediation [1­3]. For such systems, the behavior of the brine as a function, the behavior of brines under such conditions is of central interest. In previous work [4], hereafter referred

  7. RECOVERY OF SURFACE PARAMETERS FROM STEPPEDFREQUENCY RADAR RETURNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, Margaret

    crystal matrix, so small pockets of brine tend to form. The size and number of these pockets depends in the portion of the ice above sea level. Because brine and air have very di#erent electrical properties from. At higher temperatures, a larger fraction of the sample is composed of brine, which tends to drain out when

  8. Simulation of hysteretic effects in multi-phase flows in aquifers N. D. Botkin, M. Brokate, K.-H. Hoffmann, O. A. Pykhteev, and V. L. Turova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turova, Varvara

    permeable rocks that are saturated with salt water, called brine. Terrestrial saline aquifers are saline be injected into such a formation. Because the supercritical CO2 is less dense than the brine, it will rise up and become trapped by the caprock above. Additionally, some CO2 will be dissolved in the brine. Injection

  9. D. A. Banks G. Giuliani B. W. D. Yardley A. Cheilletz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    in Colombia: ¯uid chemistry and the role of brine mixing Received: 9 April 1999 / Accepted: 14 March 2000 that in each region brines associ- ated with emerald mineralisation range between two extremes with many with the calcic brine caused pre- cipitation of ¯uorite and parisite. Introduction The common association

  10. Universitat Stuttgart -Institut fur Wasser-und Umweltsystemmodellierung Lehrstuhl fur Hydromechanik und Hydrosystemmodellierung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    is carried out in two steps. In the first step brine works as a heat extraction fluid. The produced brine. The second step begins when CO2 reaches the production well, from this time on wards the co-produced brine

  11. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Daniel M.

    -aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in contaminated subsurface systems through the introduction of brine solutions. The success of such techniques relies on the accurate prediction of the location of the brine during the remediation stages as well as eventual brine recovery. The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep

  12. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 2. Quantifying the transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    the rate of formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) due to brine rejection on the Okhotsk Sea northwestern- mediate water (NPIW) [Talley, 1991, 1993; Yasuda, 1997]. The initial overturn is driven by brine rejection ice formation and brine rejection into underlying waters. Newly formed DSW is advected by the large

  13. OCTOBER 1998 1999S T O S S E L E T A L . 1998 American Meteorological Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drijfhout, Sybren

    of brine release due to sea ice formation and that of employing more variable winds over SO sea ice. 1 that, by brine release through sea ice formation. Sea ice modifies the heat exchange and freshwater regions around Antarctica is often enhanced by the addition of brine associated with freezing (e

  14. The sources and evolution of sulfur in the hypersaline Lake Lisan (paleo-Dead Sea)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torfstein, Adi

    mixolimnion), bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) that occurred under the anoxic conditions of the lower brine reservoir in the lower brine was replenished by precipitation of gypsum from the upper layer, and its equation. Steady state d34 S values (~40x) were reached in the lower brine after long meromictic periods

  15. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION WITH ANOZIE EBIGBO, ANDREAS BIELINSKI, ANDREAS KOPP, HOLGER CLASS, RAINER HELMIG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    . It takes into account the two phases CO2 and brine and the components CO2 and water which can dissolve the conceptual model for a non-isothermal composi- tional CO2-water (brine) model based on the simulator MUFTE. MODEL For the description of the flow and transport processes of carbon dioxide and brine in a rock

  16. Bounds on the complex permittivity of matrix-article composites Romuald Sawicz and Kenneth Goldena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    is assumed to consist of a pure ice matrix with random brine inclusions. Using experimental measurements of the average size and separation of the brine pockets, end points of the support of the measure can consists of a pure ice matrix with random brine and air inclusions. The effect of air inclusions on P

  17. The late Quaternary limnological history of Lake Kinneret (Sea of Galilee), Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    , indicating that the Dead Sea brine (which supports aragonite production) never reached or affected Lake; Stein, 2001). The salt dissolved in the lakes originated from the ancient Sedom brine, and freshwater mixed with the brine reflects 0033-5894/$ - see front matter D 2004 University of Washington. All rights

  18. GEOLOGY, December 2007 1063 Semi-arid and arid rivers typically exhibit increasing salinity levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asmerom, Yemane

    of a sedimentary brine source. These groundwater fluxes, while very small (. Furthermore, 36 Cl/Cl ratios and 234 U values for these brines are close to secular equilibrium, indicating brine ages on the order of millions of years. The recognition of a substantial geologic salinity source

  19. GSA Bulletin; November 2000; v. 112; no. 11; p. 16941702; 8 figures; 1 table. Transient groundwater-lake interactions in a continental rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    - truded brine has been flushed backward to- ward the lake. Numerical simulations solv- ing the coupled- ent aquifer permeabilities on both sides of the rift, brine percolated into aquifers on the western. It is suggested that the perco- lating brine on the western side reacted with limestone at depth to form

  20. The influence of ocean flow on newly forming sea ice Daniel L. Feltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    conditions. The mechanism relies on brine flows developing in the sea ice due to Bernoulli suction by flow models that parameter- ize the brine content [Maykut and Untersteiner, 1971], or treat, for example, melt. In this paper, we are interested in investigating the effect of brine flow within the sea ice, which

  1. CharacteristicGalerkin and Mixed Finite Element Approximation of Contamination by Compressible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, So-Hsiang

    for the brine, radionuclides, and heat and by a mixed finite element method for the pressure and velocity disposal buried in a salt dome. The salt dissolves to generate a brine, radioactive elements decay), the viscosity of the fluid, is dependent on â?? c, the concentration of the brine in the fluid. For simplicity we

  2. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 7 (2012) 153167 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .elsevier.com/locate/ijggc CO2­brine­caprock interaction: Reactivity experiments on Eau Claire shale and a review of relevant report new laboratory experiments on CO2­brine­caprock interactions and a review of the relevant dissolution in brine were conducted at 200 C and 300 bars to test the extent of fluid-rock reactions

  3. Z .Cold Regions Science and Technology 31 2000 207225 www.elsevier.comrlocatercoldregions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    2000 Abstract Microstructure and thermal evolution of sea-ice brine inclusions were investigated-frequency RF signals in the dielectrically lossy brine resulted in degraded signals and was alleviated Z . Zby by microscopic residual brine inclusions. q 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Sea ice

  4. Profiling Float Observations of the Upper Ocean Under Sea Ice off the Wilkes Land Coast of Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Stephen C.

    the water column is weakly stratified due to brine rejection and is therefore only marginally stable brine rejection associated with sea ice formation results in dense shelf waters, which mix, the salt in seawater is excluded. The expelled salt remains as pockets of brine in the ice until it slowly

  5. Atomic modelling of crystal/complex fluid/crystal contacts--Part II. Simulating AFM tests via the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2 storage on kaolinite/brine/kaolinite adhesion G. Pepe Force Microscopy (AFM) tests at a kaolinite/brine/kaolinite contact, the confined fluid in sub). Two external solutions are tested. Solution S1 is a neutral brine (pH¼7.5) leading to a possible

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical analysis is given for calculating the composition of the aqueous vapor and the saline brine (hydrosaline liquid) present at run pressure and temperature in the experiment. The mixture of aqueous vapor and brine is homogenized upon quench. The method for calculating the concentration of HCl and NaCl in the coexisting aqueous vapor and brine is shown.

  7. Norm removal from frac water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, James Manio; Matis, Hope; Kostedt, IV, William Leonard

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating low barium frac water includes contacting a frac water stream with a radium selective complexing resin to produce a low radium stream, passing the low radium stream through a thermal brine concentrator to produce a concentrated brine; and passing the concentrated brine through a thermal crystallizer to yield road salt.

  8. Filter for a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); McPherson, James (Sandy, UT)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A filter for a drill string comprises a perforated receptacle having an open end and a perforated end and first and second mounting surfaces are adjacent the open end. A transmission element is disposed within each of the first and second mounting surfaces. A capacitor may modify electrical characteristics of an LC circuit that comprises the transmission elements. The respective transmission elements are in communication with each other and with a transmission network integrated into the drill string. The transmission elements may be inductive couplers, direct electrical contacts, or optical couplers. In some embodiments of the present invention, the filter comprises an electronic component. The electronic component may be selected from the group consisting of a sensor, a router, a power source, a clock source, a repeater, and an amplifier.

  9. Cosmological consequences of string axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben [Department of Physics, University of California and Theoretical Physics Group, Bldg. 50A5104, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} > or approx. 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T < or approx. {lambda}{sub QCD}.

  10. Cosmological Consequences of String Axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kain, Ben

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Axion fluctuations generated during inflation lead to isocurvature and non-Gaussian temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background radiation. Following a previous analysis for the model independent string axion we consider the consequences of a measurement of these fluctuations for two additional string axions. We do so independent of any cosmological assumptions except for the axions being massless during inflation. The first axion has been shown to solve the strong CP problem for most compactifications of the heterotic string while the second axion, which does not solve the strong CP problem, obeys a mass formula which is independent of the axion scale. We find that if gravitational waves interpreted as arising from inflation are observed by the PLANCK polarimetry experiment with a Hubble constant during inflation of H{sub inf} {approx}> 10{sup 13} GeV the existence of the first axion is ruled out and the second axion cannot obey the scale independent mass formula. In an appendix we quantitatively justify the often held assumption that temperature corrections to the zero temperature QCD axion mass may be ignored for temperatures T {approx}< {Lambda}{sub QCD}.

  11. Energy radiated from a fluctuating selfdual string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Gustavsson

    2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the energy that is radiated from a fluctuating selfdual string in the large $N$ limit of $A_{N-1}$ theory using the AdS-CFT correspondence. We find that the radiated energy is given by a non-local expression integrated over the string world-sheet. We also make the corresponding computation for a charged string in six-dimensional classical electrodynamics, thereby generalizing the Larmor formula for the radiated energy from an accelerated point particle.

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

  13. String theory: big problem for small size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sahoo

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory is the most promising candidate theory for a unified description of all fundamental forces exist in the nature. It provides a mathematical framework that combine quantum theory with Einstein's general theory of relativity. But due to the extremely small size of strings, nobody has been able to detect it directly in the laboratory till today. In this article, we have presented a general introduction to string theory.

  14. Brane World Models Need Low String Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Calmet, Xavier

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models with large extra dimensions offer the possibility of the Planck scale being of order the electroweak scale, thus alleviating the gauge hierarchy problem. We show that these models suffer from a breakdown of unitarity at around three quarters of the low effective Planck scale. An obvious candidate to fix the unitarity problem is string theory. We therefore argue that it is necessary for the string scale to appear below the effective Planck scale and that the first signature of such models would be string resonances. We further translate experimental bounds on the string scale into bounds on the effective Planck scale.

  15. Singularities and Closed String Tachyons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A basic problem in gravitational physics is the resolution of spacetime singularities where general relativity breaks down. The simplest such singularities are conical singularities arising from orbifold identifications of flat space, and the most challenging are spacelike singularities inside black holes (and in cosmology). Topology changing processes also require evolution through classically singular spacetimes. I briefly review how a phase of closed string tachyon condensate replaces, and helps to resolve, basic singularities of each of these types. Finally I discuss some interesting features of singularities arising in the small volume limit of compact negatively curved spaces and the emerging zoology of spacelike singularities.

  16. Wiggly cosmic strings accrete dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro F. Gonzalez-Diaz; Jose A. Jimenez Madrid

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with a study of the cylindrically symmetric accretion of dark energy with equation of state $p=w\\rho$ onto wiggly straight cosmic strings. We have obtained that when $w>-1$ the linear energy density in the string core gradually increases tending to a finite maximum value as time increases for all considered dark energy models. On the regime where the dominant energy condition is violated all such models predict a steady decreasing of the linear energy density of the cosmic strings as phantom energy is being accreted. The final state of the string after such an accretion process is a wiggleless defect. It is argued however that if accreation of phantom energy would proceed by successive quantum steps then the defect would continue losing linear energy density until a minimum nonzero value which can be quite smaller than that corresponding to the unperturbed string.

  17. Vibration monitoring system for drill string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wassell, M.E.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration monitoring system is described for use in monitoring lateral and torsional vibrations in a drill string comprising: a drill string component having an outer surface; first accelerometer means A[sub 1] for measuring tangential acceleration; second accelerometer means A[sub 2] for measuring tangential acceleration; third accelerometer means A[sub 3] for measuring tangential acceleration; said first, second and third accelerometer means A[sub 1], A[sub 2] and A[sub 3] being mounted in said drill string component and being spaced from one another to measure acceleration forces on said drill string component tangentially with respect to the outer surface of said component wherein said first, second and third accelerometer means are adapted to measure and distinguish between lateral and torsional vibrations exerted on said drill string component.

  18. Bose-Einstein condensate strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiberiu Harko; Matthew J. Lake

    2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possible existence of gravitationally bound general relativistic strings consisting of Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) matter which is described, in the Newtonian limit, by the zero temperature time-dependent nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation (the Gross-Pitaevskii equation), with repulsive interparticle interactions. In the Madelung representation of the wave function, the quantum dynamics of the condensate can be formulated in terms of the classical continuity equation and the hydrodynamic Euler equations. In the case of a condensate with quartic nonlinearity, the condensates can be described as a gas with two pressure terms, the interaction pressure, which is proportional to the square of the matter density, and the quantum pressure, which is without any classical analogue though, when the number of particles in the system is high enough, the latter may be neglected. By assuming cylindrical symmetry, we analyze the physical properties of the BEC strings in both the interaction pressure and quantum pressure dominated limits, by numerically integrating the gravitational field equations. In this way we obtain a large class of stable stringlike astrophysical objects, whose basic parameters (mass density and radius) depend sensitively on the mass and scattering length of the condensate particle, as well as on the quantum pressure of the Bose-Einstein gas.

  19. QFT, String Temperature and the String Phase of de Sitter Space-time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medrano, M R

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The density of mass levels \\rho(m) and the critical temperature for strings in de Sitter space-time are found. QFT and string theory in de Sitter space are compared. A `Dual'-transform is introduced which relates classical to quantum string lengths, and more generally, QFT and string domains. Interestingly, the string temperature in De Sitter space turns out to be the Dual transform of the QFT-Hawking-Gibbons temperature. The back reaction problem for strings in de Sitter space is addressed selfconsistently in the framework of the `string analogue' model (or thermodynamical approach), which is well suited to combine QFT and string study.We find de Sitter space-time is a self-consistent solution of the semiclassical Einstein equations in this framework. Two branches for the scalar curvature R(\\pm) show up: a classical, low curvature solution (-), and a quantum high curvature solution (+), enterely sustained by the strings. There is a maximal value for the curvature R_{\\max} due to the string back reaction. Int...

  20. Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

  1. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore »effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  2. Effects of Overlapping Strings in pp Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Bierlich; Gösta Gustafson; Leif Lönnblad; Andrey Tarasov

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes". Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA 8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  3. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian [Lund University; Gustafson, Gösta [Lund University; Lönnblad, Leif [Lund University; Tarasov, Andrey [JLAB

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  4. Strings and their compactification from the particle viewpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slansky, R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of four lectures is given which deals with the particle formulation of string theory. An introductory lecture is given on where the idea of strings comes from and what strings are. An introduction is given to simple Lie algebras and their representations. Compactified strings and the heterotic theories are discussed, showing how infinite-dimensional Kac-Moody affine algebras can be spectrum generating algebras in (open) string theories. The spectrum of excited states of the heterotic string is examined, and comments are made on representations of affine algebras. Some aspects are shown of the algebraic structure of compactified closed bosonic strings. (LEW)

  5. Semiclassical analysis of string-gauge duality on noncommutative space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rashkov, R.C.; Viswanathan, K.S.; Yang Yi [Department of Physics, Sofia University, 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use semiclassical methods to study closed strings in the modified AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background with constant B fields. The pointlike closed strings and the stretched closed strings rotating around the big circle of S{sup 5} are considered. Quantization of these closed string leads to a time-dependent string spectrum, which we argue corresponds to the renormalization-group flow of the dual noncommutative Yang-Mills theory.

  6. A Proposal for Altering the Unification Scale in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An ensemble of short open strings in equilibrium with the heat bath provided by the Euclidean worldvolume of a stack of Dbranes undergoes a thermal phase transition to a long string phase. The transition temperature is just below the string scale. We point out that this phenomenon provides a simple mechanism within open and closed string theories for altering the strong-electro-weak coupling unification scale relative to the fundamental closed string mass scale in spacetimes with external electromagnetic background.

  7. Mining Energy from a Black Hole by Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Frolov; D. Fursaev

    2001-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how cosmic strings can be used to mine energy from black holes. A string attached to the black hole gives rise to an additional channel for the energy release. It is demonstrated that when a string crosses the event horizon, its transverse degrees of freedom are thermally excited and thermal string perturbations propagate along the string to infinity. The internal metric induced on the 2D worldsheet of the static string crossing the horizon describes a 2D black hole. For this reason thermal radiation of string excitations propagating along the string can be interpreted as Hawking radiation of the 2D black hole. It is shown that the rate of energy emission through the string channel is of the same order of magnitude as the bulk radiation of the black hole. Thus, for N strings attached to the black hole the efficiency of string channels is increased by factor N. We discuss restrictions on N which exist because of the finite thickness of strings, the gravitational backreaction and quantum fluctuations. Our conclusion is that the energy emission rate by strings can be increased as compared to the standard emission in the bulk by the factor 10^3 for GUT strings and up to the factor 10^{31} for electroweak strings.

  8. Effect of cosmic string on spin dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashree Chowdhury; B. Basu

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper, we have investigated the role of cosmic string on spin current and Hall electric field. Due to the background cosmic string, the modified electric field of the system generates renormalized spin orbit coupling, which induces a modified non-Abelian gauge field. The defect causes a change in the AB and AC phases appearing due to the modified electromagnetic field. In addition, for a time varying electric field we perform explicit analytic calculations to derive the exact form of spin electric field and spin current, which is defect parameter dependent and of oscillating type. Furthermore, in an asymmetric crystal within the Drude model approach we investigate the dependence of the cosmic string parameters on cosmic string induced Hall electric field.

  9. Fractal Strings and Multifractal Zeta Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapidus, Michel L.; Lévy-Véhel, Jacques; Rock, John A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decompositions of Moran fractals. Adv. Math. 92, 196–236 (Probab. 12, 8. Falconer, K. : Fractal Geometry—MathematicalB.M. , Lapidus, M.L. : Random fractal strings: their zeta

  10. Two-dimensional QCD and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Gross; W. Taylor

    1993-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A review is given of recent research on two-dimensional gauge theories, with particular emphasis on the equivalence between these theories and certain string theories with a two-dimensional target space. Some related open problems are discussed.

  11. Introduction to string and superstring theory II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conformal field theory is reviewed, then conformal invariance is used to rederive the basic results on the embedding dimensionality for bosonic and fermionic strings. The spectrum of the bosonic and the computation of scattering amplitudes are discussed. The formalism used is extended to clarify the origin of Yang-Mills gauge invariance in the open bosonic string theory. The question of the general-coordinate gauge invariance of string theory is addressed, presenting two disparate viewpoints on this question. A brief introduction is then given of the reduction from the idealized string theory in 10 extended dimensions to more realistic solutions in which all but 4 of these dimensions are compactified. The state of knowledge about the space-time supersymmetry of the superstring from the covariant viewpoint is outlined. An approach for identifying possible 6-dimensional spaces which might represent the form of the compact dimensions is discussed, and the orbifold scheme of compactification is presented. 77 refs., 18 figs. (LEW)

  12. Exact sum rules for inhomogeneous strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive explicit expressions for the sum rules of the eigenvalues of inhomogeneous strings with arbitrary density and with different boundary conditions. We show that the sum rule of order N may be obtained in terms of a diagrammatic expansion, with (N?1)!/2 independent diagrams. These sum rules are used to derive upper and lower bounds to the energy of the fundamental mode of an inhomogeneous string; we also show that it is possible to improve these approximations taking into account the asymptotic behavior of the spectrum and applying the Shanks transformation to the sequence of approximations obtained to the different orders. We discuss three applications of these results. -- Highlights: •We derive an explicit expression for the sum rules of an inhomogeneous string. •We obtain a diagrammatic representation for the sum rules of a given order. •We obtain precise bounds on the lowest eigenvalue of the string.

  13. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, C A

    2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  14. Axions from cosmic string and wall decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagmann, Chris [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-59, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall{approx}}1-100(f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

  15. String field theory and tachyon dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Haitang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present some works done during my doctoral studies. These results focus on two directions. The first one is motivated by tachyon dynamics in open string theory. We calculate the stress tensors for the ...

  16. Compressed Indexes for Approximate String Matching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Wing-Kin Ken"

    Compressed Indexes for Approximate String Matching Ho-Leung Chan1 Tak-Wah Lam1, Wing-Kin Sung2 Siu the index space to O(n log n). Huynh et al. [10] and Lam et al. [11] further compressed the index to O,wongss}@comp.nus.edu.sg Abstract. We revisit the problem of indexing a string S[1..n] to support searching all substrings

  17. Cosmological Constant and Axions in String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svrcek, Peter; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    String theory axions appear to be promising candidates for explaining cosmological constant via quintessence. In this paper, we study conditions on the string compactifications under which axion quintessence can happen. For sufficiently large number of axions, cosmological constant can be accounted for as the potential energy of axions that have not yet relaxed to their minima. In compactifications that incorporate unified models of particle physics, the height of the axion potential can naturally fall close to the observed value of cosmological constant.

  18. Thermal Duality and the String Canonical Ensemble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive the free energies of both the closed heterotic, and the unoriented, open and closed, type I string ensembles, consistent with the thermal (Euclidean T-duality) transformations on the String/M Duality Web. A crucial role is played by a temperature dependent Wilson line wrapping Euclidean time, responsible for the spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry at finite temperature while eliminating thermal tachyons, and determined uniquely by thermal duality. Conversely, we can show that the absence of a Yang-Mills gauge sector precludes the possibility of an equilibrium type II canonical ensemble prior to the introduction of background Dbranes or fluxes. As a consistency check, we verify that our results for the string free energy always reproduce the T^{10} growth expected in the low energy field theory limits while displaying a dramatically slower T^2 growth at temperatures above the string scale. We present both the low and high temperature expansions for the one-loop heterotic and type I string free energies, results which follow from an explicit term-by-term evaluation of the modular integrals in the string mass level expansion.

  19. BookProcessing public Book(string tit, string au, double pr, bool av)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krupski, Vladimir Nickolayevich

    Methods BookDB ProcessAllAvail BookProcessing Delegate b private List list; public BookDB() { list } public void ProcessAllAvail(BookProcessing Action) { foreach (Book b in list) { if (b.avail) { Action Author { get { return author;} } private string author; public class Book { private string title; private

  20. Accidental inflation in string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Andrei; Westphal, Alexander, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu, E-mail: awestpha@stanford.edu [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that inflation in type IIB string theory driven by the volume modulus can be realized in the context of the racetrack-based Kallosh-Linde model (KL) of moduli stabilization. Inflation here arises through the volume modulus slow-rolling down from a flat hilltop or inflection point of the scalar potential. This situation can be quite generic in the landscape, where by uplifting one of the two adjacent minima one can turn the barrier either into a flat saddle point or into an inflection point supporting eternal inflation. The resulting spectral index is tunable in the range of 0.93{approx}

  1. Low energy 2+1 string gravity; black hole solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Garcia Diaz; G. Gutierrez Cano

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report a detailed derivation of the dynamical equations for an n dimensional heterotic string theory of the Horowitz type is carried out in the string frame and in the Einstein frame too. In particular, the dynamical equations of the three dimensional string theory are explicitly given. The relation of the Horowitz Welch and Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is exhibited. The Chan Mann charged dilaton solution is derived and the subclass of string solutions field is explicitly identified. The stationary generalization, via SL(2;R) transformations, of the static (2+1) Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is given.

  2. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  3. Nonperturbative Type I-I' String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a nonperturbative framework for the O(32) type I open and closed string theory. The short distance degrees of freedom are bosonic and fermionic hermitian matrices belonging respectively to the adjoint and fundamental representations of the special unitary group SU(N). We identify a closed matrix algebra at finite N which corresponds to the Lorentz, gauge, and supersymmetry algebras of the large N continuum limit. The planar reduction of our matrix theory coincides with the low energy spacetime effective action of the d=10 type I O(32) unoriented open and closed string theory. We show that matrix T-duality transformations can yield a nonperturbative framework for the T-dual type I' closed string theory with 32 D8branes. We show further that under a strong-weak coupling duality transformation the large N reduced action coincides with the low energy spacetime effective action of the d=10 heterotic string, an equivalence at leading order in the inverse string tension and with either gauge group Spin(32)/Z2 or E8xE8. Our matrix formalism has the potential of providing a nonperturbative framework encapsulating all of the weak coupling limits of M theory.

  4. Fractal Strings and Multifractal Zeta Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel L. Lapidus; Jacques Levy Vehel; John A. Rock

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    For a Borel measure on the unit interval and a sequence of scales that tend to zero, we define a one-parameter family of zeta functions called multifractal zeta functions. These functions are a first attempt to associate a zeta function to certain multifractal measures. However, we primarily show that they associate a new zeta function, the topological zeta function, to a fractal string in order to take into account the topology of its fractal boundary. This expands upon the geometric information garnered by the traditional geometric zeta function of a fractal string in the theory of complex dimensions. In particular, one can distinguish between a fractal string whose boundary is the classical Cantor set, and one whose boundary has a single limit point but has the same sequence of lengths as the complement of the Cantor set. Later work will address related, but somewhat different, approaches to multifractals themselves, via zeta functions, partly motivated by the present paper.

  5. Relativistic elasticity of rigid rods and strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Natario

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the equation of motion for a rigid one-dimensional elastic body (i.e. a rod or string whose speed of sound is equal to the speed of light) in a two-dimensional spacetime is simply the wave equation. We then solve this equation in a few simple examples: a rigid rod colliding with an unmovable wall, a rigid rod being pushed by a constant force, a rigid string whose endpoints are simultaneously set in motion (seen as a special case of Bell's spaceships paradox), and a radial rigid string that has partially crossed the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole while still being held from the outside.

  6. Low Tension Strings on a Cosmological Singularity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben Craps; Chethan Krishnan; Ayush Saurabh

    2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been argued that the singularity of the Milne orbifold can be resolved in higher spin theories. In string theory scattering amplitudes, however, the Milne singularity gives rise to ultraviolet divergences that signal uncontrolled backreaction. Since string theory in the low tension limit is expected to be a higher spin theory (although precise proposals only exist in special cases), we investigate what happens to these scattering amplitudes in the low tension limit. We point out that the known problematic ultraviolet divergences disappear in this limit. In addition we systematically identify all divergences of the simplest 2-to-2 string scattering amplitude on the Milne orbifold, and argue that the divergences that survive in the low tension limit have sensible infrared interpretations.

  7. Closed string field theory in a-gauge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masako Asano; Mitsuhiro Kato

    2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a-gauge, a class of covariant gauges developed for bosonic open string field theory, is consistently applied to the closed string field theory. A covariantly gauge-fixed action of massless fields can be systematically derived from a-gauge-fixed action of string field theory.

  8. Perturbative diagrams in string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2002-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A general algorithm is presented which gives a closed-form expression for an arbitrary perturbative diagram of cubic string field theory at any loop order. For any diagram, the resulting expression is given by an integral of a function of several infinite matrices, each built from a finite number of blocks containing the Neumann coefficients of Witten's 3-string vertex. The closed-form expression for any diagram can be approximated by level truncation on oscillator level, giving a computation involving finite size matrices. Some simple tree and loop diagrams are worked out as examples of this approach.

  9. Perturbative computations in string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington Taylor

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    These notes describe how perturbative on-shell and off-shell string amplitudes can be computed using string field theory. Computational methods for approximating arbitrary amplitudes are discussed, and compared with standard world-sheet methods for computing on-shell amplitudes. These lecture notes are not self-contained; they contain the material from W. Taylor's TASI 2003 lectures not covered in the recently published ``TASI 2001'' notes {\\tt hep-th/0311017} by Taylor and Zwiebach, and should be read as a supplement to those notes.

  10. Parallel ion strings in linear multipole traps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu Marciante; Caroline Champenois; J. Pedregosa-Gutierrez; Annette Calisti; Martina Knoop

    2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional radio-frequency (rf) potentials applied to linear multipole traps create extra field nodes in the radial plane which allow one to confine single ions, or strings of ions, in totally rf field-free regions. The number of nodes depends on the order of the applied multipole potentials and their relative distance can be easily tuned by the amplitude variation of the applied voltages. Simulations using molecular dynamics show that strings of ions can be laser cooled down to the Doppler limit in all directions of space. Once cooled, organized systems can be moved with very limited heating, even if the cooling process is turned off.

  11. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Closed strings from decaying D-branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Hong Liu; Juan Maldacena

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the emission of closed string radiation from homogeneous rolling tachyons. For an unstable decaying D$p$-brane the radiated energy is infinite to leading order for $p\\leq 2$ and finite for $p>2$. The closed string state produced by a decaying brane is closely related to the state produced by D-instantons at a critical Euclidean distance from $t=0$. In the case of a D0 brane one can cutoff this divergence so that we get a finite energy final state which would be the state that the brane decays into.

  13. Non-Abelian String-Net Ladders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Schulz; S. Dusuel; J. Vidal

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the string-net model with a string tension for non-Abelian particles in the ladder geometry. Focusing on the simplest non-Abelian theory with a total quantum dimension larger than two, we find evidence for a "russian doll" spectrum featuring size-independent energy levels. Contrary to Fibonacci and Ising ladders, the spectrum is found to be gapped at the self-dual points and low-energy excitations in the ground-state sector consist in two-quasiparticle bound states that are discussed in the weak-tension limit. We argue that such properties are prototypical of theories containing more than one non-Abelian particle.

  14. Abelian-Higgs strings in Rastall gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugenio R. Bezerra de Mello; Julio C. Fabris; Betti Hartmann

    2015-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we analyze Abelian-Higgs strings in a phenomenological model that takes quantum effects in curved space-time into account. This model, first introduced by Rastall, cannot be derived from an action principle. We formulate phenomenological equations of motion under the guiding principle of minimal possible deformation of the standard equations. We construct string solutions that asymptote to a flat space-time with a deficit angle by solving the set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations numerically. Decreasing the Rastall parameter from its Einstein gravity value we find that the deficit angle of the space-time increases and becomes equal to $2\\pi$ at some critical value of this parameter that depends on the remaining couplings in the model. For smaller values the resulting solutions are supermassive string solutions possessing a singularity at a finite distance from the string core. Assuming the Higgs boson mass to be on the order of the gauge boson mass we find that also in Rastall gravity this happens only when the symmetry breaking scale is on the order of the Planck mass. We also observe that for specific values of the parameters in the model the energy per unit length becomes proportional to the winding number, i.e. the degree of the map $S^1 \\rightarrow S^1$. Unlike in the BPS limit in Einstein gravity, this is, however, not connect to an underlying mathematical structure, but rather constitutes a would-be-BPS bound.

  15. D-branes and string field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigalov, Ilya

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we study the D-brane physics in the context of Witten's cubic string field theory. We compute first few terms the low energy effective action for the non-abelian gauge field A, from Witten's action. We show ...

  16. Thin Shell Wormhole in Heterotic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rahaman; M. Kalam; S. Chakraborti

    2006-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 'Cut and Paste' technique, we develop a thin shell wormhole in heterotic string theory. We determine the surface stresses, which are localized in the shell, by using Darmois-Israel formalism. The linearized stability of this thin wormhole is also analyzed.

  17. String inspired effective Lagrangian and Inflationary Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Abdalla; A. C. V. V. de Siqueira

    1993-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a string inspired effective Lagrangian for the graviton and dilaton, containing Einstein gravity at the zero slope limit. The numerical solution of the problem shows asymptotically an inflationary universe. The time is measured by the dilaton, as one expects. The result is independent of the introduction of ad-hoc self interactions for the dilaton field.

  18. The Self-Dual String Soliton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Howe; N. D. Lambert; P. C. West

    1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain a BPS soliton of the M theory fivebrane's equations of motion representing a supersymmetric self-dual string. The resulting solution is then dimensionally reduced and used to obtain 0-brane and (p-2)-brane solitons on D-p-branes.

  19. Strings on AdS wormholes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Mir; Ruiz, Frenny; Saint-Victor, Carlos [Physics Department, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Vazquez-Poritz, Justin F. [Physics Department, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York 10016 (United States)

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the behavior of open strings on anti-de Sitter wormholes in Gauss-Bonnet theory, which are the Gauss-Bonnet gravity duals of a pair of field theories. A string with both endpoints on the same side of the wormhole describes two charges within the same field theory, which exhibit Coulomb interaction for small separation. On the other hand, a string extending through the wormhole describes two charges which live in different field theories, and they exhibit a springlike confining potential. A transition occurs when there is a pair of charges present within each field theory: for small separation each pair of charges exhibits Coulomb interaction, while for large separation the charges in the different field theories pair up and exhibit confinement. Two steadily-moving charges in different field theories can occupy the same location provided that their speed is less than a critical speed, which also plays the role of a subluminal speed limit. However, for some wormhole backgrounds, charges moving at the critical speed cannot occupy the same location and energy is transferred from the leading charge to the lagging one. We also show that strings on anti-de Sitter wormholes in supergravity theories without higher-derivative curvature terms can exhibit these properties as well.

  20. Towards Dark Energy from String-Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Krause

    2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss vacuum energy in string and M-theory with a focus on heterotic M-theory. In the latter theory a mechanism is described for maintaining zero vacuum energy after supersymmetry breaking. Higher-order corrections can be expected to give a sufficiently small amount of vacuum energy to possibly account for dark energy.

  1. Kink in superconducting cosmic string: exact solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst Trojan

    2014-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the equations of motion and find the Lorentz transformation associated with a kink in superconducting cosmic string. The kink velocity does not depend on its amplitude. The kink amplitude cannot be arbitrary but it varies within definite range and determines the explicit form of the relevant Lorentz transformation.

  2. X-Ray Computed Microtomography Studies of Fluid Partitioning in Drainage and Imbibition Before and After Gel Placement: Disproportionate Permeability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    % NaCl, and 0.1% CaCl2. The brine contained 1% NaCl and 0.1% CaCl2. The oil was hexadecane) to increase X-ray attenuation contrast relative to the brine phase. All experiments were performed at room. Wettability tests produced Amott-Harvey indexes4 of 1 for the brine/oil/Berea sandstone system and -1

  3. MATH 231 -Exam 1 NAME: ...................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xia

    ) A brine solution of salt flows at a constant rate of 4 L/min into a large tank that initially held 100 L of brine solution in which was dissolved 15 kg of salt. The solution inside the tank is kept well stirred and flows out of the tank at a rate of 3 L/min. If the concentration of salt in the brine entering the tank

  4. REVIEW FOR MT3 ANSWER KEY MATH 2373, FALL 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Greg W.

    Problem 6 We consider two brine tanks. Initially: · Tank A contains 150 gallons of water and 37 pounds of salt. · Tank B contains 250 gallons of water and 43 pounds of salt. Starting at time t = 0: · Brine at a concentration 3 lb gal of salt is pumped at 5 gal min into tank A. · Brine is pumped from tank A to tank B

  5. REVIEW FOR MT3 MATH 2373, FALL 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Greg W.

    two brine tanks. Initially: · Tank A contains 150 gallons of water and 37 pounds of salt. · Tank B contains 250 gallons of water and 43 pounds of salt. Starting at time t = 0: · Brine at a concentration 3 lb gal of salt is pumped at 5 gal min into tank A. · Brine is pumped from tank A to tank B at a rate

  6. A Mixed Finite Element Approximation for Compressible Flow of Contamination from Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, So-Hsiang

    of this system using a finite element method for the brine, radionuclides, and heat combined with a mixed finite; and ¯(â??c), the viscosity of the fluid is depen­ dent on â?? c, the concentration of the brine in the fluid + (ff L \\Gamma ff T )u i u j =juj). Brine: @ @t (OEaeâ??c) = \\Gammar \\Delta (aeâ??cu) +r \\Delta (aeE c (u

  7. Asphaltene damage in matrix acidizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa, Roberto Antonio

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REVIEW CONSTRUCTION OF APPARATUS . DESCRIPTION OF CORE SAMPLES DESIGN OF EXPERIMENTAL ACID TREATMENT . . . ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE SATURATED CORE L1D ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE/CRUDE OIL SATURATED CORE S2A . . . ACIDIZING RESULTS BRINE/KEROSENE OIL... experiment they used HCl saturated kerosene to test the same crude samples. Deposition occurred with the HCl saturated acid. The authors concluded, though deposition at an interface was preferential, sludge formation did not require an interface. Moore et...

  8. Strings, vortex rings, and modes of instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Nayar, Revant; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We treat string propagation and interaction in the presence of a background Neveu–Schwarz three-form field strength, suitable for describing vortex rings in a superfluid or low-viscosity normal fluid. A circular vortex ring exhibits instabilities which have been recognized for many years, but whose precise boundaries we determine for the first time analytically in the small core limit. Two circular vortices colliding head-on exhibit stronger instabilities which cause splitting into many small vortices at late times. We provide an approximate analytic treatment of these instabilities and show that the most unstable wavelength is parametrically larger than a dynamically generated length scalemore »which in many hydrodynamic systems is close to the cutoff. We also summarize how the string construction we discuss can be derived from the Gross–Pitaevskii Lagrangian, and also how it compares to the action for giant gravitons.« less

  9. Open string amplitudes of closed topological vertex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanehisa Takasaki; Toshio Nakatsu

    2015-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The closed topological vertex is the simplest "off-strip" case of non-compact toric Calabi-Yau threefolds with acyclic web diagrams. By the diagrammatic method of topological vertex, open string amplitudes of topological string theory therein can be obtained by gluing a single topological vertex to an "on-strip" subdiagram of the tree-like web diagram. If non-trivial partitions are assigned to just two parallel external lines of the web diagram, the amplitudes can be calculated with the aid of techniques borrowed from the melting crystal models. These amplitudes are thereby expressed as matrix elements, modified by simple prefactors, of an operator product on the Fock space of 2D charged free fermions. This fermionic expression can be used to derive $q$-difference equations for generating functions of special subsets of the amplitudes. These $q$-difference equations may be interpreted as the defining equation of a quantum mirror curve.

  10. Vacuum selection on the string landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tetteh-Lartey, Edward [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77845 (United States)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I examine some nonanthropic approaches to the string landscape. These approaches are based on finding the initial conditions of the universe using the wave function of the multiverse to select the most probable vacuum out of this landscape. All approaches tackled so far seem to have their own problems and there is no clear-cut alternative to anthropic reasoning. I suggest that finding the initial conditions may be irrelevant since all possible vacua on the landscape are possible initial state conditions and eternal inflation could generate all the other vacua. We are now left to reason out why we are observing the small value of the cosmological constant. I address this issue in the context of noncritical string theory in which all values of the cosmological constant on the landscape are departures from the critical equilibrium state.

  11. Signal connection for a downhole tool string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Bradford, Kline; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A signal transmission connection for a tool string used in exploration and production of natural resources, namely: oil, gas, and geothermal energy resources. The connection comprises first and second annular elements deployed in cooperative association with each other. The respective elements comprise inductive transducers that are capable of two-way signal transmission between each other, with downhole components of the tool string, and with ground-level equipment. The respective inductive transducers comprise one or more conductive loops housed within ferrite troughs, or within ferrite trough segments. When energized, the conductive loops produce a magnetic field suitable for transmitting the signal. The second element may be rotational in drilling applications. The respective elements may be fitted with electronic equipment to aid and manipulate the transmission of the signal. The first element may also be in communication with the World Wide Web.

  12. Two Dimensional QCD is a String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Gross; Washington Taylor

    1993-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The partition function of two dimensional QCD on a Riemann surface of area $A$ is expanded as a power series in $1/N$ and $A$. It is shown that the coefficients of this expansion are precisely determined by a sum over maps from a two dimensional surface onto the two dimensional target space. Thus two dimensional QCD has a simple interpretation as a closed string theory.

  13. Jet fragmentation and gauge/string duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshitaka Hatta; Toshihiro Matsuo

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an analog of e^+e^- annihilation in gauge theories which have a dual string description in asymptotically AdS_5 space and discuss the nature of jet fragmentation. We construct the timelike anomalous dimension which governs the scale dependence of the fragmentation function. In the limit of infinite 't Hooft coupling, the average multiplicity rises linearly with the energy and the inclusive spectrum is peaked at the kinematical boundary.

  14. Traversable wormholes in a string cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Richarte; Claudio Simeone

    2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes in a string cloud background in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime. The amount of exotic matter required for the construction, the traversability and the stability under radial perturbations, are analyzed as functions of the parameters of the model. Besides, in the Appendices a non perturbative approach to the dynamics and a possible extension of the analysis to a related model are briefly discussed.

  15. Topological insulators and superconductors from string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Shinsei; Takayanagi, Tadashi [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and superconductors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the {theta} term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond noninteracting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  16. Topological Insulators and Superconductors from String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinsei Ryu; Tadashi Takayanagi

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators and superconductors in different spatial dimensions and with different discrete symmetries have been fully classified recently, revealing a periodic structure for the pattern of possible types of topological insulators and supercondutors, both in terms of spatial dimensions and in terms of symmetry classes. It was proposed that K-theory is behind the periodicity. On the other hand, D-branes, a solitonic object in string theory, are also known to be classified by K-theory. In this paper, by inspecting low-energy effective field theories realized by two parallel D-branes, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the K-theory classification of topological insulators/superconductors and D-brane charges. In addition, the string theory realization of topological insulators and superconductors comes naturally with gauge interactions, and the Wess-Zumino term of the D-branes gives rise to a gauge field theory of topological nature, such as ones with the Chern-Simons term or the $\\theta$-term in various dimensions. This sheds light on topological insulators and superconductors beyond non-interacting systems, and the underlying topological field theory description thereof. In particular, our string theory realization includes the honeycomb lattice Kitaev model in two spatial dimensions, and its higher-dimensional extensions. Increasing the number of D-branes naturally leads to a realization of topological insulators and superconductors in terms of holography (AdS/CFT).

  17. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouby, Johanna, E-mail: karoubyj@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachussetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  18. Local cosmic string in generalised scalar tensor theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Sen; N. Banerjee

    1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent investigation shows that a local gauge string with a phenomenological energy momentum tensor, as prescribed by Vilenkin, is inconsistent in Brans-Dicke theory. In this work it has been shown that such a string is consistent in a more general scalar tensor theory where $\\omega$ is function of the scalar field.A set of solutions of full nonlinear Einstein's equations for interior region of such a string are presented.

  19. On White's model of attenuation in rocks with partial gas saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, N. C.; Seriff, A. J.

    approximate theory for the calculation of attenuation and dispersion of compressional seismic waves in porous rocks filled mostly with brine but containing ...

  20. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    geology, brine and oil compositions. Test and select surfactants to foam the injected CO2 so as to provide better EOR performance. Perform computer modeling based on test...

  1. Mineral Recovery Creates Revenue Stream for Geothermal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to develop technologies that extract strategic materials from geothermal brines at a mining operation - a first-of-its-kind achievement. GTO support enabled the company to build...

  2. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial confinement effects of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular dynamics study of interfacial confinement effects of aqueous NaCl brines in nanoporous carbon Re-direct Destination: In this paper, studies of aqueous electrolyte...

  3. Multi-Image or Lap-Dissolve Slide Techniques and Visual Images in the Large Lecture Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodner, George M.

    which he visited,the author was told that manv of the students bad to brine field elassesin order to see

  4. Low-Temperature Mineral Recovery Program FOA Selections | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a number of direct use applications. Source: Geothermal Resources Council Geothermal brine has the potential to contain relatively high concentrations of rare earths and other...

  5. RIS-M-2231 ACCELERATOR DEPARTMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5. Radiolysis of salt-brine 19 4.6. Direct effect 6i radiation on CIO, 19 #12;4.7. 0{ P) yields in alkaline

  6. Mathematics 3C Summer 2009 Worksheet 5, August 20th, TA Grace Kennedy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    at 5 liters per minute. The salt water mixes in with the fresh water and the brine exits by a funnel

  7. Math 204, Exam 1 February 17, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    . Brine containing 1 gram of salt per liter is then pumped into the tank at a rate of 4 liters per minute

  8. Math 204, Exam 1 September 30, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohner, Martin

    is dissolved. Brine containing 1 gram of salt per liter is then pumped into the tank at a rate of 4 liters per

  9. Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 Fall 2013 Biology 113 Closed Book Take-Home Exam #3 Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, A. Malcolm

    to complete? #12;Dr. Campbell's Bio111 Exam #3 ­ Fall 2013 2 Lab Questions: 6 pts. 1) For your brine shrimp

  10. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-ray analysis, namely SEMEDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We...

  11. Math 1272 30 "PRACTICE" MIDTERM EXAM 2 6 March 2011 1.) Find the length of the curve.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulliver, Robert

    of salt dissolved in 4000 L of water. Brine that contains 0.05 kg salt per liter of water enters the tank

  12. MATH 220 EXAM I 2.13.98Rev 12pm Directions: Answer all questions and show all work in the exam book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Floyd B.

    ) + 4y 0 (x) + 4y = e \\Gamma2x ln(x) + 8 5. A large tank is initially empty. At time t = 0, a brine

  13. Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadharajan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration,2 saturated brines. In 10th Carbon Capture and SequestrationIn: 9 th Annual Carbon Capture & Sequestration Meeting,

  14. Calcifying Cyanobacteria - The potential of biomineralization for Carbon Capture and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, Christer G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water produced from petroleum production or geological CO 2production or CCS can be cultured in marine waters, saline drainage water, or brine from petroleum

  15. Research Portfolio Accomplishment Report Unconventional Oil ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of brines brings added regulatory scrutiny; therefore, achievement of even partial removal of salts from produced water-a process called demineralization-can improve water...

  16. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including oil and gas fields, unmineable deep coal seams, brine formations, and natural gas hydrates. The data obtained from laboratory tests of various rock types under a...

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including oil and gas fields, unmineable deep coal seams, brine formations, and natural gas hydrates. The data obtained from laboratory tests of various rock types under a...

  18. The Very Deep Hole Concept: Evaluation of an Alternative for Nuclear Waste Disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flashed) brine at Niland, Cerro Prieto and Wairakei, anddeposits encountered at Cerro Prieto, Wairakei, and NilandThis is observed at Cerro Prieto and Xiland. With small

  19. Li and Mn uptake data from initial set of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    Batch tests of crosslinked lithium and manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C .

  20. Frictional Strength of the Creeping Segment of the San Andreas Fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coble, Clayton Gage

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    G ouge SG-2 2 100 100 25 Brine SHS 0.6 4.25 11 Table 1 continued. Gouge Type Exp. # w (m m ) T (C ) ? ne (MPa) P p (MPa) Pore Fl ui d T es t Type Shear displ. ra te... ( ?m /s) d (m m ) SAFOD Gouge SG-4 2 100 100 25 Brine SHS 0.006 3.90 SAFOD Gouge SG-6 2 100 100 25 Brine VS 0.6, 0.06, 0.006 4.25 SAFOD Gouge SG-7 2 100, 80, 120 100 25 Brine...

  1. Desert Symposium 2014 Information/Call for Papers/Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    brine playa and salt extraction facilities. Discuss drill core records of past Fault (Durmid Hills, Salt Creek and Bertram Siding). Examine

  2. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RPSEA FE Brine Chemistry SCNGO 2012; FY1236 months Gary Covatch Houston, TX Corrosion and Scale at Extreme Temperature and Pressure Theory and Practical Testing of Scale...

  3. OneTouch 4.0 Scanned Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conveying materials such as air. brine. carbon dioxide, geothermal system fluids, hydrogen gas, natural gas, nitrogen gas, oll, produced water, stream, and water). 85. 4...

  4. Geothermal News | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    March 31, 2014 Low-temp geothermal technologies are meeting a growing demand for strategic materials in clean manufacturing. Here, lithium is extracted from geothermal brines in...

  5. Advances in Geothermal Direct Use Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a new technology called Deep Direct Use, which optimizes the value stream of geothermal brines through large-scale lower temperature cascaded use, including direct heating...

  6. Can a fractured caprock self-heal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, JE; Elkhoury, JE; Detwiler, RL; Ameli, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of fractured reservoirs. J. Geophys. Eng.fractured carbonates caused by flow of CO 2 -rich brine under reservoirreservoirs. We present results from two experiments in fractured

  7. MULTIPARAMETER OPTIMIZATION STUDIES ON GEOTHERMAL ENERGY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pope, W.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source of Electricat the Susanville Geothermal Energy Converence, July 1976.for Recovery of Energy from Geothermal Hot Brine Deposits."

  8. Experimental study of crossover from capillary to viscous fingering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    viscous fingering for supercritical CO2 - water displacement in a homogeneous Abstract: Carbon sequestration in saline aquifers involves displacing resident brine from the pore...

  9. Coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical Processes in Salt, Hot...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design, and Operation Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program Establishing the Technical Basis for...

  10. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2as Heat Transmission...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program eere.energy.gov * The project started in FY10 * Collaboration between LBNL (Pruess) and INL (Redden) - Berkeley leads modeling, CO 2 -brine flow and heat...

  11. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Robertson, "Waste heat rejection from geothermal powerexchanger to recover the waste heat from the exhausted air.water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean

  12. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT FY 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and oceansources as industrial waste heat, low-temperature geothermalenergy from low-grade or waste heat can be constructed;

  13. SOLAR ENERGY PROGRAM: CHAPTER FROM THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and oceansources as industrial waste heat, low-temperature geothermalenergy from low-grade or waste heat can be constructed;

  14. Molecular Dynamics Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    low viscosity of the brine. 16 The primary disadvantage of an aqueous electrolyte supercapacitor is the limitation of the electric potential to 1 V. 17 Atomic scale...

  15. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF AQUEOUS NaCl SOLUTIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and uti1 ization of geothermal energy, petroleum recovery, desalination of sea water, and other energy systems involving water containing dissolved salts. brines contain a...

  16. Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor Lift...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    caused when a scissor lift tipped over in Brine Tank-14 (WHT-14) at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, West Hackberry, Louisiana, site on February 7, 2013. The Board's...

  17. Strings in Background Electric Field, Space/Time Noncommutativity and A New Noncritical String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Seiberg; L. Susskind; N. Toumbas

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Searching for space/time noncommutativity we reconsider open strings in a constant background electric field. The main difference between this situation and its magnetic counterpart is that here there is a critical electric field beyond which the theory does not make sense. We show that this critical field prevents us from finding a limit in which the theory becomes a field theory on a noncommutative spacetime. However, an appropriate limit toward the critical field leads to a novel noncritical string theory on a noncommutative spacetime.

  18. Non-linear sigma-models and string theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between sigma-models and string theories is discussed, as well as how the sigma-models can be used as tools to prove various results in string theories. Closed bosonic string theory in the light cone gauge is very briefly introduced. Then, closed bosonic string theory in the presence of massless background fields is discussed. The light cone gauge is used, and it is shown that in order to obtain a Lorentz invariant theory, the string theory in the presence of background fields must be described by a two-dimensional conformally invariant theory. The resulting constraints on the background fields are found to be the equations of motion of the string theory. The analysis is extended to the case of the heterotic string theory and the superstring theory in the presence of the massless background fields. It is then shown how to use these results to obtain nontrivial solutions to the string field equations. Another application of these results is shown, namely to prove that the effective cosmological constant after compactification vanishes as a consequence of the classical equations of motion of the string theory. 34 refs. (LEW)

  19. String Loop Corrections to Stable Non-BPS Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the string loop corrections to the tachyon potential for stable non-BPS Dp-branes on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. We find a non-trivial phase structure and we show that, after tachyon condensation, the non-BPS Dp-branes are attracted to each other for p=0,1,2. We then identify the corresponding closed string boundary states together with the massless long range fields they excite. For p=3,4 the string loop correction diverge. We identify the massless closed string fields responsible for these divergencies and regularise the partition function using a Fischler-Susskind mechanism.

  20. Efficient solutions for the Far From Most String Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Ferone,,,

    niques for string selection and comparison problems in genomics. IEEE. Engineering in Medicine and Biology Magazine, 24(3):81–87, 2005. [29] C.A.S. Oliveira ...