National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for brine brine string

  1. Sandstone ? Brine + GH Sandstone ? Brine 200 200 Sandstone ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos@gauss ()

    Sandstone ? Brine + GH. Sandstone ? Brine. 200. 200. Sandstone ? Brine. x. z. 800. Vp=2200 m/s. Vs=1250 m/sSigma=1 S/m. Vp=4100 m/s. Vs=2300 ...

  2. Viscous heavy brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1984-07-10

    Hydroxyethyl cellulose and a sequestrant are added to a heavy brine containing one or more salts selected from calcium chloride, calcium bromide, and zinc bromide to increase the viscosity of the brine. Preferably the brine contains zinc bromide, has a density in the range from about 14.2-19.2 pounds per gallon, and the sequestrant is a polyphosphonic acid or water soluble salt thereof.

  3. Thickened heavy brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    House, R.F.; Hoover, L.D.

    1983-12-13

    A thickened brine solution useful as a well servicing fluid is prepared, said solution consisting essentially of water, at least 20% by weight zinc bromide, calcium bromide, and a viscosifying amount of hydroxyethyl cellulose.

  4. Brine stability study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-04-15

    This is a study of the brine formulations that we were using in our testing were stable over time. The data includes charts, as well as, all of the original data from the ICP-MS runs to complete this study.

  5. Brining studies at Pepper Products Inc. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okoro, John Daniel

    1988-01-01

    of Department) A. B. Childers (Member) V. E. Sweat (Member) December 1988 Abstract Optimum brining conditions, causes of secondary fermentation, and salt fluctuation were investigated. Jalapeno peppers held in brine solution undergo lactic acid... fermentation, controlled by level of acidification and concentration of salt. Only brining at 7. 5% NaCl, with no added acetic acid, resulted in loss of all fermentable sugars. However, salt concentration fluctuated widely in this sample. Brining in 25...

  6. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program, 1991 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J.; Myers, J.; Martin, M.L.; Milligan, D.J.; Sobocinski, R.W.; Lipponer, P.P.J.; Belski, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The data presented in this report are the result of Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program (BSEP) activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) during 1991. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the WIPP. When excavations began at the WIPP in 1982, small brine seepages (weeps) were observed on the walls. Brine studies began as part of the Site Validation Program and were formalized as a program in its own right in 1985. During nine years of observations (1982--1991), evidence has mounted that the amount of brine seeping into the WIPP excavations is limited, local, and only a small fraction of that required to produce hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. The data through 1990 is discussed in detail and summarized by Deal and others (1991). The data presented in this report describes progress made during the calendar year 1991 and focuses on four major areas: (1) quantification of the amount of brine seeping across vertical surfaces in the WIPP excavations (brine ``weeps); (2) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes; (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) preliminary quantification of the amount of brine that might be released by squeezing the underconsolidated clays present in the Salado Formation.

  7. Viscous heavy brine completion fluids. [Oil wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darlington, R.K.; Hunter, D.V.

    1982-01-01

    An activated hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) has been developed which will viscosify brines of any density up to 19.2 lb/gal containing calcium chloride, calcium bromide and/or zinc bromide. The use of activated hydroxyethyl cellulose allows preparation of viscosified brines at ambient emperature and without undissolved polymer solids. The time required to prepare a viscosified brine is greatly reduced. In addition, the rheology of brines viscosified with activated HEC can be accurately predicted allowing brines with equivalent solution rheology properties to be prepared batch after batch. 29 refs.

  8. Improved Water Flooding through Injection Brine Modification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Eric Partridge; Thomas, Charles Phillip; Morrow, Norman

    2003-01-01

    Crude oil/brine/rock interactions can lead to large variations in the displacement efficiency of waterflooding, by far the most widely applied method of improved oil recovery. Laboratory waterflood tests show that injection of dilute brine can increase oil recovery. Numerous fields in the Powder River basin have been waterflooded using low salinity brine (about 500 ppm) from the Madison limestone or Fox Hills sandstone. Although many uncertainties arise in the interpretation and comparison of field production data, injection of low salinity brine appears to give higher recovery compared to brine of moderate salinity (about 7,000 ppm). Laboratory studies of the effect of brine composition on oil recovery cover a wide range of rock types and crude oils. Oil recovery increases using low salinity brine as the injection water ranged from a low of no notable increase to as much as 37.0% depending on the system being studied. Recovery increases using low salinity brine after establishing residual oil saturation (tertiary mode) ranged from no significant increase to 6.0%. Tests with two sets of reservoir cores and crude oil indicated slight improvement in recovery for low salinity brine. Crude oil type and rock type (particularly the presence and distribution of kaolinite) both play a dominant role in the effect that brine composition has on waterflood oil recovery.

  9. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    technologies that extract these strategic materials from geothermal brines at a mining operation -- a first-of-its-kind achievement. Simbol estimates that the mineral-rich...

  10. THE MECHANISM OF INTRAGRANULAR MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machiels, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    of Brine Inclusions in a Salt Repository", ORM. -5526 (JulyOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT A.J. Machiels, S. Yagnik, D.R.OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by A.J. Machiels S. Yagnik D.R.

  11. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    seawater,  industrial  waste,   and  brine  desalination  and  seawater  concentrate  disposal  alternatives."   Desalination  

  12. How temperature and pressure affect clear brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, J.T.

    1984-04-01

    The correct application of the expansivity and compressibility of brine fluids under the influence of temperature and pressure is needed to calculate the actual hydrostatic pressure in a well. Well operations can benefit by reducing unintentional overbalance, lessening fluid losses, and lowering recommended fluid densities, hence reducing fluid costs. Since the early 1970s, the effects of temperature and pressure on the density of clear brine fluids have been questioned. As early as 1973, studies were started to define density loss with increased temperature in zinc bromide brines. This article describes a continuing study, begun in 1978, which has characterized the expansivity and compressibility of single salt brine solutions, such as are used in workover and completion fluids.

  13. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  14. THERMAL GRADIENT MIGRATION OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yagnik, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    OF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT Suresh K. Yagnik February 1982 TOF BRINE INCLUSIONS IN SALT by Suresh K. Yagnik Materialsb u i l t in future. The salt deposits, however, are known

  15. Portable brine evaporator unit, process, and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hart, Paul John (Indiana, PA); Miller, Bruce G. (State College, PA); Wincek, Ronald T. (State College, PA); Decker, Glenn E. (Bellefonte, PA); Johnson, David K. (Port Matilda, PA)

    2009-04-07

    The present invention discloses a comprehensive, efficient, and cost effective portable evaporator unit, method, and system for the treatment of brine. The evaporator unit, method, and system require a pretreatment process that removes heavy metals, crude oil, and other contaminates in preparation for the evaporator unit. The pretreatment and the evaporator unit, method, and system process metals and brine at the site where they are generated (the well site). Thus, saving significant money to producers who can avoid present and future increases in transportation costs.

  16. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  17. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and...

  18. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions and Determination of Contact Angles. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular Simulation of...

  19. Property:BrineConstituents | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,InformationAwardee JumpBrineConstituents Jump to:

  20. Reduce completion fluid costs with on-site brine tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.C.; Darlington, R.K.; Kinney, W.R.; Lowell, J.L.

    1982-09-01

    A newly developed field kit makes on-site brine completion fluid testing practical. Simple titration procedures are used to analyze brine for calcium, zinc, chloride and bromide with an accuracy and repeatability that compares favorably with expensive laboratory techniques. This article describes the field testing theory and details analytical procedures used.

  1. Technique for thermodynamic crystallization temperature of brine fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, D.E.; Hubbard, J.T.

    1983-03-01

    The application of high density solids free brine fluids has proven to be technically and economically successful in hydrocarbon completion and workover operations. The use of inorganic salts such as calcium chloride, calcium bromide, zinc bromide, and sodium bromide has contributed to the development of complex salt systems. As the density and complexity of these systems becomes more detailed, the requirement for proper fluid design becomes increasingly important. When a brine solution is cooled sufficiently, a temperature is reached where the solution will be saturated. A further decrease in temperature will result in the precipitation of salt from the solution. The temperature at which this transpires, provided no super-cooling occurs, is the crystallization point of the solution. A correctly formulated solids free brine should have the optimum crystallization point for the temperature conditions it will encounter. A recently developed semiautomatic procedure constructs a cooling curve plot of each brine tested. This cooling curve plot allows the determination of the super-cooling potential, the Thermodynamic Crystallization Temperature, and the Last Crystal To Dissolve Temperature. The device provides a permanent record of the cooling curve with repeatable accuracy, which assists in the development of error free brine formulation tables, brine density, and/or crystallization point adjustments, and brine analysis.

  2. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  3. Formate brines -- New fluids for drilling and completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, M.S.; Shipp, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The term ``formate brines`` refers broadly to three primary compounds dissolved in water -- sodium formate (NaCOOH), potassium formate (KCOOH) and cesium formate (CsCOOH). Each is chemically classified as an alkali-metal salt of formic acid. They offer properties that in many respects are superior to their predecessors, halide brines such as zinc bromide and calcium bromide, without the undesirable side effects of those more common halide brine systems. This article introduces the technology and provides an overview of published work to date regarding formates.

  4. Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl- concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m...

  5. TOUGHREACT Testing in High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu

    2008-01-01

    High Ionic Strength Brine Sandstone Systems Tianfu Xu Earthwith H2S and SO2 in a sandstone formation, Chemical Geology,system using a Gulf Coast sandstone saline formation. 2.

  6. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine used Spraberry oil, synthetic reservoir brine and Spraberry core at reservoir temperature (138o F

  7. Determination of dissolved organic carbon in concentrated brine solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannaker, P.; Buchanan, A.S.

    1983-10-01

    An absolute method is reported for the determination of soluble organic carbon in concentrated brine solutions. Wet oxidation with K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/ is used in a sealed ampule at 130/sup 0/C, followed by hot CuO treatment of the gas stream, to fully oxidize organic species to CO/sub 2/. The CO/sub 2/ is measured gravimetrically after gas purification. Results are presented for a wide range of soluble organic species, both with and without NaCl present. This procedure now allows for the accurate determination of organic carbon in brines over a range from about 5 ppm to values in excess of 1000 ppm. The technique overcomes the difficulties of calibration curvature, catalytic clogging, and instrumental fogging, often encountered in modern instrumental methods, when applied to concentrated brine solutions. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  8. Actinide (III) solubility in WIPP Brine: data summary and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Marian; Lucchini, Jean-Francois; Richmann, Michael K.; Reed, Donald T.

    2009-09-01

    The solubility of actinides in the +3 oxidation state is an important input into the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) performance assessment (PA) models that calculate potential actinide release from the WIPP repository. In this context, the solubility of neodymium(III) was determined as a function of pH, carbonate concentration, and WIPP brine composition. Additionally, we conducted a literature review on the solubility of +3 actinides under WIPP-related conditions. Neodymium(III) was used as a redox-invariant analog for the +3 oxidation state of americium and plutonium, which is the oxidation state that accounts for over 90% of the potential release from the WIPP through the dissolved brine release (DBR) mechanism, based on current WIPP performance assessment assumptions. These solubility data extend past studies to brine compositions that are more WIPP-relevant and cover a broader range of experimental conditions than past studies.

  9. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01

    & Technology, Pakistan. Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven W. Poston The objective of this research was to blend both, COq injection and water imbibition methods and develop a technique best suitable for enhancing oil recovery from low permeability... drive, was induced at the end of 48 hours. Studies have shown that increase in carbonated brine concentration increased total oil recovery at 70 F. With 5. 5 % carbonated brine, 62. 2 % of OOIP was recovered at 150 F as compared to 73. 7 % of OOIP...

  10. Uranium (VI) solubility in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchini, Jean-francois; Khaing, Hnin; Reed, Donald T

    2010-01-01

    When present, uranium is usually an element of importance in a nuclear waste repository. In the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), uranium is the most prevalent actinide component by mass, with about 647 metric tons to be placed in the repository. Therefore, the chemistry of uranium, and especially its solubility in the WIPP conditions, needs to be well determined. Long-term experiments were performed to measure the solubility of uranium (VI) in carbonate-free ERDA-6 brine, a simulated WIPP brine, at pC{sub H+} values between 8 and 12.5. These data, obtained from the over-saturation approach, were the first repository-relevant data for the VI actinide oxidation state. The solubility trends observed pointed towards low uranium solubility in WIPP brines and a lack of amphotericity. At the expected pC{sub H+} in the WIPP ({approx} 9.5), measured uranium solubility approached 10{sup -7} M. The objective of these experiments was to establish a baseline solubility to further investigate the effects of carbonate complexation on uranium solubility in WIPP brines.

  11. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

  12. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO? storage reservoirs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO? storage that combines CO? injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO?. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO? injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO? injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO? storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be usedmore »directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.« less

  13. Community Geothermal Technology Program: Electrodeposition of minerals in geothermal brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    Objective was to study the materials electrodeposited from geothermal brine, from the HGP-A well in Puna, Hawaii. Due to limitations, only one good set of electrodeposited material was obtained; crystallography indicates that vaterite forms first, followed by calcite and then perhaps aragonite as current density is increased. While the cost to weight ratio is reasonable, the deposition rate is very slow. More research is needed, such as reducing the brittleness. The electrodeposited material possibly could be used as building blocks, tables, benches, etc. 49 figs, 4 tabs, 7 refs.

  14. Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea Lynne D. Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea Lynne D. Talley Scripps Institution groups. Japan Sea deep convection apparently occurs every winter, but massive renewal of bottom waters. Salyuk, P. Tishchenko, I. Zhabin, and S. Riser, Deep convection and brine rejection in the Japan Sea

  15. Nonlinear Thermal Transport and Brine Convection in First Year Sea Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    temperature gradients and at greater depths in the ice. Preliminary modelling of the impact of brine migration of thermistors frozen into first­year Antarctic sea ice provides temperature against depth data, which is fitted on heat transport through first­year sea ice is presented. Diffusion­driven brine pocket migration

  16. Brine Rejection from Freezing Salt Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Study Lubos Vrbka and Pavel Jungwirth*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Brine Rejection from Freezing Salt Solutions: A Molecular Dynamics Study Lubos Vrbka and Pavel process of brine rejection from freezing salt solutions is investigated with atomic resolution using. The presence of salt slows down the freezing process, which leads to the formation of an almost neat ice next

  17. Scaling control during membrane distillation of coal seam gas reverse osmosis brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaling control during membrane distillation of coal seam gas reverse osmosis brine Hung C. Duong during membrane distillation (MD) of brine from reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of coal seam gas (CSG. During CSG production, both gas and water are extracted to the surface. Gas is commonly separated from

  18. STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE FISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE in rockfish and chum salmon of dissolving carbon dioxide in brine. Storing the fish in the refrigerated brine treated with carbon dioxide inhibited the growth of the bacteria, retarded the rate at which the fish

  19. Chemical-equilibrium calculations for aqueous geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1981-05-01

    Results from four chemical-equilibrium computer programs, REDEQL.EPAK, GEOCHEM, WATEQF, and SENECA2, have been compared with experimental solubility data for some simple systems of interest with geothermal brines. Seven test cases involving solubilities of CaCO/sub 3/, amorphous SiO/sub 2/, CaSO/sub 4/, and BaSO/sub 4/ at various temperatures from 25 to 300/sup 0/C and in NaCl or HCl solutions of 0 to 4 molal have been examined. Significant differences between calculated results and experimental data occurred in some cases. These differences were traced to inaccuracies in free-energy or equilibrium-constant data and in activity coefficients used by the programs. Although currently available chemical-equilibrium programs can give reasonable results for these calculations, considerable care must be taken in the selection of free-energy data and methods of calculating activity coefficients.

  20. Sulfate Removal from Reject Brined in Inland Desalination with Zero Liquid Discharge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almasri, Dema A

    2013-07-03

    Sulfate is one of the most problematic ions present in reject brine in desalination systems due to its high potential of scale formation and membrane fouling; making it an obstacle in the application of zero liquid discharge. ...

  1. Seizing a species : the story of the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wotipka, Samuel Alex

    2014-01-01

    In the early 1950s, C.C. "Sparkplug" Sanders began harvesting brine shrimp from Utah's Great Salt Lake. Sanders built up a small business selling their eggs, called "cysts, to aquarium stores across the country. During the ...

  2. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    1 Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone in the pore networks corresponding to three different sandstones. The simulations were used to study up

  3. Study of thermal-gradient-induced migration of brine inclusions in salt. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olander, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    Natural salt deposits, which are being considered for high-level waste disposal, contain a small volume fraction of water in the form of brine inclusions distributed throughout the salt. Radioactive decay heating of the nuclear wastes will impose a temperature gradient on the surrounding salt which mobilizes the brine inclusions. Inclusions filled completely with brine (the all-liquid inclusions) migrate up the temperature gradient and eventually accumulate brine near the buried waste forms. The brine may slowly corrode or degrade the waste forms, which is undesirable. Therefore it is important to consider the migration of brine inclusions in salt under imposed temperature gradients to properly evaluate the performance of a future salt repository for nuclear wastes. The migration velocities of the inclusions were found to be dependent on temperature, temperature gradient, and inclusion shape and size. The velocities were also dictated by the interfacial mass transfer resistance at brine/solid interface. This interfacial resistance depends on the dislocation density in the crystal, which in turn, depends on the axial compressive loading of the crystal. At low axial loads, the dependence between the velocity and temperature gradient is nonlinear. At high axial loads, the interfacial resistance is reduced and the migration velocity depends linearly on the temperature gradient. All-liquid inclusions filled with mixed brines were also studied. For gas-liquid inclusions, helium, air and argon were compared. Migration studies were also conducted on single crystallites of natural salt as well as in polycrystalline natural salt samples. The behavior of the inclusions at large-ange grain boundaries was observed.

  4. Brine-in-crude-oil emulsions at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemer, Martin B.; Lord, David L.; MacDonald, Terry L.

    2013-10-01

    Metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion formation could occur in a Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) cavern if water were to flow into the crude-oil layer at a sufficient rate. Such a situation could arise during a drawdown from a cavern with a broken-hanging brine string. A high asphaltene content (> 1.5 wt %) of the crude oil provides the strongest predictor of whether a metastable water-in-crude-oil emulsion will form. However there are many crude oils with an asphaltene content > 1.5 wt % that don't form stable emulsions, but few with a low asphaltene content that do form stable emulsions. Most of the oils that form stable emulsions are %E2%80%9Csour%E2%80%9D by SPR standards indicating they contain total sulfur > 0.50 wt %.

  5. Recovery of energy from geothermal brine and other hot water sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wahl, III, Edward F. (Claremont, CA); Boucher, Frederic B. (San Juan Capistrano, CA)

    1981-01-01

    Process and system for recovery of energy from geothermal brines and other hot water sources, by direct contact heat exchange between the brine or hot water, and an immiscible working fluid, e.g. a hydrocarbon such as isobutane, in a heat exchange column, the brine or hot water therein flowing countercurrent to the flow of the working fluid. The column can be operated at subcritical, critical or above the critical pressure of the working fluid. Preferably, the column is provided with a plurality of sieve plates, and the heat exchange process and column, e.g. with respect to the design of such plates, number of plates employed, spacing between plates, area thereof, column diameter, and the like, are designed to achieve maximum throughput of brine or hot water and reduction in temperature differential at the respective stages or plates between the brine or hot water and the working fluid, and so minimize lost work and maximize efficiency, and minimize scale deposition from hot water containing fluid including salts, such as brine. Maximum throughput approximates minimum cost of electricity which can be produced by conversion of the recovered thermal energy to electrical energy.

  6. Brine Sampling and Evaluation Program 1992--1993 report and summary of BSEP data since 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, D.E.; Abitz, R.J. [I. T. Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States); Belski, D.S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Project Office

    1995-04-01

    This report is the last one that is currently scheduled in the sequence of reports of new data, and therefore, also includes summary comments referencing important data obtained by BSEP since 1983. These BSEP activities document and investigate the origins, hydraulic characteristics, extent, and composition of brine occurrences in the Permian Salado Formation and seepage of that brine into the excavations at the (WIPP) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. A project concern is that enough brine might be present after sealing and closure to generate large quantities of hydrogen gas by corroding the metal in the waste drums and waste inventory. This report describes progress made during the calendar years 1992 and 1993 and focuses on four major areas: (1) monitoring of brine inflow, e.g., measuring brines recovered from holes drilled downward from the underground drifts (downholes), upward from the underground drifts (upholes), and from subhorizontal holes from the underground drifts; (2) observations of weeps in the Air Intake Shaft (AIS); (3) further characterization of brine geochemistry; and (4) additional characterization of the hydrologic conditions in the fractured zone beneath the excavations.

  7. Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco-Martin, Laura; Molins, Sergi; Trebotich, David; Birkholzer, Jens

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we present FY2015 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This is a combined milestone report related to milestone Salt R&D Milestone “Modeling Coupled THM Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures” (M3FT-15LB0818012) and the Salt Field Testing Milestone (M3FT-15LB0819022) to support the overall objectives of the salt field test planning.

  8. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOKE GA; DUNCAN JB; LOCKREM LL

    2008-09-30

    This report is an initial report on the laboratory effort executed under RPP-PLAN-33338, Test Plan for the Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This report delineates preliminary data obtained under subcontract 21065, release 30, from the RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences. The report is predicated on CLS RPT-816, Draft Report: Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine. This document will be revised on receipt of the final RJ Lee Group, Inc., Center for Laboratory Sciences report, which will contain data subjected to quality control and quality assurance criteria.

  9. New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry Scott D. Wankel a , Samantha B. Joye b , Vladimir A. Samarkin b

  10. Pressure Buildup and Brine Migration During CO2 Storage in Multilayered Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    of resident brine caused by CCS operations require modeling/analysis tools of considerable complexity (Celia and may allow for effective pressure bleed-off in the storage reservoirs. This study presents, for uncertainty quantification, for parameter estimation, or for the optimization of pressure-management schemes

  11. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF TEMPERATURE EFFECTS DURING THE INJECTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE INTO BRINE for the simulation of carbon dioxide injection into geological formations is currently an intensive field of research reservoir scenario. 1. INTRODUCTION Recent investigations of underground carbon dioxide storage

  12. Constraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    mantle production ratio. In the Kebrit Deep, located in the northern Red Sea, we found a helium excessConstraints on origin and evolution of Red Sea brines from helium and argon isotopes Gisela, the Discovery and the Kebrit Deep, were sampled and analyzed for helium and argon isotopes. We identified two

  13. Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    Don Juan Pond, Antarctica: Near-surface CaCl2-brine feeding Earth's most saline lake on Earth. We report on new studies of Don Juan Pond (DJP), which exists at the upper limit of ephemeral on Juan Pond (DJP), found at the lowest point in the South Fork of Upper Wright Valley, Antarctica (Figure

  14. Analysis of hydrocarbon removal methods for the management of oilfield brines and produced waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furrow, Brendan Eugene

    2005-11-01

    and globally, the petroleum industries challenge has been to develop a high-tech and cost effective method to purify the large volumes of oilfield brines and produced water. Currently, most of the produced water requires several pre- and post- treatment methods...

  15. Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    of stray gas, metal-rich formation brines, and hydrau- lic fracturing and/or flowback fluids to drinking- ical evidence from northeastern Pennsylvania showing that path- ways, unrelated to recent drilling rapid shale-gas development in the re- gion; however, the presence of these fluids suggests conductive

  16. Investigation of oil injection into brine for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve : hydrodynamics and mixing experiments with SPR liquids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaneda, Jaime N.; Cote, Raymond O.; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John

    2004-05-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study a proposed approach for oil reintroduction in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The goal was to assess whether useful oil is rendered unusable through formation of a stable oil-brine emulsion during reintroduction of degassed oil into the brine layer in storage caverns. An earlier report (O'Hern et al., 2003) documented the first stage of the program, in which simulant liquids were used to characterize the buoyant plume that is produced when a jet of crude oil is injected downward into brine. This report documents the final two test series. In the first, the plume hydrodynamics experiments were completed using SPR oil, brine, and sludge. In the second, oil reinjection into brine was run for approximately 6 hours, and sampling of oil, sludge, and brine was performed over the next 3 months so that the long-term effects of oil-sludge mixing could be assessed. For both series, the experiment consisted of a large transparent vessel that is a scale model of the proposed oil-injection process at the SPR. For the plume hydrodynamics experiments, an oil layer was floated on top of a brine layer in the first test series and on top of a sludge layer residing above the brine in the second test series. The oil was injected downward through a tube into the brine at a prescribed depth below the oil-brine or sludge-brine interface. Flow rates were determined by scaling to match the ratio of buoyancy to momentum between the experiment and the SPR. Initially, the momentum of the flow produces a downward jet of oil below the tube end. Subsequently, the oil breaks up into droplets due to shear forces, buoyancy dominates the flow, and a plume of oil droplets rises to the interface. The interface was deflected upward by the impinging oil-brine plume. Videos of this flow were recorded for scaled flow rates that bracket the equivalent pumping rates in an SPR cavern during injection of degassed oil. Image-processing analyses were performed to quantify the penetration depth and width of the oil jet. The measured penetration depths were shallow, as predicted by penetration-depth models, in agreement with the assumption that the flow is buoyancy-dominated, rather than momentum-dominated. The turbulent penetration depth model overpredicted the measured values. Both the oil-brine and oil-sludge-brine systems produced plumes with hydrodynamic characteristics similar to the simulant liquids previously examined, except that the penetration depth was 5-10% longer for the crude oil. An unexpected observation was that centimeter-size oil 'bubbles' (thin oil shells completely filled with brine) were produced in large quantities during oil injection. The mixing experiments also used layers of oil, sludge, and brine from the SPR. Oil was injected at a scaled flow rate corresponding to the nominal SPR oil injection rates. Injection was performed for about 6 hours and was stopped when it was evident that brine was being ingested by the oil withdrawal pump. Sampling probes located throughout the oil, sludge, and brine layers were used to withdraw samples before, during, and after the run. The data show that strong mixing caused the water content in the oil layer to increase sharply during oil injection but that the water content in the oil dropped back to less than 0.5% within 16 hours after injection was terminated. On the other hand, the sediment content in the oil indicated that the sludge and oil appeared to be well mixed. The sediment settled slowly but the oil had not returned to the baseline, as-received, sediment values after approximately 2200 hours (3 months). Ash content analysis indicated that the sediment measured during oil analysis was primarily organic.

  17. Recovery Act: Molecular Simulation of Dissolved Inorganic Carbons for Underground Brine CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, William

    2012-11-30

    To further our understanding and develop the method for measuring the DICs under geological sequestration conditions, we studied the infrared spectra of DICs under high pressure and temperature conditions. First principles simulations of DICs in brine conditions were performed using a highly optimized ReaxFF-DIC forcefield. The thermodynamics stability of each species were determined using the 2PT method, and shown to be consistent with the Reax simulations. More importantly, we have presented the IR spectra of DIC in real brine conditions as a function of temperature and pressure. At near earth conditions, we find a breaking of the O-C-O bending modes into asymmetric and symmetric modes, separated by 100cm{sup -1} at 400K and 5 GPa. These results can now be used to calibrate FTIR laser measurements.

  18. Energy optimization in ice hockey halls I. The system COP as a multivariable function, brine and design choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Paul Melóis; Miska Räikkönen; Martti Viljanen

    2013-05-03

    This work is the first in a series of articles addressing the energy optimization in ice hockey halls. Here we adopt an analytical method, called functional optimization, to find which design and operating conditions maximize the Coefficient Of Performance of the entire cooling system (brine pumps and cooling tower), which we call ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. This is addressed as a function of several variables, like electric consumption and brine physical properties. By maximizing such function, the best configuration and brine choices for the system can thus be determined accurately and rigorously. We investigate the importance of pipe diameter, depth and brine type (ethylene glycol and ammonia) for average-sized ice rinks. An optimal brine density is found, and we compute the weight of the electric consumption of the brine pumps on ${\\rm COP}_{sys}$. Our formulas are validated with heat flow measurement data obtained at an ice hockey hall in Finland. They are also confronted with technical and cost-related constraints, and implemented by simulations with the program COMSOL Multiphysics. The multivariable approach here discussed is general, and can be applied to the rigorous preliminary study of diverse situations in building physics and in many other areas of interest.

  19. New Energy Efficient Method for Cleaning Oilfield Brines with Carbon Dioxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, C. T.; Seibert, A. F.; Bravo, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    METHOD FOR CLEANING OILFIELD BRINES WITH CARBON DIOXIDE C. T. LITTLE A. F. SEIBERT Research Engineer Technical Manager Amoco Oil Company Separations Research Program Naperville, Illinois The University of Texas Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Water... are used to purify these waters. However, if stricter discharge limits are imposed by the Environmental Protection Agency, the gas flotation method is likely to be inadequate. A new process was developed which utilizes carbon dioxide to clean oilfield...

  20. Targeted Pressure Management During CO2 Sequestration: Optimization of Well Placement and Brine Extraction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cihan, Abdullah; Birkholzer, Jens; Bianchi, Marco

    2014-12-31

    Large-scale pressure increases resulting from carbon dioxide (CO2) injection in the subsurface can potentially impact caprock integrity, induce reactivation of critically stressed faults, and drive CO2 or brine through conductive features into shallow groundwater. Pressure management involving the extraction of native fluids from storage formations can be used to minimize pressure increases while maximizing CO2 storage. However, brine extraction requires pumping, transportation, possibly treatment, and disposal of substantial volumes of extracted brackish or saline water, all of which can be technically challenging and expensive. This paper describes a constrained differential evolution (CDE) algorithm for optimal well placement and injection/ extractionmore »control with the goal of minimizing brine extraction while achieving predefined pressure contraints. The CDE methodology was tested for a simple optimization problem whose solution can be partially obtained with a gradient-based optimization methodology. The CDE successfully estimated the true global optimum for both extraction well location and extraction rate, needed for the test problem. A more complex example application of the developed strategy was also presented for a hypothetical CO2 storage scenario in a heterogeneous reservoir consisting of a critically stressed fault nearby an injection zone. Through the CDE optimization algorithm coupled to a numerical vertically-averaged reservoir model, we successfully estimated optimal rates and locations for CO2 injection and brine extraction wells while simultaneously satisfying multiple pressure buildup constraints to avoid fault activation and caprock fracturing. The study shows that the CDE methodology is a very promising tool to solve also other optimization problems related to GCS, such as reducing ‘Area of Review’, monitoring design, reducing risk of leakage and increasing storage capacity and trapping.« less

  1. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

    1994-11-22

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed. The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts. For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates. 54 figs.

  2. Biochemical solubilization of toxic salts from residual geothermal brines and waste waters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    1994-11-22

    A method of solubilizing metal salts such as metal sulfides in a geothermal sludge using mutant Thiobacilli selected for their ability to metabolize metal salts at high temperature is disclosed, The method includes the introduction of mutated Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans to a geothermal sludge or brine. The microorganisms catalyze the solubilization of metal salts, For instance, in the case of metal sulfides, the microorganisms catalyze the solubilization to form soluble metal sulfates.

  3. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  4. PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David

    2012-12-31

    The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

  5. The sup 36 Cl ages of the brines in the Magadi-Natron basin, east Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufman, A.; Margaritz, M.A.; Hollos, G. ); Paul, M.; Boaretto, E. ); Hillaire-Marcel, C. ); Taieb, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The depression in the East African Rift which includes both Lake Magadi and Lake Natron forms a closed basin within which almost all the dissolved chloride originates in precipitation, since there is no important source of very ancient sedimentary chloride. This provides an ideal setting for the evaluation of the {sup 36}Cl methodology as a geochemical and hydrological tracer. The main source of recent water, as represented by the most dilute samples measured, is characterized by a {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratio of 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}, in agreement with the calculated value expected in precipitation. Surface evaporation increases the chlorinity of the local freshwater inflow by about a factor of 110 without changing the isotopic ratio, indicating that little chloride enters the system in the form of sediment leachate. A second type of brine found in the basin occurs in a hot deep groundwater reservoir and is characterized by lower {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios (<1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}14}). By comparing this value with the 2.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} in recent recharge, one obtains an approximate salt accumulation age of 760 Ka which is consistent with thee time of the first appearance of the lake. These older brines also have lower {sup 18}O and {sup 2}H values which indicate that they were recharged during a climatically different era. The {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in the inflowing waters and in the accumulated brine, together with the known age of the Lake Magadi basin, may be used to estimate the importance of the hypogene and epigene, as opposed to the meteoric, mode of {sup 36}Cl production. Such a calculation shows that the hypogene and epigene processes together contribute less than 6% of the total {sup 36}Cl present in the lake.

  6. Brine migration test for Asse Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: final test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01

    The United States and the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) will conduct a brine migration test in the Asse Salt Mine in the FRG as part of the US/FRG Cooperative Radioactive Waste Management Agreement. Two sets of two tests each will be conducted to study both liquid inclusion migration and vapor migration in the two salt types chosen for the experiments: (1) pure salt, for its characteristics similar to the salt that might occur in potential US repositories, and (2) transitional salt, for its similarity to the salt that might occur in potential repositories in Germany.

  7. Advanced biochemical processes for geothermal brines FY 1998 annual operating plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    As part of the overall Geothermal Energy Research which is aimed at the development of economical geothermal resources production systems, the aim of the Advanced Biochemical Processes for Geothermal Brines (ABPGB) effort is the development of economic and environmentally acceptable methods for disposal of geothermal wastes and conversion of by-products to useful forms. Methods are being developed for dissolution, separation and immobilization of geothermal wastes suitable for disposal, usable in inert construction materials, suitable for reinjection into the reservoir formation, or used for recovery of valuable metals.

  8. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2 leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.

  9. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more »leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  10. Brine migration test report: Asse Salt Mine, Federal Republic of Germany: Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyle, A.J.; Eckert, J.; Kalia, H.

    1987-01-01

    This report presents a summary of Brine Migration Tests which were undertaken at the Asse mine of the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) under a bilateral US/FRG agreement. This experiment simulates a nuclear waste repository at the 800-m (2624-ft) level of the Asse salt mine in the Federal Republic of Germany. This report describes the Asse salt mine, the test equipment, and the pretest properties of the salt in the mine and in the vicinity of the test area. Also included are selected test data (for the first 28 months of operation) on the following: brine migration rates, thermomechaical behavior of the salt (including room closure, stress reading, and thermal profiles), borehole gas pressures, and borehole gas analyses. In addition to field data, laboratory analyses of pretest salt properties are included in this report. The operational phase of these experiments was completed on October 4, 1985, with the commencement of cooldown and the start of posttest activities. 7 refs., 68 figs., 48 tabs.

  11. Modeling Coupled THMC Processes and Brine Migration in Salt at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-08-14

    In this report, we present FY2014 progress by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) related to modeling of coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. LBNL’s work on the modeling of coupled THMC processes in salt was initiated in FY2012, focusing on exploring and demonstrating the capabilities of an existing LBNL modeling tool (TOUGH-FLAC) for simulating temperature-driven coupled flow and geomechanical processes in salt. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. we provide more details on the FY2014 work, first presenting updated tools and improvements made to the TOUGH-FLAC simulator, and the use of this updated tool in a new model simulation of long-term THM behavior within a generic repository in a salt formation. This is followed by the description of current benchmarking and validations efforts, including the TSDE experiment. We then present the current status in the development of constitutive relationships and the dual-continuum model for brine migration. We conclude with an outlook for FY2015, which will be much focused on model validation against field experiments and on the use of the model for the design studies related to a proposed heater experiment.

  12. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL LBNL and SNL for the UFD Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2014-09-01

    This report summarizes laboratory and field observations and numerical modeling related to coupled processes involving brine and vapor migration in geologic salt, focusing on recent developments and studies conducted at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Berkeley National Laboratories. Interest into the disposal of heat-generating waste in salt has led to interest into water distribution and migration in both run-of-mine crushed and intact geologic salt. Ideally a fully coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical simulation is performed using numerical models with validated constitutive models and parameters. When mechanical coupling is not available, mechanical effects are prescribed in hydraulic models as source, boundary, or initial conditions. This report presents material associated with developing appropriate initial conditions for a non-mechanical hydrologic simulation of brine migration in salt. Due to the strong coupling between the mechanical and hydrologic problems, the initial saturation will be low for the excavation disturbed zone surrounding the excavation. Although most of the material in this report is not new, the author hopes it is presented in a format making it useful to other salt researchers.

  13. Development of a flow injection analysis method for the determination of acrylamide copolymers in oilfield brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, K.C.; Burke, R.A.; Schramm, L.L. [Petroleum Recovery Inst., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01

    An automated method for the determination of acrylamide polymers by flow injection analysis (FIA) has been developed and optimized for routine use. The method has been extensively tested for interferences common in oilfield brines. Potential interferences were examined from Na{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Zr{sup 3+}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, Cl{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, sample coloration, and commonly used surfactants. The analysis is specific for amides, and the sensitivity to concentration of amide groups in the polymer was shown to be constant as the degree of polymer hydrolysis was varied. The range of the method is 0.1 to 100 mg/L. Sample throughput is 30 samples/h with triplicate analysis. Relative standard deviations of 0.2% are readily obtained from standard solutions and 0.5% from complex samples (at 50 mg/L). The method is applicable to the determination of aqueous, acrylamide-based polymers in process streams, surface waters and oilfield brines.

  14. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers withclosed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2007-02-07

    In large-scale geologic storage projects, the injected volumes of CO{sub 2} will displace huge volumes of native brine. If the designated storage formation is a closed system, e.g., a geologic unit that is compartmentalized by (almost) impermeable sealing units and/or sealing faults, the native brine cannot (easily) escape from the target reservoir. Thus the amount of supercritical CO{sub 2} that can be stored in such a system depends ultimately on how much pore space can be made available for the added fluid owing to the compressibility of the pore structure and the fluids. To evaluate storage capacity in such closed systems, we have conducted a modeling study simulating CO{sub 2} injection into idealized deep saline aquifers that have no (or limited) interaction with overlying, underlying, and/or adjacent units. Our focus is to evaluate the storage capacity of closed systems as a function of various reservoir parameters, hydraulic properties, compressibilities, depth, boundaries, etc. Accounting for multi-phase flow effects including dissolution of CO{sub 2} in numerical simulations, the goal is to develop simple analytical expressions that provide estimates for storage capacity and pressure buildup in such closed systems.

  15. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    - 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS plays an important role in oil recovery from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Therefore are important. We examined these issues by performing static and dynamic imbibition experiments. Oil recoveries

  16. Macro-and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing with Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    the reservoir brine. These crudes are obtained from a large oil field with stock tank oil viscositiesMacro- and Microscale Waterflooding Performances of Crudes which form w/o Emulsions upon Mixing ABSTRACT: We study the micro- and macroscale waterflooding performances of unusual crudes which naturally

  17. PII S0016-7037(01)00579-8 The origin and evolution of base metal mineralising brines and hydrothermal fluids,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, David

    that the major element chemistry of these fluids is comparable with that of evolved oil-field brines, and fluids of mineralising palaeoflu- ids is a complex function of the basin chemistry, subsequent modifications due to water by the evaporation of seawater or a seawater­meteoric water mixture past the point of halite precipitation. The major

  18. Unnatural landscapes in ecology: Generating the spatial distribution of brine spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Sublette, K. [University of Tulsa; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative tools are needed to evaluate the ecological effects of increasing petroleum production. In this article, we describe two stochastic models for simulating the spatial distribution of brine spills on a landscape. One model uses general assumptions about the spatial arrangement of spills and their sizes; the second model distributes spills by siting rectangular well complexes and conditioning spill probabilities on the configuration of pipes. We present maps of landscapes with spills produced by the two methods and compare the ability of the models to reproduce a specified spill area. A strength of the models presented here is their ability to extrapolate from the existing landscape to simulate landscapes with a higher (or lower) density of oil wells.

  19. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO? and brine leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO? storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO? and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO? leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highly efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO? and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO? storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO? storage projects.

  20. Reduced order models for prediction of groundwater quality impacts from CO? and brine leakage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Liange; Carroll, Susan; Bianchi, Marco; Mansoor, Kayyum; Sun, Yunwei; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-12-31

    A careful assessment of the risk associated with geologic CO? storage is critical to the deployment of large-scale storage projects. A potential risk is the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by the leakage of CO? and brine leakage from deep subsurface reservoirs. In probabilistic risk assessment studies, numerical modeling is the primary tool employed to assess risk. However, the application of traditional numerical models to fully evaluate the impact of CO? leakage on groundwater can be computationally complex, demanding large processing times and resources, and involving large uncertainties. As an alternative, reduced order models (ROMs) can be used as highlymore »efficient surrogates for the complex process-based numerical models. In this study, we represent the complex hydrogeological and geochemical conditions in a heterogeneous aquifer and subsequent risk by developing and using two separate ROMs. The first ROM is derived from a model that accounts for the heterogeneous flow and transport conditions in the presence of complex leakage functions for CO? and brine. The second ROM is obtained from models that feature similar, but simplified flow and transport conditions, and allow for a more complex representation of all relevant geochemical reactions. To quantify possible impacts to groundwater aquifers, the basic risk metric is taken as the aquifer volume in which the water quality of the aquifer may be affected by an underlying CO? storage project. The integration of the two ROMs provides an estimate of the impacted aquifer volume taking into account uncertainties in flow, transport and chemical conditions. These two ROMs can be linked in a comprehensive system level model for quantitative risk assessment of the deep storage reservoir, wellbore leakage, and shallow aquifer impacts to assess the collective risk of CO? storage projects.« less

  1. REE Sorption Study on sieved -50 +100 mesh fraction of Media #1 in Brine #1 with Different Starting pH's at 70C

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-09-29

    This is a continuation of the REE sorption study for shaker bath tests on 2g media #1 in 150mL brine #1 with different starting pH's at 70C. In a previous submission we reported data for shaker bath tests for brine #1 with starting pH's of 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5. In this submission we these pH's compared to starting brine #1 pH's of 6, and 7.

  2. Benefits and Costs of Brine Extraction for Increasing Injection Efficiency In geologic CO2 Sequestration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-12-31

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additionalmore »wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).« less

  3. Benefits and Costs of Brine Extraction for Increasing Injection Efficiency In geologic CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-12-31

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additional wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).

  4. Benefits and costs of brine extraction for increasing injection efficiency in geologic CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, Casie L.; Watson, David J.; Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    Pressure increases attendant with CO2 injection into the subsurface drive many of the risk factors associated with commercial-scale CCS projects, impacting project costs and liabilities in a number of ways. The area of elevated pressure defines the area that must be characterized and monitored; pressure drives fluid flow out of the storage reservoir along higher-permeability pathways that might exist through the caprock into overlying aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs; and pressure drives geomechanical changes that could potentially impact subsurface infrastructure or the integrity of the storage system itself. Pressure also limits injectivity, which can increase capital costs associated with installing additional wells to meet a given target injection rate. The ability to mitigate pressure increases in storage reservoirs could have significant value to a CCS project, but these benefits are offset by the costs of the pressure mitigation technique itself. Of particular interest for CO2 storage operators is the lifetime cost of implementing brine extraction at a CCS project site, and the relative value of benefits derived from the extraction process. This is expected to vary from site to site and from one implementation scenario to the next. Indeed, quantifying benefits against costs could allow operators to optimize their return on project investment by calculating the most effective scenario for pressure mitigation. This work builds on research recently submitted for publication by the authors examining the costs and benefits of brine extraction across operational scenarios to evaluate the effects of fluid extraction on injection rate to assess the cost effectiveness of several options for reducing the number of injection wells required. Modeling suggests that extracting at 90% of the volumetric equivalent of injection rate resulted in a 1.8% improvement in rate over a non-extraction base case; a four-fold increase in extraction rate results in a 7.6% increase in injection rate over the no-extraction base case. However, the practical impacts on capital costs suggest that this strategy is fiscally ineffective when evaluated solely on this metric, with extraction reducing injection well needs by only one per 56 (1x case) or one per 13 (4x case).

  5. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the strategic petroleum reserve program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Case, Robert J.; Chittenden, Jr, Mark E.; Harper, Jr, Donald E.; Kelly, Jr, Francis J.; Loeblich, Laurel A.; McKinney, Larry D.; Minello, Thomas J.; Park, E. Taisoo; Randall, Robert E.; Slowey, J. Frank

    1981-01-01

    On March 10, 1980, the Department of Energy's Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program began leaching the Bryan Mound salt dome and discharging the resulting brine into the coastal waters off Freeport, Texas. During the months of March and April, a team of scientists and engineers from Texas A and M University conducted an intensive environmental study of the area surrounding the diffuser site. A pipeline has been laid from the Bryan Mound site to a location 12.5 statute miles (20 km) offshore. The last 3060 ft (933 m) of this pipeline is a 52-port diffuser through which brine can be discharged at a maximum rate of 680,000 barrels per day. Initially, 16 ports were open which permitted a maximum discharge rate of 350,000 barrels per day and a continuous brine discharge was achieved on March 13, 1980. The purpose of this report is to describe the findings of the project team during the intensive postdisposal study period of March and April, 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

  6. Experiments and modeling of variably permeable carbonate reservoir samples in contact with CO?-acidified brines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Megan M.; Hao, Yue; Mason, Harris E.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2014-12-31

    Reactive experiments were performed to expose sample cores from the Arbuckle carbonate reservoir to CO?-acidified brine under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions. The samples consisted of dolomite with varying quantities of calcite and silica/chert. The timescales of monitored pressure decline across each sample in response to CO? exposure, as well as the amount of and nature of dissolution features, varied widely among these three experiments. For all samples cores, the experimentally measured initial permeability was at least one order of magnitude or more lower than the values estimated from downhole methods. Nondestructive X-ray computed tomography (XRCT) imaging revealed dissolution featuresmore »including “wormholes,” removal of fracture-filling crystals, and widening of pre-existing pore spaces. In the injection zone sample, multiple fractures may have contributed to the high initial permeability of this core and restricted the distribution of CO?-induced mineral dissolution. In contrast, the pre-existing porosity of the baffle zone sample was much lower and less connected, leading to a lower initial permeability and contributing to the development of a single dissolution channel. While calcite may make up only a small percentage of the overall sample composition, its location and the effects of its dissolution have an outsized effect on permeability responses to CO? exposure. The XRCT data presented here are informative for building the model domain for numerical simulations of these experiments but require calibration by higher resolution means to confidently evaluate different porosity-permeability relationships.« less

  7. Technical and economic feasibility of salt-gradient solar ponds at the Truscott Brine Lake of the Red River Chloride Control Project. A report to the House-Senate Committee on Appropriations of the Ninety-Seventh Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The Truscott Brine Lake is being constructed to impound highly brackish water from a number of sources which would normally flow into the Wichita River, a tributary of the Red River in Knox County, Texas. A 35.4-km (22-mile) pipeline is being constructed to carry the brines from their primary source to the Truscott Brine Lake site. The reservoir is designed to contain 100 years of brine emissions from three chloride emission areas in the Wichita River Basin. The solar ponds and power generating facilities would be located in the Bluff Creek Arm of Truscott Brine Lake. The Truscott Brine Lake study includes: survey of suitability of Truscott Lake site, review of solar pond technology, preconceptual design of solar salt pond power plant, and economic evaluation.

  8. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  9. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hann, R.W. Jr.; Randall, R.E.

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the environmental conditions found by the principal investigators during the predisposal study conducted from September 1977 through February 1980 prior to the start of brine discharge in March 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management. Volume 1 describes the results of the predisposal study, and it is divided into eight chapters entitled: Physical Oceanography, Analysis of the Discharge Plume, Water and Sediment Quality, Nekton, Benthos, Zooplankton, Phytoplankton, and Data Management. Volume 2 consists of appendices which contain additional supporting data in the form of figures and tables.

  10. Evaluation of brine disposal from the Bryan Mound site of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hann, R.W. Jr.; Randall, R.E. (eds.)

    1980-12-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the environmental conditions found by the principal investigators during the predisposal study conducted from September 1977 through February 1980 prior to the start of brine discharge in March 1980. The major areas of investigation are physical oceanography, analysis of the discharge plume, water and sediment quality, nekton, benthos, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management. Volume 1 describes the results of the predisposal study, and it is divided into eight chapters entitled: Physical Oceanography, Analsyis of the Discharge Plume, Water and Sediment Quality, Nekton, Benthos, Zooplankton, Phytoplankton, and Data Management. Volume 2 consists of appendices which contain additional supporting data in the form of figures and tables.

  11. Modifications of Carbonate Fracture Hydrodynamic Properties by CO{sub 2}-Acidified Brine Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hang; Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.; Fitts, Jeffrey P.; Crandall, Dustin; Bromhal, Grant S.

    2013-08-01

    Acidic reactive flow in fractures is relevant in subsurface activities such as CO{sub 2} geological storage and hydraulic fracturing. Understanding reaction-induced changes in fracture hydrodynamic properties is essential for predicting subsurface flows such as leakage, injectability, and fluid production. In this study, x-ray computed tomography scans of a fractured carbonate caprock were used to create three dimensional reconstructions of the fracture before and after reaction with CO{sub 2}-acidified brine (Ellis et al., 2011, Greenhouse Gases: Sci. Technol., 1:248-260). As expected, mechanical apertures were found to increase substantially, doubling and even tripling in some places. However, the surface geometry evolved in complex ways including ‘comb-tooth’ structures created from preferential dissolution of calcite in transverse sedimentary bands, and the creation of degraded zones, i.e. porous calcite-depleted areas on reacted fracture surfaces. These geometric alterations resulted in increased fracture roughness, as measured by surface Z{sub 2} parameters and fractal dimensions D{sub f}. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify the changes in hydraulic aperture, fracture transmissivity and permeability. The results show that the effective hydraulic apertures are smaller than the mechanical apertures, and the changes in hydraulic apertures are nonlinear. Overestimation of flow rate by a factor of two or more would be introduced if fracture hydrodynamic properties were based on mechanical apertures, or if hydraulic aperture is assumed to change proportionally with mechanical aperture. The differences can be attributed, in part, to the increase in roughness after reaction, and is likely affected by contiguous transverse sedimentary features. Hydraulic apertures estimated by the 1D statistical model and 2D local cubic law (LCL) model are consistently larger than those calculated from the CFD simulations. In addition, a novel ternary segmentation method was devised to handle the degraded zones, allowing for a bounding analysis of the effects on hydraulic properties. We found that the degraded zones account for less than 15% of the fracture volume, but cover 70% to 80% of the fracture surface. When the degraded zones are treated as part of the fracture, the fracture transmissivities are two to four times larger because the fracture surfaces after reaction are not as rough as they would be if one considers the degraded zone as part of the rock. Therefore, while degraded zones created during geochemical reactions may not significantly increase mechanical aperture, this type of feature cannot be ignored and should be treated with prudence when predicting fracture hydrodynamic properties.

  12. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO?-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO?), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO? emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO?. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO? without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO?-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO? as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this study suggests only limited potential for the release of United States Environmental Protection Agency regulated inorganic contaminants into potable water sources. Short-term core flood experiments further verify that the carbonate reactions occurring in Knox Group reservoir samples reach equilibrium rapidly. The core flood experiments also lend insight to pressure changes that may occur during CO? injection. The Maquoketa Shale experiments reveal that this rock is initially chemically reactive when in contact with CO? and brine. However, due to the conservative nature of silicate and clay reaction kinetics and the rapid equilibration of carbonate reactions that occur in the shale, these reactions would not present a significant risk to the competency of the shale as an effective seal rock.

  13. REE Sorption Study for Media #1 and Media #2 in Brine #1 and #2 at different Liquid to Solid Ratio's at Ambient Temperature

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-03-27

    This data set shows the different loading capacities of Media #1 and Media #2 in a high and low salt content brine matrix at different liquid to solid ratio's. These data sets are shaker bath tests on media #1 and media #2 in brine's #1 and #2 at 500mL-.5g(1000-1 ratio), 150mL-.75g(200-1 ratio), and 150mL-2.5g(60-1 ratio) at ambient temperature.

  14. Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses for gas and brine migration at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, May 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Bean, J.E. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butcher, B.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Garner, J.W.; Vaughn, P. [Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schreiber, J.D. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, P.N. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis, stepwise regression analysis and examination of scatterplots are used in conjunction with the BRAGFLO model to examine two phase flow (i.e., gas and brine) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is being developed by the US Department of Energy as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. The analyses consider either a single waste panel or the entire repository in conjunction with the following cases: (1) fully consolidated shaft, (2) system of shaft seals with panel seals, and (3) single shaft seal without panel seals. The purpose of this analysis is to develop insights on factors that are potentially important in showing compliance with applicable regulations of the US Environmental Protection Agency (i.e., 40 CFR 191, Subpart B; 40 CFR 268). The primary topics investigated are (1) gas production due to corrosion of steel, (2) gas production due to microbial degradation of cellulosics, (3) gas migration into anhydrite marker beds in the Salado Formation, (4) gas migration through a system of shaft seals to overlying strata, and (5) gas migration through a single shaft seal to overlying strata. Important variables identified in the analyses include initial brine saturation of the waste, stoichiometric terms for corrosion of steel and microbial degradation of cellulosics, gas barrier pressure in the anhydrite marker beds, shaft seal permeability, and panel seal permeability.

  15. Environmental assessment of the brine pipeline replacement for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound Facility in Brazoria County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA), DOE/EA-0804, for the proposed replacement of a deteriorated brine disposal pipeline from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Bryan Mound storage facility in Brazoria County, Texas, into the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, the ocean discharge outfall would be moved shoreward by locating the brine diffuser at the end of the pipeline 3.5 miles offshore at a minimum depth of 30 feet. The action would occur in a floodplain and wetlands; therefore, a floodplain/wetlands assessment has been prepared in conjunction with this EA. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 USC. 4321, et seg.). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required, and the Department is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). This FONSI also includes a Floodplain Statement of Findings in accordance with 10 CFR Part 1022.

  16. Wetting behavior of selected crude oil/brine/rock systems. Topical report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Morrow, N.R.; Ma, S.

    1996-12-31

    Previous studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) and related ensembles showed that wettability and its effect on oil recovery depend on numerous complex interactions. In the present work, the wettability of COBR ensembles prepared using Prudhoe Bay crude oil, a synthetic formation brine, and Berea Sandstone was varied by systematic change in initial water saturation and length of aging time at reservoir temperature (88 C). All displacement tests were run at ambient temperature. Various degrees of water wetness were achieved and quantified by a modified Amott wettability index to water, the relative pseudo work of imbibition, and a newly defined apparent advancing dynamic contact angle. Pairs of spontaneous imbibition (oil recovery by spontaneous imbibition of water) and waterflood (oil recovery vs. pore volumes of water injected) curves were measured for each of the induced wetting states. Several trends were observed. Imbibition rate, and hence water wetness, decreased with increase in aging time and with decrease in initial water saturation. Breakthrough recoveries and final oil recovery by waterflooding increased with decrease in water wetness. Correlations between water wetness and oil recovery by waterflooding and spontaneous imbibition are presented.

  17. PII S0016-7037(00)00369-0 Ra isotopes and Rn in brines and ground waters of the Jordan-Dead Sea Rift Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yehoshua, Kolodny

    , yet enrichment in water sources is most often not associated with anomalously high uranium or thorium Rift Valley: Enrichment, retardation, and mixing TAMAR MOISE, ABRAHAM STARINSKY, AMITAI KATZ surrounding rocks into the brine end member. 228 Ra/226 Ra ratios are exceptionally low 0.07 to 0.9, mostly

  18. Reactive transport modeling to study changes in water chemistry induced by CO2 injection at the Frio-I brine pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharaka, Y.K; Doughty, C.; Freifeld, B.M.; Daley, T.M.; Xu, T.

    2009-11-01

    To demonstrate the potential for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers, the Frio-I Brine Pilot was conducted, during which 1600 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into a high-permeability sandstone and the resulting subsurface plume of CO{sub 2} was monitored using a variety of hydrogeological, geophysical, and geochemical techniques. Fluid samples were obtained before CO{sub 2} injection for baseline geochemical characterization, during the CO{sub 2} injection to track its breakthrough at a nearby observation well, and after injection to investigate changes in fluid composition and potential leakage into an overlying zone. Following CO{sub 2} breakthrough at the observation well, brine samples showed sharp drops in pH, pronounced increases in HCO{sub 3}{sup -} and aqueous Fe, and significant shifts in the isotopic compositions of H{sub 2}O and dissolved inorganic carbon. Based on a calibrated 1-D radial flow model, reactive transport modeling was performed for the Frio-I Brine Pilot. A simple kinetic model of Fe release from the solid to aqueous phase was developed, which can reproduce the observed increases in aqueous Fe concentration. Brine samples collected after half a year had lower Fe concentrations due to carbonate precipitation, and this trend can be also captured by our modeling. The paper provides a method for estimating potential mobile Fe inventory, and its bounding concentration in the storage formation from limited observation data. Long-term simulations show that the CO{sub 2} plume gradually spreads outward due to capillary forces, and the gas saturation gradually decreases due to its dissolution and precipitation of carbonates. The gas phase is predicted to disappear after 500 years. Elevated aqueous CO{sub 2} concentrations remain for a longer time, but eventually decrease due to carbonate precipitation. For the Frio-I Brine Pilot, all injected CO{sub 2} could ultimately be sequestered as carbonate minerals.

  19. Effect of Oxygen Co-Injected with Carbon Dioxide on Gothic Shale Caprock-CO2-Brine Interaction during Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-09-16

    Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2-brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~10 MPa and ~75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale-CO2-brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale-CO2-brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4•2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~8–14 ?g/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Oxygen in CO2-brine migrating away from the injection well will be continually consumed through the reactions with sulfide minerals in deep geologic formations.

  20. Calcite dissolution kinetics and solubility in Na-Ca-Mg-Cl brines of geologically relevant composition at 0.1 to 1 bar pCO2 and 25 to 80°C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2006-08-16

    Sedimentary basins can contain close to 20% by volume pore fluids that are commonly classified as brines. These fluids can become undersaturated with respect to calcite as a result of processes such as migration, dispersive ...

  1. Evaluation of experimentally measured and model-calculated pH for rock-brine-CO2 systems under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-01

    pH is an essential parameter for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies conducted under geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH. The accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In our previous work, we have developed a method for pH determination by in-situ spectrophotometry. In the present work, we expanded the applicable pH range for this method and measured the pH of several rock-brine-CO2 systems at GCS conditions for five rock samples collected from ongoing GCS demonstration projects. Experimental measurements were compared with pH values calculated using several geochemical modeling approaches. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. Results indicate that the accuracy of model calculations is rock-dependent. For rocks comprised of carbonate and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain reaction occurring between the basalt minerals the CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  2. Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2013-04-01

    Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

  3. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, T.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.; Doughty, C.A.

    2011-02-15

    Crosswell CASSM (continuous active-source seismic monitoring) data was acquired as part of the Frio-II brine pilot CO{sub 2} injection experiment. To gain insight into the CO{sub 2} plume evolution, we have integrated the 3D multiphase flow modeling code TOUGH2 with seismic simulation codes via a petrophysical model that predicts seismic velocity for a given CO{sub 2} saturation. Results of forward seismic modeling based on the CO{sub 2} saturation distribution produced by an initial TOUGH2 model compare poorly with the CASSM data, indicating that the initial flow model did not capture the actual CO{sub 2} plume dynamics. Updates to the TOUGH2 model required to better match the CASSM field data indicate vertical flow near the injection well, with increased horizontal plume growth occurring at the top of the reservoir sand. The CASSM continuous delay time data are ideal for constraining the modeled spatiotemporal evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume and allow improvement in reservoir model and estimation of CO{sub 2} plume properties.

  4. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. C. Myint; Y. Hao; A. Firoozabadi

    2015-04-20

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun's model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO$_2$. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H$_2$O-CO$_2$-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  5. Evaluation of Experimentally Measured and Model-Calculated pH for Rock-Brine-CO2 Systems under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-11-14

    Reliable pH estimation is essential for understanding the geochemical reactions that occur in rock-brine-CO2 systems when CO2 is injected into deep geologic formations for long-term storage. Due to a lack of reliable experimental methods, most laboratory studies of formation reactivities conducted under geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) conditions have relied on thermodynamic modeling to estimate pH; however, the accuracy of these model predictions is typically uncertain. In this study, we expanded the measurement range of a spectrophotometric method for pH determination, and we applied the method to measure the pH in batch-reactor experiments utilizing rock samples from five ongoing GCS demonstration projects. A combination of color-changing pH indicators, bromophenol blue and bromocresol green, was shown to enable measurements over the pH range of 2.5-5.2. In-situ pH measurements were compared with pH values calculated using geochemical models. The effect of different thermodynamic databases on the accuracy of model prediction was evaluated. For rocks comprised of carbonate, siltstone, and sandstone, model results generally agreed well with experimentally measured pH; however, for basalt, significant differences were observed. These discrepancies may be due to the models’ failure to fully account for certain proton consuming and producing reactions that occur between the basalt minerals and CO2-saturated brine solutions.

  6. An integrated experimental and numerical study: Developing a reaction transport model that couples chemical reactions of mineral dissolution/precipitation with spatial and temporal flow variations in CO2/brine/rock systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Generate and characterize mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions in supercritical CO2/brine/rock systems under pressure-temperature-chemistry conditions resembling CO2injection into EGS. Characterize three-dimensional spatial and temporal distributions of rock structures subject to mineral dissolution/precipitation processes by X-ray tomography, SEM imaging, and Microprobe analysis.

  7. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.

    2013-03-31

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

  8. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myint, P C; Firoozabadi, A

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO$_2$) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi, and the CO$_2$ activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO$_2$, pure water, and both CO$_2$-rich and aqueous (H$_2$O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spy...

  9. A Comparison of the Corrosion Resistance of Iron-Based Amorphous Metals and Austenitic Alloys in Synthetic Brines at Elevated Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C

    2008-11-25

    Several hard, corrosion-resistant and neutron-absorbing iron-based amorphous alloys have now been developed that can be applied as thermal spray coatings. These new alloys include relatively high concentrations of Cr, Mo, and W for enhanced corrosion resistance, and substantial B to enable both glass formation and neutron absorption. The corrosion resistances of these novel alloys have been compared to that of several austenitic alloys in a broad range of synthetic brines, with and without nitrate inhibitor, at elevated temperature. Linear polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been used for in situ measurement of corrosion rates for prolonged periods of time, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX) have been used for ex situ characterization of samples at the end of tests. The application of these new coatings for the protection of spent nuclear fuel storage systems, equipment in nuclear service, steel-reinforced concrete will be discussed.

  10. Preliminary performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, December 1992. Volume 5, Uncertainty and sensitivity analyses of gas and brine migration for undisturbed performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Before disposing of transuranic radioactive waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the United States Department of Energy (DOE) must evaluate compliance with applicable long-term regulations of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Sandia National Laboratories is conducting iterative performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP for the DOE to provide interim guidance while preparing for a final compliance evaluation. This volume of the 1992 PA contains results of uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to migration of gas and brine from the undisturbed repository. Additional information about the 1992 PA is provided in other volumes. Volume 1 contains an overview of WIPP PA and results of a preliminary comparison with 40 CFR 191, Subpart B. Volume 2 describes the technical basis for the performance assessment, including descriptions of the linked computational models used in the Monte Carlo analyses. Volume 3 contains the reference data base and values for input parameters used in consequence and probability modeling. Volume 4 contains uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with respect to the EPA`s Environmental Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191, Subpart B). Finally, guidance derived from the entire 1992 PA is presented in Volume 6. Results of the 1992 uncertainty and sensitivity analyses indicate that, conditional on the modeling assumptions and the assigned parameter-value distributions, the most important parameters for which uncertainty has the potential to affect gas and brine migration from the undisturbed repository are: initial liquid saturation in the waste, anhydrite permeability, biodegradation-reaction stoichiometry, gas-generation rates for both corrosion and biodegradation under inundated conditions, and the permeability of the long-term shaft seal.

  11. The CPA Equation of State and an Activity Coefficient Model for Accurate Molar Enthalpy Calculations of Mixtures with Carbon Dioxide and Water/Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myint, P. C.; Hao, Y.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2015-03-27

    Thermodynamic property calculations of mixtures containing carbon dioxide (CO2) and water, including brines, are essential in theoretical models of many natural and industrial processes. The properties of greatest practical interest are density, solubility, and enthalpy. Many models for density and solubility calculations have been presented in the literature, but there exists only one study, by Spycher and Pruess, that has compared theoretical molar enthalpy predictions with experimental data [1]. In this report, we recommend two different models for enthalpy calculations: the CPA equation of state by Li and Firoozabadi [2], and the CO2 activity coefficient model by Duan and Sun [3]. We show that the CPA equation of state, which has been demonstrated to provide good agreement with density and solubility data, also accurately calculates molar enthalpies of pure CO2, pure water, and both CO2-rich and aqueous (H2O-rich) mixtures of the two species. It is applicable to a wider range of conditions than the Spycher and Pruess model. In aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) mixtures, we show that Duan and Sun’s model yields accurate results for the partial molar enthalpy of CO2. It can be combined with another model for the brine enthalpy to calculate the molar enthalpy of H2O-CO2-NaCl mixtures. We conclude by explaining how the CPA equation of state may be modified to further improve agreement with experiments. This generalized CPA is the basis of our future work on this topic.

  12. Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    2011-01-01

    . If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) prop- erties occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement

  13. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J.

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  14. The deep hydrogeologic flow system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation -- Assessing the potential for active groundwater flow and origin of the brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nativ, R.; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A.

    1997-08-01

    The deep hydrogeologic system underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) contains contaminants such as radionuclides, heavy metals, nitrates, and organic compounds. The groundwater in the deep system is saline and has been considered to be stagnant in previous studies. This study was designed to address the following questions: is groundwater in the deep system stagnant; is contaminant migration controlled by diffusion only or is advection a viable mechanism; where are the potential outlet points? On the basis of existing and newly collected data, the nature of saline groundwater flow and potential discharge into shallow, freshwater systems was assessed. Data used for this purpose included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the deep system, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) spatial and temporal temperature variations at depth, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline groundwater. The observations suggest that the saline water contained at depth is old but not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active, freshwater-bearing units. Influx of recent water does occur. Groundwater volumes involved in this flow are likely to be small. The origin of the saline groundwater was assessed by using existing and newly acquired chemical and isotopic data. The proposed model that best fits the data is modification of residual brine from which halite has been precipitated. Other models, such as ultrafiltration and halite dissolution, were also evaluated.

  15. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01

    tank, add 20 to 30 ppm lime (CaO), stir for 5 ! Qinutes, andience. In practice, lime (calcium oxide or hydroxide) wouldadding a large amount of lime to them {up to 700 ppm CaO).

  16. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2012-01-01

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  17. CHEMISTRY OF SILICA IN CERRO PRIETO BRINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2012-01-01

    lfuen operated w:l.thout sludge recirculation, this pilotcould lead to problems with sludge accumulation there. Ifby recirculation of part of the sludge coming out of the

  18. Chemistry of Silica in Cerro Prieto Brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, O.

    2010-01-01

    1975). When operated without sludge r e c i r c u l a t i ot o c o l l o i d a l silica. sludge accumulation there. thel a t i o n of part of the sludge coming out of The l a r g

  19. Development Operations Hypersaline Geothermal Brine Utilization Imperial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper headerCounty,

  20. Batteries from Brine | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power, Inc |Bartlesville Energy Research Centerof

  1. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    prediction and interpretation of seismic property changesmodel for improved interpretation of seismic monitoring data

  2. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    Area Southeast  Regional  Carbon  Sequestration  PartnershipCoast  Regional  Carbon  Sequestration  Partnership Water  West  Coast  Regional  Carbon  Sequestration  Partnership  (

  3. Food Saving in Texas: Drying, Brining, Canning, Curing. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Cornelia

    1917-01-01

    , Home-made Hot Water Canner. A V E R A G E COMPOSITION OF FRESH A N D DRIED FRUITS. (From U. S. D. A . Bulletin 293 . ) FRESH FRUITS. K I N D Water Protein Ether Extract Zarbohydrates A s h Calories Per L b . Apples 84.-6 0.4 0.5 14.2 0.3 290 Figs.... BERRIES—can, bottled juice, jelly, preserves and jam. QUINCES—preserve and marmalade, jelly. CHERRIES—can, preserve. APRICOTS—dry, can, preserve and marmalade. MELON RINDS—preserve. W I N T E R G A R D E N S A N D HOT BEDS. Collards Green Onions...

  4. Frio II Brine Pilot: Report on GEOSEQ Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Doughty, C.; Benson, S.M.

    2008-01-01

    model for improved interpretation of seismic monitoring dataprediction and interpretation of seismic property changes

  5. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    WAJ: Chemistry and geothermal systems. Academic Press 1977,system corrosion in geothermal systems [11–13]. For thisat the Geysers geothermal system in Northern California.

  6. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    tightly coupled solutions (Kim, 2010; Prevost, 2014). Tight coupling does not require freezing state variables or iterating between models, but it requires more computer memory and...

  7. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    produced water from the Barnett Shale in Texas to freshwatervolume treated in the Barnett Shale project is smaller than

  8. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    solutions, Journal of nuclear technology 2008, 164:180– 35.Modeling and Analysis. Nuclear Technology 1993, 104: 418- 2.

  9. The feasibility of deep well injection for brine disposal 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spongberg, Martin Edward

    1994-01-01

    collection, groundwater modeling, and fluid compatibility are discussed in detail. Injection system design, economics, and regulatory considerations are more related to economic than technical feasibility, and are discussed only as they relate to technical...

  10. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    algae production, GCS, and other BUS options could improve joint feasibility: • Bio-diesel and/or biogas

  11. Dissolution testing of a metallic waste form in chloride brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dawn E Janney

    2006-11-01

    This paper is intended for publication in the peer-reviewed proceedings from the Scientific Basis for Nuclear Waste Management (at the Fall 2006 meeting of the Materials Research Society). The same material was presented in a 15-minute talk. Argonne National Laboratory has developed an electrometallurgical process for conditioning spent sodium-bonded metallic reactor fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). One waste stream from this process consists of a metal waste form (MWF) whose baseline composition is stainless steel alloyed with 15 wt% Zr (SS-15Zr) and whose microstructure is a eutectic intergrowth of iron solid solutions and Fe-Zr-Cr-Ni intermetallics. This paper reports scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations of corrosion products formed during static immersion tests in which coupons of surrogate MWF containing 10 wt% U (SS-15Zr-10U) were immersed in solutions with nominal pH values of 3 and 4 and 1000 ppm added chloride for 70 days at 50 °C. Although the majority of the surface areas of the coupons appear unchanged, linear areas with localized corrosion products apparently consisting of porous materials overlying corrosion-product-filled channels formed on both coupons, cross-cutting phase boundaries in the original eutectic microstructures. Many of the linear areas intersected the sample edge at notches present before the tests or followed linear flaws visible in pre-test images. Compositions of corrosion products differed significantly from the bulk composition, and the maximum observed concentration of U in corrosion products (~25 at%) slightly exceeded the highest reported values in actinide-bearing phases in uncorroded surrogate MWF samples with comparable concentrations of U (~17-19 at%).

  12. Wellbore flow model for carbon dioxide and brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, L.

    2009-01-01

    with wellbore heat transmission handled semi- analytically.while wellbore heat transmission is handled semi-by lateral wellbore heat transmission is given by ? T ? T

  13. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. ofwaste emplacement tunnels at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. J. ofScale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain. International Journal

  14. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    water  management  options,  including:  geothermal  energy   extraction,  desalination,  salt  and  mineral   harvesting,  

  15. Wellbore flow model for carbon dioxide and brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, L.

    2009-01-01

    saturation, and composition conditions from reservoir2 saturations at depth calculated by reservoir simulation.

  16. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    sites  and  favorability  of  deep  EGS  (Roberts  geothermal  system  (EGS)  recharge,   underground  EGS  .  

  17. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    are: (1) geothermal energy, (2) desalination, (3) salt,desalination; saline water for cooling towers; makeup water for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) systems; and geothermal

  18. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    CO 2 ]  of  geothermal  heat,  desalination  water,  algae  geothermal  energy   extraction,  desalination,  salt  and  Geothermal  Energy  Systems CHP  Binary  Cycle Section  5.3  Non-­?potable  Water   NPV Reverse  Osmosis  Treatment Water  Sold  at  Desalination  

  19. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    and  pumping  water  is  capital  and  energy  intensive,  such  as  geothermal  energy,  water  for  aquaculture,  substantial  capital,   energy,  and  water  demands  of  

  20. GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BRINES; DETOXIFICATIO...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PROCESSING; BACTERIA; BIOCHEMISTRY; BIOREACTORS; BIOTECHNOLOGY; GEOCHEMISTRY; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; METALS; SLUDGES; TOXIC MATERIALS; CHEMISTRY; ELEMENTS; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES;...

  1. Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, H.M.

    2014-01-01

    typical of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) which rechargefor enhanced oil recovery (EOR) systems; and geothermal

  2. Risk division Semi-analytical model of brine leakage through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Canada: 508 wells in a 30km x 30 km area. from Bachu and Celia, 2009 hal-00658780,version1-18Jun2012 #12. (Pruess, 2006, for geothermal wells) · = > Thermal equilibrium (Oldenburg & Rinaldi 2011) > 8 Mt/y for 50 years > D=6.7 km from the injection to the abandonned well > Cement plug: 10 m high, weak

  3. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breunig, Hanna M.

    2014-01-01

    for  Geologic  Carbon  Sequestration. ”   International  of  Energy.  “Carbon  Sequestration  Atlas  of  the  Water  Extracted  from  Carbon  Sequestration  Projects."  

  4. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  5. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    chloride in superheated geothermal steam. Geothermics 1989,condensate from superheated geothermal steam. Implicationsexpansion of superheated geothermal steam, with implications

  6. HIGH-PRESSURE SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF METHANE FROM GEOPRESSURED BRINES:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom the BuildingHASL-258

  7. Brine Migration Experimental Studies for Salt Repositories | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De pEnergy Industrialofof Energy briefing isEnergy

  8. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |productionPatent:Compression (JournalPublisher'sLeakage into an

  9. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |productionPatent:Compression (JournalPublisher'sLeakage into

  10. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Clay Mineral Interactions

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimics byand

  11. Molecular Simulation of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, and Clay Mineral (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport)Fermentative ActivitySciTech ConnecttermsMimicsArticle) |

  12. Friday, March 16, 2007 MARS SEDIMENTS AND GEOCHEMISTRY: ATMOSPHERE, SOILS, BRINES, AND MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    explains the existence of ancient glacial melt morphology. 10:00 a.m. Zolotov M. Yu. * Origin of Acid. S. * McGill G. E. Martian Glacial Morphology, Geomorphology, and Atmospheric Methane [#1161] Methane clathrate hydrate in martian glacial ice is the major reservoir for modern atmospheric methane, and also

  13. Galvanic corrosion of a copper alloy in lithium bromide heavy brine environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itzhak, D.; Greenberg, T.

    1999-08-01

    Galvanic corrosion of the copper alloy 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni was studied in 55 wt% lithium bromide (LiBr) environments. The galvanic couples studied were: 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-Ti2, 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-Ti7, 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-30% Cu-70% Ni, 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-Pb, 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-Ag, and 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni-Sn. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements, open-circuit potential (OCP), and weight change measurements were carried out to evaluate the galvanic effect. Results indicated that Ti alloys and 30% Cu-70% Ni were the most passive alloys tested, and they behaved as cathodes. Although galvanic corrosion was expected, a negligible effect was measured because of an effective passivation layer on the surface of Ti alloys and 30% Cu-70% Ni. Pb, Ag, and Sn showed anodic behavior as compared to 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni. As a result of the galvanic coupling, significant weight loss of these metals was measured. Sn was the most effective anode as compared to the other tested alloys; it acted as a sacrificial anode. Sn provided effective cathodic protection to 84% Cu-15% Zn-1% Ni in 55 wt% LiBr environments at 140 C.

  14. Conservative behavior of uranium vs. salinity in Arctic sea ice and brine Christelle Not a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). In natural waters U is found mostly as dis- solved uranyl carbonates (UO2(CO3)3 4 - ) under oxidizing to (1) destabilization of uranyl carbonate complexes; (2) biological uptake; and/or (3) U adsorption

  15. STEM-ON WORK FOR BRINE CHERRY MARKET Dr. Nikki Rothwell, Station Coordinator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Growing degree hours (GDH) were also recorded. Measurements were made just prior to shaking an individual

  16. Continuous active-source seismic monitoring of CO2 injection in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Solbau, Ray D.; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-01-01

    INTERPRETATION The injection of CO 2 causes a decrease in seismicseismic monitoring during injection. Although quantitative interpretation

  17. Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Seismic Exploration, 14, Elsevier. Harris J.M. , Nolen-Seismic Profiling: Principles, Handbook of Geophysical Exploration:of Seismic Traveltime Tomography. Society of Exploration

  18. Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural Wastewater via Brine Shrimp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selenium Biotransformations in an Engineered Aquatic Ecosystem for Bioremediation of Agricultural. Freeman*,,#, Department of Land, Air and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California, Water Management Research Division, Parlier, California 93648, United States Biological Sciences

  19. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    membranes for surface seawater desalination, Desalination,of R&D program in seawater desalination at KISR part I.pressure limit, while seawater desalination RO module are

  20. Repetitive Regeneration of Media #1 after REE Sorption from Brine #1 at 70C

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-07-23

    This dataset shows the ability of media #1 to be loaded with REE's, stripped of the REE's sequestered, regenerated, and reused over many cycles.

  1. Results of investigations at the Zunil geothermal field, Guatemala: Well logging and brine geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A.; Dennis, B.; Van Eeckhout, E.; Goff, F.; Lawton, R.; Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Archuleta, J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Medina, V. (Instituto Nacional de Electrificacion, Guatemala City (Guatemala). Unidad de Desarollo Geotermico)

    1991-07-01

    The well logging team from Los Alamos and its counterpart from Central America were tasked to investigate the condition of four producing geothermal wells in the Zunil Geothermal Field. The information obtained would be used to help evaluate the Zunil geothermal reservoir in terms of possible additional drilling and future power plant design. The field activities focused on downhole measurements in four production wells (ZCQ-3, ZCQ-4, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6). The teams took measurements of the wells in both static (shut-in) and flowing conditions, using the high-temperature well logging tools developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two well logging missions were conducted in the Zunil field. In October 1988 measurements were made in well ZCQ-3, ZCQ-5, and ZCQ-6. In December 1989 the second field operation logged ZCQ-4 and repeated logs in ZCQ-3. Both field operations included not only well logging but the collecting of numerous fluid samples from both thermal and nonthermal waters. 18 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. Geophysical (time domain electromagnetic model) delineation of a shallow brine beneath a freshwater lake,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gvirtzman, Haim

    groundwaters. It is hypothesized that salt transport is dominated by molecular diffusion in the central part streams entering the lake. This order of magnitude difference is a result of salt fluxes from two major cores and nineteen 0.5-m cores drilled to sediments within the lake basin (Figure 1). At the water

  3. ASSESSMENT OF TECHNETIUM LEACHABILITY IN CEMENT-STABILIZED BASIN 43 GROUNDWATER BRINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; COOKE GA; LOCKREM LL

    2009-07-20

    This report documents the effort to sequester technetium by the use of getters, reductants (tin(II) apatite and ferrous sulfate), sorbents (A530E and A532E ion exchange resins), and cementitious waste form. The pertechnetate form of technetium is highly soluble and mobile in aerobic (oxidizing) environments.

  4. Dilute iota-and kappa-Carrageenan solutions with high viscosities in high salinity brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Power, Energy Environmental Research (PEER) Center, California Institute polyacrylamide solutions. Moreover, Carrageenans are renewable, nontoxic, green substances. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction To address the increasing energy needs of society in the face

  5. Draft Test Plan for Brine Migration Experimental Studies in Run-of-Mine Salt Backfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Reed, Donald T.; Boukhalfa, Hakim; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Robinson, Bruce Alan

    2015-02-02

    The primary objective of the experimental effort described here is to aid in understanding the complex nature of liquid, vapor, and solid transport occurring around heated nuclear waste in bedded salt. In order to gain confidence in the predictive capability of numerical models, experimental validation must be performed to ensure that (a) hydrological and physiochemical parameters and (b) processes are correctly simulated. The experiments proposed here are designed to study aspects of the system that have not been satisfactorily quantified in prior work. In addition to exploring the complex coupled physical processes in support of numerical model validation, lessons learned from these experiments will facilitate preparations for larger-scale experiments that may utilize similar instrumentation techniques.

  6. Laboratory Flow Experiments for Visualizing Carbon Dioxide-Induced, Density-Driven Brine Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Report LBNL- 49023,Aquifers. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Report LBNL-1243E,238. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Report LBL-37200,

  7. The role of wellbore remediation on the evolution of groundwater quality from CO? and brine leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansoor, Kayyum; Carroll, Susan A.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-12-31

    Long-term storage of CO? in underground reservoirs requires a careful assessment to evaluate risk to groundwater sources. The focus of this study is to assess time-frames required to restore water quality to pre-injection levels based on output from complex reactive transport simulations that exhibit plume retraction within a 200-year simulation period. We examined the relationship between plume volume, cumulative injected CO? mass, and permeability. The role of mitigation was assessed by projecting falloffs in plume volumes from their maximum peak levels with a Gaussian function to estimate plume recovery times to reach post-injection groundwater compositions. The results show a strong correlation between cumulative injected CO? mass and maximum plume pH volumes and a positive correlation between CO? flux, cumulative injected CO?, and plume recovery times, with secondary dependence on permeability.

  8. Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    monitoring with the RST Reservoir Saturation Tool. Oilfieldare Schlumberger's reservoir saturation tool (RST) (Adolph,Fluid Saturation Prediction in a Multicomponent Reservoir,

  9. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    21, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Utilizing a 1 million EERE investment, heat from geothermal fluids-a byproduct of gold mining-will be generating electricity this year for less than...

  10. The role of wellbore remediation on the evolution of groundwater quality from CO? and brine leakage

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mansoor, Kayyum; Carroll, Susan A.; Sun, Yunwei

    2014-12-31

    Long-term storage of CO? in underground reservoirs requires a careful assessment to evaluate risk to groundwater sources. The focus of this study is to assess time-frames required to restore water quality to pre-injection levels based on output from complex reactive transport simulations that exhibit plume retraction within a 200-year simulation period. We examined the relationship between plume volume, cumulative injected CO? mass, and permeability. The role of mitigation was assessed by projecting falloffs in plume volumes from their maximum peak levels with a Gaussian function to estimate plume recovery times to reach post-injection groundwater compositions. The results show a strongmore »correlation between cumulative injected CO? mass and maximum plume pH volumes and a positive correlation between CO? flux, cumulative injected CO?, and plume recovery times, with secondary dependence on permeability.« less

  11. Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinnikawe, Oyewande

    2012-10-19

    CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study...

  12. Effect of Brine on Hydrate Antiagglomeration J. Dalton York and Abbas Firoozabadi*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    . There is less CO2 produced from burning natural gas than other fossil fuels. Furthermore, produced CO2 can by guest molecules such as methane, propane, etc., under high pressures and temperatures in the range heating. A change of bulk-phase properties through thermodynamic inhibition with methanol (Me

  13. Time-lapse crosswell seismic and VSP monitoring of injected CO2 in a brine aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, Thomas M.; Myer, Larry R.; Peterson, J.E.; Majer, E.L.; Hoversten, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP), were acquiredof crosswell and vertical seismic profile (VSP) experiments.

  14. Effect of surface tension and brine concentration on mass transfer in micro-bubble aeration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Michael Kent

    1998-01-01

    concentration. An increase in surface tension increases the resistance to mass transfer across the bubble interface. By using the American Society of Civil Engineers' (ASCE) reaeration technique, the mass transfer coefficient is determined as a function...

  15. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Report for Buena Vista Water Storage District, (2003). S.of low-salinity brackish water: Integration of acceleratedagricultural drainage water, Desalination, A. Rahardianto,

  16. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Program, 2002. Desalination Demonstration Report for Buenaprior to RO membranes for surface seawater desalination,Desalination, 144 (2002) 353. P. Cote, J. Cadera, J. Coburn,

  17. APPLIED PHYTO-REMEDIATION TECHNIQUES USING HALOPHYTES FOR OIL AND BRINE SPILL SCARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.L. Korphage; Bruce G. Langhus; Scott Campbell

    2003-03-01

    Produced salt water from historical oil and gas production was often managed with inadequate care and unfortunate consequences. In Kansas, the production practices in the 1930's and 1940's--before statewide anti-pollution laws--were such that fluids were often produced to surface impoundments where the oil would segregate from the salt water. The oil was pumped off the pits and the salt water was able to infiltrate into the subsurface soil zones and underlying bedrock. Over the years, oil producing practices were changed so that segregation of fluids was accomplished in steel tanks and salt water was isolated from the natural environment. But before that could happen, significant areas of the state were scarred by salt water. These areas are now in need of economical remediation. Remediation of salt scarred land can be facilitated with soil amendments, land management, and selection of appropriate salt tolerant plants. Current research on the salt scars around the old Leon Waterflood, in Butler County, Kansas show the relative efficiency of remediation options. Based upon these research findings, it is possible to recommend cost efficient remediation techniques for slight, medium, and heavy salt water damaged soil. Slight salt damage includes soils with Electrical Conductivity (EC) values of 4.0 mS/cm or less. Operators can treat these soils with sufficient amounts of gypsum, install irrigation systems, and till the soil. Appropriate plants can be introduced via transplants or seeded. Medium salt damage includes soils with EC values between 4.0 and 16 mS/cm. Operators will add amendments of gypsum, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. Some particularly salt tolerant plants can be added but most planting ought to be reserved until the second season of remediation. Severe salt damage includes soil with EC values in excess of 16 mS/cm. Operators will add at least part of the gypsum required, till the soil, and arrange for irrigation. The following seasons more gypsum will be added and as the soil EC is reduced, plants can be introduced. If rapid remediation is required, a sufficient volume of topsoil, or sand, or manure can be added to dilute the local salinity, the bulk amendments tilled into the surface with added gypsum, and appropriate plants added. In this case, irrigation will be particularly important. The expense of the more rapid remediation will be much higher.

  18. Hydrogen chloride in superheated steam and chloride in deep brine at The Geysers geothermal field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haizlip, J.R.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Chloride (Cl) concentrations of 10-120 ppm{sub w} have been measured in superheated steam produced by wells at The Geysers, a vapor-dominated geothermal field in northern California. Corrosion of the well casing and steam-gathering system has been recognized in some parts of The Geysers, and is apparently related to the presence of Cl. Cl in the steam is in a volatile form, generated with the steam at reservoir temperatures, and probably travels to the wellhead as HCl gas. Published experimental data for partial pressures of HCl in steam over aqueous HCl solutions and for dissociation constants of HCl were used to calculate distribution coefficients for HCl. Reservoir liquid Cl concentrations capable of generating steam with the observed Cl concentrations were then calculated as a function of pH and temperatures from 250 to 350º C. Equilibrium mineral/liquid reactions with the K-mica and K-feldspar assemblage found in the wells limit the reservoir liquid pH values at various Cl concentrations to about 5 to 6 (near neutral at 250 to 350º C). Within this pH range, liquid at 250º C could not produce steam containing the high Cl concentrations observed. However, liquid at higher temperatures (300 to 350º C) with chloride concentrations greater than 10,000 ppm{sub w} could generate steam with 10 to over 200 ppm{sub w} Cl. There is a positive correlation between pH and the chloride concentrations required to generate a given Cl concentration in steam. The concentration of Cl in superheated steam constrains not only the reservoir liquid composition, but the temperature at which the steam last equilibrated with liquid.

  19. Membrane Desalination of Agricultural Drainage Water: Water Recovery Enhancement and Brine Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Yoram

    2008-01-01

    Intermediate Chemical Demineralization, Journal of MembraneIntegration of Chemical Demineralization with RO Membranei.e. , chemical demineralization) or desupersaturated to

  20. Molecular dynamics study of interfacial confinement effects of aqueous NaCl brines in nanoporous carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wander, M. C. F.; Shuford, K. L.

    2010-12-09

    In this paper, studies of aqueous electrolyte solutions in contact with a family of porous carbon geometries using classical molecular dynamics simulations are presented. These simulations provide an atomic scale depiction of ion transport dynamics in different environments to elucidate power of aqueous electrolyte supercapacitors. The electrolyte contains alkali metal and halide ions, which allow for the examination of size trends within specific geometries as well as trends in concentration. The electrode pores are modeled as planar graphite sheets and carbon nanotubes with interstices ranging from one to four nanometers. Ordered layers form parallel to the carbon surface, which facilitates focused ion motion under slightly confining conditions. As a result, the ion’s diffusivities are enhanced in the direction of the slit or pore. Further confining the system leads to decreased ion diffusivities. The ions are fully hydrated in all but the smallest slits and pores with those sizes showing increased ion pairing. There is strong evidence of charge separation perpendicular to the surface at all size scales, concentrations, and ion types, providing a useful baseline for examining differential capacitance behavior and future studies on energy storage. These systems show promise as high-power electrical energy storage devices.

  1. Light hydrocarbon geochemistry of brines and sediments of the red sea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Roger Allen

    1979-01-01

    -induced hydzccarbon po!. lution in the oceans [Bi"oaks and Sockett, 1973]; "sniffing" of light hydrocarbons to evaluate the oil producing potential of an area !Sackett, 1977]; and determination of light hydrocarbons in anoxic. waters [Bunt, 1974; Vtesenbpnp, 1975...

  2. Gas Content of Gladys McCall Reservoir Brine A Topical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom the Building to PROGWM

  3. Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimaland theThe overarching mission of

  4. Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin:PontiacInformation Forest ServiceBridgewater2 JumpJumpEnergy

  5. Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from Unpaved

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) |production at a linear(Conference)membranes(Conference)Article)|Roads

  6. Summary Results for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority for anStudy: AlgaeDepartment of EnergySNL

  7. Nevada: Geothermal Brine Brings Low-Cost Power with Big Potential |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department of Energy Nationwide:NaturalDepartment of

  8. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01

    seawater pumping, brine removal, water treatment, and membrane desalinationseawater and discharged brine, which it received from an adjacent desalination

  9. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    of active pumping, water extraction wells can also bescenarios in which water extraction wells operate as passivemanagement via extraction of native saline water has been

  10. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa - The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01

    phase dispersivity test (BTC) Porosity-thickness product oftracer test Two-phase tracer BTC Two-phase dispersivity (

  11. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    , this cold, oxygen-rich, but relatively fresh water is advected southward along the coast of Sakhalin island

  12. Sensitivity study of CO2 storage capacity in brine aquifers with closed boundaries: Dependence on hydrogeologic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.

    2008-01-01

    the DOE Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships, OctoberDOE Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships, henceforth

  13. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modeling for geothermal systems: predicting carbonate andmodelling of enhanced geothermal systems. Geophys. J. Int. ,IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS (EGS) Laurent André (1) ,

  14. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    linearly with a geothermal gradient of 30 o C/km, from 18 ostratified system with geothermal gradient of 30 o C/kmto the natural geothermal gradient. Consequently, the

  15. Evaluation of Membrane Treatment Technology to Optimize and Reduce Hypersalinity Content of Produced Brine for Reuse in Unconventional Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eboagwu, Uche

    2012-10-19

    Over 18 billion barrels of waste fluids are generated annually from oil and gas production in the United States. As a large amount of water is used for oilfield operations, treating and reusing produced water can cut the consumption of fresh water...

  16. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    and the reservoir properties (CO 2 saturation distribution).residual CO 2 saturation and the associated reservoir CO 2reservoir model (top) with zoom of central portion showing predicted CO 2 saturation

  17. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa - The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01

    The wireline reservoir saturation tool (RST) uses pulsedCO 2 saturation between wells RST (reservoir simulation

  18. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modelling of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Hot Fractured Rockon the properties of the Soultz fractured reservoir.Conference, March 17-18, 2005, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France.

  19. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS (EGS) Laurent André (1) ,1998 in the European Soultz EGS project (Alsace, France),

  20. Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    Clean Coal Fuels, The authors wish to thank two anonymous reviewers as well as Lehua Pan of Lawrence National Energy Technology

  1. The role of CO2 in CH4 exsolution from deep brine: Implications for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    spreading under the shale where gas saturation is higher duecomposition of the gas above the shale is mainly CH 4 , andeffect of the shale remains as higher gas saturations are

  2. Site Characterization for CO2 Geologic Storage and Vice Versa - The Frio Brine Pilot as a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2006-01-01

    seismic VSP (vertical seismic profile) CO 2 distributionFigure 3 compares vertical seismic profile (VSP) results for

  3. The role of CO2 in CH4 exsolution from deep brine: Implications for geologic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    to CO 2 -enhanced geothermal systems. Trans. Porous Med.to CO 2 -enhanced geothermal systems. Trans. Porous Med.

  4. Comparing FRACHEM and TOUGHREACT for reactive transport modeling of brine-rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, L.; Spycher, N.; Xu, T.; Pruess, K.; Vuataz, F.-D.

    2008-01-01

    modelling of enhanced geothermal systems. Geophys. J. Int. ,INTERACTIONS IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS (EGS) Laurent

  5. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    hydraulic properties may be assigned to individual wellhydraulic Page 12 heads in the region near the injection wellsrelief wells. (b) Evolution of hydraulic head changes (in m)

  6. Constraining the reservoir model of an injected CO2 plume with crosswell CASSM at the Frio-II brine plot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T.M.

    2011-01-01

    sand and above the perforations, as shown in Figure 4.2 plume along with well perforation and packer locations. (plume along with well perforation and packer locations. (

  7. Impact-driven pressure management via targeted brine extraction Conceptual studies of CO2 storage in saline formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkholzer, J.T.

    2013-01-01

    Risk, Presentation at the SPE International Workshop on Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS): Environment, Energy

  8. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  9. The Static String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Giardino

    2013-05-21

    In this article the quantum fluctuation of a rigid and static string is reported to be identical to a free quantum particle. Solutions similar to this static string have already been found in the semi-classical quantizaton of pulsating strings, and our results show that the semi-classical quantization of pulsating strings is, in some cases, a perturbation of static strings. We also interpret the energy of the static string as a lower bound for the pulsating string and speculate about a description of quantum mechanics in terms of semi-classical string theory.

  10. Fluid Mechanics of Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Schubring; Vitaly Vanchurin

    2013-06-02

    We consider conserved currents in an interacting network of one-dimensional objects (or strings). Singular currents localized on a single string are considered in general, and a formal procedure for coarse-graining over many strings is developed. This procedure is applied to strings described by the Nambu-Goto action such as cosmic strings. In addition to conserved currents corresponding to the energy-momentum tensor, we consider an antisymmetric tensor of conserved currents related to the string tangent vector. Under the assumption of local equilibrium we derive a complete set of hydrodynamic equations for strings.

  11. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, Douglas K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kuhns, Douglass J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wiersholm, Otto (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Timothy A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  12. Drill string enclosure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jorgensen, D.K.; Kuhns, D.J.; Wiersholm, O.; Miller, T.A.

    1993-03-02

    The drill string enclosure consists of six component parts, including; a top bracket, an upper acrylic cylinder, an acrylic drill casing guide, a lower acrylic cylinder, a bottom bracket, and three flexible ducts. The upper acrylic cylinder is optional based upon the drill string length. The drill string enclosure allows for an efficient drill and sight operation at a hazardous waste site.

  13. Kinky D-Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil. D. Lambert; David Tong

    1999-07-13

    We study two-dimensional SQED viewed as the world-volume theory of a D-string in the presence of D5-branes with non-zero background fields that induce attractive forces between the branes. In various approximations, the low-energy dynamics is given by a hyperKahler, or hyperKahler with torsion, massive sigma-model. We demonstrate the existence of kink solutions corresponding to the string interpolating between different D5-branes. Bound states of the D-string with fundamental strings are identified with Q-kinks which, in turn, are identified with dyonic instanton strings on the D5-brane world-volume.

  14. String Amplitudes from Moyal String Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Bars; I. Kishimoto; Y. Matsuo

    2002-12-29

    We illustrate a basic framework for analytic computations of Feynman graphs using the Moyal star formulation of string field theory. We present efficient methods of computation based on (a) the monoid algebra in noncommutative space and (b) the conventional Feynman rules in Fourier space. The methods apply equally well to perturbative string states or nonperturbative string states involving D-branes. The ghost sector is formulated using Moyal products with fermionic (b,c) ghosts. We also provide a short account on how the purely cubic theory and/or VSFT proposals may receive some clarification of their midpoint structures in our regularized framework.

  15. Handbook on string decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Iengo; Jorge G. Russo

    2006-02-20

    We explain simple semi-classical rules to estimate the lifetime of any given highly-excited quantum state of the string spectrum in flat spacetime. We discuss both the decays by splitting into two massive states and by massless emission. As an application, we study a solution describing a rotating and pulsating ellipse which becomes folded at an instant of time -- the ``squashing ellipse''. This string interpolates between the folded string with maximum angular momentum and the pulsating circular string. We explicitly compute the quantum decay rate for the corresponding quantum state, and verify the basic rules that we propose. Finally, we give a more general (4-parameter) family of closed string solutions representing rotating and pulsating elliptical strings.

  16. String Theory Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    1995-03-20

    A brief review of the status of duality symmetries in string theory is presented. The evidence is accumulating rapidly that an enormous group of duality symmetries, including perturbative T dualities and non-perturbative S-dualities, underlies string theory. It is my hope that an understanding of these symmetries will suggest the right way to formulate non-perturbative string theory. Whether or not this hope is realized, it has already been demonstrated that this line of inquiry leads to powerful new tools for understanding gauge theories and new evidence for the uniqueness of string theory, as well as deep mathematical results.

  17. PT-symmetric strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amore, Paolo; Fernández, Francisco M.; Garcia, Javier; Gutierrez, German

    2014-04-15

    We study both analytically and numerically the spectrum of inhomogeneous strings with PT-symmetric density. We discuss an exactly solvable model of PT-symmetric string which is isospectral to the uniform string; for more general strings, we calculate exactly the sum rules Z(p)??{sub n=1}{sup ?}1/E{sub n}{sup p}, with p=1,2,… and find explicit expressions which can be used to obtain bounds on the lowest eigenvalue. A detailed numerical calculation is carried out for two non-solvable models depending on a parameter, obtaining precise estimates of the critical values where pair of real eigenvalues become complex. -- Highlights: •PT-symmetric Hamiltonians exhibit real eigenvalues when PT symmetry is unbroken. •We study PT-symmetric strings with complex density. •They exhibit regions of unbroken PT symmetry. •We calculate the critical parameters at the boundaries of those regions. •There are exact real sum rules for some particular complex densities.

  18. Stable Charged Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weigel, H. [Physics Department, Stellenbosch University, Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Quandt, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen University, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Graham, N. [Department of Physics, Middlebury College , Middlebury, Vermont 05753 (United States)

    2011-03-11

    We study the quantum stabilization of a cosmic string by a heavy fermion doublet in a reduced version of the standard model. We show that charged strings, obtained by populating fermionic bound state levels, become stable if the electroweak bosons are coupled to a fermion that is less than twice as heavy as the top quark. This result suggests that extraordinarily large fermion masses or unrealistic couplings are not required to bind a cosmic string in the standard model. Numerically we find the most favorable string profile to be a simple trough in the Higgs vacuum expectation value of radius {approx_equal}10{sup -18} m. The vacuum remains stable in our model, because neutral strings are not energetically favored.

  19. Grassmannian and string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    1996-12-02

    Infinite-dimensional Grassmannian manifold contains moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces of all genera. This well known fact leads to a conjecture that non-perturbative string theory can be formulated in terms of Grassmannian. We present new facts supporting this hypothesis. In particular, it is shown that Grassmannians can be considered as generalized moduli spaces; this statement permits us to define corresponding "string amplitudes" (at least formally). One can conjecture, that it is possible to explain the relation between non-perturbative and perturbative string theory by means of localization theorems for equivariant cohomology; this conjecture is based on the characterization of moduli spaces, relevant to string theory, as sets consisting of points with large stabilizers in certain groups acting on Grassmannian. We describe an involution on the Grassmannian that could be related to S-duality in string theory.

  20. Reheating and Cosmic String Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xian Gao; Miao Li; Wei Song; Yushu Song

    2008-01-04

    We compute the string production rate at the end of inflation, using the string spectrum obtained in \\lss in a near-de Sitter space. Our result shows that highly excited strings are hardly produced, thus the simple slow-roll inflation alone does not offer a cosmic string production mechanism.

  1. Extended Inflation from Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Garcia-Bellido; M. quiros

    1991-09-25

    We study the possibility of extended inflation in the effective theory of gravity from strings compactified to four dimensions and find that it strongly depends on the mechanism of supersymmetry breaking. We consider a general class of string--inspired models which are good candidates for successful extended inflation. In particular, the $\\omega$--problem of ordinary extended inflation is automatically solved by the production of only very small bubbles until the end of inflation. We find that the inflaton field could belong either to the untwisted or to the twisted massless sectors of the string spectrum, depending on the supersymmetry breaking superpotential.

  2. Subsurface drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Casper, William L. (Rigby, ID); Clark, Don T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, Blair K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mathewson, Rodney O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Seymour, Craig A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-10-07

    A drill string comprises a first drill string member having a male end; and a second drill string member having a female end configured to be joined to the male end of the first drill string member, the male end having a threaded portion including generally square threads, the male end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the threaded portion, and the male end further having a bearing surface, the female end having a female threaded portion having corresponding female threads, the female end having a non-threaded extension portion coaxial with the female threaded portion, and the female end having a bearing surface. Installation methods, including methods of installing instrumented probes are also provided.

  3. Hydroball string sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurwitz, Michael J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Ekeroth, Douglas E. (Delmont, PA); Squarer, David (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1991-01-01

    A hydroball string sensing system for a nuclear reactor that includes stainless tubes positioned to guide hydroball strings into and out of the nuclear reactor core. A sensor such as an ultrasonic transducer transmitter and receiver is positioned outside of the nuclear reactor core and adjacent to the tube. The presence of an object such a bullet member positioned at an end a hydroball string, or any one of the hydroballs interrupts the transmission of ultrasound from the transmitter to the receiver. Alternatively, if the bullet member and hydroballs include a ferritic material, either a Hall effect sensor or other magnetic field sensors such as a magnetic field rate of change sensor can be used to detect the location and position of a hydroball string. Placing two sensors along the tube with a known distance between the sensors enables the velocity of a hydroball string to be determined. This determined velocity can be used to control the flow rate of a fluid within the tube so as to control the velocity of the hydroball string.

  4. (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The only commercially active lithium mine in the United States was a brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --United States: 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 e Production W W W W W Imports for consumption 3,160 1,890 1,960 2,850 2 production capacity. Industry analysts and the major lithium producers expected worldwide consumption94 LITHIUM (Data in metric tons of lithium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production

  5. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingThe Future of Geothermal Energy. (Massachusetts Institute ofa renewed interest in geothermal energy, and particularly in

  6. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    D.W. : A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingtwenty-?fth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering,the development of enhanced geothermal systems? In: Paper

  7. CO2-Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Paul Emeka Eke, SPE, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The abstract must contain conspicuous acknowledgment of SPE copyright. Abstract Carbon capture and storage (CCS, Mark Naylor, Stuart Haszeldine and Andrew Curtis, Scottish Centre for Carbon Storage, School of Geo. The upward buoyancy of dense phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep reservoirs means that sites need to be chosen

  8. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    of enhanced geothermal systems? In: Paper presented at theThe deep EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) project at Soultz-to CO 2 -Enhanced Geothermal Systems Moore, J. Adams, Allis,

  9. Calcium Isotopic Variation in Marine Evaporites and Carbonates: Applications to Late Miocene Mediterranean Brine Chemistry and Late Cenozoic Calcium Cycling in the Oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Tabitha Michele

    2006-01-01

    purpose of drilling into the Late Messinian salts. DSDP LegsOcean Drilling Program drilled through Messinian salts while

  10. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    of water as the heat transmission ?uid in EGS has beena sys- tem with CO 2 as heat transmission ?uid requires an

  11. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    Geothermal System) project at Soultz-sous-Forets (Alsace,hot dry rock project at Soultz/France (Gérard et al. 2006).

  12. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    typically occur in any type of EGS (Brown 2000; Fouillac etadvantages of CO 2 -based EGS include increased heatP. , Rummel, F. : The deep EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System)

  13. This is a partial list of items you may consider brining to campus. Coordinate with your roommate to avoid over-crowding your room.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    school supplies Dry erase board/markers Electronics Computer/laptop/printer/any chargers Cell phone (land

  14. Modeling CO{sub 2}-Brine-Rock Interaction Including Mercury and H{sub 2}S Impurities in the Context of CO{sub 2} Geologic Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spycher, N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses modeling and simulation approaches to investigate the impacts on injectivity of trace amounts of mercury (Hg) in a carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) stream injected for geologic carbon sequestration in a sandstone reservoir at ~2.5 km depth. At the range of Hg concentrations expected (7-190 ppbV, or ~ 0.06-1.6 mg/std.m{sup 3}CO{sub 2}), the total volumetric plugging that could occur due to complete condensation of Hg, or due to complete precipitation of Hg as cinnabar, results in a very small porosity change. In addition, Hg concentration much higher than the concentrations considered here would be required for Hg condensation to even occur. Concentration of aqueous Hg by water evaporation into CO{sub 2} is also unlikely because the higher volatility of Hg relative to H{sub 2}O at reservoir conditions prevents the Hg concentration from increasing in groundwater as dry CO{sub 2} sweeps through, volatilizing both H{sub 2}O and Hg. Using a model-derived aqueous solution to represent the formation water, batch reactive geochemical modeling show that the reaction of the formation water with the CO{sub 2}-Hg mixture causes the pH to drop to about 4.7 and then become buffered near 5.2 upon reaction with the sediments, with a negligible net volume change from mineral dissolution and precipitation. Cinnabar (HgS(s)) is found to be thermodynamically stable as soon as the Hg-bearing CO{sub 2} reacts with the formation water which contains small amounts of dissolved sulfide. Liquid mercury (Hg(l)) is not found to be thermodynamically stable at any point during the simulation. Two-dimensional radial reactive transport simulations of CO{sub 2} injection at a rate of 14.8 kg/s into a 400 m-thick formation at isothermal conditions of 106°C and average pressure near 215 bar, with varying amounts of Hg and H{sub 2}S trace gases, show generally that porosity changes only by about ±0.05% (absolute, i.e., new porosity = initial porosity ±0.0005) with Hg predicted to readily precipitate from the CO{sub 2} as cinnabar in a zone mostly matching the single-phase CO{sub 2} plume. The precipitation of minerals other than cinnabar, however, dominates the evolution of porosity. Main reactions include the replacement of primarily Fe-chlorite by siderite, of calcite by dolomite, and of K-feldspar by muscovite. Chalcedony is also predicted to precipitate from the dissolution of feldspars and quartz. Although the range of predicted porosity change is quite small, the amount of dissolution and precipitation predicted for these individual minerals is not negligible. These reactive transport simulations assume that Hg gas behaves ideally. To examine effects of non-ideality on these simulations, approximate calculations of the fugacity coefficient of Hg in CO{sub 2} were made. Results suggest that Hg condensation could be significantly overestimated when assuming ideal gas behavior, making our simulation results conservative with respect to impacts on injectivity. The effect of pressure on Henry’s constant for Hg is estimated to yield Hg solubilities about 10% lower than when this effect is not considered, a change that is considered too small to affect the conclusions of this report. Although all results in this study are based on relatively mature data and modeling approaches, in the absence of experimental data and more detailed site-specific information, it is not possible to fully validate the results and conclusions.

  15. A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    the development of enhanced geothermal systems? In: PaperThe deep EGS (Enhanced Geothermal System) project at Soultz-Application to CO 2 -Enhanced Geothermal Systems Moore, J.

  16. Assessing Uncertainty and Repeatability in Time-Lapse VSP Monitoring of CO2 Injection in a Brine Aquifer, Frio Formation, Texas (A Case Study)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazari, S.

    2014-01-01

    land-based sand reservoirs, and waterflood in marine-basedGoM-Nsea soft sand, high-GOR oil, waterflood High Med-lowNsea medium sand, low- GOR oil, waterflood High Medium W.

  17. String Theory: Progress and Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2007-03-05

    String theory builds on the great legacy of Yukawa and Tomonaga: New degrees of freedom and control of the UV are two important themes. This talk will give an overview of some of the progress and some of the unsolved problems that characterize string theory today. It is divided into two parts: (1) Connecting String Theory to the Real World; (2) Gauge Theory/String Theory Duality. Two other major subjects, which I will omit, are Black Holes in String Theory and The Impact of String Theory on Mathematics.

  18. Elliptic flow from color strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Braun; C. Pajares

    2010-08-02

    It is shown that the elliptic flow can be successfully described in the color string picture with fusion and percolation provided anisotropy of particle emission from the fused string is taken into account. Two possible sources of this anisotropy are considered, propagation of the string in the transverse plane and quenching of produced particles in the strong color field of the string. Calculations show that the second source gives an overwhelming contribution to the flow at accessible energies.

  19. Twisted Skyrmion String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miftachul Hadi; Malcolm Anderson; Andri Husein

    2014-05-07

    We study nonlinear sigma model, especially Skyrme model without twist and Skyrme model with twist: twisted Skyrmion string. Twist term, $mkz$, is indicated in vortex solution. Necessary condition for stability of vortex solution has consequence that energy of vortex is minimum and scale-free (vortex solution is neutrally stable to changes in scale). We find numerically that the value of vortex minimum energy per unit length for twisted Skyrmion string is $20.37\\times 10^{60}~\\text{eV/m}$.

  20. Probing the String Landscape

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Keith Dienes

    2010-01-08

    We are currently in the throes of a potentially huge paradigm shift in physics. Motivated by recent developments in string theory and the discovery of the so-called "string landscape", physicists are beginning to question the uniqueness of fundamental theories of physics and the methods by which such theories might be understood and investigated. In this colloquium, I will give a non-technical introduction to the nature of this paradigm shift and how it developed. I will also discuss some of the questions to which it has led, and the nature of the controversies it has spawned.

  1. Current balancing for battery strings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, James H. (New Baltimore, MI)

    1985-01-01

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means for balancing the electrical current flow through a pluraliircuitbattery strings which are connected electrically in parallel. The magnetic circuit means is associated with the battery strings such that the conductors carrying the electrical current flow through each of the battery strings pass through the magnetic circuit means in directions which cause the electromagnetic fields of at least one predetermined pair of the conductors to oppose each other. In an alternative embodiment, a low voltage converter is associated with each of the battery strings for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings.

  2. Remarks on string solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loginov, E. K.

    2008-05-15

    We consider generalized self-duality equations for U(2r) Yang-Mills theory on R{sup 8} with quaternionic structure. We employ the extended ADHM method in eight dimensions to construct exact soliton solutions of the low-energy effective theory of the heterotic string.

  3. Update on String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2003-04-28

    The first part of this report gives a very quick sketch of how string theory concepts originated and evolved during its first 25 years (1968-93). The second part presents a somewhat more detailed discussion of the highlights of the past decade. The final part discusses some of the major problems that remain to be solved.

  4. Device for balancing parallel strings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashikian, Matthew S. (Storrs, CT)

    1985-01-01

    A battery plant is described which features magnetic circuit means in association with each of the battery strings in the battery plant for balancing the electrical current flow through the battery strings by equalizing the voltage across each of the battery strings. Each of the magnetic circuit means generally comprises means for sensing the electrical current flow through one of the battery strings, and a saturable reactor having a main winding connected electrically in series with the battery string, a bias winding connected to a source of alternating current and a control winding connected to a variable source of direct current controlled by the sensing means. Each of the battery strings is formed by a plurality of batteries connected electrically in series, and these battery strings are connected electrically in parallel across common bus conductors.

  5. It's The Fluids SEG Honorary Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information please visit: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil Gas TYPES of PORE FLUIDS Gas Mixtures ·DRILLING MUD ·PRODUCTION FLUIDS Miscible Injectants (CO2, Enriched Gas) #12;From Ivar = Porosity = Density sat = 0 (1- ) + f Density: #12;·WATER and BRINE (BRINE = H2O + Salt) ·HYDROCARBONS Oil

  6. Universitat Stuttgart -Institut fur Wasser-und Umweltsystemmodellierung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    and a Comparison of Different Model Approaches for Simulating the Displacement of Brine and Fracking Fluid

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF PEEK (POLYARYLETHERETHERKETONE) POLYMERS BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bluemel, Janet

    of high pressures and temperatures, while being exposed to steam, water based drilling fluids or brines

  8. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 7 (2012) 153167 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    2 satu- rated brine and supercritical CO2. Caprock is generally defined as a low to very low with CO2 charged brine. It is expected that supercritical CO2 will dissolve into the native brine.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc CO2­brine­caprock interaction: Reactivity experiments on Eau Claire shale and a review of relevant

  9. AN AGGREGATED VECTORIAL MODEL OF PETROLEUM FLOW IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, V. V.

    2011-01-01

    Income and Production Reporting System 9. Crude Oil, Natural Gas and Brine Analysis System Petroleum

  10. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  11. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  12. The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInturff, A.D.

    2011-01-01

    the Proceedings The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test A.D.AC03-76SFOOO98. The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test P.the Proceedings The SSC Full Cell Prototype String Test A.D.

  13. String Theory and Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan Iyer; Clifford V. Johnson; Jeffrey S. Pennington

    2010-02-05

    We uncover a remarkable role that an infinite hierarchy of non-linear differential equations plays in organizing and connecting certain {hat c}water wave hierarchy. We observe that there are several other string-like limits of the system, and conjecture that some of them are type IIA and IIB (A,D) minimal string backgrounds. We explain how these and several string-like special points arise and are connected. In some cases, the framework endows the theories with a non-perturbative definition for the first time. Notably, we discover that the Painleve IV equation plays a key role in organizing the string theory physics, joining its siblings, Painleve I and II, whose roles have previously been identified in this minimal string context.

  14. Summing Planar Bosonic Open Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardakci, Korkut

    2006-02-16

    In earlier work, planar graphs of massless {phi}{sup 3} theory were summed with the help of the light cone world sheet picture and the mean field approximation. In the present article, the same methods are applied to the problem of summing planar bosonic open strings. They find that in the ground state of the system, string boundaries form a condensate on the world sheet, and a new string emerges from this summation. Its slope is always greater than the initial slope, and it remains non-zero even when the initial slope is set equal to zero. If they assume the initial string tends to a field a theory in the zero slope limit, this result provides evidence for string formation in field theory.

  15. Strings, higher curvature corrections, and black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Mohaupt

    2005-12-05

    We review old and recent results on subleading contributions to black hole entropy in string theory.

  16. Emergence String and Mass Formulas of Hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2011-07-19

    Assume that hadrons are formed from the emergence string. Usual string should possess two moving states: oscillation and rotation, so we propose corresponding potential and the equation of the emergence string, whose energy spectrum is namely the GMO mass formula and its modified accurate mass formula. These are some relations between the string and observable experimental data.

  17. Radio bursts from superconducting strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-01-30

    We show that radio bursts from cusps on superconducting strings are linearly polarized, thus, providing a signature that can be used to distinguish them from astrophysical sources. We write the event rate of string-generated radio transients in terms of observational variables, namely, the event duration and flux. Assuming a canonical set of observational parameters, we find that the burst event rate can be quite reasonable, e.g., order ten a year for Grand Unified strings with 100 TeV currents, and a lack of observed radio bursts can potentially place strong constraints on particle physics models.

  18. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  19. Worldsheet Geometries of Ambitwistor String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kantaro Ohmori

    2015-06-12

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  20. Worldsheet Geometries of Ambitwistor String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohmori, Kantaro

    2015-01-01

    Mason and Skinner proposed the ambitwistor string theory which directly reproduces the formulas for the amplitudes of massless particles proposed by Cachazo, He and Yuan. In this paper we discuss geometries of the moduli space of worldsheets associated to the bosonic or the RNS ambitwistor string. Further, we investigate the factorization properties of the amplitudes when an internal momentum is near on-shell in the abstract CFT language. Along the way, we propose the existence of the ambitwistor strings with three or four fermionic worldsheet currents.

  1. M-strings, Elliptic Genera and N=4 String Amplitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hohenegger; Amer Iqbal

    2014-03-11

    We study mass-deformed N=2 gauge theories from various points of view. Their partition functions can be computed via three dual approaches: firstly, (p,q)-brane webs in type II string theory using Nekrasov's instanton calculus, secondly, the (refined) topological string using the topological vertex formalism and thirdly, M theory via the elliptic genus of certain M-strings configurations. We argue for a large class of theories that these approaches yield the same gauge theory partition function which we study in detail. To make their modular properties more tangible, we consider a fourth approach by connecting the partition function to the equivariant elliptic genus of R^4 through a (singular) theta-transform. This form appears naturally as a specific class of one-loop scattering amplitudes in type II string theory on T^2, which we calculate explicitly.

  2. Reheating Closed String Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Green

    2007-10-02

    Protecting the inflationary potential from quantum corrections typically requires symmetries that constrain the form of couplings of the inflaton to other sectors. We will explore how these restrictions affect reheating in models with UV completions. In particular, we look at how reheating occurs when inflation is governed by closed strings, using N-flation as an example. We find that coupling the inflaton preferentially to the Standard Model is difficult, and hidden sectors are typically reheated. Observational constraints are only met by a fraction of the models. In some working models, relativistic relics in the hidden sector provide dark matter candidates with masses that range from keV to PeV, with lighter masses being preferred.

  3. String Theory: The Early Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2000-07-26

    Lenny Susskind has made many important contributions to theoretical physics during the past 35 years. In this talk I will discuss the early history of string theory (1968-72) emphasizing Susskind's contributions.

  4. String Theory Origins of Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2000-11-09

    The string theory introduced in early 1971 by Ramond, Neveu, and myself has two-dimensional world-sheet supersymmetry. This theory, developed at about the same time that Golfand and Likhtman constructed the four-dimensional super-Poincar\\'e algebra, motivated Wess and Zumino to construct supersymmetric field theories in four dimensions. Gliozzi, Scherk, and Olive conjectured the spacetime supersymmetry of the string theory in 1976, a fact that was proved five years later by Green and myself.

  5. Results on exact solutions of low energy string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Garfinkle

    1992-10-31

    A family of solutions to low energy string theory is found. These solutions represent waves traveling along "extremal black strings"

  6. Acoustic data transmission through a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-04-21

    Acoustical signals are transmitted through a drill string by canceling upward moving acoustical noise and by preconditioning the data in recognition of the comb filter impedance characteristics of the drill string. 5 figs.

  7. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, R.; Hsu, S.; Vachaspati, T.; Watkins, R. |

    1992-11-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2){sub L} {times} SU(2) {sub R} {times} U(1){sub B-L} are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  8. Metastable cosmic strings in realistic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, R. . Dept. of Physics); Hsu, S. . Lyman Lab. of Physics); Vachaspati, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Watkins, R. Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL )

    1992-01-01

    The stability of the electroweak Z-string is investigated at high temperatures. The results show that, while finite temperature corrections can improve the stability of the Z-string, their effect is not strong enough to stabilize the Z-string in the standard electroweak model. Consequently, the Z-string will be unstable even under the conditions present during the electroweak phase transition. Phenomenologically viable models based on the gauge group SU(2)[sub L] [times] SU(2) [sub R] [times] U(1)[sub B-L] are then considered, and it is shown that metastable strings exist and are stable to small perturbations for a large region of the parameter space for these models. It is also shown that these strings are superconducting with bosonic charge carriers. The string superconductivity may be able to stabilize segments and loops against dynamical contraction. Possible implications of these strings for cosmology are discussed.

  9. Quadratic superconducting cosmic strings revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustapha Azreg-Aïnou

    2008-02-22

    It has been shown that 5-dimensional general relativity action extended by appropriate quadratic terms admits a singular superconducting cosmic string solution. We search for cosmic strings endowed with similar and extended physical properties by directly integrating the non-linear matrix field equations thus avoiding the perturbative approach by which we constructed the above-mentioned \\textsl{exact} solution. The most general superconducting cosmic string, subject to some constraints, will be derived and shown to be mathematically \\textsl{unique} up to linear coordinate transformations mixing its Killing vectors. The most general solution, however, is not globally equivalent to the old one due to the existence of Killing vectors with closed orbits.

  10. Closed/open string diagrammatics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-06-28

    May 3, 2006 ... In terms of open/closed theories beyond the topological level, many interesting results have ... The rough idea is that as the strings move and interact, they form the leaves .... center (or knowledge)” equations, hold for the c/o structure on ..... ponent, subject to the unique constraint that m1 + m2 + m3 is even.

  11. Scaling behavior of regularized bosonic strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Ambjorn; Yuri Makeenko

    2015-10-12

    We implement a proper-time UV regularisation of the Nambu-Goto string, introducing an independent metric tensor and the corresponding Lagrange multiplier, and treating them in the mean-field approximation justified for long strings and/or when the dimensions of space-time is large. We compute the regularised determinant of the 2d Laplacian for the closed string winding around a compact dimension, obtaining in this way the effective action, whose minimisation determines the energy of the string ground state in the mean-field approximation. We discuss the existence of two scaling limits when the cutoff is taken to infinity. One scaling limit reproduces the results obtained by the hypercubic regularisation of the Nambu-Goto string as well as by the use of the dynamical triangulation regularisation of the Polyakov string. The other scaling limit reproduces the results obtained by canonical quantisation of the Nambu-Goto string.

  12. Filter for a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); McPherson, James (Sandy, UT)

    2007-12-04

    A filter for a drill string comprises a perforated receptacle having an open end and a perforated end and first and second mounting surfaces are adjacent the open end. A transmission element is disposed within each of the first and second mounting surfaces. A capacitor may modify electrical characteristics of an LC circuit that comprises the transmission elements. The respective transmission elements are in communication with each other and with a transmission network integrated into the drill string. The transmission elements may be inductive couplers, direct electrical contacts, or optical couplers. In some embodiments of the present invention, the filter comprises an electronic component. The electronic component may be selected from the group consisting of a sensor, a router, a power source, a clock source, a repeater, and an amplifier.

  13. String theory and integrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissimov, Emil R; Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    1993-01-01

    This is mainly a brief review of some key achievements in a `hot'' area of theoretical and mathematical physics. The principal aim is to outline the basic structures underlying {\\em integrable} quantum field theory models with {\\em infinite-dimensional} symmetry groups which display a radically new type of {\\em quantum group} symmetries. Certain particular aspects are elaborated upon with some detail: integrable systems of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili type and their reductions appearing in matrix models of strings; Hamiltonian approach to Lie-Poisson symmetries; quantum field theory approach to two-dimensional relativistic integrable models with dynamically broken conformal invariance. All field-theoretic models in question are of primary relevance to diverse branches of physics ranging from nonlinear hydrodynamics to string theory of fundamental particle interactions at ultra-high energies.

  14. Eisenstein Series in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Obers; B. Pioline

    2000-03-01

    We discuss the relevance of Eisenstein series for representing certain G(Z)-invariant string theory amplitudes which receive corrections from BPS states only. The Eisenstein series are constructed using G(Z)-invariant mass formulae and are manifestly invariant modular functions on the symmetric space K\\G(R) of non-compact type, with K the maximal compact subgroup of G(R). In particular, we show how Eisenstein series of the T-duality group SO(d,d,Z) can be used to represent one- and g-loop amplitudes in compactified string theory. We also obtain their non-perturbative extensions in terms of the Eisenstein series of the U-duality group E_{d+1(d+1)}(Z).

  15. Nuclear Force from String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Hashimoto; Tadakatsu Sakai; Shigeki Sugimoto

    2010-03-09

    We compute nuclear force in a holographic model of QCD on the basis of a D4-D8 brane configuration in type IIA string theory. Repulsive core of nucleons is quite important in nuclear physics, but its origin has not been well-understood in strongly-coupled QCD. We find that string theory via gauge/string duality deduces this repulsive core at short distance between nucleons. Since baryons in the model are realized as solitons given by Yang-Mills instanton configuration on flavor D8-branes, ADHM construction of two instantons probes well the nucleon interaction at short scale, which provides the nuclear force quantitatively. We obtain, as well as a tensor force, a central force which is strongly repulsive as suggested in experiments and lattice results. In particular, the nucleon-nucleon potential V(r) (as a function of the distance) scales as 1/r^2, which is peculiar to the holographic model. We compare our results with one-boson exchange model using the nucleon-nucleon-meson coupling obtained in our previous paper (arXiv:0806.3122).

  16. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2011-01-01

    brines co-produced with crude oil (Zarrella et al. , 1967)brines co-produced with crude oil (Zarrella et al. , 1967)of Production Condensate Crude oil Crude oil Crude oil Crude

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel cycle and fuel materials (2) radioactive wastes (2) sensitivity (2) simulation (2) water (2) arsenic (1) bentonite (1) boom clay (1) brine leakage (1) brines (1) buffers (1)...

  18. From jcarcione@inogs.it Thu Nov 1 05:42:53 2012 Date: Thu, 01 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenes una idea? > Tambien hay disolucion de CO2 en brine, pero no de brine en CO2, > alli aparece la termodinamica. > Yo no tengo nada d eeso, no se aqui

  19. Active Humidity Control Through Gas-Fired Desiccant Humidity Pump 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosel, D.; Griffiths, W. C.

    1988-01-01

    to new or existing conventional air-conditioning system via a duct. It consists of a triple integrated heat-exchanger combining (liquid) desiccant dehumidification with indirect evaporative cooling, a brine interchanger, and a gas-fired brine heater...

  20. Characteristics and removal of filter cake formed by formate-based drilling mud 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alotaibi, Mohammed Badri

    2009-05-15

    and this makes the filter cake a strong permeability barrier. Various cleaning fluids were proposed to remove drilling mud filter cake; including: solid-free formate brine and formate brine doped with organic acids (acetic, formic, and citric acids), esters...

  1. Acoustic And Elastic Reverse-Time Migration: Novel Angle-Domain Imaging Conditions And Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Rui

    2013-01-01

    2. (a)- (c) are from shale/gas interfaces, (d)-(f) shale/oilm s ? V S ? m s ? ? kg m 3 Shale Gas Oil Brine ACQUISITIONare gas, oil and brine. The reflections from shale, which

  2. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-001-2015_NSealR User Guide Gen3...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the element It is understood that brine density and viscosity are functions of temperature and pressure, as well as a function of the salinity of the brine. The...

  3. Loop Gas Model for Open Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Kazakov; I. Kostov

    1992-05-18

    The open string with one-dimensional target space is formulated in terms of an SOS, or loop gas, model on a random surface. We solve an integral equation for the loop amplitude with Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions imposed on different pieces of its boundary. The result is used to calculate the mean values of order and disorder operators, to construct the string propagator and find its spectrum of excitations. The latter is not sensible neither to the string tension $\\L$ nor to the mass $\\mu$ of the ``quarks'' at the ends of the string. As in the case of closed strings, the SOS formulation allows to construct a Feynman diagram technique for the string interaction amplitudes.

  4. Gamma Ray Bursts from Ordinary Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. H. Brandenberger; A. T. Sornborger; M. Trodden

    1993-02-12

    We give an upper estimate for the number of gamma ray bursts from ordinary (non-superconducting) cosmic strings expected to be observed at terrestrial detectors. Assuming that cusp annihilation is the mechanism responsible for the bursts we consider strings arising at a GUT phase transition and compare our estimate with the recent BATSE results. Further we give a lower limit for the effective area of future detectors designed to detect the cosmic string induced flux of gamma ray bursts.

  5. $O(d,d)$-Covariant String Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gasperini; G. Veneziano

    1991-12-17

    The recently discovered $O(d,d)$ symmetry of the space of slowly varying cosmological string vacua in $d+1$ dimensions is shown to be preserved in the presence of bulk string matter. The existence of $O(d,d)$ conserved currents allows all the equations of string cosmology to be reduced to first-order differential equations. The perfect-fluid approximation is not $O(d,d)$-invariant, implying that stringy fluids possess in general a non-vanishing viscosity.

  6. Gauge Transformations in String Field Theory and canonical Transformation in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Maharana; S. mukherji

    1992-01-24

    We study how canonical transfomations in first quantized string theory can be understood as gauge transformations in string field theory. We establish this fact by working out some examples. As a by product, we could identify some of the fields appearing in string field theory with their counterparts in the $\\sigma$-model.

  7. EA-1482: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations, Frio Formation, Liberty County, Texas

  8. Diagnosis of "fizz-gas" and gas reservoirs in deep-water environment De-hua Han, X RPL, Houston Unversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume (%) Modulas(Mpa 0 6.9Mpa, 20C 34.5Mpa, 40C 69Mpa, 70C 103.5Mpa, 90C Oil Mixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000Mixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume

  9. Research and development of a 3 MW power plant from the design, development, and demonstration of a 100 KW power system utilizing the direct contact heat exchanger concept for geothermal brine recovery project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, A.W.; Wall, D.A.; Herlacher, T.L.

    1980-09-01

    The design phase for the 100 KW unit consumed the months of May through November 1978, with the final design selected as having a direct contact boiler and condenser, a single-stage radial inflow induction turbine-generator using isopentane as the working fluid, and a single cell ejector-type cooling tower. The unit was constructed on two, forty-foot flatbed trailers between the months of October 1978 and June 1979. Systems start-up testing, in-field modifications, unit operation, and performance testing were performed between July and December 1979. AP and L (Arkansas Power and Light) personnel assumed responsibility of the unit at that time and conducted further maintenance, operations, and testing through August 1980.

  10. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). Proceedings 31 thmodeling for geothermal systems: predicting carbonate andTHC) processes in geothermal systems is complicated by

  11. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    an initial reservoir fluid composition reflecting saturationfluid saturation with respect to calcite in the reservoir.

  12. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    on the properties of the Soultz fractured reservoir.Conference, March 17-18, 2005, Soultz-sous-Forêts, France.Chemical Modelling at the Soultz-sous-Forêts HDR reservoir (

  13. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    geothermal systems (EGS). Proceedings 31 th Workshop onenhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecast the long-termdeveloped to investigate EGS, were applied to model the same

  14. Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

    2006-01-01

    rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).the study of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) to forecastrate, porosity, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS), Soultz-

  15. CO2-H2O Mixtures in the Geological Sequestration of CO2. II. Partitioning in Chloride Brines at 12-100 °C and 1-600 bar.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractorEnergy, science, and7451 CleanPLASMAS,CO N c

  16. Year Project Title USGS contact(s) Published paper, data source,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _poster_Final.pdf Vulnerability assessment methods Energy Development, Williston Basin, Brine information Keywords 1 2003-present Delineation of brine contamination in and near the East Poplar oil field_poplar/index.html Project assesses brine contamination to the shallow aquifers and surface water. Energy Development

  17. Norm removal from frac water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silva, James Manio; Matis, Hope; Kostedt, IV, William Leonard

    2014-11-18

    A method for treating low barium frac water includes contacting a frac water stream with a radium selective complexing resin to produce a low radium stream, passing the low radium stream through a thermal brine concentrator to produce a concentrated brine; and passing the concentrated brine through a thermal crystallizer to yield road salt.

  18. American Mineralogist, Volume 90, pages 371381, 2005 0003-004X/05/0203371$05.00/DOI: 10.2138/am.2005.1599 371

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scales encountered in geothermal brine-handling systems are Fe and Al silicates (Manceau et al. 1995.2005.1599 371 INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy has been exploited for several decades as a renewable in geothermal brines commonly range from 0.5 to 20 wt%. When these brines are brought to the surface through

  19. LA-UR 09-03222 LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (III) Solubility in WIPP Brine: Data Summary and Recommendations M. Borkowski, J. F. Lucchini, M. K. Richmann and D. T. Reed #12;Actinide (III) Solubility in WIPP Brine: LCO-ACP-08, Revision 0 Data Summary 0 N/A N/A Original Release #12;Actinide (III) Solubility in WIPP Brine: LCO-ACP-08, Revision 0 Data

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis is given for calculating the composition of the aqueous vapor and the saline brine (hydrosaline liquid) present at run pressure and temperature in the experiment. The mixture of aqueous vapor and brine is homogenized upon quench. The method for calculating the concentration of HCl and NaCl in the coexisting aqueous vapor and brine is shown.

  1. Extraordinary vacuum black string solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2008-01-15

    In addition to the boosted static solution there are two other classes of stationary stringlike solutions of the vacuum Einstein equation in (4+1) dimensions. Each class is characterized by three parameters of mass, tension, and momentum flow along the fifth coordinate. We analyze the metric properties of one of the two classes, which was previously assumed to be naked singular, and show that the solution spectrum contains black string and wormhole in addition to the known naked singularity as the momentum flow to mass ratio increases. Interestingly, there does not exist new zero momentum solution in these cases.

  2. Quantization of Minimal Strings: a Mechanical Analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, Cesar; Montanez, Sergio; Resco, Pedro [Instituto de Fisica Teorica CSIC/UAM, C-XVI Universidad Autonoma, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-06-19

    Recent progress in the study of Liouville field theory opens the possibility to address some problems of quantum gravity using minimal strings as a theoretical laboratory. We present a procedure to embed the minimal string target space into the phase space of an associated mechanical system. By this map quantum effects on the target space correspond to quantum corrections on the mechanical model.

  3. Stability of AdS black strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Delsate

    2008-08-14

    We review the recent developements in the stability problem and phase diagram for asymptotically locally $AdS$ black strings. First, we quickly review the case of locally flat black string before turning to the case of locally $AdS$ spacetimes.

  4. Melt dumping in string stabilized ribbon growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanuel M. (42 Old Middlesex Rd., Belmont, MA 02178)

    1986-12-09

    A method and apparatus for stabilizing the edge positions of a ribbon drawn from a melt includes the use of wettable strings drawn in parallel up through the melt surface, the ribbon being grown between the strings. A furnace and various features of the crucible used therein permit continuous automatic growth of flat ribbons without close temperature control or the need for visual inspection.

  5. String Gas Cosmology and Non-Gaussianities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Chen; Yi Wang; Wei Xue; Robert Brandenberger

    2008-03-05

    Recently it has been shown that string gas cosmology, an alternative model of the very early universe which does not involve a period of cosmological inflation, can give rise to an almost scale invariant spectrum of metric perturbations. Here we calculate the non-Gaussianities of the spectrum of cosmological fluctuations in string gas cosmology, and find that these non-Gaussianities depend linearly on the wave number and that their amplitude depends sensitively on the string scale. If the string scale is at the TeV scale, string gas cosmology could lead to observable non-Gaussianities, if it is close to the Planck scale, then the non-Gaussianities on current cosmological scales are negligible.

  6. Electric Magnetic Duality in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashoke Sen

    1992-10-06

    The electric-magnetic duality transformation in four dimensional heterotic string theory discussed by Shapere, Trivedi and Wilczek is shown to be an exact symmetry of the equations of motion of low energy effective field theory even after including the scalar and the vector fields, arising due to compactification, in the effective field theory. Using this duality transformation we construct rotating black hole solutions in the effective field theory carrying both, electric and magnetic charges. The spectrum of extremal magnetically charged black holes turns out to be similar to that of electrically charged elementary string excitations. We also discuss the possibility that the duality symmetry is an exact symmetry of the full string theory under which electrically charged elementary string excitations get exchanged with magnetically charged soliton like solutions. This proposal might be made concrete following the suggestion of Dabholkar et. al. that fundamental strings may be regarded as soliton like classical solutions in the effective field theory.

  7. Wiggly cosmic strings accrete dark energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro F. Gonzalez-Diaz; Jose A. Jimenez Madrid

    2005-06-29

    This paper deals with a study of the cylindrically symmetric accretion of dark energy with equation of state $p=w\\rho$ onto wiggly straight cosmic strings. We have obtained that when $w>-1$ the linear energy density in the string core gradually increases tending to a finite maximum value as time increases for all considered dark energy models. On the regime where the dominant energy condition is violated all such models predict a steady decreasing of the linear energy density of the cosmic strings as phantom energy is being accreted. The final state of the string after such an accretion process is a wiggleless defect. It is argued however that if accreation of phantom energy would proceed by successive quantum steps then the defect would continue losing linear energy density until a minimum nonzero value which can be quite smaller than that corresponding to the unperturbed string.

  8. Turbulent strings in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Takaaki

    2015-01-01

    We study nonlinear dynamics of the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory using the AdS/CFT duality. In the gravity side, the flux tube is realized by a fundamental string whose endpoints are attached to the AdS boundary. We perturb the endpoints in various ways and numerically compute the time evolution of the nonlinearly oscillating string. As a result, cusps can form on the string, accompanied by weak turbulence and power law behavior in the energy spectrum. When cusps traveling on the string reach the boundary, we observe the divergence of the force between the quark and antiquark. Minimal amplitude of the perturbation below which cusps do not form is also investigated. No cusp formation is found when the string moves in all four AdS space directions, and in this case an inverse energy cascade follows a direct cascade.

  9. Turbulent strings in AdS/CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takaaki Ishii; Keiju Murata

    2015-06-25

    We study nonlinear dynamics of the flux tube between an external quark-antiquark pair in $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory using the AdS/CFT duality. In the gravity side, the flux tube is realized by a fundamental string whose endpoints are attached to the AdS boundary. We perturb the endpoints in various ways and numerically compute the time evolution of the nonlinearly oscillating string. As a result, cusps can form on the string, accompanied by weak turbulence and power law behavior in the energy spectrum. When cusps traveling on the string reach the boundary, we observe the divergence of the force between the quark and antiquark. Minimal amplitude of the perturbation below which cusps do not form is also investigated. No cusp formation is found when the string moves in all four AdS space directions, and in this case an inverse energy cascade follows a direct cascade.

  10. CLNS00/1710 STRING WEBS AND THE DECAY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLNS­00/1710 STRING WEBS AND THE DECAY OF SUPERSYMMETRIC PARTICLES PHILIP C. ARGYRES and K. NARAYAN is a generalization of the ``string web'' picture of these states found in string constructions of certain theories coincides with the ``string web'' picture of BPS states developed in the context of the D3­brane

  11. Excitation Fields in a Superconducting Global String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. R. Morris

    1995-09-28

    A model of a straight superconducting global cosmic string is examined in a setting wherein the string supports a charge/current pulse described by a travelling wave along the string. Linearized field equations are obtained for fluctuations of the scalar and vector fields of the theory, and a set of approximate particular solutions are found for the case in which the linear charge density and the current of the string have equal magnitudes. Although the equations of motion seem to suggest that the scalar and vector excitation fields are massive inside the string core, the particular solutions show that they behave as effectively massless fields which propagate at the speed of light along the string along with the primary charge/current pulse. The effect of the mass parameter is to modulate the radial profile of the excitation fields. The vector excitation field generates radial and angular components for both the electric and magnetic fields, but the particular solutions do not describe the emission or absorption of electromagnetic radiation from the string.

  12. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian [Lund University; Gustafson, Gösta [Lund University; Lönnblad, Leif [Lund University; Tarasov, Andrey [JLAB

    2015-03-01

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possible effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.

  13. Effects of overlapping strings in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bierlich, Christian; Gustafson, Gösta; Lönnblad, Leif; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-26

    In models for hadron collisions based on string hadronization, the strings are usually treated as independent, allowing no interaction between the confined colour fields. In studies of nucleus collisions it has been suggested that strings close in space can fuse to form "colour ropes." Such ropes are expected to give more strange particles and baryons, which also has been suggested as a signal for plasma formation. Overlapping strings can also be expected in pp collisions, where usually no phase transition is expected. In particular at the high LHC energies the expected density of strings is quite high. To investigate possiblemore »effects of rope formation, we present a model in which strings are allowed to combine into higher multiplets, giving rise to increased production of baryons and strangeness, or recombine into singlet structures and vanish. Also a crude model for strings recombining into junction structures is considered, again giving rise to increased baryon production. The models are implemented in the DIPSY MC event generator, using PYTHIA8 for hadronization, and comparison to pp minimum bias data, reveals improvement in the description of identified particle spectra.« less

  14. Strings and their compactification from the particle viewpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slansky, R.

    1986-01-01

    A series of four lectures is given which deals with the particle formulation of string theory. An introductory lecture is given on where the idea of strings comes from and what strings are. An introduction is given to simple Lie algebras and their representations. Compactified strings and the heterotic theories are discussed, showing how infinite-dimensional Kac-Moody affine algebras can be spectrum generating algebras in (open) string theories. The spectrum of excited states of the heterotic string is examined, and comments are made on representations of affine algebras. Some aspects are shown of the algebraic structure of compactified closed bosonic strings. (LEW)

  15. SU(4) pure-gauge string tensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigemi Ohta; Matthew Wingate

    1998-08-19

    In response to recently renewed interests in SU(N) pure-gauge dynamics with large N, both from M/string duality and from finite-temperature QCD phase structure, we calculate string tensions acting between the fundamental 4, diquark 6 and other color charges in SU(4) pure-gauge theory at temperatures below the deconfining phase change and above the bulk phase transition. Our results suggest 4 and 6 representations have different string tensions, with a ratio of about 1.3. We also found the deconfining phase change is not strong.

  16. Cosmological String Backgrounds from Gauged WZW Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Kounnas; D. Luest

    1992-05-18

    We discuss the four-dimensional target-space interpretation of bosonic strings based on gauged WZW models, in particular of those based on the non-compact coset space $SL(2,{\\bf R})\\times SO(1,1)^2 /SO(1,1)$. We show that these theories lead, apart from the recently broadly discussed black-hole type of backgrounds, to cosmological string backgrounds, such as an expanding Universe. Which of the two cases is realized depends on the sign of the level of the corresponding Kac-Moody algebra. We discuss various aspects of these new cosmological string backgrounds.

  17. Energy density bounds for black strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Tomizawa

    2005-06-07

    The conserved charge called Y-ADM mass density associated with asymptotically translational Killing-Yano tensor gives us an appropriate physical meaning about the energy density of $p$ brane spacetimes or black strings. We investigated the positivity of energy density in black string spacetimes, using the spinorial technique introduced by Witten. Recently, the positivity of Y-ADM mass density in p brane spacetimes was discussed. In this paper, we will extend this discussion to the transversely asymptotically flat black string spacetimes containing an apparent horizon. We will give the sufficient conditions for the Y-ADM mass density to become positive in such spacetimes.

  18. Charged rotating dilaton black strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dehghani, M.H.; Farhangkhah, N.

    2005-02-15

    In this paper we, first, present a class of charged rotating solutions in four-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity with zero and Liouville-type potentials. We find that these solutions can present a black hole/string with two regular horizons, an extreme black hole or a naked singularity provided the parameters of the solutions are chosen suitable. We also compute the conserved and thermodynamic quantities, and show that they satisfy the first law of thermodynamics. Second, we obtain the (n+1)-dimensional rotating solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity with Liouville-type potential. We find that these solutions can present black branes, naked singularities or spacetimes with cosmological horizon if one chooses the parameters of the solutions correctly. Again, we find that the thermodynamic quantities of these solutions satisfy the first law of thermodynamics.

  19. Landau-Ginzburg String Vacua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Klemm; R. Schimmrigk

    1992-04-20

    We investigate a class of (2,2) supersymmetric string vacua which may be represented as Landau--Ginzburg theories with a quasihomogeneous potential which has an isolated singularity at the origin. There are at least three thousand distinct models in this class. All vacua of this type lead to Euler numbers which lie in the range $-960 \\leq \\chi \\leq 960$. The Euler characteristics do not pair up completely hence the space of Landau--Ginzburg ground states is not mirror symmetric even though it exhibits a high degree of symmetry. We discuss in some detail the relation between Landau--Ginzburg models and Calabi--Yau manifolds and describe a subtlety regarding Landau--Ginzburg potentials with an arbitrary number of fields. We also show that the use of topological identities makes it possible to relate Landau-Ginzburg theories to types of Calabi-Yau manifolds for which the usual Landau-Ginzburg framework does not apply.

  20. Review on High energy String Scattering Amplitudes and Symmetries of String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jen-Chi

    2015-01-01

    We review high energy symmetries of string theory at both the fixed angle or Gross regime (GR) and the fixed momentum transfer or Regge regime (RR). We calculated in details high energy string scattering amplitudes at arbitrary mass levels for both regimes. We discovered infinite linear relations among fixed angle string amplitudes conjectured by Gross in 1988 from decoupling of high energy zero-norm states (ZNS), and infinite recurrence relations among Regge string amplitudes from Kummer function U and Appell function F. In the GR/RR regime, all high energy string amplitudes can be solved by these linear/recurrence relations so that all GR/RR string amplitudes can be expressed in terms of one single GR/RR string amplitude. In addition, we found an interesting link between string amplitudes of the two regimes, and discovered that at each mass level the ratios among fixed angle amplitudes can be extracted from Regge string scattering amplitudes. This result enables us to argue that the known SL(5,C) dynamical ...

  1. The pomeron in closed bosonic string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fazio, A. R.

    2010-12-22

    We compute the couplings of the pomeron to the first few mass levels of closed bosonic string states in flat space. We recognize the deviation from the linearity of the Regge trajectories in a five dimensional anti De Sitter background.

  2. Direct contact, binary fluid geothermal boiler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rapier, Pascal M. (Richmond, CA)

    1982-01-01

    Energy is extracted from geothermal brines by direct contact with a working fluid such as isobutane which is immiscible with the brine in a geothermal boiler. The geothermal boiler provides a distributor arrangement which efficiently contacts geothermal brine with the isobutane in order to prevent the entrainment of geothermal brine in the isobutane vapor which is directed to a turbine. Accordingly the problem of brine carry-over through the turbine causes corrosion and scaling thereof is eliminated. Additionally the heat exchanger includes straightening vanes for preventing startup and other temporary fluctuations in the transitional zone of the boiler from causing brine carryover into the turbine. Also a screen is provided in the heat exchanger to coalesce the working fluid and to assist in defining the location of the transitional zone where the geothermal brine and the isobutane are initially mixed.

  3. String Junctions and Holographic Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Chiodaroli; Michael Gutperle; Ling-Yan Hung; Darya Krym

    2010-11-22

    In this paper we study half-BPS type IIB supergravity solutions with multiple $AdS_3\\times S^3\\times M_4$ asymptotic regions, where $M_4$ is either $T^4$ or $K_3$. These solutions were first constructed in [1] and have geometries given by the warped product of $AdS_2 \\times S^2 \\times M_4 $ over $\\Sigma$, where $\\Sigma$ is a Riemann surface. We show that the holographic boundary has the structure of a star graph, i.e. $n$ half-lines joined at a point. The attractor mechanism and the relation of the solutions to junctions of self-dual strings in six-dimensional supergravity are discussed. The solutions of [1] are constructed introducing two meromorphic and two harmonic functions defined on $\\Sigma$. We focus our analysis on solutions corresponding to junctions of three different conformal field theories and show that the conditions for having a solution charged only under Ramond-Ramond three-form fields reduce to relations involving the positions of the poles and the residues of the relevant harmonic and meromorphic functions. The degeneration limit in which some of the poles collide is analyzed in detail. Finally, we calculate the holographic boundary entropy for a junction of three CFTs and obtain a simple expression in terms of poles and residues.

  4. Charged String-like Solutions of Low-energy Heterotic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Waldram

    1992-10-06

    Two string-like solutions to the equations of motion of the low-energy effective action for the heterotic string are found, each a source of electric and magnetic fields. The first carries an electric current equal to the electric charge per unit length and is the most general solution which preserves one half of the supersymmetries. The second is the most general charged solution with an event horizon, a `black string'. The relationship of the solutions to fundamental, macroscopic heterotic strings is discussed, and in particular it is shown that any stable state of such a fundamental string also preserves one half of the supersymmetries, in the same manner as the first solution.

  5. Low energy 2+1 string gravity; black hole solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Garcia Diaz; G. Gutierrez Cano

    2014-12-17

    In this report a detailed derivation of the dynamical equations for an n dimensional heterotic string theory of the Horowitz type is carried out in the string frame and in the Einstein frame too. In particular, the dynamical equations of the three dimensional string theory are explicitly given. The relation of the Horowitz Welch and Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is exhibited. The Chan Mann charged dilaton solution is derived and the subclass of string solutions field is explicitly identified. The stationary generalization, via SL(2;R) transformations, of the static (2+1) Horne Horowitz string black hole solution is given.

  6. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2015-07-01

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  7. String Theory and Math: Why This Marriage May Last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aganagic, Mina

    2015-01-01

    String theory is changing the relationship between mathematics and physics. The central role is played by the phenomenon of duality, which is intrinsic to quantum physics and abundant in string theory.

  8. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  9. On the solutions to the string equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Schwarz

    1991-09-10

    The set of solutions to the string equation $[P,Q]=1$ where $P$ and $Q$ are differential operators is described.It is shown that there exists one-to-one correspondence between this set and the set of pairs of commuting differential operators.This fact permits us to describe the set of solutions to the string equation in terms of moduli spa- ces of algebraic curves,however the direct description is much simpler. Some results are obtained for the superanalog to the string equation where $P$ and $Q$ are considered as superdifferential operators. It is proved that this equation is invariant with respect to Manin-Radul, Mulase-Rabin and Kac-van de Leur KP-hierarchies.

  10. DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING Sinan along the drill string to the surface. Normal drilling operations produce in-band acoustic noise at intensities comparable to the transducer output while lossy propagation through the drill string and surface

  11. The Early Years of String Theory: A Personal Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    2009-04-03

    This article surveys some of the highlights in the development of string theory through the first superstring revolution in 1984. The emphasis is on topics in which the author was involved, especially the observation that critical string theories provide consistent quantum theories of gravity and the proposal to use string theory to construct a unified theory of all fundamental particles and forces.

  12. Thermodynamic fluctuation in black string flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng Sun; Yong-Chang Huna

    2015-06-14

    It has long been noticed that Laudau-Lifshitz theory can be used to study the fluctuation of a system that contains a black hole. Since the black string can be constructed by extending n-dimensional black hole into one extra dimension. We study the fluctuation of black string flow with a Schwarzschlid-like metric in D=n+1 dimensional spacetime and a charged solution in D=5 dimensional spacetime and get the second moments of the fluctuation of the mass flux and charge flux.

  13. Thermodynamic fluctuation in black string flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng Sun; Yong-Chang Huang

    2015-05-11

    It has long been noticed that Laudau-Lifshitz theory can be used to study the fluctuation of a system that contains a black hole. Since the black string can be constructed by extending n-dimensional black hole into one extra dimension. We study the fluctuation of black string flow with a Schwarzschlid-like metric in D=n+1 dimensional spacetime and a charged solution in D=5 dimensional spacetime and get the second moments of the fluctuation of the mass flux and charge flux.

  14. de Sitter String Vacua from Kahler Uplifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Westphal

    2007-06-22

    We present a new way to construct de Sitter vacua in type IIB flux compactifications, in which the interplay of the leading perturbative and non-perturbative effects stabilize all moduli in dS vacua at parametrically large volume. Here, the closed string fluxes fix the dilaton and the complex structure moduli while the universal leading perturbative quantum correction to the Kahler potential together with non-perturbative effects stabilize the volume Kahler modulus in a dS_4-vacuum. Since the quantum correction is known exactly and can be kept parametrically small, this construction leads to calculable and explicitly realized de Sitter vacua of string theory with spontaneously broken supersymmetry.

  15. Diffractive Scattering and Gauge/String Duality

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tan, Chung-I [Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, United States

    2009-09-01

    High-energy diffractive scattering will be discussed based on Gauge/String duality. As shown by Brower, Polchinski, Strassler and Tan, the ubiquitous Pomeron emerges naturally in gauge theories with string-theoretical descriptions. Its existence is intimately tied to gluons, and also to the energy-momentum tensor. With a confining dual background metric, the Pomeron can be interpreted as a 'massive graviton'. In a single unified step, both its infrared and ultraviolet properties are dealt with, reflecting confinement and conformal symmetry respectively. An effective field theory for high-energy scattering can be constructed. Applications based on this approach will also be described.

  16. Closed strings from decaying D-branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Hong Liu; Juan Maldacena

    2007-02-05

    We compute the emission of closed string radiation from homogeneous rolling tachyons. For an unstable decaying D$p$-brane the radiated energy is infinite to leading order for $p\\leq 2$ and finite for $p>2$. The closed string state produced by a decaying brane is closely related to the state produced by D-instantons at a critical Euclidean distance from $t=0$. In the case of a D0 brane one can cutoff this divergence so that we get a finite energy final state which would be the state that the brane decays into.

  17. Cosmic strings: A problem or a solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, D.P.; Bouchet, F.R.

    1987-10-01

    The most fundamental issue in the theory of cosmic strings is addressed by means of Numerical Simulations: the existence of a scaling solution. The resolution of this question will determine whether cosmic strings can form the basis of an attractive theory of galaxy formation or prove to be a cosmological disaster like magnetic monopoles or domain walls. After a brief discussion of our numerical technique, results are presented which, though still preliminary, offer the best support to date of this scaling hypothesis. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Quantization of a string with attached mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lewis Licht

    2011-08-02

    A simple model of a relativistic open string with a point mass attached at one end is quantized. The normal modes are derived and used to construct expressions for the operator commutators. Light cone gauge is used to find the mass squared operator. The singular part of the operator product expansion is derived.

  19. Abelian-Higgs strings in Rastall gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugenio R. Bezerra de Mello; Julio C. Fabris; Betti Hartmann

    2015-04-02

    In this paper we analyze Abelian-Higgs strings in a phenomenological model that takes quantum effects in curved space-time into account. This model, first introduced by Rastall, cannot be derived from an action principle. We formulate phenomenological equations of motion under the guiding principle of minimal possible deformation of the standard equations. We construct string solutions that asymptote to a flat space-time with a deficit angle by solving the set of coupled non-linear ordinary differential equations numerically. Decreasing the Rastall parameter from its Einstein gravity value we find that the deficit angle of the space-time increases and becomes equal to $2\\pi$ at some critical value of this parameter that depends on the remaining couplings in the model. For smaller values the resulting solutions are supermassive string solutions possessing a singularity at a finite distance from the string core. Assuming the Higgs boson mass to be on the order of the gauge boson mass we find that also in Rastall gravity this happens only when the symmetry breaking scale is on the order of the Planck mass. We also observe that for specific values of the parameters in the model the energy per unit length becomes proportional to the winding number, i.e. the degree of the map $S^1 \\rightarrow S^1$. Unlike in the BPS limit in Einstein gravity, this is, however, not connect to an underlying mathematical structure, but rather constitutes a would-be-BPS bound.

  20. Evidence for Non-perturbative String Symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    1994-11-29

    String theory appears to admit a group of discrete field transformations -- called $S$ dualities -- as exact non-perturbative quantum symmetries. Mathematically, they are rather analogous to the better-known $T$ duality symmetries, which hold perturbatively. In this talk the evidence for $S$ duality is reviewed and some speculations are presented.

  1. The Self-Dual String Soliton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Howe; N. D. Lambert; P. C. West

    1997-09-09

    We obtain a BPS soliton of the M theory fivebrane's equations of motion representing a supersymmetric self-dual string. The resulting solution is then dimensionally reduced and used to obtain 0-brane and (p-2)-brane solitons on D-p-branes.

  2. An Alternative String Landscape Cosmology: Eliminating Bizarreness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clavelli, Louis J.

    An Alternative String Landscape Cosmology: Eliminating Bizarreness L. Clavelli and Gary R landscape models or whether there are scenarios in which it is avoided. If a viable alternative cosmology in mind that the alternative is not ruled out. In addition to being consistent with current observations

  3. Musical Acoustics Lab, C. Bertulani, 2012 PreLab 4 Standing Waves in a String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    ­ Standing Waves in a String Standing waves are set up in the strings of musical instruments when, a violin bow will excite a unique standing wave vibration of the string. The string's vibrations standing waves. Also standing waves only occur when the frequency of the vibration in the string allows

  4. Strings, vortex rings, and modes of instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gubser, Steven S.; Nayar, Revant; Parikh, Sarthak

    2015-03-01

    We treat string propagation and interaction in the presence of a background Neveu–Schwarz three-form field strength, suitable for describing vortex rings in a superfluid or low-viscosity normal fluid. A circular vortex ring exhibits instabilities which have been recognized for many years, but whose precise boundaries we determine for the first time analytically in the small core limit. Two circular vortices colliding head-on exhibit stronger instabilities which cause splitting into many small vortices at late times. We provide an approximate analytic treatment of these instabilities and show that the most unstable wavelength is parametrically larger than a dynamically generated length scalemore »which in many hydrodynamic systems is close to the cutoff. We also summarize how the string construction we discuss can be derived from the Gross–Pitaevskii Lagrangian, and also how it compares to the action for giant gravitons.« less

  5. Open string amplitudes of closed topological vertex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takasaki, Kanehisa

    2015-01-01

    The closed topological vertex is the simplest "off-strip" case of non-compact toric Calabi-Yau threefolds with acyclic web diagrams. By the diagrammatic method of topological vertex, open string amplitudes of topological string theory therein can be obtained by gluing a single topological vertex to an "on-strip" subdiagram of the tree-like web diagram. If non-trivial partitions are assigned to just two parallel external lines of the web diagram, the amplitudes can be calculated with the aid of techniques borrowed from the melting crystal models. These amplitudes are thereby expressed as matrix elements, modified by simple prefactors, of an operator product on the Fock space of 2D charged free fermions. This fermionic expression can be used to derive $q$-difference equations for generating functions of special subsets of the amplitudes. These $q$-difference equations may be interpreted as the defining equation of a quantum mirror curve.

  6. Open string amplitudes of closed topological vertex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanehisa Takasaki; Toshio Nakatsu

    2015-07-25

    The closed topological vertex is the simplest "off-strip" case of non-compact toric Calabi-Yau threefolds with acyclic web diagrams. By the diagrammatic method of topological vertex, open string amplitudes of topological string theory therein can be obtained by gluing a single topological vertex to an "on-strip" subdiagram of the tree-like web diagram. If non-trivial partitions are assigned to just two parallel external lines of the web diagram, the amplitudes can be calculated with the aid of techniques borrowed from the melting crystal models. These amplitudes are thereby expressed as matrix elements, modified by simple prefactors, of an operator product on the Fock space of 2D charged free fermions. This fermionic expression can be used to derive $q$-difference equations for generating functions of special subsets of the amplitudes. These $q$-difference equations may be interpreted as the defining equation of a quantum mirror curve.

  7. On Water, Steam and String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christof Schmidhuber

    1997-01-22

    This is a colloquium-style review lecture for physicists and non-physicists, as part of the requirements for ``Habilitation'' at the university of Bern: At a pressure of 220 atm. and a temperature of 374 Celsius there is a second-order phase transition between water and steam. Understanding it requires the concept of the renormalization group. Images from computer simulations of the lattice gas model (included) are used to explain its basic ideas. It is briefly reviewed how the renormalization group is used to compute critical coefficients for the water-steam phase transition, in good agreement with experiment. Applications in particle physics and string theory are mentioned. The appendix contains a sample of the author's results on renormalization group flows in theories with dynamical gravity and their relation to perturbative string theory: gravity modifies critical coefficients and phase diagrams, in agreement with numerical calculations, and leads to curious phenomena such as oscillating flows and quantum mechanical flows.

  8. Signal connection for a downhole tool string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Bradford, Kline; Fox, Joe; Briscoe, Michael

    2006-08-29

    A signal transmission connection for a tool string used in exploration and production of natural resources, namely: oil, gas, and geothermal energy resources. The connection comprises first and second annular elements deployed in cooperative association with each other. The respective elements comprise inductive transducers that are capable of two-way signal transmission between each other, with downhole components of the tool string, and with ground-level equipment. The respective inductive transducers comprise one or more conductive loops housed within ferrite troughs, or within ferrite trough segments. When energized, the conductive loops produce a magnetic field suitable for transmitting the signal. The second element may be rotational in drilling applications. The respective elements may be fitted with electronic equipment to aid and manipulate the transmission of the signal. The first element may also be in communication with the World Wide Web.

  9. Open string amplitudes of closed topological vertex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanehisa Takasaki; Toshio Nakatsu

    2015-11-20

    The closed topological vertex is the simplest ``off-strip'' case of non-compact toric Calabi-Yau threefolds with acyclic web diagrams. By the diagrammatic method of topological vertex, open string amplitudes of topological string theory therein can be obtained by gluing a single topological vertex to an ``on-strip'' subdiagram of the tree-like web diagram. If non-trivial partitions are assigned to just two parallel external lines of the web diagram, the amplitudes can be calculated with the aid of techniques borrowed from the melting crystal models. These amplitudes are thereby expressed as matrix elements, modified by simple prefactors, of an operator product on the Fock space of 2D charged free fermions. This fermionic expression can be used to derive $q$-difference equations for generating functions of special subsets of the amplitudes. These $q$-difference equations may be interpreted as the defining equation of a quantum mirror curve.

  10. Obstacle to populating the string theory landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Larfors, Magdalena

    2008-12-15

    We construct domain walls and instantons in a class of models with coupled scalar fields, determining, in agreement with previous studies, that many such solutions contain naked timelike singularities. Vacuum bubble solutions of this type do not contain a region of true vacuum, obstructing the ability of eternal inflation to populate other vacua. We determine a criterion that potentials must satisfy to avoid the existence of such singularities and show that many domain wall solutions in type IIB string theory are singular.

  11. Double Wick rotating Green-Schwarz strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleb Arutyunov; Stijn J. van Tongeren

    2015-05-05

    Via an appropriate field redefinition of the fermions, we find a set of conditions under which light cone gauge fixed world sheet theories of strings on two different backgrounds are related by a double Wick rotation. These conditions take the form of a set of transformation laws for the background fields, complementing a set of transformation laws for the metric and B field we found previously with a set for the dilaton and RR fields, and are compatible with the supergravity equations of motion. Our results prove that at least to second order in fermions, the AdS_5 x S^5 mirror model which plays an important role in the field of integrability in AdS/CFT, represents a string on `mirror AdS_5 x S^5', the background that follows from our transformations. We discuss analogous solutions for AdS_3 x S^3 x T^4 and AdS_2 x S^2 x T^6. The main ingredient in our derivation is the light cone gauge fixed action for a string on an (almost) completely generic background, which we explicitly derive to second order in fermions.

  12. String melting in a photon bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karouby, Johanna, E-mail: karoubyj@mit.edu [Center for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachussetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We compute the decay rate of a metastable cosmic string in contact with a thermal bath by finding the instanton solution. The new feature is that this decay rate is found in the context of non thermal scalar fields in contact with a thermal bath of photons. In general, to make topologically unstable strings stable, one can couple them to such a bath. The resulting plasma effect creates metastable configurations which can decay from the false vacuum to the true vacuum. In our specific set-up, the instanton computation is realized for the case of two out-of-equilibrium complex scalar fields: one is charged and coupled to the photon field, and the other is neutral. New effects coming from the thermal bath of photons make the radius of the nucleated bubble and most of the relevant physical quantities temperature-dependent. However, the temperature appears in a different way than in the purely thermal case, where all scalar fields are in thermal equilibrium. As a result of the tunneling, the core of the initial string melts while bubbles of true vacuum expand at the speed of light.

  13. Non-perturbative String Theory from Water Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan Iyer; Clifford V. Johnson; Jeffrey S. Pennington

    2010-11-29

    We use a combination of a 't Hooft limit and numerical methods to find non-perturbative solutions of exactly solvable string theories, showing that perturbative solutions in different asymptotic regimes are connected by smooth interpolating functions. Our earlier perturbative work showed that a large class of minimal string theories arise as special limits of a Painleve IV hierarchy of string equations that can be derived by a similarity reduction of the dispersive water wave hierarchy of differential equations. The hierarchy of string equations contains new perturbative solutions, some of which were conjectured to be the type IIA and IIB string theories coupled to (4,4k-2) superconformal minimal models of type (A,D). Our present paper shows that these new theories have smooth non-perturbative extensions. We also find evidence for putative new string theories that were not apparent in the perturbative analysis.

  14. Cosmic strings in hidden sectors: 2. Cosmological and astrophysical signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Andrew J.; Vachaspati, Tanmay, E-mail: andrewjlong@asu.edu, E-mail: tvachasp@asu.edu [Physics Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Cosmic strings can arise in hidden sector models with a spontaneously broken Abelian symmetry group. We have studied the couplings of the Standard Model fields to these so-called dark strings in the companion paper. Here we survey the cosmological and astrophysical observables that could be associated with the presence of dark strings in our universe with an emphasis on low-scale models, perhaps TeV . Specifically, we consider constraints from nucleosynthesis and CMB spectral distortions, and we calculate the predicted fluxes of diffuse gamma ray cascade photons and cosmic rays. For strings as light as TeV, we find that the predicted level of these signatures is well below the sensitivity of the current experiments, and therefore low scale cosmic strings in hidden sectors remain unconstrained. Heavier strings with a mass scale in the range 10{sup 13} GeV to 10{sup 15} GeV are at tension with nucleosynthesis constraints.

  15. Semiclassical strings in AdS(3) X S^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogeun Gwak; Bum-Hoon Lee; Kamal L. Panigrahi; Chanyong Park

    2009-01-30

    In this paper, we investigate the semiclassical strings in AdS(3)XS^2, in which the string configuration of AdS(3) is classified to three cases depending on the parameters. Each of these has a different anomalous dimension proportional to logS, S^(1/3) and S, where S is a angular momentum on AdS(3). Further we generalize the dispersion relations for various string configuration on AdS(3)XS^2.

  16. Gravitational Collapse of Null Radiation and a String fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K S Govinder; M Govender

    2003-04-03

    We consider the end state of collapsing null radiation with a string fluid. It is shown that, if diffusive transport is assumed for the string, that a naked singularity can form (at least locally). The model has the advantage of not being asymptotically flat. We also analyse the case of a radiation-string two-fluid and show that a locally naked singularity can result in the collapse of such matter. We contrast this model with that of strange quark matter.

  17. Open String Theory in 1+1 Dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bershadsky; D. Kutasov

    1991-10-14

    We show that tree level open two dimensional string theory is exactly solvable; the solution exhibits some unusual features, and is qualitatively different from the closed case. The open string ``tachyon'' S -- matrix describes free fermions, which can be interpreted as the quarks at the ends of the string. These ``quarks'' live naturally on a lattice in space-time. We also find an exact vacuum solution of the theory, corresponding to a charged black hole.

  18. A casing string model for the personal computer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuniga-Pflucker, Manuel Pablo

    1988-01-01

    is often inaccurate - too conservative for shallow strings, too liberal for deep strings. Most wells, probably 90 percent of them, are designed . using uniaxial and biaxial techniques that rely heavily on safety factors to ensure adequate designs. While... uniaxial or biaxial conditions rather than triaxial and the uncertainty of the assumed worst conditions, conventional casing design relies heavily on safety factors to ensure an adequate design. When designing or analyzing a casing string...

  19. Strings in Background Electric Field, Space/Time Noncommutativity and A New Noncritical String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Seiberg; L. Susskind; N. Toumbas

    2000-05-04

    Searching for space/time noncommutativity we reconsider open strings in a constant background electric field. The main difference between this situation and its magnetic counterpart is that here there is a critical electric field beyond which the theory does not make sense. We show that this critical field prevents us from finding a limit in which the theory becomes a field theory on a noncommutative spacetime. However, an appropriate limit toward the critical field leads to a novel noncritical string theory on a noncommutative spacetime.

  20. Making Ends Meet: String Unification and Low-Energy Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith R. Dienes; Alon E. Faraggi

    1995-10-04

    A long-standing problem in string phenomenology has been the fact that the string unification scale disagrees with the GUT scale obtained by extrapolating low-energy data within the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). In this paper we examine several effects that may modify the minimal string predictions and thereby bring string-scale unification into agreement with low-energy data. These include heavy string threshold corrections, non-standard hypercharge normalizations, light SUSY thresholds, intermediate gauge structure, and thresholds arising from extra matter beyond the MSSM. We explicitly evaluate these contributions within a variety of realistic free-fermionic string models, including the flipped SU(5), SO(6) x SO(4), and various SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) models, and find that most of these sources do not substantially alter the minimal string predictions. Indeed, we find that the only way to reconcile string unification with low-energy data is through certain types of extra matter. Remarkably, however, many of the realistic string models contain precisely this required matter in their low-energy spectra.

  1. The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephon Alexander

    2007-02-27

    I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

  2. The Hubble Web: The Dark Matter Problem and Cosmic Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, Stephon

    2009-07-06

    I propose a reinterpretation of cosmic dark matter in which a rigid network of cosmic strings formed at the end of inflation. The cosmic strings fulfill three functions: At recombination they provide an accretion mechanism for virializing baryonic and warm dark matter into disks. These cosmic strings survive as configurations which thread spiral and elliptical galaxies leading to the observed flatness of rotation curves and the Tully-Fisher relation. We find a relationship between the rotational velocity of the galaxy and the string tension and discuss the testability of this model.

  3. String Loop Corrections to Stable Non-BPS Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2000-10-31

    We calculate the string loop corrections to the tachyon potential for stable non-BPS Dp-branes on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. We find a non-trivial phase structure and we show that, after tachyon condensation, the non-BPS Dp-branes are attracted to each other for p=0,1,2. We then identify the corresponding closed string boundary states together with the massless long range fields they excite. For p=3,4 the string loop correction diverge. We identify the massless closed string fields responsible for these divergencies and regularise the partition function using a Fischler-Susskind mechanism.

  4. From Decay to Complete Breaking: Pulling the Strings in SU(2) Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2009-05-15

    We study (2Q+1) strings connecting two static charges Q in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. While the fundamental (2) string between two charges Q=(1/2) is unbreakable, the adjoint (3) string connecting two charges Q=1 can break. When a (4) string is stretched beyond a critical length, it decays into a (2) string by gluon pair creation. When a (5) string is stretched, it first decays into a (3) string, which eventually breaks completely. The energy of the screened charges at the ends of a string is well described by a phenomenological constituent gluon model.

  5. CMB ISW-lensing bispectrum from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp

    2014-02-01

    We study the effect of weak lensing by cosmic (super-)strings on the higher-order statistics of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). A cosmic string segment is expected to cause weak lensing as well as an integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the so-called Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins (GKS) effect, to the CMB temperature fluctuation, which are thus naturally cross-correlated. We point out that, in the presence of such a correlation, yet another kind of the post-recombination CMB temperature bispectra, the ISW-lensing bispectra, will arise in the form of products of the auto- and cross-power spectra. We first present an analytic method to calculate the autocorrelation of the temperature fluctuations induced by the strings, and the cross-correlation between the temperature fluctuation and the lensing potential both due to the string network. In our formulation, the evolution of the string network is assumed to be characterized by the simple analytic model, the velocity-dependent one scale model, and the intercommutation probability is properly incorporated in order to characterize the possible superstringy nature. Furthermore, the obtained power spectra are dominated by the Poisson-distributed string segments, whose correlations are assumed to satisfy the simple relations. We then estimate the signal-to-noise ratios of the string-induced ISW-lensing bispectra and discuss the detectability of such CMB signals from the cosmic string network. It is found that in the case of the smaller string tension, G? << 10{sup -7}, the ISW-lensing bispectrum induced by a cosmic string network can constrain the string-model parameters even more tightly than the purely GKS-induced bispectrum in the ongoing and future CMB observations on small scales.

  6. Mesons: Relativistic Bound States with String Tension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anishetty, R; Anishetty, Ramesh; Kudtarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2003-01-01

    A systematic method of analysing Bethe-Salpeter equation using spectral representation for the relativistic bound state wave function is given. This has been explicitly applied in the context of perturbative QCD with string tension in the $1 \\over N$ expansion. We show that there are only a few stable bound state mesons due to the small "threshold mass"(constituent mass) of quarks. The asymptotic properties of the bound states are analytically analysed. The spectrum is derived analytically and compared phenomenologically. Chiral symmetry breaking and PCAC results are demonstrated. We make a simple minded observation to determine the size of the bound states as a function of the energy of the boundstate.

  7. Higher-Spin Geometry and String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Francia; A. Sagnotti

    2006-02-14

    The theory of freely-propagating massless higher spins is usually formulated via gauge fields and parameters subject to trace constraints. We summarize a proposal allowing to forego them by introducing only a pair of additional fields in the Lagrangians. In this setting, external currents satisfy usual Noether-like conservation laws, the field equations can be nicely related to those emerging from Open String Field Theory in the low-tension limit, and if the additional fields are eliminated without reintroducing the constraints a geometric, non-local description of the theory manifests itself.

  8. Comment about UV regularization of basic commutators in string theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Kamenshchik; I. M. Khalatnikov; M. Martellini

    1998-06-24

    Recently proposed by Hwang, Marnelius and Saltsidis zeta regularization of basic commutators in string theories is generalized to the string models with non-trivial vacuums. It is shown that implementation of this regularization implies the cancellation of dangerous terms in the commutators between Virasoro generators, which break Jacobi identity.

  9. Computational Modeling of Chord Fingering for String Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radicioni, Daniele

    Computational Modeling of Chord Fingering for String Instruments Daniele P. Radicioni (radicion for the fingering process with string instruments, based on a constraint satisfaction approach. The model is imple-mechanical aspects of the performer's hand in its interaction with the musical instrument. Introduction Music

  10. PhD Thesis: String theory in the early universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhiannon Gwyn

    2009-11-14

    The intersection of string theory with cosmology is unavoidable in the early universe, and its exploration may shine light on both fields. In this thesis, three papers at this intersection are presented and reviewed, with the aim of providing a thorough and pedagogical guide to their results. First, we address the longstanding problem of finding a string theory realisation of the axion. Using warped compactifications in heterotic string theory, we show that the axion decay constant can be lowered to acceptable values by the warp factor. Next, we move to the subject of cosmic strings, whose network evolution could have important consequences for astrophysics and cosmology. In particular, there are quantitative differences between cosmic superstring networks and GUT cosmic string networks. We investigate the properties of cosmic superstring networks in warped backgrounds, giving the tension and properties of three-string junctions in these backgrounds. Finally, we examine the possibility that cosmic strings in heterotic string theory could be responsible for generating the galactic magnetic fields that seeded those observed today.

  11. RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS: EXTENDED ABSTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    of this paper is to make propaganda for the use of renewal theory to study e.g. Markov models, even if we doRENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS: EXTENDED ABSTRACT SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We give a survey of a number of simple applications of renewal theory to problems on random strings, in particular

  12. Dynamics of a self-gravitating thin cosmic string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau; C. Charmousis; B. Linet

    1997-02-06

    We assume that a self-gravitating thin string can be locally described by what we shall call a smoothed cone. If we impose a specific constraint on the model of the string, then its central line obeys the Nambu-Goto equations. If no constraint is added, then the worldsheet of the central line is a totally geodesic surface.

  13. Character String Predicate Based Automatic Software Test Data Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyu, Michael R.

    Character String Predicate Based Automatic Software Test Data Generation Ruilian Zhao Computer is an important element in programming. A problem that needs further research is how to automatically generate generation of program paths including character string predicates, and the effectiveness of this approach

  14. SCHWARTZ TENNIS CENTER DAMPENERS, GRIPS, STRING, TENNIS BALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    SCHWARTZ TENNIS CENTER DAMPENERS, GRIPS, STRING, TENNIS BALLS STRINGING:(We attempt to have all, Durability $34.00 Luxilon Big Banger Rough, Spin, Control, Durability $34.00 Prince Lightning, 16 g: $5.00 Wilson Pro Feel Plus Dampener: $4.00 TENNIS BALLS: Wilson US Open Tennis Balls: $3.25 SPECIAL

  15. Quantum Fusion of Strings (Flux Tubes) and Domain Walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-05-20

    We consider formation of composite strings and domain walls as a result of fusion of two elementary objects (elementary strings in the first case and elementary walls in the second) located at a distance from each other. The tension of the composite object T_2 is assumed to be less than twice the tension of the elementary object T_1, so that bound states are possible. If in the initial state the distance d between the fusing strings or walls is much larger than their thickness and satisfies the conditions T_1 d^2 >> 1 (in the string case) and T_1 d^3 >> 1 (in the wall case), the problem can be fully solved quasiclassically. The fusion probability is determined by the first, "under the barrier" stage of the process. We find the bounce configuration and its extremal action S_B. In the wall problem e^{-S_B} gives the fusion probability per unit time per unit area. In the string case, due to a logarithmic infrared divergence, the problem is well formulated only for finite-length strings. The fusion probability per unit time can be found in the limit in which the string length is much larger than the distance between two merging strings.

  16. RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS: EXTENDED ABSTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    RENEWAL THEORY IN ANALYSIS OF TRIES AND STRINGS: EXTENDED ABSTRACT SVANTE JANSON Abstract. We give a survey of a number of simple applications of renewal theory to problems on random strings, in particular to tries and Khodak and Tunstall codes. 1. Introduction Although it long has been realized that renewal

  17. The M Theory Five-Brane and the Heterotic String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz

    1997-05-13

    Brane actions with chiral bosons present special challenges. Recent progress in the description of the two main examples -- the M theory five-brane and the heterotic string -- is described. Also, double dimensional reduction of the M theory five-brane on K3 is shown to give the heterotic string.

  18. Peculiarities in the energy transfer by waves on strained strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    Peculiarities in the energy transfer by waves on strained strings Eugene I. Butikov St. Petersburg of elastic potential energy associated with waves in a stretched string is discussed. The influence of nonlinear coupling between transverse and longitudinal waves on the density of energy is investigated

  19. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  20. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  1. ONE-DIRECTED INDECOMPOSABLE PURE INJECTIVE MODULES OVER STRING ALGEBRAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prest, Mike

    ONE-DIRECTED INDECOMPOSABLE PURE INJECTIVE MODULES OVER STRING ALGEBRAS MIKE PREST (MANCHESTER) AND GENA PUNINSKI (LIMA) Abstract. We classify one-directed indecomposable pure injective modules over #12. In this paper we classify one-directed indecomposable pure injective modules over a string algebra A. We prove

  2. String stabilized ribbon growth a method for seeding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachs, Emanuel M. (39 Harding Ave., Belmont, MA 02178)

    1987-08-25

    This invention is a method of initiating or seeding the growth of a crystalline or polycrystalline ribbon by the String Stabilized Ribbon Growth Method. The method for seeding the crystal growth comprises contacting a melt surface with a seed and two strings used in edge stabilization. The wetted strings attach to the wetted seed as a result of the freezing of the liquid melt. Upon drawing the seed, which is attached to the strings, away from the melt surface a melt liquid meniscus, a seed junction, and a growth interface forms. Further pulling of the attached seed causes a crystal ribbon to grow at the growth interface. The boundaries of the growing ribbon are: at the top the seed junction, at the bottom the freezing boundary of the melt liquid meniscus, and at the edges frozen-in strings.

  3. Tachyon condensation in boundary string field theory at one loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Bardakci; A. Konechny

    2001-08-21

    We compute the one-loop partition function for quadratic tachyon background in open string theory. Both closed and open string representations are developed. Using these representations we study the one-loop divergences in the partition function in the presence of the tachyon background. The divergences due to the open and closed string tachyons are treated by analytic continuation in the tachyon mass squared. We pay particular attention to the imaginary part of the analytically continued expressions. The last one gives the decay rate of the unstable vacuum. The dilaton tadpole is also given some partial consideration. The partition function is further used to study corrections to tachyon condensation processes describing brane descent relations. Assuming the boundary string field theory prescription for construction of the string field action via partition function holds at one loop level we study the one-loop corrections to the tachyon potential and to the tensions of lower-dimensional branes.

  4. Deriving Veneziano Model in a Novel String Field Theory Solving String Theory by Liberating Right and Left Movers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger B. Nielsen; Masao Ninomiya

    2015-03-10

    Bosonic string theory with the possibility for an arbitrary number of strings - i.e. a string ?eld theory - is formulated by a Hilbert space (a Fock space), which is just that for massless noninteracting scalars. We earlier presented this novel type of string ?eld theory, but now we show that it leads to scattering just given by the Veneziano model amplitude. Generalization to strings with fermion modes would presumably be rather easy. It is characteristic for our formulation /model that: 1) We have thrown away some null set of information compared to usual string ?eld theory, 2)Formulated in terms of our \\objects" (= the non-interacting scalars) there is no interaction and essentially no time development(Heisenberg picture), 3) so that the S-matrix is in our Hilbert space given as the unit matrix, S=1, and 4) the Veneziano scattering amplitude appear as the overlap between the initial and the ?nal state described in terms of the \\objects". 5) The integration in the Euler beta function making up the Veneziano model appear from the summation over the number of \\objects" from one of the incoming strings which goes into a certain one of the two outgoing strings. A correction from Weyl anomaly is needed to get the correct form of the Veneziano amplitude and it only fits for 26 dimensions.

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) flotation (2) performance (2) reservoir rock (2) salinity (2) water (2) api gravity (1) aqueous solutions (1) brines (1) carbonate rocks (1) chemistry (1) computerized...

  6. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Brine Migration Modeling Performed by LANL, LBNL and SNL for the Used Fuel Disposition Program Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal...

  7. Li and Mn uptake data from initial set of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-03-27

    Batch tests of crosslinked lithium and manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C .

  8. External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been...

  9. High Recovery Desalination of Brackish Water by Chemically-Enhanced Seeded Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCool, Brian Carey

    2012-01-01

    for quality water supply and waste water disposal.disposal. Management of agricultural drainage water quality,brine disposal) at the optimal recovery a . AD Water Quality

  10. Investigations of Dual-Purpose Canister Direct Disposal Feasibility...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    water containing a range of neutron absorbing elements, at different concentrations. Salt brines may ensure subcriticality for all DPCs. Criticality analyses are presented for...

  11. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF AQUEOUS NaCl SOLUTIONS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and uti1 ization of geothermal energy, petroleum recovery, desalination of sea water, and other energy systems involving water containing dissolved salts. brines contain a...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) transport (2) - environmental sciences (1) basalt (1) brines (1) carbon 14 (1) contamination (1) contraction (1) corrosion (1) diffusion (1) distribution (1) drainage (1) dust...

  13. Scale-up characteristics of salinity gradient power technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feinberg, Benjamin Jacob

    2014-01-01

    dilution desalination and established seawater desalinationfor low energy seawater desalination and brine management,economics of RO seawater desalination, Desalination, 105 (

  14. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TX; Trimeric Corporation: Champaign, IL and Buda, TX. FESCCStorage Division Bruce Brown Brine Extraction and Treatment Strategies to Enhance Pressure Management... Project...

  15. Lithium uptake data of lithium imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-12-04

    Batch tests of lithium imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium from synthetic brines at T=45C. Initial selectivity data are included

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (2) performance (2) reservoir rock (2) salinity (2) water (2) aqueous solutions (1) bacteria (1) bioremediation (1) brines (1) buffers (1) carbon sources (1) carbonate rocks (1)...

  17. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer Version Bacon Diana H carbon...

  18. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1 Citation Details...

  19. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1","Bacon, Diana...

  20. Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Passive injection: A strategy for mitigating reservoir pressurization, induced seismicity and brine migration in geologic CO2 storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  1. EARTH SCIENCES DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    fluids. In the binary system, geothermal brine is used tocorrosion control in geothermal systems; and development ofand testing of geothermal systems and components is under

  2. Desert Symposium 2014 Information/Call for Papers/Registration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    brine playa and salt extraction facilities. Discuss drill core records of past Fault (Durmid Hills, Salt Creek and Bertram Siding). Examine

  3. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the useable water. Potential pathways for this increase could be the result of drilling oil and gas wells, or brine migration through fractures from the Rustler, Salado,...

  4. NORM Mitigation and Clean Water Recovery from Marcellus Produced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD process. Every effect is an opportunity to recycle latent heat; higher pressure vapor condenses and cooler brine evaporates to generate lower pressure vapor. The...

  5. High Recovery Desalination of Brackish Water by Chemically-Enhanced Seeded Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCool, Brian Carey

    2012-01-01

    water management: (1) direct disposal (no desalination), (2)recovery (62% for RO). Direct disposal of AD brackish watervarious methods for direct brine disposal such as thermal

  6. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 RTI International Rsrch Triangle Park,NC FESCCCrosscutting Research Div Jessica Mullen Low-Energy Water Recovery from Subsurface Brines The goal is to develop and demonstrate...

  7. Effects of uncertainty in rock-physics models on reservoir parameter estimation using marine seismic AVA and CSEM data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong; Dickens, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    random functions of reservoir water saturation and porosity,models We relate reservoir water saturation S w and porosityexponent Saturation exponent Reservoir brine resistivity (W-

  8. Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor Lift...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lift Accident in the West Hackberry Brine Tank-14 Resulting in Injury, Strategic Petroleum Reserve West Hackberry, LA Accident Investigation of the February 7, 2013, Scissor...

  9. Request for Information explores mineral recovery from geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-temp geothermal technologies are meeting a growing demand for strategic materials in clean manufacturing. Here, lithium is extracted from geothermal brines in California....

  10. California: Geothermal Plant to Help Meet High Lithium Demand...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geothermal technologies are meeting a growing demand for strategic materials in clean manufacturing. Here, lithium is extracted from geothermal brines in California....

  11. Nevada manufacturer installing geothermal power plant | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from brine, a salty solution from within the earth. | Photo courtesy Chemetall Chemetall extracts lithium carbonate, a powder, from...

  12. Sandia Energy - Joint Sandia/University of Texas-Austin Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of CO2 for GCS. Molecular-dynamics simulations provide insight on relative wetting of supercritical CO2 and brine hydrophilic and hydrophobic basal surfaces of kaolinite....

  13. Li and Mn uptake data from initial set of imprinted polymers

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Susanna Ventura

    Batch tests of crosslinked lithium and manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C .

  14. An Integrated Experimental and Numerical Study: Developing a...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Variations in CO2BrineRock Systems Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2...

  15. Parallel Dynamic Programming for Solving the String Editing Problem on a CGM/BSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehene, Frank

    Parallel Dynamic Programming for Solving the String Editing Problem on a CGM/BSP C. E. R. Alves present a coarse-grained parallel algorithm for solving the string edit distance problem for a string A and all substrings of a string C. Our method is based on a novel CGM/BSP parallel dynamic programming

  16. Harmonic coordinates in the string and membrane equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Lei He; Shou-Jun Huang

    2010-04-16

    In this note, we first show that the solutions to Cauchy problems for two versions of relativistic string and membrane equations are diffeomorphic. Then we investigate the coordinates transformation presented in Ref. [9] (see (2.20) in Ref. [9]) which plays an important role in the study on the dynamics of the motion of string in Minkowski space. This kind of transformed coordinates are harmonic coordinates, and the nonlinear relativistic string equations can be straightforwardly simplified into linear wave equations under this transformation.

  17. Dynamics of a global string with large Higgs boson mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Charmousis; B. Boisseau; B. Linet

    1998-01-12

    We consider a self-gravitating string generated by a global vortex solution in general relativity. We investigate the Einstein and field equations of a global vortex in the region of its central line and at a distance from the centre of the order of the inverse of its Higgs boson mass. By combining the two we establish by a limiting process of large Higgs mass the dynamics of a self-gravitating global string. Under our assumptions the presence of gravitation restricts the world sheet of the global string to be totally geodesic.

  18. A note on string size evolution in phantom cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soon-Tae Hong

    2015-04-05

    We analyze evolution of string size in higher-dimensional cosmology with phantom field. Assuming that the Universe possesses the phantom field defined in a ten-dimensional spacetime, we predict string size which is claimed to be that of photon in nature at present. The Universe size increases as in the standard inflationary Universe model while the photon size decreases drastically at the early stage of the string evolution after the Big Bang. Moreover, the photon spin in the phantom Universe is analyzed in the framework of the stringy cosmology.

  19. Lovelock black hole thermodynamics in a string cloud model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Hun; Maharaj, Sunil D; Baboolal, Dharmanand

    2015-01-01

    The Lovelock theory is an extension of general relativity to higher dimensions. We study the Lovelock black hole for a string cloud model in arbitrary dimensional spacetime, and in turn also analyze its thermodynamical properties. Indeed, we compute the mass, temperature and entropy of the black hole and also perform a thermodynamical stability analysis. The phase structure suggests that the Hawking-Page phase transition is achievable. It turns out that the presence of the Lovelock terms and/or background string cloud completely changes the black hole thermodynamics. Interestingly, the entropy of a black hole is unaffected due to a background string cloud, but has a correction term due to Lovelock gravity.

  20. First Structure Formation: II. Cosmic String + Hot Dark Matter Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Albert Stebbins; Peter Anninos; Michael L. Norman

    1997-06-26

    We examine the structure of baryonic wakes in the cosmological fluid which would form behind GUT-scale cosmic strings at early times (redshifts z > 100) in a neutrino-dominated universe. We show, using simple analytical arguments as well as 1- and 2-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations, that these wakes will NOT be able to form interesting cosmological objects before the neutrino component collapses. The width of the baryonic wakes (< 10 kpc comoving) is smaller than the scale of wiggles on the strings and are probably not enhanced by the wiggliness of the string network.

  1. Width of the Confining String in Yang-Mills Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gliozzi, F.; Pepe, M.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  2. Modified Dispersion Relations from Closed Strings in Toroidal Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mar Bastero-Gil; Paul H. Frampton; Laura Mersini

    2002-02-13

    A long-standing problem of theoretical physics is the exceptionally small value of the cosmological constant $\\Lambda \\sim 10^{-120}$ measured in natural Planckian units. Here we derive this tiny number from a toroidal string cosmology based on closed strings. In this picture the dark energy arises from the correlation between momentum and winding modes that for short distances has an exponential fall-off with increasing values of the momenta.The freeze-out by the expansion of the background universe for these transplanckian modes may be interpreted as a frozen condensate of the closed-string modes in the three non-compactified spatial dimensions.

  3. Dark Energy Generated by Warped Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinoud Jan Slagter

    2014-07-29

    If we live on the weak brane in a warped 5D bulk spacetime, gravitational waves and brane fluctuations can be generated by a part of the 5D Weyl tensor and carries information of the gravitational field outside the brane. We consider the U(1) self-gravitating scalar-gauge field on the warped spacetime without bulk matter. It turns out that "branons" can be formed dynamically, due to the modified energy-momentum tensor components of the cosmic string. It turns out that the parameter $\\alpha$, i.e., the gauge-to-scalar mass, changes from a value $>1$ to a value $wave energy. It is the time-dependent part of the warp factor which triggers this extraordinary behavior.

  4. Conformable apparatus in a drill string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2007-08-28

    An apparatus in a drill string comprises an internally upset drill pipe. The drill pipe comprises a first end, a second end, and an elongate tube intermediate the first and second ends. The elongate tube and the ends comprising a continuous an inside surface with a plurality of diameters. A conformable metal tube is disposed within the drill pipe intermediate the ends thereof and terminating adjacent to the ends of the drill pipe. The conformable metal tube substantially conforms to the continuous inside surface of the metal tube. The metal tube may comprise a non-uniform section which is expanded to conform to the inside surface of the drill pipe. The non-uniform section may comprise protrusions selected from the group consisting of convolutions, corrugations, flutes, and dimples. The non-uniform section extends generally longitudinally along the length of the tube. The metal tube may be adapted to stretch as the drill pipes stretch.

  5. Light superconducting strings in the Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesc Ferrer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2006-08-08

    Observations of the Milky Way by the SPI/INTEGRAL satellite have confirmed the presence of a strong 511 KeV gamma-ray line emission from the bulge, which require an intense source of positrons in the galactic center. These observations are hard to account for by conventional astrophysical scenarios, whereas other proposals, such as light DM, face stringent constraints from the diffuse gamma-ray background. Here we suggest that light superconducting strings could be the source of the observed 511 KeV emission. The associated particle physics, at the ~ 1 TeV scale, is within reach of planned accelerator experiments, while the distinguishing spatial distribution, proportional to the galactic magnetic field, could be mapped by SPI or by future, more sensitive, satellite missions.

  6. String Theory, Supersymmetry, Unification, and All That

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John H. Schwarz; Nathan Seiberg

    1998-04-22

    String theory and supersymmetry are theoretical ideas that go beyond the standard model of particle physics and show promise for unifying all forces. After a brief introduction to supersymmetry, we discuss the prospects for its experimental discovery in the near future. We then show how the magic of supersymmetry allows us to solve certain quantum field theories exactly, thus leading to new insights about field theory dynamics related to electric-magnetic duality. The discussion of superstring theory starts with its perturbation expansion, which exhibits new features including ``stringy geometry.'' We then turn to more recent non-perturbative developments. Using new dualities, all known superstring theories are unified, and their strong coupling behavior is clarified. A central ingredient is the existence of extended objects called branes.

  7. String Gas Shells, their Dual Radiation and Hedgehog Signature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Guendelman

    2009-03-12

    We search for spherically symmetric, stationary solutions with a string gas shell as a source. The requirement of a uniform newtonian potential, or constancy of the 00 component of the metric, implies the existence of a "dual" radiation, which we argue can be interpreted as representing the virtual quantum fluctuations that stabilize the shell. A string hedgehog can be introduced also into the solution. For zero or small hedgehog strength the string gas shell is of a regular nature, while the dual radiation is of a spacelike nature. For higher hedgehog strengths however the radiation "materializes" and becomes timelike while the string gas shell becomes space like. The significance of these solutions for the quantum theory is discussed.

  8. LHC Olympics Workshop and String Phenomenology 2006 Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gross

    2006-10-01

    This is the final report of the organizers of the String Phenomenolgy program of which the LHC Olympics and the String Phenomenolgy conference were a part. In addition, it includes the list of talks from our website which comprise the online proceedings. The KITP no longer publishes conferences proceedings but rather makes recordings and visuals of all talks available on its website at www.kitp.ucsb.edu Program talks are available at http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/strings06/ Conference talks are are at http://online.itp.ucsb.edu/online/strings_c06/ and LHC Olympics talks are at http://online.itp.ucsb.edu/online/lhco_c06/. These talks constitute the proceedings of these meetings.

  9. Phenomenology of heterotic and type II orientifold string models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayes, Van Eric

    2009-05-15

    Cryptons are metastable bound states of fractionally-charged particles that arise generically in the hidden sectors of models derived from heterotic string. We study their properties and decay modes in a speci?c ?ipped ...

  10. Assessment of Olefin-BasedIUD Tail Strings David Roylance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roylance, David

    the controversy over the Dalkon Shield multi- filamentary tail string, it would appear prudent to use are met by olefin (specifically polyethylene and polypropylene) polymers that have been extruded

  11. Self-Dual Supergravity from N = 2 Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Boer, J.

    2010-01-01

    the difference between the RNS formulation of the (1,2)to the conventional N = 1 RNS string through a non-localto formulate our model in RNS variables. One immediate

  12. The Wigner Function of Produced Particles in String Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2009-11-05

    We show that QCD4 with transverse confinement can be approximately compactified into QCD2 with a transverse quark mass $m_{{}_T}$ that is obtained by solving a set of coupled transverse eigenvalue equations. In the limits of a strong coupling and a large number of flavors, QCD2 further admits Schwinger QED2-type bosonized solutions. We therefore examine phenomenologically the space-time dynamics of produced particles in string fragmentation by studying the Wigner function of produced bosons in Schwinger QED2, which mimics many features of string fragmentation in quantum chromodynamics. We find that particles with momenta in different regions of the rapidity plateau are produced at the initial moment of string fragmentation as a quark pulls away from an antiquark at high energies, in contrast to classical pictures of string fragmentation with longitudinal space-momentum-time ordering.

  13. Towards a metamaterial simulation of a spinning cosmic string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom G. Mackay; Akhlesh Lakhtakia

    2009-11-21

    Establishing the constitutive parameters of a nonhomogeneous bianisotropic medium that is equivalent to the spacetime metric of a spinning cosmic string, in a noncovariant formalism, we found a metamaterial route to investigate the existence of closed timelike curves.

  14. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  15. Regge behavior saves String Theory from causality violations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe D'Appollonio; Paolo Di Vecchia; Rodolfo Russo; Gabriele Veneziano

    2015-05-12

    Higher-derivative corrections to the Einstein-Hilbert action are present in bosonic string theory leading to the potential causality violations recently pointed out by Camanho et al. We analyze in detail this question by considering high-energy string-brane collisions at impact parameters $b \\le l_s$ (the string-length parameter) with $l_s \\gg R_p$ (the characteristic scale of the D$p$-brane geometry). If we keep only the contribution of the massless states causality is violated for a set of initial states whose polarization is suitably chosen with respect to the impact parameter vector. Such violations are instead neatly avoided when the full structure of string theory - and in particular its Regge behavior - is taken into account.

  16. N=2 String as a Topological Conformal Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Gomis; H. Suzuki

    1991-11-28

    We prove that critical and subcritical N=2 string theory gives a realization of an N=2 superfield extension of the topological conformal algebra. The essential observation is the vanishing of the background charge.

  17. Closed tachyon solitons in type II string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iñaki García-Etxebarria; Miguel Montero; Angel M. Uranga

    2015-05-20

    Type II theories can be described as the endpoint of closed string tachyon condensation in certain orbifolds of supercritical type 0 theories. In this paper, we study solitons of this closed string tachyon and analyze the nature of the resulting defects in critical type II theories. The solitons are classified by the real K-theory groups KO of bundles associated to pairs of supercritical dimensions. For real codimension 4 and 8, corresponding to $KO({\\bf S}^4)={\\bf Z}$ and $KO({\\bf S}^8)={\\bf Z}$, the defects correspond to a gravitational instanton and a fundamental string, respectively. We apply these ideas to reinterpret the worldsheet GLSM, regarded as a supercritical theory on the ambient toric space with closed tachyon condensation onto the CY hypersurface, and use it to describe charged solitons under discrete isometries. We also suggest the possible applications of supercritical strings to the physical interpretation of the matrix factorization description of F-theory on singular spaces.

  18. Gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model and axionic QCD string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi Xiong

    2014-12-30

    We propose an axionic QCD string scenario based on the original flux-tube model by Kogut and Susskind, and then incorporate it into a gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Axial anomaly is studied by a new topological coupling from the string side, and by the 't Hooft vortex from the NJL side, respectively. The nontrivial phase distribution of the quark condensate plays an important role in this scenario.

  19. Non-Abelian String of a Finite Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monin, Sergey; Yung, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    We consider world-sheet theories for non-Abelian strings assuming compactification on a cylinder with a finite circumference $L$ and periodic boundary conditions. The dynamics of the orientational modes is described by two-dimensional CP$(N-1)$ model. We analyze both non-supersymmetric (bosonic) model and ${\\mathcal N}=(2,2)$ supersymmetric CP$(N-1)$ emerging in the case of 1/2-BPS saturated strings in \

  20. Non-Abelian String of a Finite Length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Monin; Mikhail Shifman; Alexei Yung

    2015-05-28

    We consider world-sheet theories for non-Abelian strings assuming compactification on a cylinder with a finite circumference $L$ and periodic boundary conditions. The dynamics of the orientational modes is described by two-dimensional CP$(N-1)$ model. We analyze both non-supersymmetric (bosonic) model and ${\\mathcal N}=(2,2)$ supersymmetric CP$(N-1)$ emerging in the case of 1/2-BPS saturated strings in \

  1. Mellin-Barnes Representation of the Topological String

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krefl, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We invoke integrals of Mellin-Barnes type to analytically continue the Gopakumar-Vafa resummation of the topological string free energy in the string coupling constant, leading to additional non-perturbative terms. We also discuss in a similar manner the refined and Nekrasov-Shatashvili limit version thereof. The derivation is straight-forward and essentially boils down to taking residue. This allows us to confirm some related conjectures in the literature at tree-level.

  2. High-Energy Scattering vs Static QCD Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Petrov; R. A. Ryutin

    2014-09-30

    We discuss the shape of the interaction region of the elastically scattered protons stipulated by the high-energy Pomeron exchange which turns out to be very similar with the shape of the static string representing the confining QCD flux tube. This similarity disappears when we enter the LHC energy region, which corresponds to many-Pomeron exchanges. Reversing the argument we conjecture a modified relationship between the width and the length of the confining string at very large lengths.

  3. Shooting string holography of jet quenching at RHIC and LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ficnar, Andrej; Gubser, Steven S.; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2014-10-13

    We derive a new formula for jet energy loss using finite endpoint momentum shooting strings initial conditions in SYM plasmas to overcome the difficulties of previous falling string holographic scenarios. We apply the new formula to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow parameter v2 of light hadrons at RHIC and LHC. We show furthermore that Gauss–Bonnet quadratic curvature corrections to the AdS5 geometry improve the agreement with the recent data.

  4. Fusion of strings and cosmic rays at ultrahigh energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Armesto; M. A. Braun; E. G. Ferreiro; C. Pajares; Yu. M. Shabelski

    1996-02-13

    It is shown that the fusion of strings is a source of particle production in nucleus--nucleus collisions outside the kinematical limits of nucleon--nucleon collisions. This fact, together with another effect of string fusion, the reduction of multiplicities, sheds some light on two of the main problems of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays, the chemical composition and the energy of the most energetic detected cosmic rays.

  5. Spiky Strings on AdS(4) X CP**3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Kamal L. Panigrahi; Chanyong Park

    2008-11-07

    We study a giant magnon and a spike solution for the string rotating on AdS(4) X CP**3 geometry. We consider rigid rotating fundamental string in the SU(2) X SU(2) sector inside the CP**3 and find out the general form of all the conserved charges. We find out the dispersion relation corresponding to both the known giant magnon and the new spike solutions. We further study the finite size correction in both cases.

  6. Radio Jets and Galaxies as Cosmic String Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fa-bo Feng

    2012-07-17

    The lensing effect of a cosmic string is studied, and some new methods are proposed to detect the cosmic string. The technique for using jets as extended gravitational lensing probes was firstly explored by Kronberg. We use the "alignment-breaking parameter" $ \\eta_G $ as a sensitive indicator of gravitational distortion by a wiggly cosmic string. Then, we applied the non-constant deflection angle to jets, and $ \\eta_G $ of a specific jet is just related to the projected slope of the jet. At least three jets in the sample of Square Kilometer Array (SKA) would have significant signals ($ \\eta_G >10^\\circ $) if the wiggly infinite cosmic string existed. The distortion of elliptical object is also studied and used to do a statistical research on directions of axes and ellipticities of galaxies. In the direction of the string, we find that galaxies appear to be more elliptical for an observer and the distribution of apparent ellipticity changes correspondingly. Ellipticity distribution of current SDSS spiral sample has the signal-to-noise ratio up to 8.48 which is large enough for astronomical observations. The future survey, such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and Dark Energy Survey (DES), would weaken the requirement of special geometry in the data processing. As a result, all kinds of distributions, including ellipticity axis distribution, would serve as probes to detect wiggly strings in the near future. In brief, if a wiggly cosmic string existed, these signals would be convenient to be observed with the future weak lensing survey or other surveys in deep space. If there was no lensing signal in these distributions, it would give the upper limit of the abundance of infinite strings.

  7. Self-avoiding effective strings in lattice gauge theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Caselle; F. Gliozzi

    1991-11-28

    It is shown that the effective string recently introduced to describe the long distance dynamics of 3D gauge systems in the confining phase has an intriguing description in terms of models of 2D self-avoiding walks in the dense phase. The deconfinement point, where the effective string becomes N=2 supersymmetric, may then be interpreted as the tricritical Theta point where the polymer chain undergoes a collapse transition. As a consequence, a universal value of the deconfinement temperature is predicted.

  8. Streched String with Self-Interaction at the Hagedorn Point: Spatial Sizes and Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Yachao

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the length, mass and spatial distribution of a discretized transverse string in $D_\\perp$ dimensions with fixed end-points near its Hagedorn temperature. We suggest that such a string may dominate the (holographic) Pomeron kinematics for dipole-dipole scattering at intermediate and small impact parameters. Attractive self-string interactions cause the transverse string size to contract away from its diffusive size, a mechanism reminiscent of the string-black-hole transmutation. The string shows sizable asymmetries in the transverse plane that translate to primordial azimuthal asymmetries in the stringy particle production in the Pomeron kinematics for current pp and pA collisions at collider energies.

  9. Streched String with Self-Interaction at the Hagedorn Point: Spatial Sizes and Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yachao Qian; Ismail Zahed

    2015-08-15

    We analyze the length, mass and spatial distribution of a discretized transverse string in $D_\\perp$ dimensions with fixed end-points near its Hagedorn temperature. We suggest that such a string may dominate the (holographic) Pomeron kinematics for dipole-dipole scattering at intermediate and small impact parameters. Attractive self-string interactions cause the transverse string size to contract away from its diffusive size, a mechanism reminiscent of the string-black-hole transmutation. The string shows sizable asymmetries in the transverse plane that translate to primordial azimuthal asymmetries in the stringy particle production in the Pomeron kinematics for current pp and pA collisions at collider energies.

  10. A microscopic description of absorption in high-energy string-brane collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Appollonio, Giuseppe; Russo, Rodolfo; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We study the collision of a highly energetic light closed string off a stack of Dp-branes at (sub)string-scale impact parameters and in a regime justifying a perturbative treatment. Unlike at larger impact parameters - where elastic scattering and/or tidal excitations dominate - here absorption of the closed string by the brane system, with the associated excitation of open strings living on it, becomes important. As a first step, we study this phenomenon at the disk level, in which the energetic closed string turns into a single heavy open string at rest whose particularly simple properties are described.

  11. A microscopic description of absorption in high-energy string-brane collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe D'Appollonio; Paolo Di Vecchia; Rodolfo Russo; Gabriele Veneziano

    2015-10-13

    We study the collision of a highly energetic light closed string off a stack of Dp-branes at (sub)string-scale impact parameters and in a regime justifying a perturbative treatment. Unlike at larger impact parameters - where elastic scattering and/or tidal excitations dominate - here absorption of the closed string by the brane system, with the associated excitation of open strings living on it, becomes important. As a first step, we study this phenomenon at the disk level, in which the energetic closed string turns into a single heavy open string at rest whose particularly simple properties are described.

  12. Naked singularities in low energy, effective string theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayan Kar

    1998-04-05

    Solutions to the equations of motion of the low energy, effective field theory emerging out of compactified heterotic string theory are constructed by making use of the well-known duality symmetries. Beginning with four-dimensional solutions of the Einstein-massless scalar field theory in the canonical frame we first rewrite the corresponding solutions in the string frame. Thereafter, using the T and S duality symmetries of the low energy string effective action we arrive at the corresponding uncharged, electrically charged and magnetically charged solutions. Brief comments on the construction of dual versions of the Kerr-Sen type using the dilatonic Kerr solution as the seed are also included. Thereafter, we verify the status of the energy conditions for the solutions in the string frame. Several of the metrics found here are shown to possess naked singularities although the energy conditions are obeyed. Dual solutions exhibit a duality in the conservation/violation of the Null and Averaged Null Energy Conditions (NEC/ANEC), a fact demonstrated earlier in the context of black holes (hep-th/9604047) and cosmologies (hep-th/9611122). Additionally, those backgrounds which conserve the NEC/ANEC in spite of possesing naked singularities serve as counterexamples to cosmic censorship in the context of low energy, effective string theory.

  13. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringeval, Christophe; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi; Bouchet, Francois R

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = O(1) x 10^(-6) match the amplitude of th...

  14. Large scale CMB anomalies from thawing cosmic strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Ringeval; Daisuke Yamauchi; Jun'ichi Yokoyama; Francois R. Bouchet

    2015-10-07

    Cosmic strings formed during inflation are expected to be either diluted over super-Hubble distances, i.e., invisible today, or to have crossed our past light cone very recently. We discuss the latter situation in which a few strings imprint their signature in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies after recombination. Being almost frozen in the Hubble flow, these strings are quasi static and evade almost all of the previously derived constraints on their tension while being able to source large scale anisotropies in the CMB sky. Using a local variance estimator on thousand of numerically simulated Nambu-Goto all sky maps, we compute the expected signal and show that it can mimic a dipole modulation at large angular scales while being negligible at small angles. Interestingly, such a scenario generically produces one cold spot from the thawing of a cosmic string loop. Mixed with anisotropies of inflationary origin, we find that a few strings of tension GU = O(1) x 10^(-6) match the amplitude of the dipole modulation reported in the Planck satellite measurements and could be at the origin of other large scale anomalies.

  15. Testing Problem Solving in Ravens: String-Pulling to Reach Food Bernd Heinrich & Thomas Bugnyar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    the string to lift the meat. A second group of birds with similar exposure to strings but without any Bugnyar, Konrad Lorenz Research Station and Department of Behaviour, Neurobiology, and Cognition

  16. Water 2013, 5, 480-504; doi:10.3390/w5020480 ISSN 2073-4441

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to characterize geochemical processes in a complex coastal groundwater system and to provide constraints of native groundwater, intruded seawater, non-native injected water, and oil-field brine water. In some with oil-field brines. Groundwater 3 H above 1 tritium unit (TU) was observed only in a few select wells

  17. The final publication is available in Transport in Porous Media at http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11242-013-0221-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ., 1988). Underground disposal of liquid industrial waste, mostly from oil and gas production and from of waste fluid (e.g., co-produced brine) in deep saline aquifers of sedimentary basins create large scale-013-0221-3 #12;2 Keywords Semi-analytical leakage solution, brine density, CO2 geological storage, waste fluid

  18. J A N U A R Y 2 0 0 6 Natural abilities are like natural plants; they need pruning by study.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    LRS 610,883.00 Milan Vavrek Development of an Oil Brine Spill Restoration Plan OSRADP 66,447.00 Joshua Leffler Pioneering Plants to Remediate Oil and Brine Spills OSRADP 47,131.00 Andre Paun A New Way for Medical Discovery BoR 70,374.00 Tabbetha Dobbins Engineering Dopant Atomic Structures in Com- plex Metal

  19. Carbon and Water Program Protocols for Neutrally Buoyant Sediment Traps Twilight Zone Explorer at BATS, June 2007-December 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    pump o Tubing (CTD to Flojet to filter holder to carboy) o Small carboys of brine o Volumetric flasks of sediment trap tubes #12;o Measure out 500 mL of brine with volumetric flask o Insert tubing into tube

  20. Reservoir characterization using oil-production-induced microseismicity, Clinton County, Kentucky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Clinton County, Kentucky. Oil is produced from low-porosity, fractured carbonate rocks at pressure via brine invasion. Storage capacity computed for one of these drained fractures implies total oil. Pressure re-equilibration via brine invasion replacing previously-produced oil along the seismically

  1. Capillary tension and imbibition sequester frack fluid in Marcellus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelder, Terry

    LETTER Capillary tension and imbibition sequester frack fluid in Marcellus gas shale In a recent years, it would now be all gone. Introducing 104 m3 of fracking fluid per horizontal well seems sizable free brine from the Marcellus comes in contact with the frack fluid. Drawing brine into a Marcellus

  2. Hydrogeology, chemical and microbial activity measurement through deep permafrost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stotler, R.L.

    2010-01-01

    L), re?ecting the Ca-salt drilling ?uid used at High Lake.values as the salt used to form the drilling brine (? ? 0.4‰salt used to mix the drill brine for clearing the hole prior to drilling,

  3. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as drilling mud and work- over fluids. These are all shallow wells using injected fresh water to dissolve salt Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling into a brine solution. In order to develop a solution mine, either a new well is drilled for brine extraction

  4. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL 104, NO C7, PAGES 15,66915,677, JULY 15, 1999 An energyconserving thermodynamic model of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    of internal brine­pocket melting on surface ablation. Sea ice models that parameterize latent heat storage season. Compared with our energy­conserving model, a nonconserving model underestimates top to brine pockets, which change size in order to remain in thermal equilibrium with the ice [Schwerdtfeger

  5. Using Nanotechnology in Viscoelastic Surfactant Stimulation Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurluk, Merve Rabia 1986-

    2012-11-12

    -networked VES fluid systems were analyzed in an HP/HT viscometer. A series of rheology experiments have been performed by using 2-4 vol% amidoamine oxide surfactant in 13 to 14.2 ppg CaBr2 brines and 10.8 to 11.6 ppg CaCl2 brines at different temperatures up...

  6. Maintaining An Aquaria and its Organisms The aquarium you have set up is a very small ecosystem that needs to be managed in order to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these return tubes may also get plugged with debris. Food and feeding (30 minutes or less, once you have the food; 2 x week) Suspension feeders need plankton or brine shrimp. One plankton/brine shrimp feeding per. Vacuum the radiator in the right bottom front of the tank frame. Look through those black holes

  7. A network model for fluid transport through sea ice A. JABINI,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice also plays an important role in heat transfer between the ocean and atmosphere (Lytle and Ackley, 1996; Trodahl and others, 2000), and in the input of dense brine and fresh water into the upper ocean oriented brine channels penetrating much of the ice thickness (Cole and Shapiro, 1998). Correspondingly

  8. International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control 16S (2013) S203S215 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, Jean

    2013-01-01

    integrity (Shukla et al., 2010). When combined with enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations, water and CO2.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Dissolution and deformation in fractured carbonates caused by flow of CO2-rich brine under reservoir 2013 Keywords: Weyburn Fracture Deformation Dissolution Supercritical CO2-rich brine CO2 sequestration

  9. A Microscale Exsolution Investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Microscale Exsolution Investigation Markus Buchgraber, Anthony R. Kovscek Department of Energy-term storage security of the CO2 because the denser brine is less likely to move upwards towards shallower supplies, the risk is not zero. There are plausible mechanisms by which the CO2 laden brine could

  10. String Bits at Finite Temperature and the Hagedorn Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles B. Thorn

    2015-07-10

    We study the behavior of a simple string bit model at finite temperature. We use thermal perturbation theory to analyze the high temperature regime. But at low temperatures we rely on the large $N$ limit of the dynamics, for which the exact energy spectrum is known. Since the lowest energy states at infinite $N$ are free closed strings, the $N=\\infty$ partition function diverges above a finite temperature $\\beta_H^{-1}$, the Hagedorn temperature. We argue that in these models at finite $N$, which then have a finite number of degrees of freedom, there can be neither an ultimate temperature nor any kind of phase transition. We discuss how the discontinuous behavior seen at infinite $N$ can be removed at finite $N$. In this resolution the fundamental string bit degrees of freedom become more active at temperatures near and above the Hagedorn temperature.

  11. Clouds of strings in third-order Lovelock gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushant G. Ghosh; Uma Papnoi; Sunil D. Maharaj

    2014-08-20

    Lovelock theory is a natural extension of the Einstein theory of general relativity to higher dimensions in which the first and second orders correspond, respectively, to general relativity and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity. We present exact black hole solutions of $D\\geq 4$-dimensional spacetime for first-, second-, and third-order Lovelock gravities in a string cloud background. Further, we compute the mass, temperature, and entropy of black hole solutions for the higher-dimensional general relativity and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theories and also perform thermodynamic stability of black holes. It turns out that the presence of the Gauss-Bonnet term and/or background string cloud completely changes the black hole thermodynamics. Interestingly, the entropy of a black hole is unaffected due to a background string cloud. We rediscover several known spherically symmetric black hole solutions in the appropriate limits.

  12. Solution of the string equations for asymmetric potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Waters

    2015-06-22

    We consider the large $N$ expansion of the partition function for the Hermitian one-matrix model. It is well known that the coefficients of this expansion are generating functions $F^{(g)}$ for a certain kind of graph embedded in a Riemann surface. Other authors have made a simplifying assumption that the potential $V$ is an even function. We present a method for computing $F^{(g)}$ in the case that $V$ is not an even function. Our method is based on the string equations, and yields "valence independent" formulas which do not depend explicitly on the potential. We introduce a family of differential operators, the "string polynomials", which make clear the valence independent nature of the string equations.

  13. Toroidal Orbifolds: Resolutions, Orientifolds and Applications in String Phenomenology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reffert, S

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the geometry of toroidal orbifolds and their applications in string theory. By resolving the orbifold singularities via blow-ups, one arrives at a smooth Calabi-Yau manifold. The systematic method to do so is explained in detail. Also the transition to the Orientifold quotient is explained. In the second part of this thesis, applications in string phenomenology are discussed. The applications belong to the framework of compactifications with fluxes in type IIB string theory. The first example belongs to the category of model building, flux-induced soft supersymmetry breaking parameters are worked out explicitly. The second example belongs to the subject of moduli stabilization along the lines of the KKLT proposal. Orientifold models which result from resolutions of toroidal orbifolds are discussed as possible candidate models for an explicit realization of the KKLT proposal.

  14. Instability of Axions and Photons In The Presence of Cosmic Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduardo I. Guendelman; Idan Shilon

    2008-10-26

    We report that axions and photons exhibit instability in the presence of cosmic strings that are carrying magnetic flux in their core. The strength of the instability is determined by the symmetry breaking scale of the cosmic string theory. This result would be evident in gamma ray bursts and axions emanating from the cosmic string. These effects will eventually lead to evaporation of the cosmic string.

  15. Theoretical Research in Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, Y Jack; Dolan, Louise; Mersini-Houghton, Laura; Frampton, Paul

    2013-07-29

    The research was in the area of Theoretical Physics: Cosmology, High-Energy Physics and String Theory

  16. Bounds on topological Abelian string-vortex and string-cigar from information-entropic measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa, R A C; Almeida, C A S; da Rocha, Roldao

    2016-01-01

    In this work we obtain bounds on topological Abelian string-vortex in six dimensions using a new measure of configurational complexity known as configurational entropy. In this way, the information-theoretical measure of six dimensional braneworlds scenarios are capable to probe situations where the parameters responsible for the thickness are arbitrary. The so-called Configurational Entropy (CE) selects the best value of the parameter in the model. This is accomplished by minimizing the CE, namely, by selecting the most appropriate parameters in the model that correspond to the most organized system, based upon Shannon information theory. This information-theoretical measure of complexity provides a complementary perspective to situations where strictly energy-based arguments are inconclusive. We show that the higher the energy the higher the configurational entropy, what shows an important correlation between the energy of the a localized field configuration and its associated entropic measure.

  17. Quantization of Dyon Charge and Electric-Magnetic Duality in String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashoke Sen

    1992-09-05

    We analyze the allowed spectrum of electric and magnetic charges carried by dyons in (toroidally compactified) heterotic string theory in four dimensions at arbitrary values of the string coupling constant and $\\theta$ angle. The spectrum is shown to be invariant under electric-magnetic duality transformation, thereby providing support to the conjecture that this is an exact symmetry in string theory.

  18. Preprint typeset in JHEP style. PAPER VERSION CLNS00/1704 String Webs from Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preprint typeset in JHEP style. ­ PAPER VERSION CLNS­00/1704 String Webs from Field Theory Philip C of the stable supersym­ metric spectrum is a generalization of the ``string web'' picture of these states found.3 Recovery of a string junction picture 18 4. BPS states in N=4 SU(N) theories 19 4.1 BPS states as webs

  19. Parallel Dynamic Programming for Solving the String Editing Problem on a CGM/BSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Siang Wun

    Parallel Dynamic Programming for Solving the String Editing Problem on a CGM/BSP C. E. R. Alves, string editing, dynamic programming, CGM, BSP # Partially supported by CNPq and FINEP­PRONEX­SAI Proc. No. net ABSTRACT In this paper we present a coarse­grained parallel algorithm for solving the string edit

  20. MUS420/EE367A Lecture 7B Digital Waveguide Modeling of Bowed Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith III, Julius Orion

    = Friction Curve × Differential Velocity Reaction Force = String Wave Impedance × Velocity Change · Nominally StringBow Bow Velocity (Primary Control) Bow Force Bow Position BridgeString-1 Nut or Finger Lowpass Body into two sections · Bow junction = nonlinear two-port · Primary control variable = bow velocity velocity

  1. Power Towers of String Instantons for N=1 Vacua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Blumenhagen; Maximilian Schmidt-Sommerfeld

    2008-03-11

    We provide arguments for the existence of novel hereinafter called poly-instanton corrections to holomorphic couplings in four-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric string compactifications. After refining quantitatively the D-brane instanton calculus for corrections to the gauge kinetic function, we explicitly apply it to the Type I toroidal orbifold defined in arXiv:0710.3080 and compare the results to the proposed heterotic S-dual model. This leads us to the intriguing conclusion that N=1 string vacua feature a power tower like proliferation of instanton corrections.

  2. Generalized dilaton-Maxwell cosmic string and wall solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Morris

    2006-08-15

    The class of static solutions found by Gibbons and Wells for dilaton-electrodynamics in flat spacetime, which describe nontopological strings and walls that trap magnetic flux, is extended to a class of dynamical solutions supporting arbitrarily large, nondissipative traveling waves, using techniques previously applied to global and local topological defects. These solutions can then be used in conjunction with S-duality to obtain more general solitonic solutions for various axidilaton-Maxwell theories. As an example, a set of dynamical solutions is found for axion, dilaton, and Maxwell fields in low energy heterotic string theory using the SL(2,R) invariance of the equations of motion.

  3. Kerr-NUT-AdS metrics and string theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wei

    2008-10-10

    are then described as the exchanges of gauge bosons in an SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) symmetry group. The Standard Model is quite successful in explaining the experimental data, and in fact it agrees with all of our observations of the physical world. However, a major problem..., string theory has been deemed to be a very promising can- didate for the unification theory of everything. The spectrum of bosonic particles may be explained as the various excitations of strings, and this spectrum automat- ically contains a massless spin...

  4. Finite Energy Solutions in Three-Dimensional Heterotic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Bourdeau; Gabriel Lopes Cardoso

    1997-09-24

    We show that a large class of supersymmetric solutions to the low-energy effective field theory of heterotic string theory compactified on a seven torus can have finite energy, which we compute. The mechanism by which these solutions are turned into finite energy solutions is similar to the one occurring in the context of four-dimensional stringy cosmic string solutions. We also describe the solutions in terms of intersecting eleven-dimensional M-branes, M-waves and M-monopoles.

  5. Physical Interpretation of the 26 Dimensions of Bosonic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank D. Smith Jr

    2002-07-15

    The 26 dimensions of Closed Unoriented Bosonic String Theory are interpreted as the 26 dimensions of the traceless Jordan algebra J3(O)o of 3x3 Octonionic matrices, with each of the 3 Octonionic dimenisons of J3(O)o having the following physical interpretation: 4-dimensional physical spacetime plus 4-dimensional internal symmetry space; 8 first-generation fermion particles; 8 first-generation fermion anti-particles. This interpretation is consistent with interpreting the strings as World Lines of the Worlds of Many-Worlds Quantum Theory and the 26 dimensions as the degrees of freedom of the Worlds of the Many-Worlds.

  6. Note on Structure Formation from Cosmic String Wakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duplessis, Francis

    2013-01-01

    The search for cosmic strings has been of renewed interest with the advent of precision cosmology. In this note we give a quantitative description of the nonlinear matter density fluctuations that can form from a scaling network of cosmic string wakes. Specifically, we compute the distribution of dark matter halos. These halos would possess strong correlations in position space that should have survived until today. We also discuss the challenges involved in their detection due to their small size and the complex dynamics of their formation.

  7. Coset Symmetries in Dimensionally Reduced Bosonic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; P. C. West

    2001-08-02

    We discuss the dimensional reduction of various effective actions, particularly that of the closed Bosonic string and pure gravity, to two and three dimensions. The result for the closed Bosonic string leads to coset symmetries which are in agreement with those recently predicted and argued to be present in a new unreduced formulation of this theory. We also show that part of the Geroch group appears in the unreduced duality symmetric formulation of gravity recently proposed. We conjecture that this formulation can be extended to a non-linear realisation based on a Kac-Moody algebra which we identify. We also briefly discuss the proposed action of Bosonic M-theory.

  8. Anyonic glueballs from an effective-string model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buisseret, Fabien

    2015-01-01

    Relying on an effective-string approach in which glueballs --- bound states of pure Yang-Mills theory --- are modelled by closed strings, we give arguments suggesting that anyonic glueballs, \\textit{i.e.} glueballs with arbitrary spin, may exist in $(2+1)$-$\\,$dimensional Yang-Mills theory. We then focus on the large$\\,$-$N_c$ limit of $SU$($N_c$) Yang-Mills theory and show that our model leads to a mass spectrum in good agreement with lattice data in the scalar sector, while it predicts the masses and spins of anyonic glueball states.

  9. Edge Detection, Cosmic Strings and the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Stewart; Robert Brandenberger

    2009-01-07

    We develop a method of constraining the cosmic string tension $G\\mu$ which uses the Canny edge detection algorithm as a means of searching CMB temperature maps for the signature of the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We test the potential of this method using high resolution, simulated CMB temperature maps. By modeling the future output from the South Pole Telescope project (including anticipated instrumental noise), we find that cosmic strings with $G\\mu > 5.5\\times10^{-8}$ could be detected.

  10. 24/02/2012 12:49SPE Projects, Facilities & Construction -CO2/Brine Surface Dissolution and Injection: CO2 Storage Enhancement Page 1 of 1http://www.spe.org/ejournals/jsp/journalapp.jsp?pageType=Preview&jid=EFC&pdfChronicleId=090147628022501b&mid=SPE-12471

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Strategies, Climate Change, Leakage Risk Mitigation Summary Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is capable.1.5 Processing Equipment Keywords CO2 Capture and Storage, Process Design and Simulation, CO2 Injection of dense-phase carbon dioxide (CO2) in deep reservoirs means that sites need to be chosen

  11. Classical Worldsheets for String Scattering on Flat and AdS Spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles M. Sommerfield; Charles B. Thorn

    2008-05-21

    We present a study of the worldsheets that describe the classical limit of various string scattering processes. Our main focus is on string scattering in AdS spacetime because of its relation via the AdS/CFT correspondence to gluon scattering in {\\cal N}=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. But we also consider analogous processes in flat Minkowski spacetime which we compare to the AdS case. In addition to scattering of string by string we also find and study worldsheets describing the scattering of a string by external sources.

  12. Landscape statistics of the low autocorrelated binary string problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    , NM 87501, USA Abstract. The statistical properties of the energy landscape of the low autocorrelated]. In this contribution we carry out a thorough investigation of the statistical properties of the energy landscapeLandscape statistics of the low autocorrelated binary string problem Fernando F. Ferreira a , Jos

  13. Landscape statistics of the low autocorrelated binary string problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    , NM 87501, USA Abstract. The statistical properties of the energy landscape of the low autocorrelated]. In this contribution we carry out a thorough investigation of the statistical properties of the energy landscapeLandscape statistics of the low autocorrelated binary string problem Fernando F. Ferreiraa , Jos

  14. Phases in String Theory A thesis submitted to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phases in String Theory A thesis submitted to Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India Institute of Fundamental Research Mumbai - 400 005, India July 2013 #12;#12;Declaration This thesis, at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai. (Prithvi Narayan P) In my capacity as the supervisor

  15. HBT puzzle at RHIC AMPT model with String Melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    /RsideSmall radii Small duration time dt by Stephen Johnson at RWW02 One way out: Hydro Softest point in EOS Measured extensively in heavy ion collisions reasonably described by models (hydro-ph/01120062 recent hydro studies: #12;HIJING energy in strings(soft) and minijet partons(hard) ZPC (Zhang

  16. Flux-induced Isometry Gauging in Heterotic Strings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Wu-yen; Gao, Peng

    2007-01-05

    We study the effect of flux-induced isometry gauging of the scalar manifold in N = 2 heterotic string compactification with gauge fluxes. We show that a vanishing theorem by Witten provides the protection mechanism. The other ungauged isometries in hyper moduli space could also be protected, depending on the gauge bundle structure. We also discuss the related issue in IIB setting.

  17. Combinatorial Problems on Strings with Applications to Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Alantha

    Combinatorial Problems on Strings with Applications to Protein Folding Alantha Newman MIT San Jose, CA 95120, USA ruhl@almaden.ibm.com Abstract We consider the problem of protein folding in linear time. 1 Introduction We consider the problem of protein folding in the HP model on the three

  18. Renewal Strings for Cleaning Astronomical Databases Amos J. Storkey #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storkey, Amos

    pixel processing, and of course no imaging system is perfect. This paper looks at a class of problems strings, a probabilistic tech­ nique combining the Hough transform, re­ newal processes and hidden Markov ranging in scale from the solar neighbourhood to a significant fraction of the observable universe. Sur

  19. Renewal Strings for Cleaning Astronomical Databases Amos J. Storkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storkey, Amos

    pixel processing, and of course no imaging system is perfect. This paper looks at a class of problems strings, a probabilistic tech- nique combining the Hough transform, re- newal processes and hidden Markov ranging in scale from the solar neighbourhood to a significant fraction of the observable universe. Sur

  20. Scalar Perturbations in a String Inspired Inflationary Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. M. Batista; J. C. Fabris

    1996-02-28

    We consider an inflationary model inspired in the low energy limit of string theory. In this model, the scale factor grows exponentially with time. A perturbation study is performed, and we show that there is a mode which displays an exponential growth in the perturbation of the scalar field.